Help Your Child Identify Interests, Explore Careers, and Develop by mrl19919

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									Slide 1: Help Your Child Identify Interests, Explore Careers, and Develop Plans for the Future.



Slide 2: Why Should You be Involved in your Child's Education and Career Planning?



Slide 3: Why Parent Involvement?

* Research shows that you have the greatest influence on your child's career choices.

* As a parent, you have the best knowledge of your child's interests and abilities.

* You have more interest than anyone else in your child's well-being and success.

* Your child's future is too important to be left to luck or chance.



Slide 4: When Parents are Involved

Children have

* Higher grades and test scores

* Higher graduation rates

* Better attendance at school and get more homework done

* Fewer placements in special education

And

* Are more likely to enroll in postsecondary education

* Show more positive attitudes and behavior.

Source: The Family is Crucial to Student Achievement, National Committee for Citizens in Education,
1994


Slide 5: Elementary Career Awareness


In Elementary School Your Child Needs to:

* Identify personal interests, abilities, strengths, and weaknesses.

* Describe how work at home and/or school relates to jobs in the community.

* Describe how work is important and attainable to all people.

* Demonstrate a positive attitude.
* Describe how personal beliefs and values affect decision making.

Source: American School Counselor Association



Slide 6: Middle School Career Exploration

In Middle School Your Child Needs to:

* Demonstrate effective skills in working with others.

* Show an appreciation for the similarities and differences among people.

* Describe individual skills and aptitudes required to fulfill roles.

* Identify strategies for managing personal finances.

* Describe skills needed in a variety of occupations.

* Demonstrate skills needed to obtain and keep a job.

Source: American School Counselor Association



Slide 7: High School Career Exploration

In High School Your Child Needs to:

* Understand how individual personality, abilities and interests relate to career goals.

* Demonstrate skills that can apply to a variety of occupations and changing work requirements.

* Understand how high school education relates to college majors, further training and/or entry into the job
market.

* Be able to use a wide variety of career information resources.

Source: American School Counselor Association




Slide 8: Discuss Your Child’s Interests

Ask Your Child:

* What are your favorite school subjects?

* What extracurricular activities do you enjoy most?

* What are your favorite hobbies?

* What do you like to do with your friends?
* What special skills do you think you possess?

* What have you done that you are most proud of?

* What do you like to do with your free time?

* What interests you the most?



Slide 9: Nurture Your Child’s Interests

If your child has an interest in animals, he or she might like to:

Elementary School

* Feed and care for a family pet.

Middle School

* Join a 4-H Club.
* Walk or care for a neighbor’s dog.

High School

* Volunteer at a local veterinary clinic, animal shelter or zoo.



Slide 10: Nurture Your Child’s Interests

If your child has an interest in art, he or she might like to:

Elementary School

* Make birthday or holiday cards for relatives and friends.

Middle School

* Create graphics for the school newsletter.
* Design invitations for a special event.

High School

* Design a personal or school website.



Slide 11: Nurture Your Child’s Interests

If your child likes to help people, he or she might like to:

Elementary School

* Join a Girl Scout or Boy Scout club.
Middle School

* Teach a younger child to read.
* Volunteer to read to nursing home residents.

High School

* Be a summer or vacation camp counselor.
* Assist at a day care center.



Slide 12: Nurture Your Child’s Interests

If your child likes to build or repair things, he or she might like to:

Elementary School

* Use Lego's or Lincoln Logs to build things.

Middle School

* Build a radio or computer from a kit.
* Take apart an old appliance and put it back together.

High School

* Design and build a robot or a piece of furniture.
* Help repair or remodel things in your home.



Slide 13: Nurture Your Child’s Interests

If your child likes sports, he or she might like to:

Elementary School

* Play on a sports team.

Middle School

* Assist a coach.
* Take a fitness class.

High School

* Umpire or referee community games.
* Coach a youth sports team.



Slide 14: What if My Child’s Interests Change?

* If your child has been exploring interests, and he or she decides that interests have changed — hurray!
* It is just as important for your child to know what he or she does not want to do as it is to know what he
or she does want to do.

* Exploration is the key to helping make informed decisions.



Slide 15: Help Your Child Explore Careers

To help your child with career exploration:

* Encourage your child to make independent decisions.

* Involve yourself in your child’s future planning.

* Encourage exploration of all kinds of post-high school education opportunities.

* Give your child economic responsibilities.

* Encourage job awareness.

* Be flexible as the decision-making process evolves.



Slide 16: Career Exploration Resources

To find your state’s office of America’s Career Resource Network:

* Visit www.acrnetwork.org.
* Click on Network and then click on your state.

Your state’s Career Resource Network office can direct you and your child to career exploration resources.



Slide 17: Parent Resources

Visit www.acrnetwork.org for Parent Resources

Click on Parent Involvement Guide to learn about:

* Helping Your Child Identify Interests

* Helping Your Child Make Career Decisions

* Helping Your Child Make a Post-High School Plan

* Finding the Right College

* Locating Financial Aid

* And more.
Slide 18: Career Exploration Resources

* America’s Career InfoNet at http://www.acinet.org/acinet

* Occupational Outlook Handbook at http://www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm

* Your local library has career information books and publications, as well as Internet access to explore
careers online.



Slide 19: Help Your Child Plan for the Future



Slide 20: What Parents Need to Know About Education and the Labor Market



Slide 21: Parents Need to Know

Unemployment rates for non-institutionalized civilians ages 25 and older

Less than a high school diploma              8.2 percent

High school diploma                          5.4 percent

Some college, no degree                      5.6 percent

Associate degree                    4.4 percent

Bachelor's or higher                         3.4 percent

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, July 2003


Slides 22 and 23: Parents Need to Know

Of the 22.2 million jobs to be generated between 2000 and 2010, 17.5 million will require some
postsecondary education.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2001



Slide 24: Parents Need to Know

8 of the 10 fastest growing occupations between 2000 and 2010 will require some form of postsecondary
education.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2001



Slide 25: Parents Need to Know
48 of the 50 best paying jobs will require a college degree.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2002



Slide 26: About College

Although over 97 percent of students (and their parents) aspire to college,

* 63 percent enroll in college the fall following their graduation from high school.

* More than a third leave within two years without earning a degree.

* Only about half earn a bachelor’s degree by the time they are 29 years old.

Source: The Condition of Education, 2002


Slide 27: About College

* Community or technical college can lead to well-paying jobs, and may be all a child needs to reach his or
her career goal.

* Community college can also be the path to a 4-year degree.

* Many students start out at a community college to save costs or get a handle on college-level work.

Source: Higher Learning Equals Higher Earnings, Center on Education Policy, September 2001



Slide 28: College Preparation

* Freshmen who enter college without a career goal or an academic major in mind have higher college
dropout rates.

* More than 22 percent of college freshmen need to take remedial courses — these do not count as credit
toward a degree.

* Your child should take challenging courses in high school to prepare for college-level coursework.



Slide 29: College Preparation

* 83 percent of students who take Algebra I and Geometry in high school go on to college.

* Students who don’t take Algebra and Geometry in high school are much less likely to go to college —
only 36 percent do.

* Taking challenging courses in high school not only helps children get into college, but also increases the
chances they will complete college.
Slide 30: Help Create Post-High School Plans

* Discover the training that is required for your child to meet his or her career goals.

* Find colleges or career schools that provide training specific to your child’s goals.

* Think about the school’s atmosphere, does your child do better in small classes or large groups? Will he
or she do better at a school in a large city or a small town?




Slide 31: With your help, your child can create a solid plan that will guide him or her to successful post-
high school training and rewarding career.

								
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