Operational implications _including examples_ _max 6 pages_ by lonyoo

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 27

									UNDP will leverage its multisectoral programming, its long-term engagement and its role in developmental and humanitarian coordination to provide an effective bridge that spans the relief-to-development gaps that have hindered recovery efforts to date. A recovery approach focuses on how best to restore the capacity of the government and communities to rebuild and recover from crisis and to prevent relapses. In so doing, recovery seeks not only to catalyse sustainable development activities but also to build upon earlier humanitarian programmes to ensure that their inputs become assets for development UNDP in Crisis and Post-Conflict Situations, DP/2001/4

In December 2005, the IASC Principals agreed to implement the cluster approach in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, and Uganda. In addition, the cluster approach would be applied in all new major disasters. Key elements of the cluster approach were already applied in the response to the South Asia earthquake (and are the subject of a current evaluation that will analyse how to apply the cluster approach in sudden-onset disaster response) The cluster approach operates on two levels. At the global level, the approach will build up capacity in the nine key ‘gap’ areas by developing better surge capacity, ensuring consistent access to appropriately trained technical expertise and enhanced material stockpiles, and securing the increased engagement of all relevant humanitarian partners At the field level, the cluster approach will strengthen the coordination and response capacity by mobilising clusters of humanitarian agencies (UN/Red Cross-Red Crescent/international organisations /NGOs) to respond in particular sectors or areas of activity, each cluster having a clearly designated and accountable lead, as agreed by the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) and the Country Team

1

2

IASC principals decision on 12 December 2005

   

Regional disparities in achieving the MDGs are amplified by the prevailing security and humanitarian situation in Northern Uganda. The situation is characterised by the insurgency of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in the northern districts and cattle rustling in Karamoja. The LRA’s attacks have uprooted more than 1.6 million people into internally displaced persons camps, which reached its peak during June 2003–March 2004







received valuable support in the form of technical expertise and financial resources to upscale its operations.
 





 







4

Post-conflict reintegration evaluation: breaking new ground



   



   



        

 

  

      



  





7

FAFO profiling study, IOM profiling



.





   





 

       

  

“

”

   

      

       


								
To top