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Early Childhood - DOC

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					News and Research Update Index
(Scroll down to find short descriptions of articles and web links) Early Childhood
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being U.S. Spends Less on Young Children First Focus Releases Children's Budget 2009 Children of Substance-Using Parents Home Visiting Programs (Prenatal and Postnatal) Better Day Care, Smarter Kids? Using Developmental Science to Transform Children's Early School Experiences Recognition and Response is Successful Intervention Votes Count: Legislative Action on Pre-K Reasons Why Finnish Students Perform Better than American Students

Early Education

Early Learning
11. Educators Start Children on Computers as Early as Preschool 12. Research Finds Musical Training Can 'Tune' the Auditory System

Health
13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Economic Impact of Uninsured Children on America Every Child Deserves a Medical Home Early Start on Fitness Is Important Societal Costs of Childhood Asthma Children‘s Eating Influenced by Company

Media
18. No Einstein in Your Crib? Get a Refund 19. Kids Spend More Than One Full Day Per Week Watching TV 20. Healthy Media Choices Hour

Social-Emotional and Mental Health
21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. What Works? A Study of Effective Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Programs Rough and Tumble Play Supports Social Skills Predictors of Peer Victimization in Preschool Use of Cultural Rituals as Part of the Therapeutic Process Preventing Child Maltreatment Traumatic Childhood Takes 20 Years off Life Expectancy History of Childhood Maltreatment Linked to Higher Rates of Unemployment, Poverty Differences in Corporal Punishment by Parents in 32 Nations and its Relation to National Differences in IQ

Family Strengthening/Child Abuse and Neglect

Advocacy and Policy
29. Policy for Results.Org 30. The Partnership for America’s Economic Success 31. FTC Agrees to Investigating PG-13 Movie Marketing

Early Childhood
1. America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being The new 2009 report has been released. For the full report or highlights, go to: http://childstats.gov/ 2. U.S. Spends Less on Young Children “The United States trails most industrialized nations in the amount of public spending on younger children, according to new data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, or OECD. This spending increases, however, as children get older, and the U.S. system outpaces other developed countries in resources channeled toward students in the 6-11 and 12-17 age groups.” Read more from this summary at EdWeek: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2009/09/us_lags_in_earlychildhood_spen.html or find more details at: http://www.oecd.org/document/12/0,3343,en_2649_34819_43545036_1_1_1_37419,00.html#dat a 3. First Focus Releases Children's Budget 2009 This comprehensive guide details all spending on children by 180 federal programs designed to enhance the well-being of children. This year the Children's Budget includes additional information on investments in children made through the economic stimulus package. Find it at: http://www.firstfocus.net/pages/3631 4. Children of Substance-Using Parents This report from SAMHSA found that between 2002 and 2007, “more than 1 in 10 children were living in homes with substance-dependent or substanceabusing parents.” Read the summary at: http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=107&articleid=2658 or the full report at www.oas.samhsa.gov/2k9/SAparents/SAparents.pdf. 5. Home Visiting Programs (Prenatal and Postnatal) This resource in the Canadian Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development looks at both prenatal and postnatal home visiting and includes articles written by experts. Three questions are addressed: “How important is it? What do we know? What can be done?” Find it at: http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/enca/home-visiting-programs-prenatal-postnatal/how-important-is-it.html

Early Education
6. Better Day Care, Smarter Kids? “Scientists have long known that poverty can inhibit a child's intellectual development. High-quality day care for the youngest poor kids may be enough to offset negative home environments and provide them the foundation for good school skills, at least up to the fifth grade, according to a new study” from Boston College and published in Child Development. Read the rest of this article from the “Atlanta Journal-Constitution”: http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/cdev/630945.html 7. Using Developmental Science to Transform Children's Early School Experiences “Developmental psychology and education have grown apart. Too often, advances in developmental science are unrelated to educational programs for young children, and early childhood educational practices tend to ignore scientific findings or reflect outdated theories and research.” Read more of this brief from the FPG Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~firstschool/assets/UsingDevelopmentalScience.pdf 8. Recognition and Response is Successful Intervention “R&R helps teachers use information they gather on children‟s skills to improve the quality of instruction for all children and to provide targeted interventions to some children who need additional supports to learn.” This study from the University of North Carolina showed that R&R is a successful strategy that teachers are able to implement. Find the Edweek summary of the study at: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/speced/2009/10/researchers_find_new_program_s.html Key findings from the study are summarized at: http://randr.fpg.unc.edu/sites/randr.fpg.unc.edu/files/KeyFindingsHandout.pdf

9. Votes Count: Legislative Action on Pre-K This report found that even in these hard economic times, “state pre-k funding [nationwide] will increase modestly by just slightly more than 1 percent to $5.3 billion.” Read more at: http://www.preknow.org/documents/LegislativeReport_Oct2009.pdf 10. Reasons Why Finnish Students Perform Better than American Students Among the reasons cited are “a comprehensive preschool program that emphasizes „self-reflection‟ and socializing, not academics…. Preschool education — a relatively new addition to the Finnish toolkit — has been part of their educational system for the past 10 years.” Read more at: http://www.greatschools.net/students/academic-skills/u-s-students-compare.gs?content=1075

Early Learning
11. Educators Start Children on Computers as Early as Preschool “For these 5- and 6-yearolds, technology is a way of life, no different than using a crayon for their writing lessons. Technology has become increasingly prominent in classrooms and ever more important for the young generation.” Read the complete article from the “Ocala Star-Banner” at: http://www.ocala.com/article/20091005/ARTICLES/910051000/1402/NEWS?Title=Educatorsstart-children-on-computers-as-early-as-pre-school 12. Research Finds Musical Training Can 'Tune' the Auditory System Developing musical skills involves the same process in the brain as learning how to speak. According to the director of this study from Northwestern University in Illinois, “Increasing music experience appears to benefit all children -- whether musically exceptional or not -- in a wide range of learning activities.” It may be particularly helpful for children with learning disabilities. Read more about the study at: http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2007/03/music0.html

Health
13. Economic Impact of Uninsured Children on America This report from Rice University found that children with health coverage receive better health care and enjoy better health than those without insurance, thereby improving their productivity as adults. Therefore, extending health insurance coverage to all children in the United States would be relatively inexpensive compared to the cost of letting children remain uninsured and would yield economic benefits that are greater than the costs. Read the report from the Baker Institute for Public Policy at: http://cdf.childrensdefense.org/site/R?i=BJURhguBVRvMhx9dnAKKtw 14. Every Child Deserves a Medical Home The National Center for Medical Home Implementation has useful information and downloadable materials for parents, providers and others at: http://www.medicalhomeinfo.org/about/ChildHealthDay2009.html 15. Early Start on Fitness Is Important A study from the University of Iowa found that appropriate levels of exercise as a preschooler may lead to better fitness later in childhood, even if children are less active as they grow older. Outreach to promote fitness might be most effective if it is aimed at young children, especially girls. Read about the study at: http://news-releases.uiowa.edu/2009/july/072809studyactivepreschooler.html 16. Societal Costs of Childhood Asthma Untreated asthma in young children has societal as well as business costs. This report from the Partnership for Success estimates that the costs may be as much as $19 billion a year and advocates for early preventive measures to cut those costs. Read more at: http://www.partnershipforsuccess.org/uploads/20090708_asthmafinalformatted.pdf 17. Children‘s Eating Influenced by Company This study found that children are more likely to overeat when they eat with friends, as opposed to strangers, leading to the conclusion that friends and family must be involved in efforts toward change. Read the full study from ----at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/10314

Media
18. No Einstein in Your Crib? Get a Refund “Parent alert: the Walt Disney Company is now offering refunds for all those “Baby Einstein” videos that did not make children into geniuses.” Read more of this New York Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/24/education/24baby.html?_r=1&emc=eta1 Here‟s how to get a refund: http://www.babyeinstein.com/(S(3qnoffi1whnnnt55h2ljk355))/parentsguide/satisfaction/upgrade_u s.html Here‟s a fact sheet on baby videos from Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood: http://www.commercialexploitation.org/factsheets/baby%20videos%20final.pdf 19. Kids Spend More Than One Full Day Per Week Watching TV The Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood reports that the “newest Nielsen [ratings] figures find that children ages 2 to 5 watch over 32 hours of television per week, and children ages 6 to11 watch more than 28 hours. This puts kids' TV viewing at an 8-year high. The increase is said to be due to more programming targeted at children, including video on demand, which allows kids to watch shows repeatedly. Children in the 2 to 5 age group watch more commercials than older kids and adults, watching ads over and over in playback mode.” Read more at: http://www.commercialexploitation.org/news/2009/10/kidswatchmorethanadayoftv.html 20. Healthy Media Choices Hour This show that focuses on media‟s influence on young children can be good resource for parents. Listen as it streams live on Tuesdays, 11 AM to Noon (Mountain Time), at www.wvew.org, or listen to archived podcasts of previous shows at www.healthymediachoices.org.

Social-Emotional and Mental Health
21. What Works? A Study of Effective Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Programs This report from Georgetown University explores the essential components of effective mental health consultation programs. The Report, the Executive Summary, and the Study Factsheet can be downloaded from: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu/78358.html 22. Rough and Tumble Play Supports Social Skills In her article, “Rough and Tumble Play 101”, Francis Carlson notes that “Through the (very) physical interactions required in [such] play, children are learning the give-and-take of appropriate social interactions.” The article can be found on the website of the Child Care Exchange: http://www.ccie.com/resources/view_article.php?article_id=5018870&keyword_id=120 23. Predictors of Peer Victimization in Preschool: Intervening Early to Target Parenting Skills and Children‟s Behavior Could Head Off Long-Term Victimization by Peers One finding from this Canadian study was that “both harsh, reactive parenting and insufficient parental income predicted preschool peer victimization above and beyond a child's aggressive behavior.” Read more in this summary of the study by the National Institute for Early Education Research: http://nieer.org/psm/index.php?article=295 24. Use of Cultural Rituals as Part of the Therapeutic Process This article highlights practices related to youth violence but the ideas and some of the strategies are applicable to younger children. Read it at: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu/products/PPMH_SanFrancisco.pdf

Family Strengthening/Child Abuse and Neglect
25. Preventing Child Maltreatment The fall 2009 issue of the Future of Children journal is focused entirely on child maltreatment prevention. Articles include: Introducing the Issue, Progress toward a Prevention Perspective, Epidemiological Perspectives on Maltreatment Prevention, Creating Community Responsibility for Child Protection, Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect with Parent Training, The Role of Home-Visiting Programs in Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect, Prevention and Drug Treatment, The Prevention of Childhood Sexual Abuse, and Prevention and

the Child Protection System. Find it at: http://futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/journals/journal_details/index.xml?journalid =71 26. Traumatic Childhood Takes 20 Years off Life Expectancy These findings are the latest from the ongoing Adverse Childhood Experiences Study that asked more than 17,000 adults about ten kinds of childhood trauma involving abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction. Read the article summarizing the results of this latest study in the Lawrence Journal World: http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2009/oct/06/traumatic-childhood-takes-20-years-life-expectancy/ 27. History of Childhood Maltreatment Linked to Higher Rates of Unemployment, Poverty This study found that “the long-term impacts of childhood maltreatment include higher rates of unemployment, poverty, and use of social services in adulthood... The related losses in productivity and tax revenues, increased spending on social services, and potential transmission of abusive behaviors from one generation to the next, suggest major costs to society as well.” Read more from the National Institute for Mental Health at: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/sciencenews/2009/history-of-childhood-maltreatment-linked-to-higher-rates-of-unemploymentpoverty.shtml 28. Differences in Corporal Punishment by Parents in 32 Nations and its Relation to National Differences in IQ This study from the University of New Hampshire found that “the higher the percent of parents who used CP [corporal punishment], the lower the national average IQ.” Read more at: http://pubpages.unh.edu/~mas2/Cp98D%20CP%20%20IQ%20world-wide.pdf

Advocacy and Policy
29. Policy for Results.Org This website will help policy makers and advocates find data and resources and thus achieve “better results for kids and families through research-informed policy.” http://www.policyforresults.org/en.aspx 30. “The Partnership for America’s Economic Success is a coalition of economists, policy experts and advocates mobilizing business leaders to improve tomorrow's economy through smart policy investments in young children today… The Partnership is comprised of committed donors, national business organizations and an advisory board of employers, economists, funders and advocates; it is managed by the Pew Center on the States in Washington, D.C.” Read more about the Partnership at: http://www.partnershipforsuccess.org/index.php?id=2&MenuSect=2 31. FTC Agrees to Investigating PG-13 Movie Marketing In response to a campaign mounted by the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC) to halt the practice of marketing PG-13 movies to young children, “the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has agreed to investigate the marketing plans for several films rated PG-13 for violent content…” A letter from the FTC agrees that such marketing is an “ „end run around the parental review role‟ and that neither the Motion Picture Association of America… nor the individual movie studios have taken adequate steps to ensure that PG-13 movies are not marketed in a manner inconsistent with their rating… Nearly 5,000 ads for five 2009 violent PG-13 movies and their related merchandise ran during children's programming…” Read more about CCFC‟s campaign at: http://commercialfreechildhood.org/actions/pg1309.html This publication was produced in part by funds from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement, Parental Information & Resource Center Program, under grant #84.310A. The content herein does not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Education, any other agency of the U.S. Government, or any other source. This publication is also funded in part under a contract with the Montana Children‟s Trust Fund Board. The statements herein do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the MT CTF Board.


				
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