Lice Outbreak_ Rising Waters

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					DA KA R

A C A D E MY

The Stapled Papers
OCTOBER 2005

Lice Outbreak!
By Jenn Requadt Lice! There has not been an outbreak like this at DA since the pink eye crisis of 2003. According to Judy Schultz, high school dorm mom, over seventyfive students were required to leave school as a direct result of lice on September 26. The bugs were first discovered in one of the dorms. After many unsuccessful weeks of trying to contain and annihilate the pests, the problem grew out of hand and spread throughout the DA community. The administration decided to take action, and requested the dorm moms and dads and other volunteers to check each student’s head for nits (the eggs of lice). For two days these relentless workers combed through the scalps of the members of Dakar Academy. Even if only one nit is found Photo by Jenn Requadt in a person’s hair, the student is required to go home, treat themselves with lice shampoo, and remove all nits. A student is only allowed to come back to school eight to ten hours after the treatment and being rechecked by the volunteers. Some students were overjoyed to miss school, while others were extremely irritated. Freshman Melinda Sessoms said, “I was pretty ticked to have to leave, because I hate Juniors Holly Bastow and missing school.” Cheralyn McKee commemorate A week later, on DA’s infestation with lice nits by October 6, a second designing a t-shirt. complete check was done. This time only 22 students had will be October 14. Please do nits. your part to make sure that the The next all-school check next time DA has a lice check, you will be nit free.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

School Begins New Staff New President Movie Night Fall Play Cast World News Media Critic

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Rising Waters
By Emily Nuss Residents of Cite Bellevue, a neighborhood to the northwest of Dakar Academy, were forced to evacuate their homes due to a flash-flood caused by heavy rain in the Dakar area on Saturday afternoon, August 20. Cite Bellevue is surrounded by a security wall on all sides except for the one road leading in. Following three days of heavy rain, a sewage pipe in Grande Yoff burst and flooded the Auto Route. The culmination of all this water broke through the barrier wall. About 3:00 p.m., residents heard a large “whumph,” the sound of the wall breaking. Water started spilling into the neighborhood. At first, people began piling valuables on tables and cabinets; some were able to haul important items upstairs. However, no one was completely prepared for the final amount of water and the destruction it would bring. By 5:00 p.m., families knew they needed to evacuate. Not only had the water level risen above a meter, but the water was contaminated by sewage. It was a health hazard to stay behind. Most people were able to walk out of their homes carrying valuables above their heads or in plastic containers. Parents hoisted young children up on their shoulders. From the Korean dorm, five kids were rescued by floating them out in trash cans. Around midnight, firemen rescued those who had been stranded in their homes. Eight families in the DA community were affected: • Lou and Deb Aisenbrey and their son Daniel; the Continued on page 2

Advice Column 12 Sports Calendar 14 18

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Rising Waters (continued)
Photo by Deb Aisenbrey

Some of the girls living in the Korean Dorm were floated out in tubs and trash cans, for lack of better floatation device, after the water level had risen over their heads. Continued from page 1 Aisenbreys are with SIL and Deb Aisenbrey is DA’s music teacher and guidance counselor • Dalenna Herren; She is a missionary with the Nazareen Mission and recently arrived in Dakar this summer. • Bruce and Michele Evans, Paul and Leah; Bruce Evans is the Director of Dakar Academy • Bill and Becky Erickson, Nathan; Ericksons are with United World Mission and teach science, math, and French at DA. • Robert and Terri Harmon, Katy, Rachel, Ellie, and Seth; Harmons are with New Tribes Mission and Terri teaches 4th grade at DA. • Keith and Deb Kanaval, Kara and Colin; Kanavals serve with Mission to the World. • Korean Dorm with David and Abigail Jun and five elementary students: Yea Won Lee, Ha Won Koo,Yea Lim Lee, Ye Weon Lim, and Ha Rim Koo. • Guy and Jane Penney, Sarah, Laura, and Josh; the Penneys
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are in Dakar with Pentecos- willing to assist in every way possible so it was only up to tal Assemblies of Canada the flood-victims to ask. (PAOC), Mr. Penney is a The city’s fire department former DA teacher and and security personnel have chaplain. Mrs. Penney is also been helping in CBV. The a former teacher. firemen have mostly assisted in Initially, most residents from Cite Bellevue (CBV) were evacuating people and taking belongings out. The gendarmes taken in by other friends and have been active in keeping the family in the community. Since then, some have been staying in houses from being looted. All people entering the neighborguesthouses and temporary hood have had to give their apartments. names, reason for coming, and From the first reports that the neighborhood had house numbers in order to flooded until now, people have establish credibility. Also from the city, there have been been reaching out to these volunteers willing to come and families in countless ways. clean the area, but once again, Initially, many people generously opened their homes to rain continues to hinder their plans. the evacuees. Fourth grade Due to continuing rain teacher, Terri Harmon, was storms, the water has not been grateful to one of her able drain away or dry up. student’s mothers who provided lunches for herself Pumping began on the Sunday following the first flood, but and her four children for a has been a slow process. The week after the flood. Others pipes are small and there are helped displaced families by few places in the area which having them over for supper, offering the use of their are not already saturated to pump the water to. As a help, washing machines, or setting aside cardboard boxes. People water is being pumped into five also helped by volunteering to septic trucks to be taken to the ocean. go rescue possessions. For the most part, people were Continued on page 3

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Rising Waters (continued)
Continued from page 2 Since the initial flood, the water level has risen again and exceeded its first crest. It has now flooded four times. At the beginning, families like the Kanavals and Ericksons were relatively unaffected because their houses were slightly above water level. However, since then, everybody in the neighborhood has been forced to leave because the water level has risen and there is no electrical service to the neighborhood. Initially, there was hope that the houses could be cleaned, fixed, and made livable again. Several of the home owners are committed to the restoration of the neighborhood. Even so, final decisions cannot be made until flood water subsides. Currently, displaced families are in the process of looking for alternate places to live and moving into new homes. Electricity and water to CBV were cut that first evening: electricity, because water has destroyed wiring; and water, because the ground is saturated. As of yet, neither have been restored. The area is becoming a serious health hazard. Dark, stagnant sewage water with floating debris has permeated everything. It is necessary to wear plastic boots and gloves to avoid getting worms such as feline and canine hook worms. Authorities have been spraying the general area for cholera and typhoid. They were also finally able to spray the houses themselves for disease. Water is perhaps the most destructive element. “It looks like a war zone,” said Harmon. Structurally, there are now cracks in house walls. Some other exterior walls have fallen. In the houses, furniture tipped on its sides, dumping their contents into the broth of house-soup. Several days after the initial flood, some people carted junk into a center area called the triangle to be hauled away. Unfortunately, with the next rain and re-flooding, these items were floating around as well. Historically, the area where the neighborhood now stands has been known to be low and swampy. Cite Bellevue, Grand Yoff, and Hann Park are the three areas in this part of town for waterdrainage. When the land for Cite Bellevue was sold and the houses built, owners were advised by those in the community not to build on the land. Senegal, especially Dakar, has been in a period of drought for the past twenty to thirty years. According to Mr. Badji, high school French teacher, heavy rainfall was typical for this region until around 1975. Since then, rainfall has been less plentiful. Neighborhoods like Cite Bellevue that may have been considered swampland twenty years ago, have seemed acceptable places for construction in recent years. A description of the destruction caused by this flood cannot be adequately put into words. For the families affected, it was not merely a loss of possessions, but a loss of their home and security. Mrs. Deb Aisenbrey attempts to salvage items from her home after the water receded the first time. Photo by Daniel Aisenbrey

By Bill Amend www.foxtrot.com

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Launch Into a New Year!
By Emily Nuss The 2005-2006 academic year at Dakar Academy started Tuesday, August 16, as students gathered on campus. For most students, not much has changed at DA. Another year older and a little more grass on the field. Some are quite excited about the new year. Freshman Sam Owusu-Baafi said, “So lush! I feel like a big dog!” when asked how he felt about entering high school. Many things about the year are typical and predictable. For example, the sixth grade boys think, “The girls are really ornery.” And, of course, the homework load has increased. In general, students feel the year is off to a good start. They have been impressed with the emphasis on greater unity. This theme was stressed with the slogan Go for the Gusto in the first middle school/high school chapel. Several have expressed their hope for stronger unity within the DA community as well. There are nearly 250 students enrolled at DA, a 20 percent increase from last year’s number. In fact, this year’s enrollment is the highest it has ever been. An outstanding thirty percent of those are new students or students returning from home assignment. More students will be returning second semester, causing enrollment to rise even higher. A total of five new classes have been added to the high school schedule this year. Three of them are electives that are being offered on a rotating basis, alternating with choir during fourth period. The three elective classes are Life Skills, Creative Writing, and Odyssey of the Mind. The two other new classes are Advanced Placement courses: Chemistry and World History. Study Skills has been added to the middle school schedule, with Mr. Ken Vaughan teaching it. The Bradburys, a new couple who will be filling in the roles of librarian and computer technician, arrived September 16. Also, Cathy Lukon, the new third grade teacher, arrived a few weeks after school started. It has been a challenge to start the year short on staff, and it will continue to be a challenge for a while as new members learn the ropes. The Parent Teacher Organization that was reformed last spring is now fully up and running. They are busy sending out parent surveys and putting together new programs. An idea that was brought to the committee at the end of last year was restarting King’s Kids, a weekly Bible club. Several high school students are interested in helping. The program for middle school youth group has been completely remodeled this year. Most of the games have been replaced, and the leaders are hoping to incorporate a greater spiritual focus. The adult leaders are Keith Ellenberger, Dan Mullay, Ken Vaughan, and Sarah Walker. Middle school students are pleased with the changes. Ben Bowers said, “There is actually a service now. And I think that it is a good change.” Last year, middle school youth group met on Wednesday afternoons, now they meet in the evening. Johanna Lowe prefers it at night. She says, “It’s easier to get homework done.” School has started, have you started with it? Don’t get left behind: go for the Gusto!

“ School has started, have you started with it? ”

October 24-28, 2005
Traditional Food Fashion Show Music Wrestling

COME LEARN ABOUT AND EXPERIENCE SENEGALESE CULTURE
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Photos by Daniel Aisenbrey and Ashley Herriott By Ashley Herriott The 2005 school year has begun and with ten new staff joining us, while three return from stateside.

DA Initiates New Staff
ships and have an impact on the students. She would also like to learn French.

Terri Ann Harmon
4th Grade Teacher

Elementary
Cori Ladd
1st Grade Student Teacher

Cori Ladd is the 1st grade student teacher. Ladd is from Sacramento, California. She is in her senior year at Wheaton College. She will be helping here until November. She enjoys playing lacrosse. This is her first time overseas and her first impression was the diversity within the school. Her goal for her time here is to learn to teach and how to deal with the cultural differences.

Cathy Lukon
3rd Grade Teacher Cathy Lukon is the new 3rd grade teacher at Dakar Academy. She is from Tucson, Arizona and has been there off and on for the past ten years. She previously worked with Campus Crusade in Florida and with office management. This is her first time living overseas; however, she has been on several short mission trips. Lukon enjoys birding, reading, writing, golfing, and bowling. She is a lifetime member of the 600 club (a combination of scores for three games). When Lukon first arrived to Dakar Academy she noticed that the power was off. However, she loves the students and thinks they are great. Lukon’s hope for the year is to have strong friend-

Terri Ann Harmon is the new 4th grade teacher. She has spent seven years in Senegal with New Tribes Mission as a field educational coordinator and home school consultant. However, she calls Michigan home. She has four kids attending Dakar Academy: Kate (7th), Rachel (5th), Ellie (3rd), and Seth (1st). Mrs. Harmon loves DA. She enjoys the carnivals, movie nights, and any other fun activities. When asked about her personal hobbies, she replied, “Who has time for hobbies?” Her hope for the year, though, is to stay dry and have fun with the fourth graders. The Harmons were living in Cite Bellevue and hope to be moving to an apartment in the area soon.

lived in New Zealand and Mexico. She also learned Arabic on a volunteer mission trip in Morocco. Aune loves being outdoors, doing water sports, hiking, kayaking, and running. She also enjoys reading and movies, but she hates sad endings. Aune also enjoys dancing. Her favorites are the salsa, swing, and jitterbug. When she first arrived at DA, she thought the layout of the campus was confusing. Her hope for the year is to become a better teacher, learn more about the Senegalese culture, and speak Wolof. She often says, “I know five languages, but I can only speak one on a good day.”

Middle/High School
Eryn Austin
Bible Teacher

Kennetta Aune
5th Grade Teacher

Kennetta Aune is teaching 5th grade this year. She calls Bozemen, Montana home. Before coming to DA, she taught ESL and French and

Eryn Austin is teaching Bible 7, 8, and 12 at DA. She was born in New Orleans, has lived in the Gambia and North Carolina, but calls New York home. Austin attended DA for seven years as a student while her parents were working in the Gambia. She calls Africa the home of her childhood. While attending Houghton College, she studied in England for a year and spent a summer in Tanzania. She enjoys swimming, the beach, and hanging out with friends. Austin’s first impression of DA as a teacher is that it is more work to be a teacher than to be a student. Her hope for the year is to successfully communicate to students so they will grasp their true identity in Christ. Continued on page 6

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New Staff (continued)
Continued from page 5

Boarding Homes
Bill and Nancy McComb
On-Campus Boys Boarding Home Parents

Administration and Student Support
Darl Powell
Maintenance Director

Paul Bradbury
Computer Technician

Paula Bradbury
Librarian Bill and Nancy McComb are the high school boarding home parents for the on campus boys’ dorm. They were here two years as boarding home parents for off-campus high school girls, but returned to ICA last year. After being evacuated, they spent the remaining of the year in Denver, Colorado. During that time, they traveled 22,000 miles between December and June. They have four boys: J.J. (4th grade), Ian (2nd grade) , Brian, and Brady (Kindergarten). They are originally from Arizona. Aunt Nancy loves to bike ride and Uncle Bill enjoys woodworking and sports. They both like being on campus this year because there is a bigger backyard for their boys. Their goal this year is to demonstrate their vision statement: To know Christ personally, intimately, and faithfully. Their goal with their boarding home boys is to be a family. Aunt Nancy says she is glad to be home.

Jill Powell
Cashier/Office Assistant

Darl Powell is the maintenance supervisor for Dakar Academy and his wife, Aunt Jill Powell, is working in the business and front offices. They are from Cincinnati, Ohio. For the past ten years, they have lived in France, Ivory Coast, and Senegal.Their son, Travis, attended DA three years ago, and they are glad to be back. They both enjoyed DA when they were here before. Aunt Jill enjoys painting, decorating, swimming, taboe, and running. Mr. Powell likes working with buildings and deer hunting. Previously, Mr. Powell did construction and Aunt Jill worked at retail store. Their hope for the year is to get to know the students, and Mr. Powell would also like to get the shop organized.

Paul and Paula Bradbury are from St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. They both arrived on September 16th, after school had started. Paul is the computer technician and Paula is the librarian. Paul previously was working with the Software Computer Technical Support and Paula worked at a Christian bookstore. This is their first time overseas as missionaries. Their relatives, the Penneys and the Radfords helped lead them to missions. Paul and Paula have three kids: Sheila (11th grade), Allan (8th grade), and Eryn (5th grade). Paul enjoys sports and reading. Paula first noticed the positive attitude at DA and she hopes to get to know people and learn French. Paul would like to satisfy everyone’s expectations and hopes his children will be happy. Continued on page 7

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Belle Isle Wins Senate Election
Photo by Daniel Aisenbrey juniors and seniors to sign up and declare their candidacy for Student Senate President was Friday, September 9, 2005. Ryan Kim was the only student confident enough to sign up initially. Due to the lack of candidates, Miss Sarah Walker, sponsor and organizer of the student senate, extended the date to the following Monday. Four Andrew Belle Isle was elected Student more candidates Senate President by the high school in declared themelections on September 9. selves before this second deadline: seniors Andrew Belle Isle, Kate By Lauran Reed Louw, and Melissa Carvalho, “Close your eyes and and junior Sarah Herriott. picture this… a field of green The five candidates grass, a pool of cool water, and delivered their campaign water fountains that actually speeches to the high school work.” This was the opening student body during lunch sentence of student senate Thursday, September 15. They presidential candidate Ryan each said they wanted the Kim’s campaign speech. senate to have a more active However, he later went on to say that he would not promise role in campus life. All five were these things because they were qualified for various reasons. Some have been here since impossible to achieve. elementary; others have The first deadline for experienced various school situations. They represented both day and dorm students and individually each expressed their desire for unity in the school. The votes were cast and then counted the next day at lunch. But it was not until seventh period that the new Student Senate President was announced. Andrew Belle Isle won the election and will replace the former Student Senate President Emily Mahoney. In his speech he explained that the student senate is here to represent the student body. He is going to work on the senate having a more active role in our school. As for the rest of the members of the student senate, these were decided upon in class meetings. Each high school class elected two representatives. On October 3, the officers were voted upon. Melissa Carvalho is the vice president, Ryan Kim is the treasurer, and Michael Cortimilia is the secretary. Now that each class has their representatives in place and the senate is organized, the student senate body of 20052006 will begin its work.

Student Senate Representatives
Seniors: Melissa Carvalho Ryan Kim Juniors: Sarah Herriott Ben Porch Sophomores: Sarah Penney Michael Cortimilia Freshmen: Kerrianne Ibsen Jimmy Stewart

New Staff (continued)
Buck the Rhodesian Ridgeback
Guard Dog-in-training Buck is the new guardian at Dakar Academy. He enjoys being with kids and having fun. He is often seen wandering the campus. Buck is a Rhodesian Ridgeback and his goal for the year is to be the best guard dog around. Dakar Academy during the waiting process. Matt Statler is the elementary physical education teacher until the middle of October. Mrs. Campbell helped out in the library until Mrs. Bradbury arrived was able and fulfill her duties. And Mrs. Louw substituted for 3rd grade until Ms. Lukon arrived. Although not a new face,high school math teacher Lois Clark has returned after a year in the states.

Other New Faces
Not all the new staff were able to arrive by the beginning of school, so there were several substitutes that aided

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Senior Class Brings Hollywood to DA
Photo by Kyle Ibsen By Jenn Requadt Lights, camera, action! After grueling hours of cranking ice cream, setting up chairs, moving a heavy oven, and transporting food, the senior class was ready on September 22 to serve food at their first fundraiser of the year: Movie Night. The movies shown were The Pacifier and Sahara. Both movies went over well, even though a large portion of the audience had previously viewed The Pacifier. Sahara, on the other hand, was new to almost everyone, and in general, the crowd was pleased. In The Pacifier,Vin Diesel stars as Navy SEAL Shane Wolfe who, as an elite member of the world’s fiercest and most highly trained force, thought he was prepared to take on any duty no matter how perilous... until he tried baby-sitting. Assigned to protect the five out-of-control children of an assassinated scientist working on vital government secrets, Shane is suddenly faced with juggling two outrageously incompatible jobs: fighting the bad guys while keeping house. Replacing his usual arsenal of wetsuits and weapons with diapers and juice boxes, Shane not only must battle a deceptive enemy but wrangle teen rebel Zoe (Brittany Snow), sullen 14-yearold Seth (Max Theriot), 8-yearold Ninja-wanna-be Lulu (Morgan York), as well as 3 Seniors Fatenne Fournier and Jenny Sessoms pause to read a customer’s meal ticket before filling their order as they serve food. year-old Peter and baby Tyler not to mention their off-beat Romanian Nanny (Carol Kane) (neoseeker.com). Sahara is based on a Clive Cussler bestseller. This modern action-adventure is the story of NUMA agent (National Underwater Marine Agency) and master explorer, Dirk Pitt (Matthew McConaughey) and the people he comes in contact with, Eva Rojas and Al Giordino (Penelope Cruz and Steve Zahn), who discover that thousands of people in North Africa are dying. Eventually they find that something is polluting the water. If unchecked, the entire world population could be threatened. Meanwhile, Pitt is personally looking for a specific civil war battleship. It is on his quest for saving the North Africans’ health that he discovers clues about the aforementioned battleship. 98% of high school girls surveyed enjoyed having McConaughey, Zahn, and Diesel over for the Movie Night. The seniors worked diligently on food prep both the Saturday before Movie Night, and the afternoon of the event. According to Judy Schultz, high school girls’ dorm mom, “The nachos were good, but the blizzards could have been bigger.” The general consensus regarding the food was it was delicious. However, the blizzards and hot dogs were small, and the blizzards melted too quickly. The senior class apologizes for the unavoidably warm weather that melted the ice cream. The sloppy joes seemed to be an acceptable replacement for the hamburgers that have typically been seen at previous movie nights. Eryn Austin, Bible teacher, said, “I prefer it outside to doing it in the auditorium like we did when I was a student here.” She thought the mosquito candles were a good idea and sophomore Daniel Crickmore thought the flytraps above the food were cool. The senior class did their best to take care of the pests, and, while the problem was not entirely solved, it seemed to be lessened. The method of how to take care of the flies that the seniors used was brought back from the United States with senior class sponsor, Tim Mahoney. When a clear plastic bag of water is placed in front of a light, the water breaks up the light. To a fly, the broken light appears to be a spider’s web, and the insect stays away. So the seniors dangled about Continued on page 9
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“Fabulous service! The seniors appeared to be hardworking and organized,” Eyrn Austin.

Elementary students Harim Koo,Yea Won Lee, and Yea Lim Lee enjoy supper while waiting for the movies to start.

Photo by Sarah Herriott

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DA to be Surprised by DA Actors
few doubt her ability to pull off another success. Aisenbrey herself indicated that the play would be somewhat of a change from the string of comedies which have been performed in recent years. “I have decided to produce a more serious play than the ones we’ve had in the past few years.” Aisenbrey went on to say that the play will be somewhat easier to direct without precision-oriented comedy scenes, but “…the challenge in this play will be to make the courtroom scenes interesting for the audience.” Aisenbrey also commented that she was “pleasantly surprised to get enough guys to play the roles needed.” In addition, Aisenbrey confirmed the rumors of a surprise ending to the play when she commented, “We didn’t hand out the Third Act scripts until after the auditions.” While the cast and crew for the play are optimistic, there are some skeptics of the play who have voiced their opinions. Junior Eric Debrah said, “When I heard this play wasn’t going to be a comedy, I was quite fached.” Junior Taylor Dearman was no more thrilled than Debrah, “I am not looking forward to the play… we always have a play. Let’s, like, be untraditional this year.” With such responses to the play, many are questioning whether it will be worth the time and effort to produce. However, even with the dissidents found in and around the Dakar Academy community, there is still a murmur of excitement and anticipation as the fall play approaches. Freshman Ben Nuss said, “Yeah, I’m looking forward to [the play]. Normally, Mrs. Aisenbrey’s plays are really good.” Nuss is not alone. With feedback very similar to this coming from students of all different age groups, it is clear that strong support for the play is developing, and it is for these fans that the cast and crew are performing. So is the play worth it? Aside from those few who are not pleased about the release of Witness for the Prosecution, the play has garnered some real support. Another point which should be considered is the fact that plays are not necessarily geared towards the enjoyment of the audience. While an audience is appreciated, most directors would argue that the purpose of a play in general is to be an experience for the cast and crew. Of course, those who show little interest in the play won’t attend, and even lacking these people, it is beginning to appear as if the auditorium will be nearly full on the nights of November 2 and 3. In summary, the Witness for the Prosecution is in fact acquiring the support needed to get the play produced. Whether or not there are those who do not support the play, the cast and crew are showing excitement, and this will most likely be enough to draw play supporters to the DA Campus in November.

By BJ Bellamy With the start to a new year at Dakar Academy, students are already anticipating the annual fall play Witness for the Prosecution, which is due out in November, and which is growing in popularity among students. The play is rumored to be more sober than other pieces produced by Dakar Academy in recent years and is said to contain a surprise ending. As lead actor Eric Ketcham put it, “This play is more serious and suspense-oriented.” Ketcham continued, “I think it will be a good play if it’s done right, and if the ending stays a secret.” He also told The Stapled Papers that, “I feel my part will broaden the spectrum of my acting.” Play director Deb Aisenbrey has directed numerous plays over the course of her career at DA. With productions such as The Clumsy Custard Show and The Curious Savage on her resumé,

Leonard Vole ............... Eric Ketcham Sir Wilfred ........ Daniel Crickmore Romain Vole ............... Anna Leeger Madame Myers .......... Katie Roper Greta ........................... Jenn Requadt Miss Carter ............. Janelle Waynes Judge ................................ Kate Louw Mr. Mayhew ................ Jon Belle Isle Inspector Hearne .. Trevor Creech Jury ............................... Kirstin Louw .................................... Sasha Roper Foreman ....................... Ben Bowers Janet MacKenzie .... Jessica Howell Court Clerk ........... Amanda Whest Margaret Clegg ............... Grace Lee

Movie Night (continued)
Continued from page 8 fifteen bags of water from the rafters of the shelter. By the end of the evening, the strings holding the bags were covered with flies. While this was not the expected outcome, it still put a stop to the fly problem. The seniors put in a hard day and night of work in order to make the event a success. Jenn Requadt, the senior class president ,was incredibly impressed with the hard work her peers put into their first event. She believes it to be promising. She is sure that at this rate they will make enough money to pay for their Senior Sneak to Aldiana at the end of the year. Schultz described the seniors as, “Highly organized ahead of time and efficient.” Austin praised them, saying, “Fabulous service! The seniors appeared to be hard-working and organized.” Freshman Brett Amstutz wanted the seniors to know, “I think you guys did an excellent job!” Now, the question is, can they do it again at Harvest Fest?

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This Month in the World
By Kyle Ibsen This month we commemorate the fourth anniversary of 9/11, and the world’s situation continues to decline. Just since the beginning of this school year, there have been world wide catastrophes that have shaken it to its roots. Events such as hurricane Katrina and the famine in Niger have caused countless numbers of people to lose their homes and their loved ones. Rita’s winds topped those of Katrina’s, making her a category 5. Many flew from Texas and Louisiana hoping to get away before this monster storm hit. Fortunately Rita dwindled down before making landfall, and caused very little damage. Niger. Therefore all of the money and food comes through them, and the WFP. All of the other NGOs then have to have meetings with these two organizations to discuss how much of the resources will be allotted to each them. Naturally disputes arise. Each one wants more than the other, and wants to be the one doing the most to help. Samaritan’s Purse project manager, Charles Ibsen, sums it up well when he says, “What I don’t like is the dealing with UNICEF and the WFP, and all the emails asking for reports and food requests and all that. There’s so much politics involved in what’s going on here that it’s a wonder than anything actually gets done.” Then much of the money that is donated goes into the pockets of some of these organization’s workers. While they are working in Niger, any of the worker’s expenses are paid for. This includes plush housing, vehicles, computers, communication, house help, cooks, etc. Because of the large sums of money spent on housing, the prices for rent for the ex-pats have gone up greatly. Also any national workers employed are paid much more than the average government salary. All of this causes a kind of fake economy. When the NGOs leave, there will be a decline in the economy because of these factors. What is the solution, and why has no one realized this crisis until now? I leave that for you, the readers, to decide. Where does the DA community fit in to all of this? Well we live in this world, and we see the effects of some of these things daily. We can learn from the experiences of others to keep ourselves safe, and to help us make a better impact around us.

Niger Famine
This year Niger went through another one of its droughts that happen yearly before the harvest. This year something was different, however. This year someone actually came to the aid of this ailing third world country. The word got out and immediately half a dozen NGOs were there to provide aid. For years Niger has been having major droughts just before their harvest time. As a result many go with out food, and starvation becomes a problem. However, no one realized this until just this year. The people of Niger have revealed that this has been an issue for years, but the difference this year was that they got a great deal of publicity, causing the whole world to jump in and help. NGOs such as UNICEF, Islamic Relief,World Food Program, Mercy Corps, and Samaritan’s Purse are currently working in the country to provide as much aid as they can in the short periods of time that they have. With so many non governmental organizations working in one country on the same project, some issues tend to arise. One of these issues is who gets what portion of the money donated? UNICEF seems to be heading up the relief efforts in

Hurricanes Katrina and Rita
Katrina, the eleventh hurricane of this season, made landfall on August 29 near New Orleans, Louisiana. According to Wikipedia Her 175 mile an hour winds pounded the city of New Orleans and the storm surges caused the levees to break that were protecting the city from Lake Pontchartrain. The storm lasted eight days and caused damage in the Bahamas, Florida, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and most of eastern North America. The damage is estimated to be as high as $200 billion, and the death toll to be more than 700 directly related, and 500 indirectly related. It has been said that this was the worst humanitarian disaster in the US since the Great Depression. Katrina’s big sister Rita threatened the coast of Texas.

“The damage [of Katrina] is estimated to be as high as $200 billion, and the death tool to be more than 700...”

Satellite picture of Katrina

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The Aviator
Sarah Herriott and Daniel Aisenbrey The Aviator, directed by Martin Scorsese, is a semibiographical account of the life of Howard Hughes, set in the mid 1900’s. It follows Hughes’s life from an eager new movie director to a self-absorbed genius. Through his sordid Hollywood romances, acclaimed aeronautical innovations, and numerous character flaws we get a glimpse of what the mysterious Hughes was really like. Though this movie may appear to be historical and family-friendly, watch out! The foul language is abundant and there are a number of questionable scenes. Now don’t get us wrong, the movie is still incredibly well-cast and acted and thoroughly intriguing, but it definitely owns up to it’s PG-13 rating if not more.

M E D I A C R I T I C

“Witness for the Prosecution”
a courtroom drama by Agatha Christie

Dakar Academy November 4th & 5th, 8:00 p.m.
ick go DA Off Tickets go on sale in the DA Business Office October 17th. cfa, cfa Adults 2500 cfa, Students 1500 cfa
play recommended for young childr ounger hildren. * This play is not recommended for younger children. *

P A G E 12

Good Scents
By BJ Bellamy and Kyle Ibsen I think we’ll all agree that the recent power outages have gotten a little tiresome. Due to the humidity which has followed the heavy rainfall, and the lack of electricity for fans and air conditioners; we often find ourselves forgetting what it feels like to be comfortable. One of the problems which are closely linked to the problem of heat is the issue of body odor. We’ve all experienced it. It’s eighth period, you’re feeling somewhat warm, and the person on your right is feeling even warmer than you. As you watch the sweat roll down his or her face, a disturbing scent fills your nostrils. You discreetly sniff yourself to make sure that your Old Spice is still in effect, while at the same time looking for other possible sources of this distracting aroma. Then your eyes fall upon your fellow classmate and you slowly lean in the opposite direction. Now we at DA Staple know that you would rather fail the eighth period class then be the unfortunate soul melting in the middle row. Therefore, we are providing a few helpful tips which will help you remain smelling fresh and clean throughout your day. 1. Deodorant- This may seem a bit disgusting and inappropriate, but one of the key sources for not-soenchanting body odor is the human armpit. In order to win the war against disgusting body smells, you must first win the battle of the scented underarms. For those readers who may not know much about deodorant shopping, please heed the following advice. First of all, find a reputable brand. At the neighborhood mini-market, Le Caddie, you will find a whole aisle devoted to the subject of personal hygiene. If you don’t know what brand to look for, ask for suggestions from guys who are constantly surrounded by girls. They tend to know what they’re talking about where this subject is concerned. When you have settled on a good brand, you must then choose a fragrance to your liking. If there is any scent you’re not sure of, don’t
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risk it. Take something which you enjoy and which fits your personality. 2. Daily BathingUnfortunately, deodorant can only do so much. Studies have proven that eventually, the molecules which compose human stench will penetrate the protective cover of your Right Guard antiperspirant. Hence, daily bathing is another crucial step to defeating your natural stink. When you bathe, the bacteria which causes human reek is washed from the body, and your deodorant can work to its full effect. We do not intend to instruct the student on the rudiments of this process, for we assume that the average student is familiar with the basics already. 3. Cologne/ LotionAnother element which should be used in close conjunction with deodorant is a bottle of cologne or body spray. Guys, look into a good brand of cologne. Cologne is more noticeable than deodorant, and, if used properly, makes a better impression. Again, if you are unsure on this subject, ask a guy who is known for good taste in this area. Examples would be Adidas Adrenaline, Calvin Kliene, Lomani, and Ness. Girls, while some of you don’t like to admit it, guys know that you are trying to get their attention. An effective way to accomplish this is by using a nice-smelling lotion. A female source has stated that lotion endures for longer periods of time than body spray. While most guys don’t know the difference, there are particular scents which spark a guy’s interest. These include: Cucumber Melon, Sweet Pea, Country Apple,Warm Sugar Vanilla, Hawaiian Ginger, and Coconut Lime. We hope that by reading this column, you have learned some useful tips which you can use to your advantage. If you were one of those “middlerow” students before, then take heart, for you no longer have to come to class smelling horrible. On the other hand, if you were the agonized smeller, rejoice, for your days of distraction have come to an end, and your grades will once again rise to their former glory.

Along the S
What do you look for in a guy? Seven girls say what they truly find attractive about a guy. “A sense of humor.” –Elysia Cook (11th grade)

“He has to be my friend.” –Keche Awangtang (4th grade)

“He has to smell nice.” –Grace Lee (11th grade)

“He has to be cute.” –Kaitlyn Stauart (7th grade)

“I don’t look for guys!!” –Janelle Waines (12th grade)

“Three thingsStrong walk in the Lord, respect for everyone, and honesty.” –Cheralyn Mckee (11th grade) “Everything that BJ’s got.” –Sarah Herriott (11th grade)

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Staples
What do you look for in a girl? Seven guys state what they find attractive about a girl. “Someone with a heart following hard after God.” –Andrew Belle Isle (12th grade)

The Door Is Closed
here is a door shall we go in? or even more we could climb over or even for sure dig under ah, but the temptation is trong shall we open it slowly or we cuold break through or even unscrew all of those hingy thingies we could shoot a gun

“Not a girly girl.” –Daniel Waines (10th grade)

“Fun to be with.” –Travis Julian (11th grade)

through the lock (like a western) or use high-tech tools to cut silently by hey maybe we could use

“Looks and funny personality.” –Alex McLane (9th grade)

one of those bombs you know, like KABLAM! BAM! and down it’d blow blow...blow...I know! we could get a giant

Sorry, No Photo Available

“I love girls!” –Evan Ballard (Kindergarten)

GIGANORMOUS fan And it would splat to the ground or... maybe we could... OH! this is best! A lighter and some gasoline would do it! SHAZAM! FIRE! and down it’d burn into a pile of ashes! yes! yes! ...what? what’s that you say? you’ve got a key? Oh. —Dedicated to Colin Kanaval —By Sarah Penney

“Has to be alive, preferably female and not dead.” –Austin Grudda (9th grade)

“Super Woman.” –Joey Decker (12th grade)

P A G E 14

Sports Program Gets a Makeover
By Sarah Herriott Students involved in sports no longer have to run from one sports practice to the next, and elementary kids now have a much wider variety of sports to play, thanks to a new schedule being incorporated this year. The coaches from all the different teams decided that it would be a lot easier on the athletes who participate in numerous sports to adjust the schedule somewhat. In the past, all the sports took place during the same time of year in preparation for SIPS. This put the field and court in constant use and kept the athletes very busy. The new schedule has created essentially four seasons. There is an early fall, late fall, winter, and spring season. With these new sport seasons, athletes will be able to practice more days per week and develop their skills more fully. If they choose, athletes will also be able to stay active
Sport/Level Soccer Bo y s Vars ity Bo y s Inte rme d iate Girls Vars ity Girls Inte rme d iate J unio r Softbal l Vars ity J unio r Vars ity J unio r (Ele m. ) Baskebal l Bo y s Vars ity Girls Vars ity Inte rme d iate Vol l eybal l Bo y s Vars ity Girls Vars ity Inte rme d iate J unio r Aug

in sports all year. The new schedule is also utilizing the field and courts better. Dakar Academy only has one field and two courts. There are two sports that require the use of the field and two sports that require the use of the court. The problem is that there are many different teams in each sport, so the usage of the field and courts is a lot. For each sport there are about six teams: varsity boys, varsity girls, boys intermediate, girls intermediate, junior, and intramurals. The way the schedule has been rearranged, though, the field and court can now accommodate all these different teams. In each season there is only one sport going on that requires the court and only one sport that requires the field. The varsity teams have already started volleyball and softball, and in a few weeks the intermediate and junior teams will be starting these sports as well.
Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan

Another change that has come about due to this new schedule is that the senior divisions will no longer participate in the SIPS games in March. At the end of each sport season, there will be a tournament held during a weekend just for that sport. This system accomplishes two things: it is less expensive (not as much money spent during SIPS) and it will place more emphasize on the junior teams, allowing them greater court and field usage prior to SIPS. The senior division will still be participating in the track division during SIPS, just not the sport games. Intramurals will start in the spring with intramural basketball and intramural petit poteaux. The elementary sports this year will be baseball and football in the fall; volleyball and soccer just prior to SIPS; and basketball and possibly floor hockey in the spring.

Feb

Mar

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May

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Basketball Season Underway
By Sarah Herriott and Kyle Ibsen Twelve high school boys showed up on Monday 19 to tryout for a position on the varsity boys basketball team, and since there were twelve spots to be filled on the team, every boy made the team. It is a young team this year, but it has a lot of talent and has some good experience. There is not a lot of size on the team, but Coach Jim Timberlake says they will do fine. Coach Timberlake has been working the team hard this season, hoping to have them ready for a game every week, with a total of about ten games by Christmas. Practices will take place Mondays and Tuesdays from 3:15-4:30. When they are ready to compete, Coach Timberlake will start looking for games to take place on Wednesdays. In case of conflicts with the volleyball games, the basketball games might be moved to Tuesdays or Friday night. Come support the team. Freshman Brandon Julian is intent on doing it right during basketball tryouts September 19.

Varsity Basketball Roster
Paul Evans .......................... 12 Ryan Kim ........................... 12 Arnold Tabaro .................. 12 Kyle Timberlake ............... 12 Lucas Grudda ................... 11 Kyle Ibsen .......................... 11 Travis Julian ....................... 11 Mouki Thiam ..................... 11 Brandon Julian ..................... 9 Alex McLane ........................ 9 Seth Porch ............................ 9 Tyler Timberlake ............... 9 Photo by Ashley Herriott

Turkey Bowl is coming!!! November 23rd!! Prepare to enjoy good food, good company, and fun football games!
This is your chance to win fame, glamour, and maybe even money! Send us your best digital photos and we’ll pick three winners in every issue of The Stapled Papers. Send your pictures in JPEG format to the_stapled_papers@dakar-academy.org. The deadline for next issue is October 31. See Daniel Aisenbrey for more details.

This Month’s Photo Tips:
- take your time - take a spare battery and memory card - take lots of pictures

P A G E 16

Bump, Set, Spike!
Amazon Warriors
By Sarah Herriott Twelve girls made the Amazon Warriors, the varsity girls volleyball team, despite several rain delays during tryouts. Coach JP Schutlz and assistant coach Evan Evans were hoping to get an early start to the girls volleyball season this year. They were planning on holding tryouts August 17-19. Unfortunately, the weather was not on their side. They had to cancel tryouts three times before they were able to get the two days they needed to see the girls in action before making the cuts. August 23 was the last day to tryout, and all 18 girls went out and gave it their all. By the end of the day, though, Uncle JP and Uncle Evan were able to make the cuts, allowing 12 girls to become the infamous Amazon Warriors. This year’s Amazon Warriors are looking very promising. Ten out of the twelve are returning from last year. They have experience playing together and many of them participated in volleyball practices over the summer. Team captain Amber Evans says “We have lost a valuable player [Ruth Fort], but we have definitely improved as a team.” The Amazon Warriors have been working hard this season.They practice everyday, except Tuesdays. They put in a good effort and encourage one other to do their best. they were ready. They played tough and almost won with a final score of 23-25. The last three games they tried their best but could never win a game.

Match Two-9/14/05
The Amazon Warriors had their second match the next Wednesday against the same team and you could tell they were looking for revenge. The first game the Amazon Warriors were not as nervous, as they were the previous week. They started the game out with some strong hits and a lot of hustle. They did not win that game but they played very well and almost won. The second game, they played just as well, but still not managing to pull off a win. The third game was a different story. They played awesome defense and amazing offense. With this combination, they won! That was the only game they ended up winning out of the five games they played, but it is start. The team did a lot better than last week and they will just keep getting better.

Match One-9/07/05
The Amazon Warriors had their first match against a team known as Gerard’s team, or the Pharmacy team. This strong club team beat the girls almost every game last year. This did not put a damper on the Amazon Warriors, though. They had high hopes of winning, knowing they are a stronger team this year. The girls were a bunch of nerves the first game, and didn’t play up to their full potential. By the second game,

Tri-match-9/21/05
The Amazon Warriors participated in a mini-tournament, consisting of three teams: Amazon Warriors, Gerard’s team, and the N’Gore team. The Amazon Warriors and Gerard’s team played the first three games, to see who would win the most out of the three. Gerard’s team won the first game, then the Amazon Warriors won. The third game would be the tiebreaking. The Amazon Warriors fought hard, but were unable to pull off a victory. The Amazon Warriors then played the N’Gore team. This was a new team to them, one that they had never played before. They went into playing their hardest, and they won the first two games, placing them second in the whole tri-match. Continued on page 17
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Amber Evans goes for the bump

Photo by Daniel Aisenbrey

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Volleyball (continued)
Continued from page 16

Tri-Match Two-9/28/05
This was the Amazon Warriors first away game, but they were playing the same two teams from the tri-match the week before. They played Gerard’s team first again. They lost the first two games in a row against them. They tried their best, but the wind was blowing hard and they were just getting into the swing of things. They then played the N’Gore team. They remembered their weaknesses from last week and were again able to beat them in the first two games.

Andrew Mahoney spikes over Travis Julian’s block.

Match Five-10/1/05
This past Saturday, the varsity girl’s volleyball team was matched against the varsity boy’s volleyball team. You could tell both teams were ready to play each other. The first game was a very close one. The girls ended up winning, though, 25-23. The girls won the next two games after that, as well. By then, the guys were ready to win. They jumped in the next game and took the victory, with a final score of 2518. This did not discourage the girls, though. They realized they would have to fight a bit harder, and they did. They won the last two games after that.

DA Brothers
By Sarah Herriott The varsity boys volleyball team has started, with tryouts August 23 and 30, and Coach Ellenberger kept twelve guys on the team. Coach Keith Ellenberger and assistant coach Bill McComb are working the team hard this season. They only practice one day a week, due to some conflicts in scheduling, so coach Ellenberger is looking to make the most out of each practice. The boys have a lot of work to do this season, considering eight of them are new to the team. The team lost five seniors, mostly starters, from last year. This is a significant loss, but one that coach Ellenberger thinks he can overcome with the cooperation and hard work of the team. Ben Porch, one of the few returning players from last year says, “We have a lot of new guys, but [our team] is looking

Photo by DanielAisenbrey

pretty sweet.” The boys will just have to work hard each practice and work some on their own too. In a few weeks, they should have found their groove and coach Ellenberger will be ready to schedule some matches.

Amazon Warriors Roster
Name ............ Grade Kalyn Amstutz ........... 12 Amber Evans ............. 12 Ashley Herriott ......... 12 Melanie Mahoney ..... 12 Jenny Sessoms ........... 12 Sarah Herriott ........... 11 Cheralyn Mckee ........ 11 Iyamide Olukoshi ...... 11 Alexis Schultz ............ 10 Stephanie Schultz...... 10 D’evan Evans ................ 9 Jordana Schultz ............. 9

DA Brothers Roster
Name ............ Grade Kyle Timberlake ........ 12 Davin Ellenberger ..... 11 Lucas Grudda ............ 11 Kyle Ibsen ................... 11 Travis Julian ................ 11 Andrew Mahoney ..... 11 Paul Park ..................... 11 Ben Porch ................... 11 Jonathan Belle Isle .... 10 Daniel Waines ............ 10 Brett Amstutz ............... 9 Austin Grudda .............. 9

P A G E 18

Take Me Out to the Ballgame
Photo by Sarah Herriott Photo by BJ Bellamy

Tigers Roster
Jessica Ketcham .......... 12 Purity Marklund .......... 12 Janelle Waines ............. 12 Michael Cortimilia ..... 10 Daniel Waines ............. 10 Austin Grudda .............. 9 Christian Ortiz ............. 9 Samuel Owusu-Baafi ... 9 Seth Porch ..................... 9 Jimmy Stewart ............... 9 Sarah Wilson ................. 9 Elianna Adamson .......... 8 Thad Dearman .............. 8 Jacob Decker ................. 8 Loren Ellenberger ....... 8 Massaly Mashburn ........ 8 Lois Calrk ............ Coach

DA Tigers
By Kyle Ibsen This year’s Tigers team is shaping up to make a roar at WAIST. Comprised mainly of Mad Dog hopefuls; the team has some great potential. After being away for a year it will be interesting to see how their

coach Miss Clark does back in the driver’s seat. With several practices already under their belt, the Tigers will enter their season far from unprepared. With a combination of fielding and batting exercises, they are honing in their skills for the upcoming games. With good talent and

New Tiger Massaly Mashburn makes catching look easy at 1st base. Coach Clark at the helm, many are hopeful that this year’s team will go the distance. Perhaps even farther than teams of the past.

Photo by BJ Bellamy

Sam Owusu-Baafi snatches the ball in the outfield.

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Softball (continued)
Photo by Daniel Aisenbrey very different.They do, however, still have pitcher Scott Hicks and several dorm dads that will be playing with them this year as well. Tryouts for the Mad Dogs went well, though they lasted almost two weeks due to rain delays. The players who made it (see roster) are pretty confident in their team’s and coaches’ abilities to take them all the way this year. Returning third baseman Eric Debrah says, “Coach Mulay is a good coach, and I think he has what it takes to help us win the championship.” Confidence is high among both players and coaches. Returning first baseman/ outfielder Travis Julian shows his confidence with his statement, “We have an excellent team this year.” Coach Herriott agrees, “Depending on how the young talent develops, the Mad Dogs have a good shot at winning WAIST.” He went on to say, “We have good, strong, fast kids with athletic savvy.” Hopes are high for this year’s team, and we look forward to seeing many wins throughout the season. Sickem, Dogs!! Sophomore Daniel Crickmore, new Mad Dog, connects with the ball during batting practice.

Mad Dogs
By Kyle Ibsen Get out your lawn chair, grab a hot dog, and slap on the sunscreen, people, DA’s ready to take the WAIST tournament for the second year in a row. The Mad Dogs are back and geared up for what promises to be another great season of softball. Head Coach Dan Mulay says they have a lot of good young talent this year that will help them especially in the future. That’s not all they have going for them, though. They also have some experienced players returning, including last year’s MVP Kyle Timberlake. The competition will be tough again this year. The jury’s still out as to which team will be the toughest for our Dogs as both coaches have differing opinions on the matter. Coach Mulay thinks the Patriots, the team from the American Embassy, will be the team to beat as they will be looking for revenge from last year. Assistant Coach Ron Herriott, however, claims that the Dogs will have to work to claim the title this year against their archrivals, the DA Cavemen, who are the men’s team for the school made up of staff and parents.

The Cavemen may have a tough year, though. As of now they barely have a team. They are missing their short stop Brad Mashburn and right fielder Rodney Duttweiller at least until January. First baseman Jeff Shaa will not be returning at all. Without these key players, this team will be

Mad Dogs Roster
Daniel Aisenbrey ........ 12 Eric Ketcham ............... 12 Kyle Timberlake .......... 12 Eric Debrah ................. 11 Davin Ellenburger ...... 11 Lucas Grudda .............. 11 Travis Julian .................. 11 Andrew Mahoney ....... 11 Daniel Crickmore ..... 10 Brett Amstutz ............... 9 Brandon Julian ............... 9 Alex McClain ................. 9 Alex Reed ...................... 9 Tyler Timberlake .......... 9 Photo by Daniel Aisenbrey

Junior Lucas Grudda fires it in to home during a Mad Dog practice.

October 2005
S unda y M nda y o Tue s da y W dne s da y e Thur s da y F r i da y S a t ur da y
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Bret t Ams t ut z Frances co De Fel i ce
9 10 11

Cara Kanavel Sarah Penney
12 13

Yadhaw Baz nat h Laura Ndongnyam
14 15

Fai s al Shuai b

Ruky Shuai b
16 17

Ri chard W hes t Et i enne Henger
18

Mel i s s a Hi cks
19

Marcy St at l er
20

Puri t y Markl und
21

Paul Park
22

Tanner Grudda Dhruraj Baz nat h

PSAT
25

Janel l e Wai nes
24 26 27 28

Harves t Fes t Soraya Dorvi l i er
29

ACT Karl i n El l enberger

23

Davi d Bowl er Mi chael Cort i mi l i a
30 31

George Ndj ungu

November 2005
S unda y M nda y o Tue s da y
1

W dne s da y e
2

Thur s da y
3

F r i da y
4

S a t ur da y
5

Samya Fre i re
6 7 8 9 10 11

Fal l Pl ay
12

SAT Fal l Pl ay

Kai t l yn St e wart
13

Tyl e r Ti mbe rl ake
14 15

Ade l i ne Chauvancy
16 17

De bora DaSi l va Tayl or De arman Me l ani e Mahone y
18 19

Amanda W he s t

Jus t i n Bas t ow
20 21 22 23 24 25

Abi gai l Cart e r
26

El i s a Tanqui s t

NEWSPAPER STAFF:

Daniel Aisenbrey B. J. Bellamy Ashley Herriott Sarah Herriott Kyle Ibsen Emily Nuss Lauran Reed Jenn Requadt Advisor: Deb Mashburn
27 28

Col i n Kanave l
29 30

Turke y Bowl

Fauz i yat Shuai b

Hol l i Bas t ow

Iwan Groot Dre w Mas hburn

Be n Porch Pe t e r Rope r


				
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