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NORWAY

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									Norway

NORWAY

National Report on the implementation of The United Nations Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects

Oslo, 28 April, 2009

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Norway Executive Summary

The Government of Norway holds the view that combating and eradicating illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects is fundamental to improve global, regional and national security as well as necessary social and economic development in many countries. Norway is a strong supporter of international efforts to achieve this goal, and co-operates with governments as well as Non Governmental Organisations based on the Programme of Action within multilateral, regional and bilateral frameworks. The following is a report on the policy and undertakings by the Government of Norway to implement the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects.

A.) National level
1. National coordination agency The national co-ordination agency for policy guidance, research and monitoring efforts to prevent, combat and eradicate the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons in all its aspects is: Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs Section for Humanitarian Affairs/Project for Humanitarian Disarmament P.O.Box 8114 Dep. N-0032 Oslo Norway E-mail: seksjon.for.humanitaere.sporsmal@mfa.no 2. National point of contact Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs Section for Humanitarian Affairs/Project for Humanitarian Disarmament P.O.Box 8114 Dep. N-0032 Oslo Norway E-mail: seksjon.for.humanitaere.sporsmal@mfa.no 3. Legislation, regulations, administrative procedures i) What national laws, regulations and administrative procedures exist to exercise effective control over SALW in the following areas? (II.2)    Production export import

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  transit retransfer

Note Norway has no production of weapons defined as SALW in the OSCE document: FSC.DOC/1/00 ”OSCE Document on Small Arms and Light Weapons”, but produces and exports ammunition for such weapons.

As of 4 July 2007, the Regulations relating to the implementation of control of the export of strategic goods, services and technology, laid down by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on 10 January 1989 pursuant to section 1 of the Act of 18 December 1987 relating to control of the export of strategic goods, services, technology, etc. have been amended in order to strengthen the control of arms brokering (see para 6 below). By this amendment, an element of extraterritoriality has been introduced as the new control text covers brokering activities conducted by anyone under Norwegian jurisdiction, including nationals acting abroad. Apart from this amendment, no significant changes have been introduced in
legislation or administrative measures related to Small Arms and Light Weapons since the last national report.

There is a process to review and possibly revise the regulations related to the legislation on Small Arms and Light Weapons. The review is also looking into other parts of national legislation in this regard, such as the possibility of explicitly banning certain types of weapons and ammunition, deemed to be unnecessary or exceedingly dangerous. An amnesty for the voluntary handing in of Small Arms and Light Weapons lasted from 1 September 2003 until 31 August 2004.

1.1.1 1.1.2 National Laws, Regulations and Decrees

Area:
1.2

Law/ Regulation/ Decree

1.3

Date

Production

Lov nr 1. om skytevåpen og ammunisjon m.v. 9. juni 1961 Act of 9 June 1961 relating to control of firearms and ammunition. The Firearms Act

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The Firearms Act covers most aspects of control at the overall level and provides a specific basis for penalties. With regard to production of ammunition the Act of 14 June 2002 relating to Fire and Explosion applies also. Web link: www.lovdata.no Lov nr. 93 om kontroll med eksport av strategiske 18. desember varer, tjenester og teknologi m.v. 1987 Act of 18 December 1987 relating to control of the export of strategic goods, services, technology, etc., cf. Royal Decree of 18 December 1987 No. 967. The Export Control Act Web link: www.lovdata.no Lov nr 1. om skytevåpen og ammunisjon m.v. 9. juni 1961 Act of 9 June 1961 relating to control of firearms and ammunition. The Firearms Act The Firearms Act covers most aspects of control at the overall level and provides a specific basis for penalties. With regard to ammunition the Act of 14 June 2002 relating to Fire and Explosion applies also. Web link: www.lovdata.no Lov nr. 93 om kontroll med eksport av strategiske 18. desember varer, tjenester og teknologi m.v. 1987 Act of 18 December 1987 relating to control of the export of strategic goods, services, technology, etc., cf. Royal Decree of 18 December 1987 No. 967. The Export Control Act Web link: www.lovdata.no Lov nr. 93 om kontroll med eksport av strategiske 18. desember varer, tjenester og teknologi m.v. 1987 Act of 18 December 1987 relating to control of the export of strategic goods, services, technology, etc., cf. Royal Decree of 18 December 1987 No. 967. The Export Control Act Web link: www.lovdata.no

Export

Import

Transit

Retransfer

1.3.1 1.3.2 Administrative Procedures

Area:
1.4

Administrative Procedures

1.5

In place since

Production

Legal basis for the procedure As above (… in the area of production)

N/A

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Web link Regulations relating to the implementation of 10 January control of the export of strategic goods, services 1989 and technology Regulations relating to the implementation of control of the export of strategic goods, services and technology, laid down by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on 10 January 1989 pursuant to section 1 of the Act of 18 December 1987 relating to control of the export of strategic goods, services, technology, etc. Web link: www.lovdata.no Legal basis for the procedure N/A As above (… in the area of import) Web link Regulations relating to the implementation of 10 January control of the export of strategic goods, services 1989 and technology, § 3 e Regulations relating to the implementation of control of the export of strategic goods, services and technology, § 3 e Web link: www.lovdata.no Regulations relating to the implementation of 10 January control of the export of strategic goods, services 1989 and technology Regulations relating to the implementation of control of the export of strategic goods, services and technology Web link: www.lovdata.no

Export

Import

Transit

Retransfer

ii) What national measures exist to prevent the manufacture, stockpiling, transfer and possession of unmarked or inadequately marked SALW? How have these been implemented? (II.8) The manufacture, stockpiling, and possession of SALW are covered by various sections of the Firearms Act. Manufacturers, importers and dealers must be licensed to operate legally. Private owners must obtain a license from the police authorities before acquiring a firearm. Ownership to the individual firearm is being recorded on the basis of its adequate numbering/marking. Specific penal sanctions are included in the Firearms Act. A central Firearms register was provided for by an update of the Firearms Act in 2001. The transfer (export) of SALW is covered by the Regulations of 10 January 1989 relating to the implementation of control of the export of strategic goods, services and technology. Any movement of military goods across (transit) or out of Norwegian customs area (export, re-export, retransfer) requires a license from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. There are no specific measures relating to marking in such cases.

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iii) Please describe how national laws, regulations and procedures that impact on the prevention, combating and eradication of the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects are made public. (II.23) Information on new or changed legislation is disseminated to the public through the minutes from the Council of State, which is referred in major newspapers; the publication “Legal Gazette”, and the database “Lovdata”, which are available via internet and are free of charge. 4. Law enforcement/criminalization i) What national legislative or other measures exist to make the illegal manufacture, possession, stockpiling and trade of SALW criminal offences under domestic law? How have these measures been implemented? (II.3) See Para 3 ii) above ii) Have those groups and individuals engaged in the illegal manufacture, trade, stockpiling, transfer, possession, as well as financing for acquisition, of illicit SALW been identified, where applicable? What action has been taken under appropriate national law against such groups and individuals? (II.6) The Firearms act or the penal code, dependent on circumstances, is applicable for individuals in illegal possession of SALW. iii) What national measures have been taken, including legal or administrative means, against activity that violates a United Nations Security Council arms embargo in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations? (II.15)

1.5.1 1.5.2 National measures for the enforcement of 1.5.3 UN Security Council arms embargos

Area:
1.6

Legal means

1.7

Date

Enforcement of UN arms embargoes

Lov nr. 14 om iverksetjing av internasjonale, ikkje- militære tiltak i form av avbrott eller avgrensning av økonomisk eller anna samkvem med tredjestatar eller rørsler.

27.04.2001

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Act on the implementation of international, nonmilitary measures that prevent or limit economic or other relations with third countries or movements This Act entitles the Government to make the decisions that are necessary for Norway to join international, non-military measures that prevent or limit economic or other relations with third countries or movements. Web link: http:\\ www.lovdata.no/all/hl-20010427-014.html#3

1.7.1 1.7.2 National measures for the enforcement of 1.7.3 UN Security Council arms embargos

Area:
1.8

Administrative means

1.9

In place since

Enforcement of UN arms embargoes

Short description of the procedure(s) used to prevent/punish violations Breach of decisions made on the basis of this law is punishable by fines or prison terms of up to three years. Web link: http://www.lovdata.no/all/hl20010427-014.html#3

27.04.2001

5. Stockpile management and security i) What national standards and procedures exist for the management and security of SALW stocks held by armed forces, police or other authorized bodies? (II.17) SALW stocks within the armed forces are secured, controlled and accounted for by the Norwegian Defence Forces Logistics Organisation and individual military units. Strict military regulations and procedures apply. Existing procedures and physical security are assessed regularly and improvements made accordingly. SALW stocks within the police forces are secured, controlled and accounted for by the Police Data and Materiel Service. SALW distributed to individual police districts are secured at district level.

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ii) How often are stocks of SALW held by armed forces, police and other authorized bodies reviewed? (II.18) Stocks held by the armed forces are reviewed (actual holdings counted) every 6 months. Stocks held by police authorities are updated continuously. iii) How are those stocks of SALW held by armed forces, police and other authorized bodies that are surplus to requirements identified? (II.18) Surplus stocks held by the armed forces are identified as SALW no longer required equipping active and reserve units. In principle the police do not hold surplus stocks of SALW. The number of SALW within the police forces correspond with the number of servicemen on active duty and in the reserves. 6. Collection and disposal i) Please give details of any national programmes that have been established and implemented for the responsible disposal of surplus stocks of SALW held by armed forces, police and other authorized bodies. (II.18) The armed forces manage the responsible disposal of its surplus SALW and SALW decommissioned by the police when required. ii) Is destruction the means used to dispose of such stocks? (II.18) Destruction is the means of disposal. iii) What national measures exist to safeguard such stocks prior to their disposal? (II.18) Such stocks are secured, controlled and accounted for in the same way as SALW in service, ref Para 5 i). iv) Subject to the exceptions set out in paragraph II.16 of the UN Programme of Action, are all confiscated, seized or collected SALW destroyed? (II.16) SALW that are confiscated, seized or collected will be destroyed except for a limited number that may be kept by the police centrally for training and technical purposes.

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v) What methods has your country used to destroy surplus stocks of SALW designated for destruction? (If appropriate, please make reference to the report of the UN Secretary-General (S/2000/1092) of 15 November 2000.) (II.19) The method of destruction is milling, however melting has been used on a few occasions in the past. vi) Please give details of any information on SALW confiscated or destroyed within your jurisdiction that is submitted to relevant regional and international organizations. (II.23) The Norwegian Police is linked to the National Schengen Information System (NSIS) database for stolen weapons. 7. Export controls i) Please describe the system of export and import licensing or authorization, as well as measures on international transit, used by your country for the transfer of all SALW. (II.11) Export and transit of SALW requires a licence from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (the Export Control Act and relevant Regulations). Import of SALW requires an import licence from the police.

ii) Please describe the national laws, regulations and administrative procedures used by your country to ensure effective control over the export and transit of SALW. How are these measures implemented? (II.12) The import or export of firearms, spare parts for such, and ammunition is regulated in the Firearms Act, section 23, which requires a licence by the relevant authority. Implementation details are provided in the Firearms regulation, chapter 18.

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1.9.1 1.9.2 National laws, regulations and administrative procedures used to ensure effective control over SALW export and transit

Area:
1.10 Laws / regulations / procedures 1.11 Date

Export

Lov om kontroll med eksport av strategiske varer, 18.12.1987 tjenester og teknologi m.v. av 18. desember 1987 nr. 93. Act of 18 December 1987 relating to control of the export of strategic goods, services, technology, etc., cf. Royal Decree of 18 December 1987 No. 967. The Export Control Act All military goods require an export licence from the MFA before it can be exported out of Norwegian customs area. SALW can only be licensed to governments upon documentation. Web link Lov om kontroll med eksport av strategiske varer, 18.12.1987 tjenester og teknologi m.v. av 18. desember 1987 nr. 93. Act of 18 December 1987 relating to control of the export of strategic goods, services, technology, etc., cf. Royal Decree of 18 December 1987 No. 967. The Export Control Act Transit of military goods requires a licence from the MFA, according to the Export Control Act and Regulations. www.eksportkontroll.mfa.no

Transit

iii) Does your country use authenticated end-user certificates for this purpose? (II.12) As a general rule, end user documentation in original is required. If an export is covered by the cooperation with allied or EU countries, documentation confirming the end user is required. iv) Does your country notify the original exporting State when reexporting or retransferring previously imported SALW? (II.13) Norway has no experience with such cases. However, possible exports or retransfers would only be authorized to governments on the basis of end user documentation. 8. Brokering

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i) What national legislation or administrative procedures exist to regulate the activities of those who engage in SALW brokering within national jurisdiction and control? (E.g. registration of brokers, licensing or authorization of brokering transactions and appropriate penalties) (II.14) Trading in, negotiating or otherwise assisting in the sale of military goods and technology included in List I (national munitions list; identical to the Wassenaar Arrangement’ list) from one foreign country to another is not permitted without a licence from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Corresponding provisions apply in connection with negotiations for goods included on List II (dual use list), and for appurtenant technology and services if it is known or there is reason to believe that such goods, technology or service are or may be intended, in their entirety or in part, for use in connection with the development, production, maintenance, storage, detection, identification or proliferation of nuclear, chemical or biological weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, and in connection with the development, production, maintenance or storage of missiles that can deliver such weapons. There is no registration requirement. The Export Control Act includes specific penalties. 9. Marking, record keeping and tracing a. Arms i) Does your country require licensed manufacturers of SALW to apply an appropriate and reliable marking on each weapon as an integral part of the production process? (II.7) All arms procured by the armed and the police forces have unique identification markings applied by the producers. This forms part of the production specifications. It is a general prerequisite for licensing and registration that SALW have a unique serial number. Detailed requirements on markings may be introduced by police authorities. ii) Is this marking unique? (II.7) All arms held by the armed forces and the police have unique markings. Otherwise see Para 9 i)

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iii) Does this marking identify the country of manufacture? (II.7) The marking of armed forces and police SALW consists of the producer’s unique numbering and a marking indicating Norway. The country of manufacture is not necessarily reflected. iv) How does this marking otherwise allow concerned authorities to identify and trace the relevant weapon? (II.7) The armed forces hold complete inventory lists of all weapons in its possession. This identifies the exact location of each stored weapon, or the individual holding the weapon. The police authorities maintain a similar system. See para 5 i) All SALW that require licensing and registration remain in the weapons register after being exported, decommissioned or destroyed, thereby maintaining their traceability. v) How long are records kept on the manufacture, holding and transfer of SALW under your jurisdiction? (II.9) See Para 9 iv) above vi) What national measures exist for tracing SALW held and issued by the State? (II.10) See Paras 9 ii), 9 iv) above vi) Please give details of any steps taken by your country to cooperate in tracing illicit SALW, including the strengthening of mechanisms based on the exchange of relevant information. (III.11) See Para 6 v) above b. Ammunition i) Does your country require licensed manufacturers of SALW ammunition to apply an appropriate and reliable marking on each weapon as an integral part of the production process? (II.7) Norway supports the establishment of an international system for marking all weapons and ammunition, and is ready to engage in establishing such a system. In the absence of international standards, ammunition produced in Norway for export is marked

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with a lot number, in addition to the markings that the purchaser will require. All ammunition produced for and acquired by the armed forces is marked according to certain standards. This is done as an integral part of the production process. Ammunition procured over the last few years and in the future hold/will hold text specifying the type of ammunition in the Norwegian language. ii) Is this marking unique? (II.7) All ammunition belonging to the armed forces is identifiable by its lot (batch) production number. The lot number identifies what production batch the ammunition stems from, what year the ammunition was produced and by whom. Colour coding is also applied to identify the filling of the ammunition if any, and its main characteristics, e. g. armour piercing, incendiary, high explosive etc iii) Does this marking identify the country of manufacture? (II.7) Not directly, although it does carry an abbreviation indicating the producer. iv) How does this marking otherwise allow concerned authorities to identify and trace the relevant ammunition? (II.7) No other identification is available. The MFA holds a list of relevant producers identified by the lot number. The producers are required to keep lists of which retailers/customers/states received ammunition from which lot number. v) How long are records kept on the manufacture, holding and transfer of SALW ammunition under your jurisdiction? (II.9) Export records are kept for ten years. vi) What national measures exist for tracing SALW ammunition held and issued by the State? (II.10) Routines consistent with NATO standards are established for procurement and stockpile management throughout the lifecycle of ammunition used by the armed forces and the police. vii) Please give details of any steps taken by your country to cooperate in tracing illicit SALW ammunition, including the strengthening of mechanisms based on the exchange of relevant information. (III.11)

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Norway participates in the Schengen Information System, and uses that system regularly to trace SALW. 10. Disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) i) Please describe any disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) programmes your country has developed and implemented, including the effective collection, control, storage and destruction of SALW. (II.21) Norway has not developed any DDR programmes. ii) Please describe how your country has addressed the special needs of children affected by armed conflict, in particular the reunification with their family, their reintegration into civil society, and their appropriate rehabilitation. (II.22) A national policy document entitled “The Strategic Framework for Peace building” was launched in August 2004, and addresses security aspects as well as political and economic development related to efforts to build and support peace. This framework constitutes the basis for Norway’s global support to peace processes, and places great emphasis on the plight of children in connection with war and conflict. The need for special programmes for (former) child soldiers in connection with DDR processes is highlighted. iii) Please describe any DDR programmes or activities that your country has supported. (II.30, 34) Norway has supported a range of DDR programmes and related activities in many post-conflict situations, for example through contributions to UNICEF's programme for demobilisation of child soldiers in DR Congo; and various contributions to UNDP's Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery (BCPR). 11. Awareness-raising i) Please describe any public awareness and confidence-building programmes on the problems and consequences of the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects that your country has developed and implemented (including the public destruction of surplus weapons and the voluntary surrender of SALW). (II.20) Norway has not developed any public awareness or confidencebuilding programmes.

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ii) Please describe any education and public awareness programmes on the problems of the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects that your country has encouraged. (II.41) Norway supports inter alia the UNDP/UNDDA/UNIDIR project “Capacity Development for Reporting to the UN Programme of Action against the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons”; Viva Rio´s efforts to mobilise the public against armed violence; the Quaker United Nations Office´s project “Focusing on the Small Arms Demand Agenda”, International Alert, Safer world an University of Bradford´s project “Biting the Bullet”. In addition, Norway supports several research and awareness-raising efforts carried out by inter alia the Small Arms Survey, the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue, UNIDIR, IANSA, and the NISAT projects.

B.) Regional level
1. Legally binding instruments i) Has your country been involved in negotiations for the conclusion of legally binding instruments aimed at preventing, combating and eradicating the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects? (II.25) Norway has participated in the elaboration of the OSCE´s Document on Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW), which sets concrete norms, principles and measures for participating States on the SALW issue, including information exchange on the export and import of weapons. Norway also took part in efforts to establish the Principles on the control of brokering in SALW; the Handbook on SALW (consisting of a range of best practice guides); Principles on MANPADS; and Standard Elements of End-User Certificates. ii) Where such instruments exist, please describe the steps your country has taken to ratify and fully implement them. (II.25) OSCE standards are routinely taken into account when procedures are revised; and lessons from OSCE best practices are drawn on in the continuous application of existing standards and procedures. 2. Moratoria and action programmes i) Please give details of any support your country has given moratoria or similar initiatives on the transfer and manufacture of SALW, and/or regional action programmes to prevent, combat and eradicate the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects (including cooperation with States

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concerned in the implementation of these initiatives). (II.26) Norway has supported the ECOWAS moratorium, and has pledged to support the new ECOWAS Small Arms Convention through contributions to ECOSAP. In addition, Norway finances the Norwegian Initiative on Small Arms Transfers, which is implemented by the Peace Research Institute, the Norwegian Red Cross, and Norwegian Church Aid. 3. Regional Cooperation i) Please describe any involvement your country has had in the establishment of sub regional or regional mechanisms with a view to preventing, combating and eradicating the illicit trade in SALW across borders (in particular trans-border customs cooperation and networks for information-sharing among law enforcement, border and customs control agencies). (II.27) Norway has supported efforts to establish the SADC Firearms Protocol and the OSCE´s instruments; and has supported efforts to implement the ECOWAS moratorium and the Nairobi Protocol. ii) Please describe any initiatives your country has undertaken to encourage regional and sub regional action on illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects in order to, as appropriate, introduce, adhere, implement or strengthen relevant laws, regulations and administrative procedures. (II.28) See Para 3 i) above

C.) Global level
1. International instruments against terrorism and crime i) What existing international legal instruments against terrorism and transnational organized crime has your country ratified or acceded to? (II.38) Norway participated in the negotiations that led to the UN Firearms Protocol, and the International Instrument on Marking and Tracing of Small Arms and Light Weapons, and argued in favour of making both instruments legally binding. Norway ratified the UN Firearms Protocol on 23 September 2003. In addition, Norway supports and promotes efforts to start negotiations on a legally binding international instrument against illicit brokering in small arms and light weapons; and on a legally binding

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international treaty on the trade in conventional weapons (Arms Trade Treaty – ATT). Norway has ratified all UN conventions that are considered of relevance for the fight against terrorism, and has integrated all recommendations from the UN Counter-Terrorism Committee into national legislation. 2. International cooperation and assistance i) Please give details of any assistance, including technical and financial assistance, your country has provided for purposes of supporting the implementation of the measures to prevent, combat and eradicate the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects as contained in the UN Programme of Action. (III.3, 6, 10, 14) Norway has supported, and continues to support a number of projects, including: IANSA SALW activities RECSA/the Nairobi Protocol small arms regional activities Saferworld regional SALW activities in South Asia and Nepal PRIO/Norwegian Initiative on Small Arms Transfers OSCE: Stockpile management in Tajikistan Viva Rio’s SALW work in Latin America UNODA/CAB Trust Fund (SALW) South Eastern and Eastern Europe Clearinghouse for the control of Small Arms and Light Weapons, capacity-building project in Western Balkan Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue: Negotiating Disarmament International Alert/Saferworld/Bradford University: Biting the Bullet, Institute for Security Studies: Arms Management Programme, Safer Africa: Various dialogue and capacity building projects Small Arms Survey: Core funding and various studies Quaker United Nations Office: Focusing on the Small Arms Demand Agenda The list is indicative, not exhaustive. It gives an indication about the range of activities and partners supported by Norway. ii) Please describe any initiatives your country has undertaken to enhance mutual legal assistance and other forms of cooperation in order to assist investigations and prosecutions in relation to the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects. (III.13) See Para 2 i) above
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iii) Please give details of any assistance your country has provided to combat the illicit trade in SALW linked to drug trafficking, transnational organized crime and terrorism. (III.15) See Para 2 i) above iv) Please give details of your country's cooperation with Interpol for the purpose of identifying those groups and individuals engaged in the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects. (II.37) Norwegian police cooperate closely with Interpol. The Interpol channel is central to identifying groups and individuals involved. The system is being used regularly in actual cases. v) Please give details of your country's use and support of Interpol’s International Weapons and Explosives Tracking System database (including providing relevant information on the illicit trade in SALW). (III.9) Norway has not had the opportunity to use this database so far, but expect it to become useful in the future. vi) Please give details of your country's cooperation with the UN system to ensure the effective implementation of arms embargoes decided by the UN Security Council in accordance with the UN Charter. (II.32) Arms embargoes are implemented immediately, as Norwegian legislation that entitles the King to make the decisions that are necessary for Norway to join international, non-military measures that prevent or limit economic or other relations with third countries or movements is already in place. vii) Please describe any steps your country has taken in cooperation with other states, or regional or international organizations, to develop common understandings of the basic issues and the scope of the problems related to illicit brokering in SALW. (II.39) Norway, together with the Netherlands, took the initiative to highlight the need for more effective international cooperation in addressing the question of brokering of small arms and light weapons (The Dutch-Norwegian Initiative). A special conference on the subject was organized in Oslo 23-24 April 2003, which has formed the basis for several initiatives to highlight the need for international cooperation on illicit brokering. Norway has argued in favour of negotiating an international instrument against illicit brokering in SALW, and participated in the UN Group of
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Governmental Experts which was convened in 2006 and finalized its report to the UN SG in 2007. Norway participated in the elaboration of the 2004 OSCE Principles on the Control of Brokering in Small Arms and Light Weapons 3. Cooperation with civil society and NGOs i) Please give details of cooperation with civil society and nongovernmental organizations in activities related to the prevention, combat and eradication of the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects, at the national, regional and global levels. (II.20, 40, 41; III.2, 18) In addition to the contribution to the efforts of civil society organisations to fight the illicite spread of SALW, Norway supports enhanced participation from civil society in fora where such issues are discussed, including meetings under the UN Programme of Action, and the UNGA First Committee. On the national level, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs maintains close contact with the civil society that have articulated an interest in the SALW issue. 4. Information exchange i) Please describe any steps taken by your country to exchange information on national marking systems on SALW. (III.12) Noway has submitted the required information on Armed Forces markings in accordance with the OSCE Document on SALW. ii) Please give details of any information on, inter alia, SALW confiscated or destroyed within national jurisdiction, or other relevant information such as illicit trade routes and techniques of acquisition, that your country has submitted to relevant regional and international organizations. (II.23) 5. Training, capacity-building, research i) Please describe any initiatives your country has undertaken to enhance cooperation and exchange of experience and training among competent officials, including customs, police, intelligence and arms control officials, at the national, regional and global levels in order to combat the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects. (III.7) Norway has seconded the head of the OSCE project for stockpile management in Tajikistan, and provided financial support to the project, which has been successfully finalized.
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ii) Please describe any regional and international programmes for specialist training on small arms stockpile management and security that your country has developed or supported. (III.8) See Para 5 i) above iii) Please give details of any action-oriented research aimed at facilitating greater awareness and better understanding of the nature and scope of the problems associated with the illicit trade in SALW in all its aspects that your country has developed or supported. (III.18) (The following list is not exhaustive.) Small Arms Survey/UNDDA/UNIDIR: Study on the scope and implications of developing a mechanism to prevent the illicit brokering in small arms. Small Arms Survey: Studies on, inter alia, brokering and transport; and SALW in Central Asia UNIDIR: Studies on, inter alia, SALW in Western Africa NISAT: Various studies Other reasearch institutions: Various studies on SALW issues

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