Docstoc

Slide 1 - American College Health Association

Document Sample
Slide 1 - American College Health Association Powered By Docstoc
					NCHA Data: Administrative and Clinical strategies for linking (mental) health and substance abuse disorders to academic success.
Joy Himmel, Psy D. Director, Health and Wellness Center, Penn St. Altoona Keith Anderson, Ph.D. Psychologist, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

Objectives
1. Issues that influence student learning and academic progress. 2. Prevalence of disorders and a review of NCHA data and trends. 3. Identifying strategies to develop best practice guidelines that promote academic success.

Issues that influence student learning and academic progress.
• Determining barriers to academic success • Surveys
– NCHA
• Data collected from 2000 to 2005 • Current analysis uses Spring 2005 data set • N= 54,111

– AUCCCD
• Survey of Counseling center directors • Data is from Fall 2005 • N= 366

Impediments to Academic Success
• • • • • Stress 31.6% Cold/Flu 26.5% Sleep Problems 24.8% Depression 15.3% Internet Use/ Games 14.2% (3-6% of students addicted to internet pornography; 20% are women)

ACHA-NCHA Spring 2005

American College Health Association. American College Health Association - National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) Web Summary. Updated April 2006. Available at http://www.acha.org/projects_programs/ncha_sampledata.cfm. 2006

Academic performance impaired by impact of Alcohol use
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Rec'd lower exam grade Rec'd lower class grade Dropped class/inc.

Percentage

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Academic performance impaired by Depression, Anxiety, Seasonal Affective Disorder
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Rec'd lower exam grade Received lower course grade Dropped/Inc.

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Percentage

Academic performance impaired by Drug Use

2.5

Percentage

2 1.5 1 0.5 0
Rec'd lower exam grade Rec'd lower course grade Dropped/Inc

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Academic performance impaired by Internet/Computer game use
12 10 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Percentage

8 6 4 2 0
Rec'd lower exam grade Rec'd lower course grade Dropped/Inc

Evidence for Rise in Psychological Distress
• Big 10 Universities Student Suicide Study (1980-1990) • CDC‟s YRBS ( 1999 - 2003) • CDC‟s NCHRBS (1995) • ACHA-NCHA - Spring 2000 - 2004 • AUCCCD‟s Annual Surveys • Published literature

Rise on college campuses
– Earlier identification and referral (high school) – Improved treatment options – Decreased stigma (high school & college) – Increased accessibility/availability – Greater use of structured screening tools, web-based resources – Improved accommodations – Greater parity with physical health – More students working, increased stress

Consequences of increased demands for service
• Advocating for more staff • Increased wait times
– for intake and between sessions – premature drop out – if we focus on those with more severe disorders, do some students fall between the cracks?

• Requires an analysis of our mission
–Who should we serve?

Related (but often unapparent) concerns
• Do some avoid treatment, problems stigma, center reputation, concerns about confidentiality. • How do we reconcile a high demand for service with concerns that some are still untreated.

Why Some Students Do Not Use University Counseling Facilities
• For help with all kinds of problems, friends were the first choice, parents were the second choice, and faculty and psychological services the last choice.

• Counseling centers should begin to focus their attention on more preventive-oriented types of services rather than traditional remediation, which may include being available to the student in his own life space rather than in the counseling center.
Derksen, Timothy; Hill, Clara; Snyder, John. “Why Some Students Do Not Use University Counseling Facilities.” Journal of Counseling Psychology 19 No.4 (1972): 263-268.

Stigma of Psychological Therapy: Stereotypes, Interpersonal Reactions, and the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy • Negative attitudes were displayed toward people who sought psychological assistance from a clergyman or from a psychiatrist.

• A person described as seeking counseling is rated more negatively than is a “typical” person.
Dovidio, John; Sibicky, Mark. “Stigma of Psychological Therapy: Stereotypes, Interpersonal Reactions, and the SelfFulfilling Prophecy.” Journal of Counseling Psychology 33 No.2 (1986): 148-154.

Finding value in our services Retention
• 562 students asking for counseling followed over 2 year period

• 0 sessions 65%

1-12 79%

>13 83%

• Several studies followed people over 5 years all showed dramatically higher retention rates, averaging more than 10% for students who used counseling services

Steve Wilson, Terry Mason, Evaluating the impact of receiving university based counseling services on student retention Journal of Counseling Psychology 1997 vol 44. no 3 p. 316-320

Retention
• Social Isolation single most important determinant of dropout rates
Pascarella and Terrazini, 1979

• Emotional- Social Adjustment items predicted attrition better than academic items
Gerdes and Mallinckrodt 1994

• 5 year study of Berkeley students and those making use of counseling had higher graduation rates
Frank and Kirk 1975

Retention
Counseling records of 2365 students and student body records of 67,026 over 6 years(473 /13,400) at Western Land Grant University. • 70% report that personal problems were affecting their academic progress • 70.9% retention of students in counseling, 58.6% retention in control group over 6 years (annual, eventual, graduation and total retention) • Annual rates were 85.2 vs. 73.8%
Andrew Turner Journal of College Student Development, Nov. Dec 2000

Common Presenting Problems
Mood Disorders
– In any given year- 9.5% of US population age 18+, or 20.9 million adult Americans,

– 16.3% indicate that depression/anxiety/SAD affect academics (NCHA, spring 2005)
• • • • • Major Depressive Disorder Dysthymic Disorder Cyclothymia Bi Polar Disorder Depressive Disorder NOS

– Twice as many women as men
NIMH Facts about Depression

Signs and Symptoms
• • • • • • • • • • • • Prolonged sadness/increased crying Noticeable changes in appetite and sleep patterns Worry, anxiety Irritability, agitation, anger Pessimism, indifference Loss of energy, persistent lethargy Unexplained aches and pains Excessive feelings of guilt, worthlessness, hopelessness Difficulty concentrating, indecisiveness Social Withdrawal, loss of pleasure in things of interest Excessive consumption of alcohol or other drugs Recurring thoughts of death or suicide

The Prevalence of Depression as a Function of Gender and Facility Usage in College Students
• The rate of depression is 50% higher for college students than for non-student peers. • One-third of college drop-outs suffer depression just before leaving school. • Men are more likely to present psychological problems at a health facility with a nonpsychological image. • Students with somatic symptoms associated with depression are seen quite frequently at infirmaries.
Balzer, Diana; Pillsbury, Elecia; Nagelberg, Daniel. “The Prevalence of Depression as a Function of Gender and Facility Usage in College Students.” Journal of College Student Personnel (Nov 1983): 525-529.

100

Percentage of High School Students Who Felt Sad or Hopeless,* 1999 - 2003

80

Percent

60

40

28.3
20

28.3

28.61

0
1999 2001 2003

* Felt so sad or hopeless almost every day for > 2 weeks in a row that they stopped doing some usual activities during the 12 months preceding the survey 1 No change over time

National Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 1999 – 2003

2005 Spring Survey Results

American College Health Association. American College Health Association - National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) Web Summary. Updated April 2006. Available at http://www.acha.org/projects_programs/ncha_sampledata.cfm. 2006

Felt things were hopeless
25 20 15 10 5 0
Female 3-8 Female 9+ Male 3-8 Male 9+

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

NCHA 2000/05

Percentage

Number of Incidents

ACHA-NCHA Spring 2005

American College Health Association. American College Health Association - National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) Web Summary. Updated April 2006. Available at http://www.acha.org/projects_programs/ncha_sampledata.cfm. 2006

Felt so depressed it was difficult to function

16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Females 3-8 NCHA 2000/05 Females 9+ Males 3-8 Males 9+ 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Percentage

ACHA-NCHA Spring 2005

American College Health Association. American College Health Association - National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) Web Summary. Updated April 2006. Available at http://www.acha.org/projects_programs/ncha_sampledata.cfm. 2006

Seriously considered attempting suicide

12 10 8 6 4 2
Females 1+ Males 1+

NCHA 2000/05

Percentage

0

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

ACHA-NCHA Spring 2005

American College Health Association. American College Health Association - National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) Web Summary. Updated April 2006. Available at http://www.acha.org/projects_programs/ncha_sampledata.cfm. 2006

Percentage of High School Students Who Seriously Considered Attempting Suicide,* 1991 - 2003
100 80 60

Percent

40

29.0 24.1 24.1 20.5 19.3 19.0 16.91

20

0
1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003

* During the 12 months preceding the survey 1 Significant linear decrease and quadratic effect, p < .05

National Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 1991 - 2003

Summary of Suicide & Suicide Attempts
[Comparing 18-24 year olds to total population 2001]
Rate per 100,000 Suicide Rate* 18-24 only Suicide Attempt Rate* 18-24 only Ratio Suicide Attempts/Suicide* 18-24 only
*Rate for total population

Males 17.61 19.73 102.82 251.42 5.84 12.75

Females 4.10 3.00 123.48 264.44 30.14 88.00

Both Genders 10.73 11.57 113.34 257.77 10.56 22.28

• Female youths attempt at a slightly higher rate, however • Male youths are more likely to have a fatal outcome
[Source: CDC WISQARS Fatal & Non-fatal 2001]

Risk Factors for Youth Suicide
• Personal Characteristics
– Psychopathology (mood disorders, substance abuse) – History of prior attempt – Cognitive and personality factors, including hopelessness and poor interpersonal problem-solving – Biological factors (primarily serotonin function)
Gould MS, Greenberg T, Velting DM, Shaffer D. Youth suicide risk and preventive interventions: a review of the past 10 years. Journal of the American Academy of child Adolescent Psychiatry. 2003;42(4):386-405.

Risk Factors for Youth Suicide
• Family characteristics
– History of suicidal behavior – Parental psychopathology

• Adverse life circumstances
– Stressful life events, loss, legal/disciplinary problems, bullying – Physical abuse – Sexual abuse

• Socio-environmental
– Academic problems/failure – Media influence (contagion)
Gould MS, Greenberg T, Velting DM, Shaffer D. Youth suicide risk and preventive interventions: a review of the past 10 years. Journal of the American Academy of child Adolescent Psychiatry. 2003;42(4):386-405.

Suicide Among College Undergraduates
• Therefore, our best estimate of number of suicides and attempts among all U.S. college undergraduates to date,
– approx. 1,305 will die as a result of suicide /year – approx. 31,469 will attempt suicide /year
• Note: # suicides using Big Ten suicide rate for 17-24 year olds [6.3/100,000†] * # 18-24 year old undergraduates [9,367,000] + 30%= 767 college undergraduate suicides/year; • and using Harvard Pilot suicide rate for 18-24 year olds [3.74/100,000] * # 18-24 year old undergraduates [9,367,000] + 30% = 455 college undergraduate suicides/year

• In order to know the true number of college undergraduate suicides & attempts, we need to know the rate of suicide & attempts among this population
[Source: †rate is weighted average of 17-19 and 20-24 categories; CDC WISQARS Fatal & Non-fatal 2001]

Academic Consequences
• Consistently high/significant correlations between GPA and
– Hopelessness – Feeling exhausted – Considering/attempting suicide – Feeling so depressed it was difficult to function

Bipolar Disorder
In any given year 5.7 million American Adults have Bipolar (2.6%). • Commonly diagnosed in college age • 20-25% increased risk of committing suicide Signs and Symptoms • Irritability, distractibility, increased energy, elation, racing thoughts, decreased need for sleep, reckless behavior, decreased need for sleep, loss or reason

Anxiety Disorders
In any given year, anxiety disorders affect about 40 million Americans (18%), NCHA spring 2005, (13.4%) All symptoms cluster around excessive, irrational fear and dread, subjective tension.

– – – – –

Generalized Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder PTSD Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Social Phobia

(NIMH-Facts about anxiety disorders)

Signs and Symptoms
• Worrying about things –big and small • Headaches or other aches and pains for no reason • Tense, difficulty relaxing, pressured speech • Trouble concentrating • Irritable • Trouble falling asleep or staying asleep • Sweats, hot flashes • On guard, hyper vigilant

Adjustment Disorders
Precipitators of stress • Common stressors include:
– – – – – – – – Greater academic demands Being on your own in a new environment Changes in family relations Financial responsibilities Changes in your social life/fitting in Exposure to new people, ideas, and temptations Awareness of your sexual identity and orientation Preparing for life after graduation

(NIMH)

National College Health Assessment Data - Alcohol

American College Health Association. American College Health Association - National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) Web Summary. Updated April 2006. Available at http://www.acha.org/projects_programs/ncha_sampledata.cfm. 2006 .

Major characteristics of abuse and dependency
• Abstinence • Experimentation-episodic use without pattern or consequences • Social/Recreational- seek it out, no established pattern or negative consequences • Habituation- established pattern • Abuse- use despite consequences • Addiction- Abuse plus compulsion (Inaba, 2003)

Cognitive impact of substance abuse
Two to three standard drinks can directly: • interfere with restful sleep • Cause slow thinking processes- Lack of glycogen to the brain • Impairment in sustained concentration • Impairment in reaction time • Ability to use abstract thought processes
(Dodes, 2002)

Impact of Alcohol Abuse
The positive: • 74.6% use a designated driver, 64.1% keep track, 42% avoid drinking games, 33.9% determine in advance not to exceed a set number, 76.9% eat before they go out

Michigan Alcohol Screening Test Scores and Academic Performance in College Students

• Several studies have indicated that problem drinking behaviors among college students can lead to legal, academic, or social difficulties. • Freshman reported a significantly greater weekly drinking frequency, Sophomore weekly alcohol consumption was significantly greater than consumption frequencies reported by junior, senior, or graduate students.

Academic Consequences
• A significant inverse correlation was obtained between GPA and weekly alcohol consumption. This was evident for persons with GPAs below 2.5. Students reporting lower GPAs (1.5-1.9) also reported a significantly greater weekly consumption of alcohol.

• Data indicated negative correlation between the students‟ average weekly alcohol consumption and their GPA. Students in the lowest GPA category (1.5-1.99) had the greatest mean alcohol consumption rate.
• Lall, Rakesh; Schandler, Steven. “Michigan Alcohol Screening Test Scores and Academic Performance in College Students.” College Student Journal (1988): 245-251.

Consequences to alcohol use and abuse
• • • • • 37% did something they later regretted 15% had unprotected sex 30% experienced blackouts 18.5% physically injured Only 4.1% report experiencing substance abuse problems, 7.6% indicate that use affected academics,

(NCHA, spring 2005)

Other common problems Sleep
Correlations between sleep patterns and reported GPA • Consequences of sleep loss: poor academic performance, increased medical illness and increased rates of depression and anxiety.
(Armitage, R., 2004)

• 24.8% report that sleep has affected academics,

(NCHA, spring 2005)

Sleep Quality, Sleep Propensity and Academic Performance
• 15% of college students experience poor sleep quality.
• The median length of sleep reported by college students has decreased by over one hour across the last three decades. (Hicks, Fernandez, Pellegrini)

• Higher GPAs were associated with, waking up less often during the night, taking fewer naps, and sleeping somewhat longer on school nights.

Sleep Quality and Academic Performance
• For a sample of 148 undergraduates that those who slept on the average less than six hours per night had lower self-reported GPAs than those who slept nine hours or more. (Kelly, Kelly, Clanton)

• Lower GPAs were significantly associated with later weekday and weekend bedtimes, later weekday and weekend wake-up times, and longer hours of sleep on weekend nights. (Trockel, Barnes, Egget)
Howell, Andrew; Jahrig, Jesse; Powell, Russell. “Sleep Quality, Sleep Propensity and Academic Performance.” Perpetual and Motor Skills 99 (2004): 525-535.

Sleep Problems
• 35% of adult population experience insomnia • 11% of college students get a “good night‟s sleep” • Loss of cognitive functioning, driving • Increased risk of depression • < 7 hours yields sleep deprivation

UA Student Quality of Sleep Project
• Mean bedtime: 12:43, minutes to fall asleep-25, usual wake up time- 8:15, usual hours of sleep6.8 • Those with mental health issues and those drinking five or more standard drinks per occasion had greater levels of disordered sleep • Two-thirds of the students are dealing with anxiety and over half are experiencing depression. • Women are at higher risk for sleep disorders and negative outcomes
(Student Health Spectrum, November 2006)

Internet Use/computer games
• 13.4% report interference with academics (NCHA, spring 2005) • 42% gambled in the past year and 2.6% gamble weekly or more frequently (JACH, Sept. 2003) • The Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey survey, College age gambling moved from11.7% in 2002 to 20.9% in 2005.(www.800gambler.org) • 80/15/5 Rule: Social, Problem, Compulsive

Stress
• 31.6% indicate that stress has affected academics (NCHA, spring 2005) • Evidence based interventions
– CBT, changing thinking – Behavioral interventions – Wellness prevention and intervention programs involving nutrition, sleep, exercise

Influences of Stress and Situation-Specific Mastery Beliefs and Satisfaction with Social Support on Well-Being and Academic Performance
• Stress was positively correlated with somatic and psychological disorder and negatively correlated with GPA. The correlations were modest for GPA (r=-.21,p<.05), anxiety (r=.35,p<.001), and somatic disorder (r=.31,p<.001) but stronger for depression (r=.47,p<.001).

• Grade point average was negatively related to stress. • Stress was associated with increased somatic and psychological symptomatology and decreased GPA.

Felsten, Gary; Wilcox, Kathy. “Influences of Stress and Situation-Specific Mastery Beliefs and Satisfaction with Social Support on Well-Being and Academic Performance.” Psychological Reports 70 (1992): 291-303.

Eating Disorders
• Females are much more likely than males to develop an eating disorder. Only an estimated 5 to 15 percent of people with anorexia or bulimia and an estimated 35 percent of those with binge-eating disorder are male.

Bulimia
• Recurrent episodes of binge eating

• Recurrent inappropriate compensatory behavior in order to prevent weight gain • The binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviors both occur, on average, at least twice a week for 3 months

Anorexia
• Resistance to maintaining body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height • Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight
• Disturbance in the way in which one's body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of the current low body weight

• Infrequent or absent menstrual periods (in females who have reached puberty)

Binge Eating Disorder
• Recurrent episodes of binge eating • The binge-eating episodes are associated with at least 3 of the following: eating much more rapidly than normal; eating until feeling uncomfortably full; eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry; eating alone because of being embarrassed by how much one is eating; feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or very guilty after overeating
• The binge eating occurs, on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months

Strategies that promote academic success. Share information/data Recruit allies

Identify Your Data Needs
• How busy is counseling? Waiting lists? • Where else do students get care? • Retention: track carefully. Who comes back? How is GPA affected. • How do students get medication? Insurance? • How many students are hospitalized? • Student Research: gets students engaged

Identify barriers to treatment
– What factors make it less likely that those in distress will seek help?
• • • • • • • • Hours of operation Attitudes about seeking help Reputation of the counseling center Physical location Integrated vs non integrated Wait times Welcoming environment Outreach

Academic Difficulties
Encourage faculty to notice students who are:

• • • • •

Absent Withdrawn Excessively anxious about performance Engaging in disruptive behaviors Exaggerated emotional response that is inappropriate to the situation • Talk about giving up • Present with hopelessness or helplessness

Screening Programs
• A form of outreach and education • College Response National screening Program (Depression, Bipolar, GAD, PTSD, Eating Disorders, Alcohol) • Anonymous screening 24/7 • 509 Colleges and Universities 2004, 130,000 online screenings
– 26% of college students who scored positive for depression, and 27% who scored positive for Bipolar had thoughts about or wanted to commit suicide (2003 results).

New Directions
Increase recognition, treatment and compliancy (less than 50% use psychotropic medication correctly and consistently, MDE- 6 wks, continuing through 6 months). Incomplete remission of depressive symptoms is associated with higher rates or reoccurrence.

The opportunities and challenges of timely diagnosis, inadequate treatment and poorly-adherent patients
• Early identification and intervention programs
– Health risk assessments in Health Services which include depression, ATOD, anxiety, sleep, abusive relationships and stress. – AIP Programs utilizing a Comprehensive Wellness model – High school to college social norms based alcohol prevention programs

“How Far” High School to College Transition Program Results: After viewing the video
• Participants were 2.62 more likely to say no to drinking games, 6 weeks later 2.23 times more likely

• 2.5 times more likely to make a safety plan, 6 weeks later 7 times more likely • 2 times more likely to intervene at mid-semester • 50% more likely to make plans to use a designated driver, 6 weeks later four times more likely
• Keep track of number of drinks- 5%, 16%, 31%

Perception changes
• Five or more- reduced from 62% to 18% to 33% • Three or more nights a week- 72% to 38% to 62% • Number of college students who do not drink/drive -18%. 49%, 31%

Primary care setting models• Duke University/Dartmouth study
– Structured rating scales for depression used by the primary health care provider – Behavioral health care manager – Counseling if necessary
(Friedlander,Student Health Spectrum, November 2006)

Other models
• Integrated vs nonintegrated centers • Community Mental Health Model
– Depression Disease Management Program (Aetna), regularly checked on patients who were on antidepressant medication. They showed a 15% improvement in adherence rates for participants compared to those not enrolled in the program.

Case management in College Health
• Trained clinicians in motivational interviewing • Shared positions within integrated Centers • Red Flags
– Co-morbid disorders – History of poor adherence to treatment – Crisis Center, ER, or inpatient admissions – Abrupt onset – Chronic and persistent mental illness

Creating partnerships.. From the very beginning…………
• Parent orientation welcoming session during “drop-off day” • Parent website:
– warning signs of ……… – how to talk to your child about……. – how to/when to reach us about ……….. – how we can help/what we can do about…… – identifying the limits of our service.

Training and Education
• Techniques for assessment and identification (observing & asking) • Skills for listening and providing support • Procedures for referral • What constitutes “a cry for help” • Audience: faculty, coaches, clergy, residential staff, academic advisors, student advisors, tutors

Non-Clinical Student Support Services Network
• • • • • A form of outreach and education Telephone helplines On-call services Peer support groups The Five D‟s: family deaths, disasters, divorces, debts, decay

Campus-Wide Public Health Education
• • • • • • • Student newspaper articles/radio spots How to be a good friend/neighbor How to manage “winter blues” How to seek help How to recognize signs/symptoms of…… What is a “cry for help”/warning sign The role of alcohol in this community

How many students receive information on suicide prevention?
• Only 14% of students receive information on suicide prevention, the least of any health issue. • Most students receive their health information from their parents, leaflets, friends, and magazines, however
– the most trusted & believable sources are health educators & student health service medical staff.

• Important for college counseling staff to provide necessary information on suicide prevention, opportunity to fill void.
[Source: NCHA Survey 2004]

50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Students Receiving Information from their college

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Percentage

Tobacco

ATOD

Sex. As.

Viol. Prev

Inj. Prev.

Suic. Pre.

Preg. Pre

HIV Prev.

STD Info

Diet

Phys. Act

None abv.

Rensselaer‟s Self Assessment Program
• Designed to identify students who might fall in the cracks. • Make use of technology to provide information • Effective prescreening • Information from, Counseling Center, Health Educator, Health Center, ALAC

I spend so much time online that my grades suffer. 1. It is easy to spend more time on-line than you realize. Getting lost in the internet, playing games, on-line gambling, or surfing an auction site can be time consuming. Many people loose track of the time spent and as a result end up not getting their work done or sacrificing the social or recreational time. 2. If you find yourself spending more time on-line and not getting your work done, or not leading a balanced lifestyle, you may need to consider ways of monitoring how much time is being used. Consider looking for strategies for monitoring how much time you spend on-line. If this time is making it difficult to keep up with your schedule or spending time with your friends, it may be time to cut back. If you find that cutting back is difficult, consider talking with someone who can help you with your schedule. Some sources include ALAC, the Health Educator and the Counseling Center. 3. Spending large amounts of time on-line can have many negative effects on your grades and social life. If you find your losing track of time on-line, ignoring your other responsibilities, losing track of your friends, having difficulty keeping up with your class assignments, or getting behind in your work, contact: ALAC, the Health Educator and the Counseling Center 4. Some of the warning signs of „internet addiction‟ include, spending increasing amounts of time on-line, skipping meals when on-line, cutting back on important activities to spend time on-line, unsuccessful efforts to cut back on time on-line, spending time on-line even when doing so has negative effects. If you notice these, or any related symptoms, you should contact the counseling center.

I believe that I know how to study for and take tests in the most effective ways. I know that “studying” doesn‟t just mean visually reviewing the course material. 1. Knowing how and what to study is very important. Your resources include your professors and TAs (they make and grade the exams), your LA or TLA, and the Advising and Learning Assistance Center. We offer free tutoring and academic suggestions. We can teach you how to most effectively read your text book, take notes, practice problems, and the importance of studying alone and in groups. Take the time now to learn how to study. It will pay off in your understanding and preparation for your courses and your future career. 2. Your confidence and grades will improve when you begin to understand how and what to study, and when you do so in a regular and planned way. If you need suggestions, contact the Advising and Learning Assistance Center, your LA or TLA in the Residence Halls. We can teach you how to study for and take tests successfully. 3. Making the time to study adequately every day begins on the first day of classes. Regular review, plenty of rest and a healthy diet can also help with test taking. For more tips, contact your LA, TLA, or the Advising and Learning Assistance Center. 4. Mastering the art of test preparation and test taking is a major feat at the college level! Keep up the great work, and always feel free to seek further fine tuning and assistance from your professors as you need it, or contact the Advising and Learning Assistance Center for more suggestions.

I know my family history for Heart disease • 1. If you do not know your family history, ask your family the next time you visit. Knowledge of your family history will allow you to make healthy choices! You might want to know that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the US. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease include: physical inactivity, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, diabetes, hypertension, excessive body fat, smoking, tension and stress, age, and personal and family history of CVD. If you find out that you have some of these risk factors and want to make healthy changes in your diet, exercise or talk to someone about your risks, make an appointment with the health educator or the medical clinic at the student health center.
• 4. If you have no family history of heart disease, great! If you have cardiovascular disease in your family, you probably know this is the leading cause of death in the US. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease include: physical inactivity, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, diabetes, hypertension, excessive body fat, smoking, tension and stress, age, and personal and family history of CVD. If you have some of these risk factors and want to make healthy changes in your diet, exercise or talk to someone about your risks, make an appointment with the health educator or the medical clinic at the student health center.

Early Warning System
Rensselaer Student Information System

• Service initiated by Academic Advising and Counseling Center • Administered by Registrars office • Formation of the Intervention team
– ALAC, Counseling Center, Residence life – Required training of faculty as the first responders

Personal Information Search

Student Menu
Go

Instructor & Advisor Menu

Main Menu

Hartford HR/Payroll Student Menu Menu
MENU | SITE MAP | HELP | EXIT

Early Warning System
Welcome to the Early Warning Entry Page.

660010067 Keith J. Anderson Fall 2006 Nov 21, 2006 11:22 am

Please choose the appropriate warning from the drop down box and enter comments that would be helpful to us to assist the student. Notification e-mails will be delivered to the student's advisor(s), the Advising and Learning Assistance Center and the Office of the First Year Experience. The comments you enter will be shared with these recipients. Students are notified electronically for all warnings except "OTHER", in which case they are contacted by ALAC. Please note that comments will not be communicated to students.

Freshmen Fall 2003 Course : HUMAN SEXUALITY

Enter a New Warning Select a Warning:

Stress Reduction Programs
• • • • • Hygiene-diet, exercise, sleep Social skills Academic skills Time management Support groups (losses, bereavement, gender identity, etc.) • Dealing with stress during a time of war • Choosing courses and careers

Emergency Services
• 24-hour access • Where to go/Whom to call/What to expect • Community emergency/Crisis intervention services • Mobile support services • Hotline numbers

Medical Leave Policies
• Policies, procedures, protocols, panels, policing • Is the student able to function as a student? • Is the behavior disruptive to the community? • Re-entry protocols and criteria • Programs for returning students

Postvention Programs
• • • • Crisis intervention/Emergency teams Support, assistance, direction Bringing closure Media relations

Faculty and Staff Consultation Services
• Assessing the need for referral or intervention • Available Resources • Clarifying your own thoughts about the student and make recommendations • Discuss follow up concerns • Faculty and staff training

Coordination of Care
• Handbook expectations: who gets notified about hospitalization/ return • Identifying high-risk students • How is residence involved with worrisome students? • Eating Disordered or Substance Abusing students in residence, what happens? • Contracts: When to invoke them

Referral Network
• Licensed and certified mental health professionals • Multi-disciplined • Multi-ethnic • Developmental perspective • Available locations • Accommodating hours


				
DOCUMENT INFO