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					WELCOME TO THE TRANSITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

WORKSHOP ADMINISTRATION
• Breaks • Meals • Dress

• Participation
• Attendance

T-I-2

Introductions
• Use your name

• State current occupation
• Give global view of YOU
– I hope to …

• Make it interesting, Every one is a potential Network contact

• Polite close

VETS (Veterans’ Employment Training Service).

“Provide veterans and transitioning service members

with the resources and services to succeed in the
21st Century Workforce by maximizing their employment opportunities, protecting their

employment rights, and meeting labor market
demands with qualified veterans today”.

Under Section 4113 (a) of title 38 of

the United States Code, VETS employees
or contractors will conduct Transition Assistance Programs(TAP) Employment Workshops on military installations world wide.

Workshop Standards and Expectations

• You will complete at a minimum, a hand written DRAFT resume. • You will understand how to use the Key to Career Success Cards and know the resources available to you at a Career One Stop Center. www.servicelocator.org

Workshop Objectives Continued
• You will conduct a Mock Interview and receive feedback you can use. • You will be familiar with the DVOP/LVER positions and how to contact a representative in the area you will be residing or searching for employment.

• Initiative
• The Initiative will strive to heighten employer awareness about the employability of veterans and will refer employers interested in hiring veterans to local One-Stop
T-1.1-1

COURSE OVERVIEW
Introduction to programs Personal Appraisal Career Exploration

Strategies for an Effective
Job Search

T-I-3

COURSE OVERVIEW
Resume Building Interviews Reviewing Job Offers

Support and Assistance

T-I-3

VETS PROGRAMS
• • • • • (VWIP) Veterans’ Workforce Investment Program (HVRP) Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (IVTP) Incarcerated Veterans’ Transition Program (TAP) Transition Assistance Program (REALifelines) Recovery and Employment Assistance Lifelines

(VWIP) Veterans’ Workforce Investment Program

VWIP provides employment, training, and supportive services to assist in reintegrating eligible veterans into meaningful employment within the labor force.

VWIP CONTINUED

VWIP eligible participants include: • Veterans with service-connected disabilities • Veterans who have significant barriers to

employment
• Veterans who served on active duty in the armed forces during war or in campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized.

(HVRP) Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program

HVRP provides employment, training, and supportive services to assist in reintegrating homeless veterans into meaningful employment with the labor force.

(HVRP) Funded Employment and Training services

1. Classroom training 2. Job search activities 3. Job preparation 4. Subsidized trial employment

5. On the job training
6. Job placement 7. Placement follow up services 8. Vocational Counseling

(IVTP) Incarcerated Veterans Transition Program

Designed to help ex-offender veterans who are at risk of homelessness to re-enter the workforce. Provides direct services through case management approach to link veterans with appropriate employment and life skills support as they transition from a correctional facility into the community.

(DVOP) Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program

Develops jobs and job training opportunities for disabled and other veterans Through contacts with employers; promote and develop on-the-job training and

apprenticeship and other on-the-job training
positions within agencies.

(DVOP) Continued
• DVOP is provided through state formula grants • DVOP specialist target their services to veterans with barriers to employment, disabled veterans and those that are educationally or economically challenged. • DVOP specialist can be located in One Stops Career Centers and local

Employment Agencies.

(LVER) Local Veterans’ Employment Representative
LVER staff are appointed to serve as advocates for veterans with business and Industry, promote veterans as job Seekers and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff is

located in service delivery points throughout the states
such as One-Stop Career Centers.

Veterans can find the services they need at a convenient One-Stop

Career Center. Work with a
veterans employment specialist to find jobs, acquire skills and education, plan your career, attend workshops and take advantage of other resources.

KEYS TO CAREER SUCCESS

Keys to Career Success Campaign is designed to
connect veterans with a full array of the highest quality workforce services available at One Stop Career Centers.

Key to Career Success Card

Key to Career Success Cards will be provided to veterans during TAP to help them locate

the nearest One Stop Career Center.
Each Card will list the Department of Labors toll free hotline and America’s service locator. www.servicelocator.org

HELPFUL CONTACTS
U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans’ Employment

and Training Service
www.dol.gov/vets Veteran Employment Representatives DVOPs/LVERs Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (HVRP) Veterans’ Workforce Investment Program (VWIP)
T-1.1-10
1.1 Deal with Stress

HELPFUL CONTACTS
Department of Veterans Affairs www.va.gov/homeless  Medical Center Homeless Coordinator  Benefits Administration Regional Office Homeless Coordinator  VET Center Staff
State Office of Veterans Affairs www.nasdva.com

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans
www.nchv.org 1-800-VET-HELP
T-1.1-11
1.1 Deal with Stress

Risk of Homelessness continued
• Education • Use your Veterans benefits. • Contact Career One Stop Centers and speak to an LVER/HVRP agent

• Stay drug free
• Stay away from criminal mischief • Stay away from heavy gambling • Learn good money habits

COPING WITH STRESS
Objective: • What to Know • What to Do • Know When to Seek Professional Help (Quiz)

• Develop A Personal Stress Management
Plan

T-1.1-1

Section 1.1

WHAT IS STRESS?

“A mismatch between the demands in our lives, and the resources we have available to deal with those demands.”

T-1.1-2

Stress

Is a normal part of our lives It may be positive or negative We can’t avoid stress Develop and maintain a plan to manage the effects of stress • Seek professional assistance if needed

• • • •

Personal Stress Management Plan
• Recognize Stressors Surrounding your job search and personal life • Develop a Job search plan • Structure your time and practice time

management
• Initiate/maintain an exercise and nutrition regimen

Personal Stress Management Plan
• Maintain your religious beliefs, social/family customs and daily routines • Learn and use relaxation techniques • Develop and maintain support systems

• Establish a life plan and career goals
• Schedule time for yourself • Include daily humor and laughter in you life • Communicate openly and honestly with others

STRESS AS A PART OF LIVING
Is a normal part of our lives It may be positive or negative We can’t avoid stress

Stress is any change that you must adjust to...
T-1.1-3

HOMELESSNESS AMONG VETERANS

VA estimates that as many as 200,000

veterans are homeless on any given night.*
More than twice that many experience homelessness over the course of a year.*
*US Department of Veterans Affairs - 2005

T-1.1-5
1.1 Deal with Stress

WHY ARE VETERANS HOMELESS?
Male veterans are twice as likely to become homeless, and female veterans are four times more likely to be homeless as their non-veteran counterparts. A large number live with post traumatic stress disorders and addictions acquired during or exacerbated by their military service. Lack of family and social networks due to lengthy periods

away from their communities of origin. Government money is
limited and serves only one in 5 of homeless veterans in need.
T-1.1-6
1.1 Deal with Stress

PREVENTION OF HOMELESSNESS AMONG VETERANS
•
  

Military service separation process
Participate in “pre-separation” counseling process Participate in Transition Assistance Program (TAP) Employment Workshop Know about your VA Benefits

•
•

Obtain income
Seek early assistance for mental health

and substance abuse issues
T-1.1-7
1.1 Deal with Stress

BREAK
Please take only 15 minutes

Create a Career Catalog
Objectives:
Gather the information and records you need

in order to create a resume, fill out a job application, and prepare for a job interview Deal effectively with the strengths and challenges arising from military experience
Identify your transferable skills that can be used in a variety of jobs (See Pages 18 - 22)
T-1.2-1

Key Elements of

Job Search

Courtesy of Sam Sauer

Research
• Yourself (skills, abilities, accomplishments, competencies, preferences, etc.) • Career Field you are interested in • Area you are thinking of living in
Don’t be a couch potato, do your research!

• Job Openings
• Potential Companies

MASTER APPLICATION
Personal Information Education and Training Special Skills Military Service

Work Experience
Other Information

T-1.2-3

Research Yourself
• List of equipment you have used or repaired • Job titles you have held, duties you performed • Programs you developed or implemented Start your Master Application • Education and Worksheet/Career Training Catalog on page 7 • Accomplishments

TYPES OF RECORDS
MILITARY SERVICE
• Separation Papers – DD Form 214 (certified copy or copy 4) • Training Record • Honors and Awards • DD FORM 2586 Verification of Military Experience and Training • Service Record • Medical Record • Benefits

WORK EXPERIENCE
• Work History (job titles, employers, duties,

accomplishments)
• Work Samples • Honors and Citations • Community Activities • Salary History • Licenses • Certifications

PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION
• Birth Certificate (copy) • Proof of Citizenship • Social Security Card • Passport (current)

EDUCATION AND TRAINING
• Transcripts • Diplomas/Certificates • Honors • Activities List

T-1.2-2

This is fine Chief, but how are your computer skills?

Courtesy of Sam Sauer

TEN MOST

SKILLS
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Problem Solving Skills Vocational – Technical Skills Human Relation Skills Computer Programming Skills Teaching – Training Skills 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Science and Math Skills Money Management Skills Information Management Skills Foreign Language Skills Business Management Skills

Identify Strengths and Challenges Arising from Military Experience

Translate your knowledge and skills into the needs of the employer

Learn to speak plain English before an employer will understand you

Identify Strengths and Challenges Arising from Military Experience
CHALLENGES Communications: Militarese vs. Civilianese Stereotypes: Be aware of false impressions about the military

Unrealistic Expectations: Expecting a high
paying position. Reality is a cut in pay and status when changing careers Credentials: License & Certifications VMET COOL Career Info Net
T-1.3-3

Stereotypes
• It may be necessary for you to overcome stereotypes some employers hold about the military:
– That you always follow orders so you don't have to think for yourself – That you are lazy; and – That you don't want to work hard.

Unrealistic Expectations
• You may have to adjust your thinking on the type of job you can qualify for and the salary you can expect. • Despite your military experience, you may be expected to work your way up and may have to take a lower level job than you are actually qualified for. • It may be difficult for you to adjust to living on the wages or salary you are likely to be offered by an employer. • You are used to a relatively small paycheck in the military, but you also have certain benefits and privileges you won't have in civilian life.

Credentials
• While you may have extensive training in a particular field, making the transition into an equivalent civilian position may require state and/or local licensing or certification. When planning your transition, consider carefully the time and/or investment required to obtain necessary credentials.

Your Name

Transitioning to Civilian Careers Meeting Civilian Credentialing Requirements

Determining whether your military training and experience meet civilian credentialing requirements is an important first step in becoming licensed or certified. This section of VMET can help you do that. For 25 civilian occupations most relevant to military personnel, an analysis was done to determine whether there are any gaps between military training and experience and civilian credentialing requirements. The results of this analysis can be accessed by selecting either a civilian occupational title or a military occupational code.

If your military occupational specialty was not among the 25 occupations analyzed, or if you are considering becoming licensed or certified in an occupational area different from your military occupational specialty, then click below for information on credentialing requirements: • Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook -- General Career Information and Overview of Credentialing Requirements

Determine Your Work Preferences
Objectives:

Identify your work-related values Determine your personal preferences Where do you want to live & work Bestplaces Explain why your work-related values and preferences are important in making job decisions
T-1.5-1

VETERAN’S EMPLOYMENT STRENTHS
Leadership • Discipline • Training • Team Member/Team • Leader • • Work with diverse • groups • Work under pressure • Accountability/Record Keeping • • • • Plan systematically Safety Follow directions Drug free Maturity Security clearance

Leadership training
• Regardless of your rank, you have probably had an opportunity to be a leader. Leadership training in the civilian world is costly and not as widely respected. Employers know that military leadership training is both intense and extensive, assuring them that you are experienced and qualified in this area.

Ability to conform to rules and structure
• Military life demands conformity. Employers can be assured that you understand the importance of rules and that you are disciplined.

Ability to learn with advanced training
• Military training is respected by many in the civilian work force because it is intensive. You are well trained and can advance with further training.

Familiarity with records
• The military requires you to account for all of your equipment as well as your time and actions.

Ability to work as a team member and a team leader
• In the military, you have developed the ability to work in close coordination with your coworkers. • Employers may appreciate your ability to lead when asked, or to participate in team efforts concertedly.

Ability to work in a diverse group
• In the military you worked productively with others, regardless of their race, religion, age, etc. • Civilian life also demands this ability, and employers appreciate that they can count on you to participate with all team members.

Ability to work under pressure and meet deadlines
• By the nature of its mission, the military requires that you learn to work under pressure. • Employers are aware that you have handled potentially life-or-death scenarios. • Military experience establishes that you are able to cope with frustration and fatigue, and employers want employees who persevere despite obstacles.

Systematic planning
• Most military operations require careful planning at all levels. You have been trained to consider outcomes carefully. • Employers want employees who are forward thinking and keep unwanted outcomes to a minimum.

Emphasis on safety
• The military requires safety training and maintenance. • You have safety training that is among the best available and ensures that an employer can count on you to work safely.

Ability to give and follow directions
• You have proven your ability to follow directions well, simply by being in the military.

Drug-free
• Many employers are interested in providing a drug-free workplace and therefore appreciate the fact that you are certified drug-free by the military.

Maturity
• Think about the responsibilities and experiences you gained from the military. • You have not taken your responsibilities lightly, and bring focus and flexibility to tasks.

Security clearance
• Being in the military might make it easier for you to obtain a clearance for government contracting and for employment with the federal government. • These clearances are highly prized in certain civilian fields.

ANALYZE YOUR SKILLS
What to Know:

People are hired based on their qualifications- a mix of experience, skills, education, training, knowledge, attitudes and abilities- how well their qualifications match what is needed on the job.

ANALYZE YOUR SKILLS
Assessing your skills will help you determine: • Your strongest skills • The skills you most enjoy using

• The jobs you might enjoy doing and
which ones you would do well

ANALYZE YOUR SKILLS

Follow the instructions on Page 18 thru 21 to analyze your transferable skills.

Determine Your Work Preferences
In addition to your skills and experience, your personal preferences about what you want to do are critical in your Job Search. Your Transition Office has resources that can help

you investigate these aspects of your job
search. Call to set up an appointment. Follow the work preference exercise in your TAP manual on pages 23,24,& 25.

Analyze Work-Related Values
Your Work-related values influence how you feel about your job. You need to know your values as you begin to look for a job. To be satisfied with your work, you should

choose a job that matches your work
values as closely as possible. Complete the exercise on Page 26 in your TAP

Manual.

BREAK
Please take only 15 minutes

CAREER EXPLORATION
Objectives:

Identify and research career possibilities Determine your financial needs as a way of estimating your salary requirements

T-2.1-1

CAREER RESEARCH
The closer the match between a job and your work preferences, financial needs and transferable skills, the more likely you will be successful and happy in that job. Make career decisions with as much information as possible. Choose intelligently. The more knowledge you have about an occupation, the

better prepared you are to move in to that career
knowing both the positive and negative aspects.

CAREER RESEARCH
• Review list of Career Exploration options

• Use the telephone to seek information

• Cold Calling. Tap into the hidden job market.

• Review example in TAP manual, Pages 28-31

Assess Financial Needs
What to Know No matter where your work-related values placed the importance of salary, you need to know your bottom line. You need a certain amount of money

to support yourself and to reach your goals.
What to do It is important to consider the benefits offered by an employer. Some provide no benefits others pay for a wide variety of benefits.

Assess Financial Needs
Practice Before looking for employment, determine the amount of money you need to earn to meet your expenses and goals. (see Budget worksheet on p. 34-35)

Financial Planning
If you have personal financial concerns, seek appropriate counseling. The Family Support Center has a financial counselor available to assist you.

Financial Management

Class Outline
  


  

Budget Military Retirement Calculation Debt Reduction Investing Credit Reports Moving Calculators Buying a Home

IMPORTANCE OF FINANCIAL PLANNING


Retiring or separating from the military will cause some degree of financial change Careful financial planning is the key to successful management of a limited income



Budgeting

   

1st step to financial success Add up all income Add up all expenses Subtract expenses from income Decide who bill pay the bills and who will track them

Based on E1



Wksheet.xls



TAP Manual pg 34-35

Retirement Pay %

https://avo-intranet

Air Force Financial Services Center https//www.afpc.randolph.af .mil/retepcalc/eoretfrm.asp

http://dod.mil/militarypay

Debt Reduction



  

 

List all your credit bills by: 1. Name 2. Institution 3. Loan Amount 4. Monthly Payment & actual 5. Interest Rate Power Pay
Debt Quiz

min

LIQUIDITY RATIO


A liquidity ratio will tell you how many months you can financially survive by using current liquid assets without additional income




Add up all assets that are cash or could be easily converted to cash or that you could sell Divide your current liquid assets by your anticipated monthly expenses i.e. $8000 / $1300mo = 6.15 months




TAP Manual pg 35

PRIORITIZE YOUR EXPENSES
 

Rate your expenses as: high, medium or low priority
 



High priority items are things you and your family cannot do without Medium priority items are important to you but you can exist without them Low priority items should be temporarily (or permanently) dropped from the budget

Financially Independent




Credit cards and loans should only be used for long lasting items, Travel, and emergencies Fund your daily expenditures from your paycheck's

COST OF LIVING INDEX





Where can you afford to live? Since living costs vary from city to city, your dollar will stretch farther in one town than it will in another. When you consider job offers, take into consideration the cost of living. http://www.bestplaces.net



LEGAL ASSISTANCE



     

Services available at the legal assistance office: Last Will and Testament Living Will Power of Attorney 1. General 2. Specific Debtor/Credit Problems Family Law Tax Law

VGLI

  

0 - 120 days to 1yr + 120 days to apply Max coverage $250,000.00 20 yr Term policy Within 45-60 days of separation you should receive a letter in regards to converting over to VGLI
http://www.va.gov

 

VGLI Premium Rates

Why Invest?
  



To achieve financial goals To increase current income To gain wealth and financial security To have funds available at retirement

Investment Options


 





Money Market Accounts – safe, insured up to $100K Certificates of Deposit—very safe Bonds--safe Mutual Funds—can be low risk with higher return than bonds Individual Stock Purchases—very risky What is your most valuable asset?



Rule of 72


How long to double money
72/6% = 12 years Rate of return needed to double? 72/8 years = 9%







Where to get a Credit Report






Equifax PO Box 740241 Atlanta, GA 30374-0241 www.equifax.com Experian PO Box 2104 Allen TX 75013-2104 www.experian.com Trans Union Corporation Consumer Disclosure Center PO Box 403 Springfield PA 19064 http://www.transunion.com

Moving Calculators



 


 




Buying builds equity Moving Calculators http://homefair.com 1. Mil. Relocation Wizard – Moving Day.doc Create a moving time line 2. Rent vs buy Calculator 3. Moving Expense Calculator 4. Salary Calculator

Buying a Home
   


  




Get a Pre- Approval from your bank/mortgage company Be careful in regards to how much you are pre approved for Check your budget to see what you can really afford $100,000 7.5% 15 yr vs 30 yr mortgage 30 yrs = 700/mo Adjustable rate vs fixed rate 15 yrs = 927/mo Closing Cost Add. payment goes towards principal ?? Mortgage Insurance You always need $ for repairs You can hire a professional to inspect the house Mortgage Payment Calculator

Home Loans

 


 

Conventional Loans VA Loans 1. Certificate of Eligibility http://www.va.gov a. Form 26-1880 b. Mail; 26-1880, DD 214 or Statement of Service (VMPF)

Home Equity Loan




 

Borrow money against the equity in your house Pay for home improvements, new car, college tuition, etc. The loan interest is tax deductible Caution: If you default you could loose your home

Car Purchase/Sale


Lease vs buy Kelly Blue Book http://www.kbb.com NADA guides http://www.nada.com

 





       


    

Budget Military Retirement Calculation https://avo-intranet Debt Reduction Power Pay What is your Liquidity Ratio Prioritize Expenses Unemployment Compensation http://www.bestplaces.net Cost of Living Index Legal Assistance VGLI Rule of 72 Credit Reports http://homefair.com Moving Calculators Buying a Home
loan 15yr vs 30yr VA vs Conventional

Summary

Questions?

BREAK

SETTING GOALS
Objectives: Set personal goals

Get organized
Plan an effective job search Analyze job announcements and ads

Fill out job applications
Research potential employers Write effective resumes

Translate Military skills into job skills
Write effective cover letters
T-3.1-1

TYPES OF GOALS
SHORT-RANGE
(6 months to 1 yr)

INTERMEDIATE-RANGE
(1 to 5 yrs)

LONG-RANGE
(5 to 10 yrs)

T-3.1-2

EMPLOYMENT GOALS
Employment goals need to be SMART:

Specific
Measurable

Adaptable
Realistic Trackable

T-3.1-3

SMART GOALS
Specific: If you goal is not specific you may not have a firm idea of how to get that job

Measurable: Make a realistic, daily/weekly

time table. This allows you to measure whether
or not your are consistent in your in your employment search efforts.

SMART GOALS
Adaptable: Setting an employment goal is like using a road map with optional routes. Realistic: Goals should be realistic for your personal needs, local economy and the job

market.
Trackable: Must be able to trace your steps in your search for appropriate employment.

GET ORGANIZED

Page 42

Approach the Job Search Process
Objectives:
Plan an effective job search Understand how to conduct company research Learn about job assistance resources Understand how to begin using the internet as part of the job search process

Analyze job announcements and ads for critical
information
T-3.3-1

JOB SEARCH PROCESS
Job search is a full time job! Use all available resources: Check with, transition office, State Employment Services, Private employment agencies, internet, school placement

offices, union hiring halls, chambers of commerce.
Answer ads in: Local, state, national news papers and professional or trade journals Apply directly: Job fairs, private industry council, employers

JOB SEARCH PROCESS
Hidden Job Market 80% of all positions are filled without employer advertising. These positions are filled by candidates who come

to the attention of employers through
recommendations from employees, referrals from trusted associates, recruiters, or direct contact with the employers contacts.

LOOKING FOR WORK

T-3.4-1

NETWORKING

T-3.4-2

RESEARCH COMPANIES
Research is a good idea because: 1. You may get to know someone in the organization- a personal contact. 2. Information about the company enables you to

identify transferable skills to match the needs of
the organization and the job 3. You can ask question in a job interview that are bases on information few other applicants have.

RESEARCH COMPANIES
Things to research before contacting a company • Number of Employees

•
• • • • •

What the company does (service / products)
Business volume, net worth, profit & loss Competitors, history and future plans Company locations Contact names Employment activity-recent hiring, firing, layoffs.

RESEARCH COMPANIES
Create a company information record

Maintain a Job Search Log
See Tap manual, pages 48 & 49

Create an Employment Folder (H/O #5)

JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE
1. Internet: Hoovers.com Careervoyages.gov RielyGuide Salary.com O'Net 2. State Workforce Agency (Employment Office) bls.gov

3. Local Veteran’s Employment Representatives (LVER)
4. Vocational Rehabilitation

and Employment

VOC-REHAB

T-3.5-1

JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE
5. Employment and Training Administration

(ETA), U.S. Department of Labor
6. Private Employment Services 7. College/School Placement Agencies 8. Military and Professional

DOL/ETA

Associations and Organizations

T-3.5-2

JOB SEARCH ASSISTANCE
9. Telephone Directory Yellow

Pages, Industry Directory
10. Industrial and Craft Unions 11. Job Fairs

12. Transition Offices
13. Chambers of Commerce

T-3.5-3

Analyze Want Ads
Most new ads are published on Wednesday and Sundays. Looking through want ads will give you idea of the availability of jobs in certain industries.

When reading and responding to want ads be aware
of the following: • Ads that do not give a company name • Big paycheck and little experience may indicate sales positions that work on commission

Analyze Want Ads
• If the contact is an employment agency, find out if they will charge you a fee

• Multiple positions ads may indicate a new or
expanding company • Some ads use the word “preferred”, usually means you can apply if you don’t have that particular skill or ability as long as you have other

qualifications
• When responding to a want ad make sure you meet the minimum qualifications

Complete Application forms
Objectives: Understand how to complete application forms Understand how to find opportunities for

Federal Civil Service Employment
Understand how to initiate the Federal application process

T-3.8-1

Complete Application forms
Master Application Worksheet
(H/O 6)

• Bring an erasable blue or black ink pen • Copy of resume and references • Answer all questions -Do not leave blank spaces

• Check application for accuracy and neatness
• Turn in application and follow up weekly

BREAK

An overview to seeking

FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT

FEDERAL JOB OUTLOOK
As of March 2003
2,738,344 employees FY03 Payroll $70,841,950

Excepted & Sr. Exec. Service (SES) 1,373,065
General Schedule 1,723,852

Wage Grade 212,684
Postal 801,808

…POTENTIAL
“More than 70 percent of the

federal workforce will be eligible to retire for regular or early retirement by 2010”
9 September 2003

JOB SEARCH/SERIES CATEGORIES

GS-0000, Miscellaneous Occupations Group GS-0100, Social Science, Psychology, and Welfare GS-0200, Human Resources Management Group GS-0300, General Administrative, Clerical, and Office Services GS-0500, Accounting and Budget Group GS-0600, Medical, Hospital, Dental, and Public Health Group GS-0800, Engineering and Architecture Group GS-1000, Information and Arts Group GS-1100, Business and Industry Group GS-1400, Library and Archives Group GS-1500, Mathematics and Statistics Group GS-1600, Equipment, Facilities, and Services Group GS-1700, Education Group GS-1800, Investigation Group GS-1900, Quality Assurance, Inspection, and Grading Group GS-2000, Supply Group GS-2100, Transportation Group GS-2200, Information Technology Group

QUALIFYING for a federal job!
Knowing what the job is and what it takes to qualify…

www.opm.gov/qualifications/ sec-iii/b/alph-ndx.htm

JOB SEARCH PROCESS
Office of Personnel Management

(OPM) site for all federal jobs! Specific branches/agencies for jobs
that are not posted on OPM’s site

jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/index.asp

PAY TABLES
OPM site for all federal wages!
Consider:
Locality (32 including the rest of U.S.A)

Housing
Step/within grade increases (1st 3 yrs every year; after that every 2 yrs) www.opm.gov/oca/04tables/html/gs.asp

LOCALITY
Rest of U.S.
GS-09 Step 1 = $39690

Washington D.C.
GS-09 Step 1 = $40894 San Francisco GS-09 Step 1 = $44066

Federal Job BENEFITS
Retirement Thrift Savings Plan Health Insurance Life Insurance Education Upward Mobility Geographic Mobility Job Security

FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM (FERS)
3-part System: FERS, Social Security, & Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) FERS min. age based upon year born & years served Formulas: 1% times “High-3” average salary times all years & months service, or… If over age 62 with 20+ years service, use 1.1% Example: Henry is 60 and has earned $31,000; $30,000 & $29,000 in his top 3 years. He has worked exactly 30 years. 1% of his High-3 average ($30K) is $300 x 30 years = $9,000 per year ($750 per month)

FEDERAL RETIREMENT AGE
Age 55 with 30 years

Age 60 with 20 years
Age 62 with five years of service
During early outs, feds can retire as early as age 42 if they have 25 years federal service or if they are at least 50 with at least 20 years.

Thrift $aving$ Plan (T$P)
Agency automatic 1% (of base pay) contribution (not taken out of your pay, nor do they Agency matches you dollar for dollar on the first 3% you contribute; 50 cents on the dollar for next 2%. As of 2004 you may contribute up to 14%
increase your pay for income tax or Social Security purposes)

15% as of 2005; changes in 2006 to flat $15K according to IRS limits; adjustments thereafter

T$P contribution chart

Percent of Basic Pay Contributed to Your Account (FERS Employees Only) Your agency puts in: You put in: Automatic (1%) Contribution Agency Matching Contribution And the total contribution is:

0% 1%
2% 3% 4% 5%

1%
1% 1% 1% 1% 1%

0%
1% 2% 3% 3.5% 4%

1%
3% 5% 7% 8.5% 10%

Amounts that you contribute above 5% are not matched.

T$P continued…
Decide between 5 funds for investing: 1. Government Securities Investment (G) Fund (nonmarketable US Treasury securities) 2. Fixed Income Index Investment (F) Fund (bond market) 3. Common Stock Index Investment (C) Fund (large company stocks) 4. Small Capitalization Stock Index Investment (S) Fund (small company stocks) 5. International Stock Index Investment (I) Fund (foreign stocks)

Reallocate contributions and or fund balances Contributions are “pre-tax dollars;” taxable at retirement Possible to borrow against your account Early withdrawals (before age 59) = severe penalty (tax + 10%)

HEALTH INSURANCE
You can select from numerous companies and choose one of the following:

1- Fee for Service: (monthly premium, annual deductible, + percentage of charges; least restrictive; usually most costly) 2- Preferred Provider Plan: (monthly premium + percentage of charges & you agree to use providers who’ve pre-negotiated their rates with insurance company) 3- Health Maintenance Organization: (HMO) (monthly premium + minimal “co-pays;” “gatekeeper” physician refers you to other medical care providers; most restrictive, but least expensive)

LIFE INSURANCE
Basic Life (your salary rounded up to nearest thousand, plus $2,000) agency pays 1/3 group rate/you pay remainder & can choose from: Option A Standard – additional $10,000 coverage; Option B Additional (in amount from 1 to 5 times your annual basic pay); and / or Option C Family (choose 1 to 5 multiples of $5,000 for spouse & $2,500 for eligible children)

Accidental death & dismemberment (no add’l chg – ends when you are no longer actively employed).
Premiums deducted from payroll every two weeks.

OTHER BENEFITS
Education

Upward Mobility
Geographic Mobility

Job Security
Initially Career Conditional Career Status after 3 yrs Priority Placement during reductions in force Life time entitlement to reentry

VETERANS PREFERENCE
“Veterans’ preference is a legal right that reflects a national value”
Kay Coles James, Director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management

VetsInfo Guide
http://www.opm.gov/veterans/ Veterans' Employment Opportunities Act of 1998 http://www.usajobs.opm.gov/ei52.asp

VetGuide
http://www.opm.gov/veterans/vetguide.asp#2Why

VETERANS PREFERENCE
General Requirements:
An honorable or general discharge Retirees at the rank of major, lieutenant commander, or higher are not eligible-unless they are disabled veterans. Guard and Reserve active duty for training purposes does not qualify for preference.

5 POINTS…
During the period December 7, 1941, to July 1, 1955; or

For more than 180 consecutive days, any part of which occurred after January 31, 1955, and before October 15, 1976; or
During the Gulf War from August 2, 1990 through January 2, 1992; or In a campaign or expedition for which a campaign medal has been authorized, including El Salvador, Grenada, Haiti, Lebanon, Panama, Somalia, Southwest Asia, and Bosnia.

10 POINTS…
A present service connected disability or is receiving compensation, disability retirement benefits, or pension from the military or the Department of Veterans Affairs Individuals who received a Purple Heart qualify as disabled veterans. An unmarried spouse of certain deceased veterans, a spouse of a veteran unable to work because of a service-connected disability A mother of a veteran who died in service or who is permanently and totally disabled.

Claiming VETERANS PREFERENCE
Claim preference on your application or resume

For 10-point preference you must complete form SF-15, Application for 10-Point Veteran Preference (www.va.gov)
5 points tentative preference on the basis of information contained in application (must produce a DD Form 214 prior to appointment to document entitlement to preference)

ON LINE FEDERAL RESUME
OPM’s resume builder: www.usajobs.opm.gov

Prepare a resume that you can print for personal use Save and/or edit on the web site for future use Electronically submit for agency-specified job opportunities in the fed jobs database

3 STEP FORMULA

1. Qualify
2. Obtain an interview 3. Get a job offer

KEY TO SUCCESS

Follow the instructions!
Compliance details!

NATURE OF THE JOB SEARCH
Time consuming (10 hrs wk, 4 – 6 months)

Complex
Can be frustrating Requires perseverance, focus and energy

What are your reasons for seeking a federal job?

QUESTIONS?

Resumes & Cover Letters
Objectives: Understand how to write effective resumes
(Resume Quiz Page 164)

Begin to translate military experience into job skills

Understand how to write effective cover letters

T-3.10-1

Resume Formats

Translate Your Military Experience Into Civilian Terms
As you create your resume, avoid military jargon and military terms. Most Civilian Employers will not understand military jargon, abbreviations and acronyms.

Review page 67 in TAP manual for military terms and Civilian Equivalent.

SPEAK THE SAME LANGUAGE
One reason the Services have trouble operating jointly is that they don’t speak the same language. For example, if you told Navy personnel to “secure a building,” they would turn off the lights and lock the doors. The Army would occupy so no one could enter. Marines would assault the building, capture it, and defend it with suppressive fire and close combat. The Air Force, on the other hand, would take out a year lease with an option to buy.
T-3.10-2

LEADERSHIP ROLES
TEAM LEADER: This position is responsible for ensuring a given team is fulfilling its role and running smoothly. Team leaders are not responsible for doing all jobs that fall within a team’s objectives but are responsible for making sure these jobs are done. SUPERVISOR: This position is responsible for either direct supervision or assisting the manager in every day operations. Responsibilities include: supervision of personnel, overseeing daily operations, assisting with financial and budgetary matters. Ability to interact with front line staff and customers, and the ability to review work progress.

T-3.10-3

LEADERSHIP ROLES
MANAGER: This position is responsible for supervision of professional administrative and hourly employees. Individuals holding this position must have the ability to organize and negotiate. DIRECTOR: This position is responsible for development and management of programs, divisions or areas. Most normal duties and responsibilities are handled independently. They often help establish procedures and policies. Responsible for decisions related to the development and execution of strategic plans affecting the organization.
T-3.10-4

Resume Guidelines
Your resume Must show employers three things: • • • The Amount and Kind of Responsibility you’ve handled The Results you have achieved The Relevancy of you past responsibilities and accomplishments

Resume Guidelines
• List your achievements and how you solved a problem

• Use Statistics or Numbers
• Write Your Own Resume • Keep your resume brief, clean and easy to read, be able to defend every word • Be Specific and Selective

• Include Volunteer experiences that are
relevant

Resume Guidelines
• Avoid Gimmicks, Be Creative but Professional • Keep an electronic copy • Never exaggerate or Misrepresent yourself • Your Resume should be succinct and targeted to

the needs of the Employer
• A Resume is a Living document, and should be frequently updated – Modify when necessary

Resume Guidelines
• Always send a cover letter with your Resume • Do Not include References • Do Not mention Salary in Resume (unless requested by employer)

• Keep every thing Positive – Stress your
Strengths, not your Weaknesses • Keep Resume to one or two pages

SELL YOUR SKILLS
Use Action Verbs Related to: People Things Ideas

T-3. 10-6

Resume Format
Format has to do with Organization of Information

Name: Use complete name Address: Complete address, spell out Street, Avenue, etc.

E-Mail: Use a Professional address, i.e.
JohnWayne@gunho.com vs. BigJohn@gunho.com Phone: Full numbers where you can be reached personally, by voice mail or Professional Answering machine

Resume Format
Employment Objective: The most effective, well-written job objective is a targeted objective that is for a specific job (bookkeeper, medical transcriber, jet engine mechanic) with a specific company (for General Motors, John-Hopkins Medical Center). Consider the title of your resume. The rest of the

resume must convince the hiring authority that
you have the background and skills to do the job.

Resume Format
Targeted Job Objective: • Seeking a position as a Licensed Vocational Nurse for Bay General Hospital • A position as a Bookkeeper for H&R Tax

Consultants
• Position as a Security Guard for Pinkertons

Resume Format
General Job Objective: • Entry level position in a multi-image Production company • Position as a Health Educator

• Project Management position in Marketing

Resume Format
Summary of Qualifications: Write a summary that highlights your professional background as it Relates to the needs of the company.

This can be in the form of a paragraph or a short list,
with 4-5 one line bullet statements

Writing Cover Letters
Purpose of a Cover Letter: is to introduce yourself and sell the employer on how well your specific skills, abilities and attributes match the organization’s needs. Three main parts to a Cover Letter • They identify the specific job and how you learned about it.

• They match your skills, training, and experience
with those required for the job.

Writing Cover Letters
• The last line should emphasize your interest in the job and your plan for follow-up. Cover letter Guidelines 1. The Cover letter should not repeat your resume.

2. Use standard business letter format.
3. Type the letter on bond paper that matches your resume 4. Proofread carefully, no typos and proper grammar was used.

Writing Cover Letters
5. Sell yourself! Make the reader want to speak to you. 6. Keep the letter to one page or less. 7. Sign and send the original. Keep a copy.

8. Address the letter to the hiring authority,
include their title. If you cannot get a specific name, start the letter with “Dear (manger of Department/title of position)”. 9. Do your research homework on the company

Writing Cover Letters

See Cover Letter examples in you

TAP manual, Pages 103, 104, 105 and
106.

INAPPROPRIATE RESUME CONTENT
Marital Status Children Spouse Age Religion Politics Height/Weight Health

Race

Salary

T-3.10-5

BREAK

Interview Process
Objectives: Prepare for interviews Prepare to take employment tests as part of the interview process

T-4.1-1

INTERVIEW STAGES
1. Introductory Stage 2. Employer Questions 3. Applicant Questions

4. Closing Stage

T-4.1-2

Interview Process
Objectives: Prepare a personal 30-second commercial Prepare for the interview Mock Interviewing

T-4.3-1

INTERVIEW TIPS
Be prepared

Be punctual
Look good Watch your body language Carry a portfolio Be enthusiastic

Say thank you
Smile
T-4.4-1

DRESS FOR SUCCESS
Objectives: Learn how to dress appropriately for a job interview

T-4.5-1

DRESS FOR SUCCESS
• Objectives:

• Learn how to dress appropriately for a job interview

T-4.5-1

Example Interviews

• Construction • Machinist • Security guard • Factory • Road crew • Grounds maintenance

Example Interviews
• Fast Food • Telemarketer • Manufacturing • Janitorial • Gardener • Housekeeping • Auto mechanic

Example Interviews

• Clerical • Social worker • Nurse • Paralegal • Photographer

Example Interviews • Administrative support • Child care worker • Waitress • Hotel desk clerk • Retail sales

Example Interviews

• Trainer • Executive secretary • Banking • Engineer • Sales representative • Personnel

Example Interviews
• Management • Architect • School teacher • Project manager • Attorney • Insurance agent

REMEMBER!
FIRST impressions are LASTING impressions.

T-4.5-2

SHARPEN LISTENING SKILLS
• Objectives:

• Sharpen listening skills
• Interpret body language

T-4.6-1

SHARPEN LISTENING SKILLS
Control distractions Use nonverbal signals Paraphrase Focus on key words

Ask clarifying questions
Take notes

T-4.6.2

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS
Objectives: Prepare to answer employer questions Prepare questions to ask of employers

T-4.8-1

THE WAY WE COMMUNICATE

T-4.7-1

YOUR ANSWERS SHOULD:
1. Be brief 2. Use examples 3. Show thought 4. Make connections

5. Tell how you work

T-4.8-2

Tough Questions and Tough Answers
TOUGH QUESTIONS AND TOUGH ANSWERS The following list of questions and answers may help

you prepare for your interview.
1. Tell me about yourself.
Be thorough, but brief. Talk for no more than two minutes. Be logical. Be positive. Discuss your education and professional achievements and goals. Then briefly describe your qualifications for the job and the contributions you could make to the organization. Refer to the 30-second commercial in section 4.4.

Tough Questions and Tough Answers
2. Why did you leave the military? This can be a difficult question. “I achieved my goals in the military and I’m now looking for a new challenge.” You could then explain what your

goals were, how you met them, and where you
see yourself going now.

Tough Questions and Tough Answers
3. Why are you leaving your current position? This is a critical question. Do not bad-mouth previous employers. Don’t sound too opportunistic. It is good to state after long

personal consideration you wanted an opportunity
to expand your background/knowledge. You feel your chance to make a contribution at this time is

very low due to company restructuring. Still
attempt to score points.

Tough Questions and Tough Answers
4. What do you consider your most significant accomplishment? This can get you the job. Prepare extensively. Tell a brief story, which includes details and your

professional involvement. The problem, action,
resolution organization works well here. Describe a situation that presented a problem, detail what

actions you took to resolve it, and discuss what
the resolution was.

Tough Questions and Tough Answers
5. Why do you believe you are qualified for this position? Why should I hire you? Pick two or three main factors about the job and about you that are most relevant. Discuss for two

minutes, with specific details. Select a technical
skill, a specific management skill (organizing, staffing, planning) and a personal success story.

Tough Questions and Tough Answers
6. Have you ever accomplished something you did not think you could? Show you are goal-orientated, have a strong work ethic, personal commitment and integrity. Provide

a good example where you overcame numerous
difficulties to succeed. Prove you are not a quitter and you’ll get going when the going gets tough.

Tough Questions and Tough Answers
7. What do you like/dislike about your current position? Interviewer may be trying to determine your compatibility with the open position. Stating

you dislike overtime or dislike specific details, or that
you dislike “management” can cost you the position. There is nothing wrong with liking

challenges, pressure situations, opportunity to
grow, or disliking bureaucracy.

Tough Questions and Tough Answers
8. How do you handle pressure? Do you like or dislike these situations?

High achievers tend to perform well in high pressure
situations. Conversely, this question also could imply that the position is pressure-packed. If you perform well under stress, provide a good example with details, giving an overview of the stress situation. Try to relay the situation as a challenge rather than focusing on your ability to handle pressure.

Illegal Interviewing Questions

Illegal Interviewing Questions

Illegal Interviewing Questions

Follow up After Interviews
Objectives: Evaluate interviews Write thank you letters as a follow-up to an interview

Analyze a rejection subsequent to an
interview

T-4.10-1

Follow up After Interviews
Every interview is an opportunity to improve your interviewing skills. You can maximize your potential for success and help you to learn from your experience to increase your chances for success, do two things at the end of each interview. 1. Send a thank you note or letter to the interviewer.

2. Take a few notes about how you did.

Thank You Letter

Thank You Letter

Follow up After Interviews
Do these two things after each interview. Make notes while the interview experience is still fresh

in your mind. Use the Post Interview Checklist on
page 132, this will help you in two ways: 1. If called for a second interview, you can easily review what went on in the first interview. 2. If you do not get the job, review your interview

performance and improve it for the next time.

WHY DIDN’T YOU GET A JOB?
SOMETIMES THE COMPANY: Hires from within

Hires a more experienced applicant
Does not hire

Review Page 136 in your TAP Manual

T-4.11-1

WHY DIDN’T YOU GET A JOB?
SOMETIMES YOU: Are over-qualified

Have a conflicting work style

T-4.11-2

WHAT WENT WRONG?
PERSONAL PRESENTATION: Appearance

Handshake
Tone of voice

Speech/grammar

T-4.11-3

WHAT WENT WRONG?
PERSONAL PRESENTATION: Language

Late or rushed
Aggressive

Lack of confidence, courtesy or enthusiasm

T-4.11-4

WHAT WENT WRONG?
PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES

AND VALUES:
Lack of goals Focus on short term

Cynical or defensive attitude
Lack of interest in company or position Unpleasant attitude
T-4.11-5

WHAT WENT WRONG?
INTERVIEW SKILLS: Poor eye contact or body language Focus on money Evasive answers Negative responses Lack of preparation

T-4.11-6

Evaluate Job Offers
Objectives: Evaluate job offers Negotiate terms of employment Effectively communicate decisions to employers

T-5.1-1

Job Evaluation Factors
The Industry • Is this a field where you would like to build a career. • Potential for long-term growth

The Position
• Work duties • Potential for advancement • Position level • Wages/benefits

Job Evaluation Factors
• Hours • Working conditions • Quality of job • Travel requirements

The Company
• Growth Potential • Planned expansion • Reputation • Management Team

Job Evaluation Factors
Your Supervisor • Skills • Organizational position • Interaction/expectation

Environmental Concerns
• Geographical location • Area factors • Housing • Recreation & Schools

Possible Benefits Companies Might Negotiate
Paid Vacations Health Insurance Paid Sick Leave Paid Life Insurance

Savings and Profit Sharing
Pension Plan (Defined benefit) Provided Other Benefits

NEGOTIATING TIPS
1. Be serious about issues 2. Research issues to support

position
3. Remember: salary usually

does not include benefits
4. Be prepared to negotiate

T-5.2-1

Communicate Your Decision to

the Employer
What to Know • Accept the offer (as is or Negotiated) • Reject the offer • Request extension of the decision

See Sample letters in TAP manual Pages 147, 148,
149 & 150.

BUSINESS LETTER FORMAT

T-5.3-1

Support and Assistance
Objectives: Understand available resources

T-6.1-1

Department of Veterans Affairs

http://www.va.gov

Small Business Administration
http://www.sba.gov http://www.sba.gov/vets http://www.score.org/ Kirstein Business Library

Mission:
Help Veterans, Reservists, and National

Guard Members secure employment
USERRA - Uniformed Services Employment & Reemployment Rights Act Unemployment Insurance

Inter-Agency Liaison

USERRA
Employment and Reemployment Rights Act
of 1994

Uniformed Services

USDOL/VETS - USERRA

National Guard and Reserve members called to active duty who must leave their civilian job to serve are entitled by law to return to their jobs when released from active duty. This protection is provided by the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act, or “USERRA,” chapter 43 of title 38, U.S. Code. USERRA is administered and enforced by the Department of Labor’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS).
USDOL/VETS - USERRA

In order to have USERRA protection, you must meet certain eligibility requirements:

•You must notify your employer of your service in advance, unless notice is precluded by military necessity or some factor beyond your control. This notice can be oral or in writing and can be provided by you or by a responsible representative of your unit. We recommend you provide notice to your employer in writing.
USDOL/VETS - USERRA

In order to have USERRA protection, you must meet certain eligibility requirements: • You must apply for reemployment in a timely manner following your release from active duty. Application deadlines depend on the length of service. For less than 31 days, you generally need to report to work at • the next normal shift following release, travel home and 8 hours rest. For 31 to 180 days, you have 14 days following release to apply for reemployment. For more than 180 days, you have 90 days. These periods are all extended if you sustain or aggravate an illness or injury during your period of active duty.
USDOL/VETS - USERRA

PENSION PLAN Section 4318(b) (2) If you participate in a pension plan, you are generally entitled to pension benefits that will make you “whole” upon your return. If your plan is one where you make contributions, you must be given the opportunity to make up contributions you missed. Repayment•of the employee contributions can be made over three times the period of military service but no longer than 5 years. Pension issues can be complicated and if any problems come up when you are reemployed, give VETS a call.

USDOL/VETS - USERRA

HEALTH INSURANCE Section 4317(a)(1)

It is EXTREMELY important to understand your health insurance entitlements under USERRA. If you participate in a health plan with your employer, you are entitled to • have this coverage continued while you are on active duty. If you request your employer
to continue your civilian health care, the employer must do so for up to 18 months, but you may be required to pay up to 102 percent of the cost of the coverage.
USDOL/VETS - USERRA

SENIORITY RIGHTS Section 4126 (a)

Reemployed service members are entitled to the seniority and all rights and benefits based on seniority that • they would have attained with reasonable certainty had they remained continuously employed.

USDOL/VETS - USERRA

CONTACTS -- ESGR This is a very brief look at USERRA as it applies to your activation. Many questions may come up, and I want to provide you with numbers you can call for information or assistance. You can contact an • ombudsman at the National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, an agency in the Department of Defense, for information and informal assistance on their toll-free help line at 1-800-336-4590 or check their website at www.esgr.org
USDOL/VETS - USERRA

CONTACTS -- VETS

Also, if you need information on your rights or wish to file a USERRA complaint, you should contact VETS (202) 693-4711 • There is a VETS office located in each State. Information on USERRA and VETS offices can also be obtained from the VETS website at: www.dol.gov/vets
USDOL/VETS - USERRA

U. S. Department of Labor
 Veterans’

Employment and Training Service
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans’ Employment and Training

Dept of Labor  200 Constitution Ave, N.W. Rm S-1316  Washington, D.C. 20210
USDOL/VETS - USERRA

 U.S.

Veterans Employment Representatives

   

Veterans Helping Veterans Develop Job and Training Opportunities Work with employers and gov’t agencies Monitors employers’ observation of Veterans’ Preference (Title 38, US Code)  Case Management / Career Counseling

One-Stop Career Centers:
      State and Federal Benefits Information Career Guidance (free testing) Resume and Cover Letter Assistance Resource Center (library, Internet, etc.) Temporary Office Space Local Agency Referrals

News You Can Use:
(VA)

Vocational Rehabilitation Services

State Tuition Waiver and Free College Prep Veterans Agents and Organizations Federal Contractor List

Local Non-Profit Veterans Training

Phone Resources:
VA: 1-800-827-1000

Unemployment Insurance:
1-877-626-6800 Boston 1-617-626-6800 Bill Leamy, Boston Vet Rep: 1-617-303-5537

Unemployment Insurance:
Every state has DIFFERENT:

– Rules, regulations, and guidelines – Filing procedure – Payment amounts
Anyone can file, everyone won’t collect A Veteran can file in ANY state! Must Have (DD 214) Member 4 Copy

Contact VETS REP when filing

“ It is all in the Manual!”


				
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