This project is part of a national study on Codes of Conduct, by by alextt

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									                  Voluntary Codes of Conduct
                   For Landscape Architects

Presented this draft to the ASLA Hawaii Chapter board on 7/12/06. Until a final, signed form
is posted, these Codes are for discussion and revision purposes only.

This project is part of a national study on Codes of Conduct, by Valerie Vartanian at the
Missouri Botanical Garden (see the website above for more information). Comments, edits,
etc. are encouraged. Email or call Christy Martin at christym@rocketmail.com (808) 722-
0995 or Carter Smith at cartersm@hawaii.edu (808) 956-7909. Codes adapted from The St.
Louis Declaration on Invasive Plant Species
http://www.centerforplantconservation.org/invasives/cbgN.html

Date:

Participating Business:

Contact Name:                                                  Phone:

Preferred Contact Method
Mailing/FAX/Email address/number:


1. Seek out education and information on invasive plant issues. Be aware of potential
environmental impacts beyond the designed and managed area of the landscape plan
(e.g. plants may spread to natural areas or croplands):

a. We will seek out and work with natural resource managers, conservation groups and plant
ecologists to help us gain an awareness of how invasive plants spread into and damage
natural areas.

b. We will use the Hawaii-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment information to review our plant
palettes to identify which species are invasive or predicted to be invasive in Hawaii.


2. Identify and specify non-invasive species that are aesthetically and horticulturally
suitable alternatives to invasive species in your region.

a. We will work to identify and specify non-invasive plants that are suitable alternatives to
invasive plants currently in our palettes.

b. We will work with others in the plant industry to identify and promote non-invasive
alternatives for the state.


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        Missouri Botanical Garden
3. Eliminate specification of species that are invasive in your region.

a. We will support the ONGA Codes by not specifying the following plants on Oahu projects:
   1. Australian tree fern (Cyathea cooperi)
   2. Rubbervine (Cryptostegia grandiflora and C. madagascariensis)
   3. Smokebush (Buddleja madagascariensis)
   4. Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii)
   5. Pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana and C. jubata**)
   6. Mule’s foot fern (Angiopteris evecta)
   7. Glorybush (Tibouchina urvilleana**)

b. We will support the KLIC Codes by not specifying the following plants on Kauai projects:
   1. Australian tree fern (Cyathea cooperi)
   2. Rubbervine (Cryptostegia grandiflora and C. madagascariensis)
   3. Smokebush (Buddleja madagascariensis)
   4. Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii)
   5. Pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana and C. jubata**)
   6. Hiptage (Hiptage benghalensis)
   7. Fountain Grass (Pennisetum setaceum**)
   8. Glorybush (Tibuchina urvilleana**)
   9. Fiddlewood (Citharexylum spinosum)
   10. Kahili ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum) –note: this was incorrectly listed as white
   ginger previously--cm
   11. Common St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum)
   12. Indian rhododendron (Melastoma candidum**)
   13. (will be adding a kalanchoe cactus once species is ID’d)

**denotes plants that are State Noxious Weeds, but are sold at times.

c. We will consider adding species to different island no-spec lists and will work together with
other industry association members and conservation groups on mutually acceptable lists.


4. Promote the use of non-invasives to other industry members, the public, and
planners.

a. We will encourage nurseries and other suppliers to provide landscape contractors and the
public with non-invasive plants.

b. We will take an active role in promoting this issue and the solutions by educating our
fellow landscape architects, planners, customers and others in the plant industry.




                                    Revised April 2002                                         2

       Missouri Botanical Garden

								
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