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					Cyber Hair Studio Occupational Health and Safety Manual

Cyber Hair Studio OH&S Manual

Table of Contents
Introduction Health and Safety Legislation The Workplace Health and Safety Act Laws Employer‟s Responsibilities Employee‟s Responsibilities Manufacturer‟s Responsibilities Legal Requirements Hazardous Substances Hairdressing/Beauty Chemicals Health Effects Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) Hair Colouring Products Other Health Issues Prevention Skin Tests General Rules for Chemical Safety First Aid Treatment for Hazardous Substances Infection in the Workplace Disinfection and Infection Control Cleaning and Disinfecting Scissors, Combs and Brushes Cleaning and Disinfecting Electrical Tools Fluids Risks Body Waste Management A Safe Working Environment Electrical Safety Electrical Safety Tips Correct Use of Electrical Appliances Check and Maintain Tools and Equipment Risks and Hazards Risk assessment Strain and Fatigue Common Fatigue and Posture Problems Measures Prevention Control Measures Manual Handling Emergency Procedures Fire Procedures Fire Extinguishers Fire Emergency Procedures Using a Fire Extinguisher First Aid in the Workplace Common Workplace Injuries First Aid Kit Recording Accidents and Incidents Contacting Emergency Services Maintaining Occupational Health and Safety 3 4 4 5 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 20 22 23 24 24 25 26 27 27 28 29 30 31 32 35 36 37 38 39 39 40 41 41 42 42 43 45 6 47 48 50 51 52 53

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Introduction
As a high quality business, Cyber Hair Studio, provides safe and hygienic services to our clients in a clean and friendly environment. To let our standards slip would be to risk the safety and health of our clients and us, the hairdressers who work here. In addition, there are laws and codes of practice, which help to ensure that our industry remains safe. We are obliged to comply with these laws. Therefore it is essential that we all understand and follow the health and safety procedures outlined in this manual. Please notify Nic Papadopoulos if you do not understand anything contained in this manual or have any questions.

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Health and Safety Legislation
The Workplace Health and Safety Act

Why do I need to know this?

Like any other workplace, Cyber Hair Studio is required by law (Acts of Parliament) to follow health and safety conditions. This is to make sure that the salon is a safe place to work in for you and your clients.

The purpose of this Act is to:    Secure the health, safety and welfare of all people at work Protect persons at work from risks to their health and safety Assist in securing a safe and healthy work environment

Laws are to protect people from occupational injury and disease. They apply to every workplace.

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Laws
Who do these laws apply to?

It is the responsibility of all people who work in the hairdressing/beauty industry to take steps to ensure health and safety. This includes the employer, employees, manufacturers and suppliers of products and equipment. Health and Safety Laws are to protect people from occupational illness and disease and they apply to every workplace.

Health and Safety at work is everyone’s responsibility.

There are three parts to the Health and Safety legislation 1. Acts, particularly the Workplace Health and Safety Act 1989 (The Act) 2. The regulations made under the Act 3. Approved Codes of Practice

What is the difference?

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Acts
Acts are government laws, which set out the general duties that those in the workforce must follow to maintain safe and healthy workplaces. Which Acts of Parliament relate to the hairdressing/beauty industry?

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Occupational Health and Safety Act (1985) Dangerous good Act (1985) Equipment (Public safety Act)(1994)

Regulations
Regulations set compulsory minimum requirements for specific hazards and work practices in relation to work health and safety. The regulations that apply to the hairdressing industry are:    Occupational Health and Safety: Hazardous Substances 1999 Notification of Accidents System Occupational Safety and Health Regulations 1996

Codes of Practice
These provide practical guidance and prevention strategies of how best to meet the regulation and requirements of the act. There are many Codes of Practice that apply to the hairdressing industry. These include:  Workplace Hazardous Substances (No24, June2000) Helps manufacturers/suppliers and employers use these substances to meet the requirements of the H&S (Hazardous Substances) Regulation 1999 to protect people at work. This includes preparation of Material Safety Data Sheets and labelling of workplace substances.
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Workplaces (No.3, June 1988)Provides practical guidance to employers in meeting certain minimum standards, facilities/amenities in workplaces in prohibiting certain activities in workplaces, and in maintaining the workplaces in a safe healthy condition.

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First aid, Workplace Amenities and Personal Protection (No18, June, 1995) Provides guidance to appropriate first aid facilities in the work place

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Manual handling (Occupational Overuse Syndrome) (No 15,Jan.1992) Provides guidance on ways to reduce risks

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Confined Spaces (No 20, March 1997) Provides guidance on risk control

Workcover administers these Acts and Regulations, which provides the legal basis for both workplace health and safety and workers compensation.

Printed copies of the Codes of Practice are available from Victorian WorkCover Authority Tel (03) 9641 1555 You can also use the following websites to find information regarding Codes of Practice. Vic - Workcover

Tas – Workplace Standards

NSW - Workcover

Qld - Workplace Health and Safety

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SA - Workcover Corporation

WA - Worksafe

NT - Work Health and Electrical Safety

ACT - Workcover

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Employer’s Responsibilities
What are the employer’s responsibilities?

As your employer, Cyber Hair Studio, is responsible (as far as practicable) to provide and maintain:   The health and safety of themselves, their employees, and members of the public. Safe and without risk work systems and plant Plant and substances safe use, handling, storage and transportation Adequate facilities for employees Information, training and supervision for employees Protective clothing and equipment.

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For an employee to work safely, employers are required to provide:    Information on any known hazards found to be in the workplace, and salon policies for carrying out safe work procedures. Instruction and training in safe work procedures. Supervision in making sure their employees are not exposed to hazards. Regular checks should be carried out to ensure health and safety instructions are being followed.

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Employee’s Responsibilities

What are the employee’s responsibilities?

An employee is responsible to:     Perform their duties in a safe and responsible manner. Comply with reasonable instructions from the employer to carry out a work procedure. Wear supplied personal protective equipment as instructed Report hazards and work related injuries to the employer

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Manufacturer’s Responsibilities

What are the manufacturer’s/suppliers responsibilities?

A manufacturer/supplier is responsible to:    Make sure plant or substances are designed/manufactured to be safe and without risks when used properly. Arrange for any necessary testing to ensure plant & substances are safe and without risk. Make sure adequate information is available on use of plant/substances

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Legal Requirements
The Workplace health and safety regulations set out the legal requirements that must be observed in the workplace. These regulations deal with procedures to be undertaken, physical working conditions and specific aspects of industrial and constructional health and safety. By law, every person in the workplace has a right to be involved in health and safety through discussion and co-operation.

What if the Workplace Act isn’t followed?

The law provides heavy penalties for employers and employees who try to prevent this process from happening. Breaches of the Act include fines of up to $120,000, or imprisonment. The maximum penalty applies if a person is killed or suffers a serious injury.

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Hazardous Substances
As a hairdresser, you come into contact with chemicals every day. Chemicals can be classed as “relatively harmless” or “hazardous”.

What is a hazardous substance?

A Hazardous Substance can be any substance that may cause harm to you, whether it is solid, liquid or gas.

When used in the workplace these substances may generate vapours, fumes, dust and mist. How dangerous the substance is will depend on its type, what it is made of, how it enters the body, and how much enters the body.

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Hairdressing/Beauty Chemicals
Hairdressing/Beauty chemicals can be dangerous because they might be:      Flammable Explosive Chemically reactive with each other Poisonous (toxic) Carcinogenic (cancer producing)

Some chemicals may have more than one of these characteristics.

How can they harm me?

If these substances are breathed in, absorbed through the skin or swallowed, you may suffer immediate or long-term health effects.

Some hazardous substances used in the hairdressing/beauty workplace are:       permanent wave solutions and neutralisers hair dyes hydrogen peroxide hair sprays nail varnishes cleaning agents other solutions

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Health Effects
Health effects may happen suddenly, such as itchy skin or eyes, nausea or dizziness. Or they can happen gradually as with contact dermatitis or cancer. While many people will not be affected, others will be susceptible.

Serious problems in the hairdressing/beauty industry are:  Dermatitis of the hands  Breathing problems caused by sprays and solution fumes

At Cyber Hair Studio, we ensure that there is effective ventilation to control chemical contaminants and odours. It is important to know which chemical products can affect you and your client.

Examples of common hazardous substances used in the Hairdressing and Beauty industry are listed in APPENDIX 1.

It is your employer’s responsibility to provide you with safe work procedures for handling hazardous substances and to provide information, training and supervision.

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Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
What is it?

Manufacturers and suppliers of hair and beauty products are required, (under the Act); to supply you with a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for each hazardous substance supplied. The MSDS contains information on the hazards and risks associated with a substance. The risk involved with a chemical will depend on the substance strength, its quantity, and the time of exposure, the workplace tasks and other workplace conditions.

An MSDS gives more information than what is on a label including:      Identification Health hazard Information Precautions for use Safe handling information.

A reference file of MSDS‟s for all chemicals used in the salon is kept where chemicals are stored, mixed or used. To minimise risks, it is important to know what chemicals you are using so you can use them safely.

HAZCHEM means Hazardous Chemicals. The government has specific regulations for the use and storage of these chemicals.

Booklets are available from Victorian WorkCover Authority Tel (03) 9641 1555 You can also use the following websites to find relevant information.
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Vic - Workcover

Tas – Workplace Standards

NSW - Workcover

Qld - Workplace Health and Safety

SA - Workcover Corporation

WA - Worksafe

NT - Work Health and Electrical Safety

ACT - Workcover

Hair Colouring Products
Hair colouring chemicals are probably the most dangerous chemicals you use. The long-term effects of these chemicals are continually being researched worldwide. Manufacturers must not only list the dangerous chemicals on labels and packaging, but also provide you with a MSDS. The dangerous ingredient in colouring products is toluene diamine or phenylene diamine commonly known as “Para”. For more information, see APPENDIX 2. Does only the “para” in hair colour cause problems?

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There are other ingredients in colouring products that may also cause skin irritations. For example: perfume. We are not qualified to know which ingredient may cause harm. However, by law, we are required to do a skin test prior to the hair colour to check if the client is allergic to the whole product.

Allergic reactions may vary from head to head and can happen after years of using the same product. Reactions can be   Minor: slight rash, itching or redness Major: swelling, blisters or severe rashes

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Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)
Peroxide is a chemical mixed with many colouring products. If not used safely it can be a strong skin, eye and respiratory irritant. Peroxide comes in different strengths:      3% = 10 vol 6% = 20 vol 9% = 30 vol 12% = 40 vol 18% = 60 vol

When using peroxide remember to always:    Follow the manufacturer‟s instructions (use recommended strength) Keep out of reach of children Store in a cool place

The latest scientific research carried out on the effect and use of permanent colour revealed that it can be absorbed into the bloodstream and body fluids. This can cause bladder, kidney or liver problems. There is a suspicion that they can also cause cancer. Your client is not exposed to colour chemicals as often as you are. You are the one at risk. Wear gloves for protection.

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Other Health Issues
As a hair and beauty operator you should be aware of different health conditions related to your profession. When dealing with hazardous substances you could be at risk from fume inhalation, dermatitis/skin disorders or allergies. By following safe work practices you can largely prevent or minimise these conditions.

Contact Dermatitis
This health condition is most common in hairdressers. It is an inflammation of the skin varying from a mild irritation and redness, to large weeping areas and severe swelling. People react differently to substances; some workers will not be affected.

What causes it?

It can be caused by:    Frequent contact with a wide variety of hair products containing recognised irritants and sensitisers. Excessive contact with water, and degreasing agents such as shampoos, which dry out the skin. Contact with hand dryers, which dry out the skin.

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Common sensitisers
Common sensitisers are certain chemicals found in hairdressing products, which are known to cause skin irritations. Some of these are:       Ammonium thioglycolate, (in permanent wave solutions) Formaldehyde/formalin, (low concentration found in some shampoos as a preservative) Hydrogen peroxide, persulphates (in bleaches) P.phenylendiamine and paratoluenediamines (in tints and some hair colours, also known as p.p.d./p.t.d.) Glycerol monothioglycolate (in acid permanent wave solutions also known as (g.m.t.g.) Thioglycolic acid (in hair straighteners)

So you can see that many of the hairdressing products we use daily have the ability to cause skin problems unless we use them safely.

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Prevention
At Cyber Hair Studio, we recommend the following methods to prevent chemical irritation:    Reduce exposure to prolonged contact with water (shampooing) Dry hands thoroughly when possible, particularly around jewellery Wear protective gloves when in contact with irritating chemicals (If you are allergic to rubber gloves, use cotton lined or cotton gloves under the rubber gloves) Wash off residue chemical products from the hands with a mild pH neutral soap Use wet work protective creams or moisturisers (preventative care) Apply treatment creams/hand care creams at the end of the working day

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All of these things can help you prevent Contact Dermatitis, however, unfortunately some people will become sensitised to a substance and in severe cases may have to change their profession.

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Skin Tests

How do I do a skin test?

1. Thoroughly clean a small patch of skin behind the ear or the inner fold of the elbow with alcohol or eau de cologne. 2. Mix approximately 1 cap of tint to one cap of peroxide (H2O2) 3. Apply to the cleaned area with a cotton bud

4. Allow to dry and leave uncovered and without washing for 24 to 48
hours If any redness or irritation occurs, the person has a positive reaction to the hair colour:

Do not use this product or any other product of similar nature on a person who has a positive reaction or has any form of skin problem.

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General Rules for Chemical Safety:
               Follow safe work practices Wear appropriate safety equipment, gloves etc Keep chemicals in clearly labelled containers Don‟t drink, eat, or smoke while working with hazardous substances Don‟t keep food or drinks near the substance Wash your hands, face and other exposed areas with soap and water before eating and drinking. Don‟t put substances into unwashed containers as a chemical reaction may occur Don‟t store incompatible substances together (eg hair spray and peroxide) Wipe up spilt chemical immediately Avoid chemicals coming into contact with the skin Use barrier creams on exposed skin area Wear dust masks when filing acrylic nails for protection Wear safety glasses where there is a chance of chemicals splashing into eyes Don‟t wear contact lens in nail technician work areas as it is difficult to clean the eye if splashed with chemicals. Read the MSDS

First Aid Treatment for Hazardous Substances
Every chemical must be treated differently, so always read and follow the manufacturer‟s instructions carefully. Risks associated with a chemical affect the way it should be used and stored. It is important to be aware of the chemicals used in hairdressing products, because if used incorrectly you or your client may be harmed.

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Infection in the Workplace
During the course of their work, hairdressers come into contact with, and are exposed to, a wide variety of diseases, some of which are infectious. It is important that you take the necessary steps to ensure the safety of yourself and others in the workplace.

What is an infectious disease?

An infectious disease is caused by germs and can be passed on from one person to another by breathing in, contact or eating. Bacteria, fungi, virus or animal parasites can also cause infections. Check your client‟s scalp for any diseases or disorders. Depending on the problem, some clients can still be attended to, while more serious complaints may need to be referred to a pharmacist or doctor.

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Disinfection and Infection Control
As a hairdresser, it is your responsibility to prevent the spread of infection in the salon with careful cleaning and disinfecting procedures.

How will I know the correct disinfection and infection control procedures?

The Act outlines the sterilisation/disinfection control procedures, which must be carried out to prevent the spread of disease in the salon:  Premises must be kept clean and hygienic, and operators must keep themselves and their clothing clean. Hairdressers should use good hygiene practices and standard precautions particularly washing and drying hands before and after contact with a client, before eating, drinking, smoking, and after using a toilet. Before being used on another person all equipment, towels and wraps must be cleaned. Broken skin must be covered with a non-porous waterproof dressing. Never use dirty or broken equipment

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Cleaning and Disinfecting Scissors, Combs and Brushes
a. Cleaning Method
 Wash in water with soap or a suitable detergent to remove loose hairs, flakes of skin, grease or product residue before disinfecting Dry with a clean cloth or towel

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b. Disinfection/sterilisation Method
Soak for 30 minutes in:   Disinfectant with 70% alcohol, such as methylated spirits, or A solution made up of 1 part of household bleach that contains 1% sodium hypochlorite (for example, Domestos or White King) and 19 parts of water.

The solutions should be changed daily.

Cleaning and Disinfecting Electrical Tools
    Remove loose hairs and skin flakes Check manufacturer‟s instructions on how to clean the particular tool Some tools may be cleaned and lubricated by using special disinfectant oils Electrical equipment such as clippers can be disinfected using 70% alcohol or methylated spirits. Single use sachets of alcohol wipes (70% ethyl alcohol or 60% isopropyl alcohol) can also be used.

Store or cover all tools to prevent re-contamination; ultraviolet cabinets are satisfactory for storage however they are not effective for disinfection. Useful reference for disinfection/sterilisation: Worksafe: www.safetyline.wa.gov.au Disposable razor blades must be discarded directly into a special ‘sharps’ container designed for their disposal. Also see the Waste Management section.
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Body Fluids Risks
Hairdressers and beauty operators are also at risk from exposure to blood and body fluids. Therefore a high standard of personal hygiene is essential and additional precautions should be taken to avoid exposure. When you are dealing with blood, gloves should be worn to avoid contamination. Any contaminated equipment must be cleaned and disinfected, as described on the previous page. However, the strength of the sodium hypochlorite should be 5%.

Cleanliness and hygiene are very important to prevent the risk of disease and the spread of infection. Do not use equipment or towels on your client unless they have been treated.

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Waste Management
Disposing of waste materials (especially hazardous substances such as used permanent wave solutions and hair colours) through the sewage system has a negative impact on local freshwater and marine ecosystems. At Cyber Hair Studio, we are trying to be as environmentally friendly as possible. All unused perm solutions and colours must be tipped into layers of old newspapers and wrapped up. This should then be placed in the rubbish bin. Used razor blades should be disposed of into the „Sharps‟ container. To dispose of full Sharps container, please advise Nic Papadopoulos.
Disposing of unused colour solution.

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A Safe Working Environment
Many accidents are the result of working in a cluttered untidy workplace. Poor housekeeping can contribute to incidents such as slips, trips and falls, or infections from unsanitary items.

How can I help?

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Regularly inspect floors; keep them free from hair Remove any spilt water, chemicals or oil Remove boxes, electrical cords, rubbish etc from walkways Wear stable non-slip footwear; avoid open toes such as sandals Have good lighting conditions

Report hazards and injuries to the appropriate person. At Cyber Hair Salon, report them to Nic Papadopoulos.

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Electrical Safety
Most accidents with electricity and electrical equipment can be avoided. Equipment checks take only a few minutes but could ultimately save you, or others from an accident. A person can get an electrical shock when they become part of an electrical circuit and the current flows through their body.

Remember water and electricity do not mix.

Electrical accidents are most often caused by:     Lack of maintenance Lack of training and supervision Unsafe work practices Unauthorised electrical repairs

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Electrical Safety Tips
When using an electrical appliance, you should check that:             There is no obvious external damage to connecting leads and plugs The outer covering of the leads are not cut, frayed, worn or otherwise damaged Connecting extension cords and power boards have no exposed wires The connection of the lead to the appliance is secure The control knobs are secure The appliance does not rattle or make strange noises There is no burning smell or smoke The power sockets are not cracked or broken Appliances are switched off at the power point before you pull out the plug Electrical cords are kept off the floor Don‟t use too many appliances from the same power point Blow dryers don‟t rattle or have a burning smell

If you become aware of a problem with an appliance, turn it off and report the problem to Nic. Sometimes, after the electrical appliance has been disconnected from the power, it may still partially operate because of stored energy. After disconnecting, activate the appliance to release the stored energy.

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Water and electricity
Water combined with electrical equipment is extremely dangerous because water acts as a conductor. You must avoid:     Touching electrical equipment with wet hands Working with electrical equipment while standing on wet hair or wet floors Placing electrical equipment on benches or trolleys next to water sprays Holding electrical equipment whilst spraying water on the hair

Keep electrical appliances away from water and wet areas. Remember electricity and water do not mix.

Heat generating appliances
Some of the electrical equipment you use becomes hot during use. The following precautions should be observed:     Protect your client‟s scalp and ears with your comb or fingers to prevent burns Direct hot air away from the scalp and keep the hair dryer moving so that hot air is not concentrated on one particular area Store hot appliances in a safe place, out of reach of children while they cool down Do not wrap electrical cords around the hot barrel of an appliance

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Follow manufacturer’s instructions on the label.
For example: Many electrical appliances have safety labels with symbols indicating do‟s and don‟t‟s. Always check these before using an appliance if you are not familiar with the appliance. Here is an example from a hair dryer label:

WARNING: Do not store or leave this appliance in a position where it may fall into a bath, sink or trough. There is danger of electrocution under these conditions even with the hair dryer’s switch being in the “off” position. Switch off at the socketoutlet and remove the plug when not in use.

Use your appliances correctly Read the instruction booklet Follow the instructions

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Correct Use of Electrical Appliances
Always check:         Electrical appliances are stored safely away from wet or moist areas when not in use The power is switched off before you clean or adjust an electrical appliance When disconnecting an appliance, switch it off, then switch off the power point. Pull the appliance out by the plug, not by the cord Never touch electrical appliances or switches with wet hands Flexible cords are fully unwound and kept clear of work traffic areas Double adaptors or power boards are not stacked causing over loading problems You don‟t use a wet cloth to clean power sockets Air filters regularly to avoid blockage in blow dryers and air conditioners.

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Check and Maintain Tools and Equipment
At Cyber Hair Studio, everyone shares the responsibility for making sure sound housekeeping procedures are in place to provide a healthy and safe working environment. To make sure the workplace is safe, furniture, tools and equipment should be regularly monitored and assessed for their continued effectiveness. As well as being dangerous, broken or run down, equipment and fittings reflect a poor salon image.

Electrical Maintenance
Only licensed electricians can inspect and test your electrical equipment. Faulty electrical equipment must be withdrawn from service, labelled as being “OUT OF SERVICE” and sent for repair or disposal. Nic Papadopoulos will arrange the repairs. A circuit breaker/safety switch has been installed at Cyber Hair Studio to reduce the risk of shock but this does not remove the need to observe safe work practices and apply regular maintenance.

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Risks and Hazards
Everyone at Cyber Hair Studio needs to work together to eliminate workplace hazards and find practical ways of protecting the safety and health of everyone in the salon.

What is the difference between a risk and a hazard?

A hazard is exposure to danger which can affect:    People: illness, injury, trauma or death Property: damage, wastage, contamination Processes: disruption to work processes

A risk is the probability of you being hurt or an accident happening through exposure to the hazard. For example: Electricity is a hazard but may not be a risk unless wiring is exposed.

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Risk Assessment
After a hazard has been identified the next step is to assess the risk.    Is the risk minor and unlikely to occur? Is the risk minor but will occur frequently? Is the risk great? If so, the solution might be to change your work arrangements.

When assessing a risk you need to consider the:     Nature of the hazard Severity of the hazard and any health effects that may occur Duration and how often a person may be exposed to the hazard Probability that risk will occur

Reporting
In the event of an unsafe situation, a fire hazard or any breakdown of equipment in the Cyber Hair Studio, report it to Nic Papadopoulos.

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Strain and Fatigue
Injuries can occur as a result of many different activities that require force to lift, lower, push or hold. These injuries include strains, sprains, neck and back injuries, slips, falls cuts, bruises and broken bones. In addition, Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS), previously known as RSI, is the result of unnatural or repetitive movements.

Hairdressers and beauty operators work long hours. Most of this time can be spent standing, bending over, and using repetitive movements and awkward postures for a long time.

Common Fatigue and Posture Problems
 Lower back - caused by standing for long periods of time, adopting awkward positions, twisting and sitting on chair/stools without back rests or leg support, or lifting objects with a bent back. Leg discomfort - caused by standing still for long periods of time and uncomfortable footwear. Shoulders – occur from working with arms held at or above shoulder level when cutting or styling hair. Neck - due to bending the head forward or turning to the side Wrist and hand - caused by gripping repetitive or forceful movements eg cutting, styling, blow-drying Varicose veins – caused by standing in one position for long periods, and they are also hereditary.

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Prevention Measures
Some of the ways you can prevent posture problems developing is by focusing on your working posture and the salon layout and furniture.

Working Posture
You can help prevent strains and fatigue by:        Wearing comfortable footwear Varying tasks; choose tasks that offer postural changes, for example, sitting to cut hair, standing to blow dry Adjusting chair/stool height to keep arms below shoulder height Positioning yourself to see the task with your head upright and facing forward Avoiding standing for long periods Keeping your back straight when lifting objects Bending your knees not your back

Salon Layout and Furniture
Hairdressers use certain muscle groups in a repetitive manner and often take on restricted posture for lengthy periods. To reduce strain, Cyber Hair Studio provides:       Work stations/benches at a suitable height for the task Room to move around to change your body position and reduce reaching Adjustable chairs/stools on wheels to help you move around the client Client chairs which are adjustable to cater for clients of different heights Equipment and products within reach to eliminate bending or twisting Work trolleys on castors to keep tools within easy reach and reduce carrying
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Control Measures
Check that:    Furniture is in good repair; if broken or unsafe it needs to be replaced Any wheels or castors are in proper working order (remove hair) Replace light bulbs or tubes; keep them in a clean, efficient state to provide good lighting

Manual Handling
At Cyber Hair Salon, all staff may be involved in processing incoming boxes of products. To help prevent strains when lifting or moving the boxes, you should: 1. Stand close to the box. 2. Bend your knees and lower your body. 3. Pick up the box, keeping your back straight 4. Make sure you are well balanced before you stand up 5. Lift yourself using the muscles in your legs, not your back

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Emergency Procedures
Fire Procedures
Why do I need to know this?

Occupational Health and Safety laws are designed to make the workplace a safe environment for all those at work. To perform your job safely it is important to know what to do in case of an emergency. Proper procedures and training can minimise the chances of an accidental fire and people being hurt. Many fires are started by human carelessness, and people have died or been injured.

What is Fire?
Fire is the process occurring when heat, fuel and oxygen join together. To have a fire three elements are necessary:    Fuel: something that will burn Heat: enough to make the fuel burn Oxygen: air
Heat Fuel

FUEL + AIR + HEAT = FIRE This is called a Fire triangle
Oxygen

If one element is removed, then the fire will go out.

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Fire Extinguishers
Federal regulations require that employers who provide portable fire extinguishers in the workplace should also provide training for how to use them. Fire extinguishers in the workplace should be placed where they can be easily seen and within easy reach. This ensures that they can be accessed quickly while a fire is still small. We have two types of fire extinguisher at Cyber Hair Studio. You need to be familiar with them and know when and when not to use them. It is important to know how to use your fire extinguisher

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Types of Fire
The three most common types of fire with corresponding fire extinguishers are:
Fire Extinguisher Label Identifying Colours Substance

Class “A”
ORDINARY COMBUSTIBLES

A
Ordinary combustibles such as wood, paper, cloth, rubber and many plastics

Water

Class “B”
FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS

B
Flammable liquids such as: gasoline, oil, grease, tar, oilbased paints, lacquer, and flammable gases Foam

Class”C”
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

C
Electrical equipment, wiring, fuse boxes, circuit breakers, machinery and appliances

Dry Chemical Powder

All fire extinguishers are labelled; using standard symbols for the classes of fire they can be used on. A red slash through any symbol tells you the extinguisher cannot be used on that class of fire.
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Fire Prevention
Ways of preventing fire:    Keep all areas clear, and do not accumulate rubbish Store and handle flammable liquids carefully Keep electrical equipment in good working order

Fire Emergency Procedures
What should I do if a fire starts?

A safe workplace must have a safe means of escape during an emergency. Evacuation procedures are the employer‟s legal obligation. Local fire brigades can help access your premises if required. It is vital that employees know what to do in case of an emergency.

Cyber Hair Studio Evacuation Policy
1. Raise the alarm (Ring 000 and ask for the Fire Department) 2. Close all doors and windows 3. Evacuate the workplace 4. Assemble in our designated emergency area – the park on the corner of High St and Main Rd. 5. Obey the instructions of the person in charge

Make sure that you know the location of fire extinguishers, escape routes and any other safety procedures.

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Using a Fire Extinguisher
How do I use a fire extinguisher?

Use the PASS method
P A S S
PULL the pin that unlocks the operating handle (Some extinguishers may have a lever). AIM at the base of the fire SQUEEZE the operating handle to discharge the fire fighting agent SWEEP from side to side, move carefully in on the fire, aiming at the base until flames appears to be out. If the fire re-ignites repeat the process

Before you think about fighting a fire, make sure the Fire Brigade has been notified and the fire is small. Do not put yourself or others at risk.

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First Aid in the Workplace
The purpose of first aid in the workplace is to provide emergency treatment and life support for people suffering injury or illness at work. Employees should always have access to first aid facilities, and at least one person with current training in first aid should be available to treat injured employees. In small workplaces arrangements could be made with a local doctor or nurse.

It is the employer’s responsibility to:   Provide first aid facilities and access to trained personnel. Select, locate and maintain first aid facilities

Any accident or incident must be documented on Cyber Hair Studio‟s accident report form (APPENDIX 1.)

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Common Workplace Injuries
Hairdressers and beauty operators can suffer from soft tissue injuries because they often use repetitive movements over long periods. Soft tissue injuries affect joints and muscles of the limbs and also include strains, sprains and dislocations.

How can these be treated?

To treat soft tissue injuries, use the RICE treatment method: Rest the injured part Ice: Apply ice packs (repeat every 10 mins) to limit swelling and reduce pain Compression: Apply a firm compression bandage as support Elevation: Raise the limb

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Eye injuries
Chemicals accidentally splashed in the eye Gently flush the eye with water from the nearest tap for approximately 20 mins. Do not attempt any other form of first aid. All eye injuries must be seen immediately at the eye hospital.

Cuts
If the skin is cut:       Wear rubber or plastic gloves to avoid contact with the blood Apply pressure with a dry sterile dressing until bleeding has stopped Wash the area with cool water If required, apply antiseptic and cover with a Band-Aid Wash and disinfect any bloodstained surfaces If the cut is severe, seek medical assistance

Serious injury
Contact a first aid officer or dial 000 and ask for the ambulance. While waiting for medical assistance to arrive:    Check the airway is clear Move the patient as little as possible to prevent further injury Do not give the patient anything by mouth

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First Aid Kit
Cyber Hair Studio‟s first aid kit complies with the requirements for a Basic Occupational First Aid Kit. Additional items may be added to this kit, provided personnel having access to the kit understand their use. Please see Nic Papadopoulos if you would like anything added.

Container
The kit is in a solid, dust proof container, which has a white cross on a green background prominently displayed on the outside. It is not locked and is located in the Staff Room.

Contents
                  Emergency Services Telephone Numbers and Addresses. Name, telephone number and extension of the nearest first aider. Basic First Aid Notes Individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressing (Band Aids) for minor wounds Sterile eye pads Sterile covering for serious wounds (where appropriate) Triangular bandages for slings Safety pins to fasten bandages Small sterile unmedicated wound dressing to control bleeding/cover large wounds Medium sterile unmedicated wound dressing Large sterile unmedicated wound dressing Adhesive tape 1.25 cm wide to fasten dressings Rubber thread or crepe bandage for joint and muscle support Scissors for cutting dressings/bandages Disposable gloves for protection Tissues for cleaning up Plastic bags for used dressings Eye wash container (one use only) and sterile eye pads (for flushing out chemicals)
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Recording Accidents and Incidents
Legislation requires that records be kept of all work injuries, work-related illnesses or dangerous occurrences that happen in the workplace. If the injury causes death or hospitalisation, the Division of Workplace Health and Safety must be notified. This information may be required if legal action is brought against you as result of an action in the workplace. It can also be used to identify risk groups, detect causes of work related injury/illness, and assess methods of how the incident could have been prevented.

Records should be kept to help recall: 1. Who was injured 2. How much work time was lost 3. What type of injury/illness it was 4. How often this type of injury/illness occurred

Any accident or incident must be documented on Cyber Hair Studio‟s accident report form (APPENDIX 1.)

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Contacting Emergency Services
If you are involved in an emergency requiring either the fire brigade, police or ambulances use the following procedures: 1. Dial 000 2. Tell the operator which emergency service you want 3. When you are connected to the service speak clearly and calmly 4. Give the full address of where help is needed, and provide any additional information, such as landmarks, which may assist in faster location 5. Wait for emergency service to arrive

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Maintaining Occupational Health and Safety
Some workplaces have an occupational health and safety representative elected by their co-workers to resolve issues. At Cyber Hair Studio, the best way to solve problems at work is to simply talk to each other and work out a constructive course of action. If you believe the task you are working on is unsafe, then you must:   Talk to your employer Agree on ways to resolve the problem

It is the employee’s responsibility to report hazards. It is the employer’s responsibility to provide a safe workplace.

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Appendix 1

Accident/Incident Report Form
All accidents and incidents must be reported immediately to Nic Papadopoulos. After completion, give the original copy to the First Aid Officer (Nic) and make a copy (use the fax machine) to give to the injured person. PERSON INVOLVED Full Name: ........................................................................................................................................……...……………. Home Address: .................................................................................................................………………………………. ....................................................................................................... Tel (H) : ..................................Tel (W) : ............................... Date of Birth: ................................. ACCIDENT/INCIDENT DETAILS Time of Accident/Incident: ........................................................ Date of Incident/Accident: .…../ ......./ ....... Postcode: .................................... Male Employee Female Client

Location of Accident/Incident: ...........…………...............………………….………........................................................ ................................................................................................................................………………………………………. How Accident/Incident Occurred (Describe injury if applicable): ......................................................................……………… ........................................................................................................................................................…………………...... .......................................................................................................................................................…………………....... Part of Body Injured (If applicable) : .......................................................................................……...………..……............ .................................................................................................................................................…………………...…...... WITNESS DETAILS Name of Witness 1: ........................................................................................ Name of Witness 2: ........................................................................................ TREATMENT Returned to Work First Aid only Sent to Doctor Sent to Hospital Tel: .......................……………...... Tel: .............................……………

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

First Aid treatment given: .................................................................................................................…………………... .............................................................................................................................................................................…….. Time and date when work: Ceased: ………….am/pm ……/…../….. Resumed: ………….am/pm ……/…../….. Tel: ....................……………......... Date: ......../ ........./ ........ Signed (First Aid Officer): …………………….………………………………. Name of Doctor or Hospital: .....................…………........................................ Signed (Person Involved): .........................................................................

Appendix 2

Common Hazardous Substances in the Hairdressing Industry
Product
Hair Dyes

Ingredient
General

Health Effect
Bladder cancer Leukaemia Lymphoma Multiple myeloma Bladder cancer Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis, aplastic anaemia Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis Asthma Strong skin, eye and respiratory irritant, potential sensitiser Dermatitis Dermatitis Dermatitis Dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis Allergic contact dermatitis

Specific Hair Dyes

Benzidine 2,4-toluene diamine 2,5-toluene diamine p-toluene diamine sulphate m-phenylene diamine o-nitro-p-phenylene diamine (2-nitro-p-phenylene diamine) 4-nitro-o-phenylene diamine 4-amino-2-nitrophenol 2,4-diaminoanisole Henna Hydrogen peroxide

Shampoos

Detergents Zinc pyridinethione Lavender oil (geraniol, linalool, linalyl-acetate) Quatemium-15

Permanent Wave Solutions Permanent Wave Neutralisers

Ammonium thioglycolate Glyceryl monothioglycolate Thioglycolic acid Hydrogen peroxide, Ammonium persulphate, Potassium persulphate, Sodium persulphate, Sodium perborate, Sodium bromate, Potassium bromate,

Strong skin, eye and respiratory irritants, potential sensitisers.

Hair Sprays

Ethanol (alcohol) Glutaraldehyde Aerosols (LPG)

Eye irritant Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis, headaches, nausea, respiratory problems and asthma Eye irritant, fire and explosion risk Asthma Strong skin, eye and respiratory irritant, potential sensitisers. Eye irritant Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis, headaches, nausea, respiratory problems and asthma Allergic contact dermatitis Irritant and allergic contact dermatitis, headaches, nausea, respiratory problems and asthma Allergic contact dermatitis Dermatitis

Hair Bleaches

Ammonium persulphate Hydrogen peroxide Potassium persulphate Sodium persulphate

Setting Lotions

Ethanol (alcohol) Glutaraldehyde

Perfumes Antiseptics Rubber Gloves

Balsam of Peru Glutaraldehyde Thiuram Mercaptobenzothiazole

From: Workplace Health and Safety Department of Training and Industrial Relations http://www.whs.qld.gov.au/information/96-i-43.pdf


				
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