Docstoc

ceramics_leaf_2009

Document Sample
ceramics_leaf_2009 Powered By Docstoc
					11th–14th June 2009
Daily: 11am-7pm Last day: 11am-6pm The Park Lane Hotel, Piccadilly,
London W1J 7BX

Founded in 1982 and held in London in June every year since, The International Ceramics Fair & Seminar is one of the world’s most successful specialist fairs. It brings together leading international ceramics dealers and is a highly respected showcase for the finest 15th century to contemporary British and Continental pottery, porcelain and glass. Held in conjunction with the fair is the famous 12-part lecture programme at which distinguished speakers present their latest findings and research (see overleaf for details). All items in the fair are for sale under the strictest vetting conditions.

The International Ceramics Fair & Seminar 2009

Lectures
2.15pm – 3.15pm – A1
ANGELA JARMAN Glass Artist

Cover illustraion: Chelsea, circa 1755

a Haughton Fair Brian and Anna Haughton – Organisers

Angela Jarman, Goede, 2008, lost-wax cast clear lead crystal and black glass. Exhibitor: Adrian Sassoon, London.

Sponsored by The Ten Ten Foundation Inc.

Thursday 11th June
DAME ROSALIND SAVILL Director, The Wallace Collection ADRIAN SASSOON Dealer, KATE MALONE Ceramicist and

Dame Rosalind Savill, Adrian Sassoon, Kate Malone and Angela Jarman discuss the curator's point of view and the contemporary artist’s response.

Inspired by The Wallace Collection, London – Contemporary Ceramics And Glass

Kate Malone at work in her Barcelona studio making pieces inspired by the Wallace Collection. Exhibitor: Adrian Sassoon, London.

A Meissen figure of Pulchinella, 1748. Exhibitor: Elfriede Langeloh, Germany.

Johann Joachim Kaendler’s Taxa report lists in chronological order the porcelain models he created for Meissen from 1739 to 1746. The Taxa report is the most important source for Kaendler’s figural work. New findings and further aspects will be discussed.

Kaendler’s Taxa

PROF. Dr. JOHANNES RAFAEL Academic and Collector

3.45 – 4.45pm – A2

An unusual Chelsea Botanical Dessert Plate, Circa 1755-58. Exhibitor: Brian Haughton Gallery, London.

5.00 – 6.00pm – A3

Two London Porcelain Factories, Chelsea and Bow: A Study In Contrasts

ANTON GABSZEWICZ Independent Ceramic Consultant, London

Nicholas Sprimont and Thomas Frye had a very different approach to the manufacture and selling of porcelain.They both left secure professions to become pioneers of these risky ventures in the mid 1740s. Examining the products of both concerns in tandem allows for the differences and similarities of their products, and the varied markets for which they were made, to be emphasised.The strengths and weaknesses of each factory and the commercial acumen of these two remarkable entrepreneurs become apparent.

Friday 12th June
11.30am – 12.30pm – B1

The New Ceramics Galleries at the Victoria & Albert Museum, Opening 2009-2010
The lecture will introduce the Victoria & Albert Museum’s new Ceramics Galleries which are due to open in two phases.The first phase, opening on 18th September 2009, will display over 3000 exhibits including many master-pieces. It includes a world-wide introduction to the history of fine ceramics as well as a room devoted to ceramic materials and techniques.The second phase, housing the V&A’s Ceramic Study Collections will open in 2010.
An extremely rare and early octagonal Worcester saucer, circa 1753. Exhibitor: Robyn Robb, London.

REINO LIEFKES Senior Curator Ceramics & Glass Collection, the Victoria & Albert Museum

3.00pm – 4.00pm – B2

GEOFFREY GODDEN Author and lecturer

The Related Limehouse, Lunds-Bristol and Worcester Porcelains. Ten Vital Years, 1746-1756.

A Meissen teapot, circa 1730; a Vincennes teapot, circa 1750; a Meissen Böttger teapot, circa 1715 -20. Exhibitor: Christophe Perlès, Paris.

The Limehouse and Lunds-Bristol blue and white porcelains are related in more than the early period. Geoffrey will show a selection of slides (drawn mainly from his own collection) showing these delightful but rare wares as a related grouping – leading on to the commercially successful Worcester examples.Ten vital years in the story of English ceramics, circa 1746-1756.

This lecture will look at the turbulent history and distinctive style of the Du Paquier manufactory, set within the context of baroque Vienna, where “nothing can look more Gay or Splendid” Du Paquier's passion for rich and intricate borders, glorious decoration and charming taste for surprise will be revealed.There will be glimpses of new discoveries!

Fired By Passion:The Vienna Baroque Porcelain of Claudius Innocentius Du Paquier

MEREDITH CHILTON Editor-in-Chief and a contributing author of the du Paquier publication "Fired by Passion" to be published in September 2009.

4.30pm – 5.30pm – B3
An extremely rare Vienna Du Paquier teabowl and saucer, circa 1730. Exhibitor: Brian Haughton Gallery, London.

Lectures
11.30am – 12.30pm – C1

Saturday 13th June
JONATHAN GRAY Independent researcher, focusing on Swansea and Bristol during the reign of George III, ECC Committee member and editor of the two volume Welsh Ceramics In Context books, published in 2003 and 2005.

A large Dutch Delft Baluster vase and cover, circa 1670. Exhibitor: E. & H. Manners, London

The Swansea pottery, on the north coast of the Bristol Channel, was well placed for European and American export trade, especially after 1789 when the factory was run by Philadelphians. Jonathan will discuss his latest research and provide a different view of looking at the factory's products, both pottery and porcelain, up to 1815. Arguably, Britain's best ceramic products of the early 19th century were made at this small Welsh factory, especially when war with America made the potters turn to the London market.

War and Peace – Swansea Ceramic and America

A Meissen seated ‘pagoda’ figure. circa 1730. Exhibitor: E. & H. Manners, London

3.00pm – 4.00pm – C2

DR KATHARINA HANTSCHMANN Curator of Ceramics, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Munich and Meissen Porcelain Collection, Ernst Schneider Bequest at Lustheim Castle, near Munich. Contributing author of the Du Paquier publication “Fired by Passion” to be published in September 2009.
In the 18th century official court dinners followed very precise rules, especially at the imperial court in Vienna. Engravings of the time show us the atmosphere.The table ceremonial reflected the differences in rank within the strictly ordered court and social hierarchy, which can be observed by many details. Even the material of the table service reflected differences in social standing: at noble courts silver or silver gilt were obligatory. Nonetheless the Viennese manufactory Du Paquier produced fine porcelain services for the savoury courses and succeeded in selling them to important families of the empire.

Court Dining in Baroque Vienna

JULIE EMERSON The Ruth J.Nutt Curator of Decorative Arts, Seattle Art Museum, USA

4.30pm – 5.30pm – C3

Brimming with European and Asian wares, the Seattle Art Museum’s new Porcelain Room has been conceived by colour and theme, to blend visual excitement with an historical concept. As well as describing how this new Porcelain Room for the 21st century was created to serve scholars and collectors, and to entice a new audience into the world of 18th century European porcelain, the lecture will also highlight rare works from the collection, including Vincennes, Strasbourg, Meissen, Chelsea and the earliest Worcester (Klepser Collection).

Room of a Thousand Porcelains

A large St Cloud cooler, circa 1720-30. Exhibitor: DragescoCramoisan, Paris.

Sunday 14th June
11.30am – 12.30pm – D1
ROGER MASSEY Lecturer and author

Shipwrecks and Marriages – The Importance of Dated and Documentary Ceramics

A English Delft posset pot, 1653. Exhibitor: Sampson & Horne Antiques, London

Our knowledge and understanding of ceramic history has been greatly enhanced by studying dated and documentary pieces.The lecture will examine the benefits and pitfalls of relying on dated and documentary pottery and porcelain.The subject matter of this talk includes, amongst other things, Chinese porcelain from shipwrecks and delftware plates commemorating the marriages of London merchants.The topic anticipates the forthcoming English Ceramic Circle Exhibition to be held at the Brian Haughton Gallery, 15 Duke Street, St James’s, London SW1Y 6DB: Friday 19th June – Wednesday 1st July. (The Gallery will be closed Saturday 20th; Sunday 21st; Saturday 27th and Sunday 28th June).

2.30pm – 3.30pm – D2

DR. EKATERINA KHMELNITSKAYA Curator of Russian Porcelain The State Hermitage Museum

KPM Déjeuner, Gardener (Mokau),, circa 1766. Exhibitor: Daniella Kumpf, Gerrmany

Nicholas I (b. 1796, reigned1825-1855) was an imperious and despotic ruler, his 30 year reign described as “the time of official regulation of life and the arts.” Meanwhile, applied arts continued to flourish.

Russian Imperial Porcelain in the Winter Palace during the Reign of Nicholas I

For almost 100 years the Imperial Porcelain Factory adhered to the principle proclaimed by Empress Elizabeth - to make porcelain “from Russian earth”. Under Nicholas I that principle was breached, as imported Limoges clay began to be added to the paste. However, the manufactory’s output in the mid-second half of the 19th century remains unsurpassed owing to its range, infinite variety and invariably high quality.

He took over the general artistic direction of the Russian Imperial Porcelain manufactory approving the designs for its products.The achievements of the manufactory were marked by a gold medal at the Great Exhibition held in London in 1851.

4pm – 5pm – D3

‘Flour Power’: Recent Discoveries in the Warda Stevens Stout Collection of German Porcelain

CHRISTINA H. NELSON Author and independent curator LETITIA ROBERTS Independent ceramics researcher and author

Enamelled glass by Ignaz Preissler, circa 1730. Exhibitor: E. & H. Manners, London

This talk chronicles the development of a significant collection of 18th century Meissen, Höchst and other porcelain acquired during the quarter century following World War II. Now at the Dixon Gallery and Gardens, Memphis,Tennessee, along with carefully preserved documentation, this collection sheds light on the ceramics market of the period and shows the degree to which scholarship has advanced.The speakers preview some of the exciting discoveries to be revealed in a book to appear later this year, which presents recent scholarship heretofore unavailable in English.

The Park Lane Hotel
Piccadilly, London W1J 7BX

Fair Opening Hours Daily: 11am-7pm Last day: 11am-6pm
Refreshments available within the Fair

Entrance to the Fair: £12.00 (including handbook) Nearest underground stations: Hyde Park Corner and Green Park Buses: 9, 14, 19, 22, 38 Brian and Anna Haughton - Organisers The International Ceramics Fair & Seminar Ltd 15 Duke Street, St. James’s, London SW1Y 6DB Telephone: +44 (0)20 7389 6555 Fax: +44 (0)20 7389 6556 www.haughton.com email: info@haughton.com
For further information:

a HAUGHTON FAIRSM

AD antiques, Gloucestershire, UK Antiques & Porcelain, Vienna, Austria Bazaart, London, UK Dragesco-Cramoisan, Paris, France Brian Haughton Gallery, London, UK Daniela Kumpf Kunsthandel, Wiesbaden, Germany Elfriede Langeloh, Weinheim, Germany E. & H. Manners, London, UK Christophe Perlès, Paris, France Potterton Books, North Yorkshire, UK Robyn Robb, London, UK Sampson & Horne Antiques, London, UK Adrian Sassoon, London, UK Steppes Hill Farm Antiques, Kent, UK John Whitehead, London, UK & France

Exhibitors

Lecture Booking Form
NO. OF SEATS LECTURE CODE £

First lecture costs £26 including fair entry and hardback handbook. Subsequent lectures cost £14 each which includes entrance to fair. N.B Children under five will not be admitted Payment by cheque/draft must be in STERLING and made payable to ICFS Ltd. Please send with a stamped self-addressed envelope to: ICFS Ltd, 15 Duke Street, St. James’s, London SW1Y 6DB, UK Fax: +44 (0)20 7389 6556 Email: info@haughton.com

Please complete the form below with the number of seats required for each lecture, the lecture code number and price.

TELEPHONE .............................................................EMAIL ........................................................................................................................................... Amex/Visa/Mastercard No. Expiry date ..................................................................................SIGNATURE ..............................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................................................POSTCODE .......................................

ADDRESS ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................

NAME .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

PLEASE USE BLOCK CAPITALS

TOTAL £

"


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:181
posted:1/29/2010
language:English
pages:2