Changing Directions Alternative careers for paramedics, EMTs

Document Sample
Changing Directions Alternative careers for paramedics, EMTs Powered By Docstoc
					       Changing Directions: Alternative careers for paramedics, EMTs, Firefighters, and Police

Changing Directions: Alternative careers for
paramedics, EMTs, Firefighters, and Police

Source: http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Uk/uk.community.firefighting/2007−05/msg00000.html



      • From: monty <everyminutesucks.com@xxxxxxxxx>
      • Date: 26 May 2007 04:01:10 −0700

Rescue team members often have highly−specialized trainings which they
undergo for months even years on end because they are dealing with
lives. Paramedics and EMTs for example, are either degree−holders of
emergency medicine (or other related courses) or have undergone extra
EMS training before operating as lifesavers. On the other hand, police
and firefighters undergo a less specialized training as EMS (many
however have not undergone such training) but are highly equipped with
combative training (for example: crime−fighting).

Though the mastery of highly−specialized skills is very necessary in
order to save lives, it has its downside as well. Emergency rescue is
a time−consuming career and leaves little to no room for the pursuit
of other activities, hobbies, and interests, let alone a second
career. The problem with the industry is that in any event that a
rescue team member ceases to work, either he or she was fired,
retired, injured or decided to take a hiatus and pursue another less
taxing career, there often are limited career opportunities where they
can make use of their specialized skills. Yet if one cares to look
deeper and be more resourceful, he or she would actually find a
plethora of job opportunities ranging from careers that are closely
related to their former occupation to something else entirely but may
have an implicit connection with their skills.

Health and Fitness Careers

Most states offering EMS have required team members to undergo fitness
tests to ensure their physical capability for life saving (mental
precision may not always be enough). As such, practicing paramedics,
EMTs, firefighters, and police are expected to be physically fit
therefore they are high candidates for athletic training and fitness
training careers. These careers focus on the provision of health care
maintenance for the physically−active and can pay as much as $40,000.

EMS work generally revolves on the prevention, treatment and
rehabilitation of traumatic injuries and diseases. A former EMS member
may opt for the following alternative careers:

1. Chiropractor − Paramedics may use their acquired skills in

Changing Directions: Alternative careers for paramedics, EMTs, Firefighters, and Police              1
      Changing Directions: Alternative careers for paramedics, EMTs, Firefighters, and Police
handling bone injuries. Chiropractors focus on treating
musculoskeletal injuries through manual manipulation of the backbone
or other pertinent bone structures.
2. Gerontologist − They usually work at senior citizen homes as
nurses.
3. Home health aide − Similar to gerontologists only instead of
working in the center, they are hired as private nurses.

The Social Social Careers Track

Emergency rescues do not only deal with rapid and careful treatment.
Effective communication is always a prerequisite especially when
dealing with victims of traumatic injuries. Communication skills are
often necessary to be able to diagnose a patient's condition (i.e. how
the patient feels, where he or she feels pain, and the like). EMS
members are also tasked to extract the patient's background history
(if he or she has had similar accidents in the past or if he or she
has a disease) and personal information.

A viable alternative career opportunity would be in the social works.
Former EMS personnel, firefighters, and police may find a promising
future as social workers and even as clergy who provide rehabilitation
through persuasion, behavioral, psychological and spiritual
counseling.

The Administrative Path

Dennis Putman, who worked in the ADA County Paramedics in 1985 as a
paramedic has had other careers throughout his occupational tenure.

                From being a paramedic he became an assistant supervisor,a supervisor,

a question and answer coordinator, and an operations team commander.
In addition, with an EMS personnel's training in filing information,
recording a victim's vital signs, and clinical duties, a profession as
medical assistant is something that one should consider.

Article Source: http://everyminutesucks.com
<a href="http://everyminutesucks.com>EMS − EveryMinuteSucks.com</a>

.




Changing Directions: Alternative careers for paramedics, EMTs, Firefighters, and Police         2