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					Women & Hi Tech

University Relations Program

Women in Technology: Taking the Mystery out of Technology Careers
Sponsored by Women & Hi Tech
Hosted by IUPUI March 31, 2003 IUPUI Riley Auditorium
Women & Hi Tech sponsored a Women in Technology night at IUPUI on March 31, 2003. IUPUI students and staff and women from business, government, and other Indiana organizations gathered in the Ruth Lilly Auditorium on the IUPUI campus to hear six professionals discuss their own experiences in technology and technology-related careers. The Women & Hi Tech College Initiative, Women in Technology, is organized on Indiana college and university campuses to introduce young women and women considering a career change to careers in technology through presentations and networking with professionals either in the field or heavily involved in technology-related careers. The six guest speakers brought more than career advice to the audience. Each speaker added their own perspective as they described their education and career path, and included words of wisdom for others considering careers in technology. Marsha Bearden Director of Technology, Sommer Barnard Ackerson, Attorneys at Law PC. E-mail: mbearden@sbalawyers.com Ms. Bearden is the director of technology at Sommer Barnard. Her primary role is to ensure that the firm has the appropriate technology tools to serve their clients’ needs. She is responsible for network and infrastructure design (both LAN and WAN); telecommunications; application deployment and design; technology budgeting; desktop development; business solution development; system integration; and remote access capabilities, including PDA solutions. In addition to her considerable professional responsibilities, Ms. Bearden also is a wife, mother of very active teens, and student working towards her MBA in Finance from the University of Phoenix Online program. Marsha’s Words of Wisdom  With no goals, there is nothing to strive for.  Servant leaders are what we most need in today’s organizations, as they constantly put others needs before their own.  When in doubt, pray for direction! The talent of success is nothing more than doing what you can do well, and doing well whatever you do. - Longfellow

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Kaye Davidson Manager, IUB~IUPUI Call Centers E-mail: kdavidso@iupui.edu Ms. Davidson is a native Hoosier with over 25 years of communication experience. She is the manager of the Call Center at Indiana University Bloomington and IUPUI. She considers the challenge of keeping up with the ever-changing technological growth of the campus and her position to be an exciting opportunity. According to Ms. Davidson, “We are living in exciting times and I am proud to be a part of the future.” Kaye’s Advice:  Change: My experience with change is that those who can adapt will continue to have a successful career. There are only two options; fight change or embrace change. With new innovations in technology and in the IT field you have to be adaptable, because change is inevitable. There is a certain amount of stress involved especially if you have just learned something new and it changes in a short period of time. In the twenty-five years that I have been in the communications field there have been numerous technological advancements. I knew that to succeed I had to change and adapt as technology changed.  Having a Supportive Team: In the IT field, especially here on campus, there are various departments that must work together for the good of the whole. I put a lot of emphasis on teamwork, then looking at new technologies it is important to have the right people supporting your efforts. I evaluate the task and pull together individuals with the appropriate skills and knowledge to keep the job running smoothly.  Empowering Staff: One of my responsibilities as a manager is to make sure my staff is successful. Individuals are encouraged to discuss idea's be creative and act on their instincts. I want my staff to know I am always ready to listen and support them in their efforts.

Eugenia Fernandez Associate Professor of Computer Technology, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI Email: efernand@iupui.edu Professor Fernandez started her career with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. After working for a short time as a Fire Protection Engineer for Kemper Insurance, she returned to school to study computers and earned an M.S.E. in Computer, Information and Control Engineering from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in Management Information Systems from Purdue University. Professor Fernandez started her academic career teaching Management Information Systems in business schools at The College of William and Mary, Butler University and Penn State Harrisburg. She returned to her engineering roots in 1996 when she joined the Computer Technology Department at IUPUI. After successfully navigating the tenure-track path, she was promoted to Associate Professor last year. Currently she teaches courses in database management, systems & database analysis, XML, and programming, and conducts research in the areas of assessment and computer pedagogy.

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Words of Wisdom from Eugenia  If a company wants to get rid of you, they will find an excuse. So don't try to fit a mold—just be yourself.  Do listen to what your colleagues say, but more importantly, watch what they do.  Don't stop learning.

Christine Y. Fitzpatrick Deputy Communications Officer, Office of the Vice President for Information Technology & CIO E-mail: cfitzpat@iu.edu Christine oversees the University Information Technology Services (UITS) Communications and Planning Office, a group of talented and creative technical communicators, artists, and multimedia/Web developers responsible for IT-related communications and events at IU. As a part-time faculty member, she has also taught technical communications and computer-related courses at IUPUI since 1983—the most recent of these taught online. Christine has bachelor's and master's degrees in English from Ball State University and is a Ph.D. candidate in Instructional Systems Technology at Indiana University. Little known fact: At one time she planned to teach high school Home Economics. Christine and her husband, Don, have three children and a dog, and enjoy watching movies (any kind -- classic and bad alike), reading, and traveling. Three things I've learned that have made a difference;    Pay attention to your inner voice. Keep a journal. Don't be afraid to ask for what you need.

Cindy Hollingsworth Coordinator of Instructional Design, IU School of Nursing, IUPUI Email: cholling@iupui.edu Following a career as a legal secretary and office manager for two separate general practice partnerships, and while raising two sons in pre- and elementary school, Ms. Hollingsworth attended Purdue University, graduating with honors in 1992 with a B.S. in Computer Information Systems. Following graduation she began working at IUPUI, first as a training and documentation specialist, then as faculty support, and now as the Coordinator of Instructional Design at the IU School of Nursing. She graduated in August 2001 with a masters in adult education from Indiana University. In her current position, she assists faculty with developing Web-based courses, and consults with schools and departments about moving to Web-based learning and building effective online learning communities. Three things Cynthia has learned:  Attending college is the hardest thing I've ever done (with the exception of childbirth, and it didn't last nearly as long as college, thank goodness) and the one that has brought me the greatest personal satisfaction and feeling of achievement.
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 

The desire to reach my goal and my willingness to make sacrifices and to work hard to achieve that goal were more important than having a genius IQ. Have fun. College is very stressful; it takes hard work, organization, the ability to ask questions, and the willingness to make sacrifices and to make some mistakes, but college is an exciting time and place and one that you can never go back to in quite the same way (whether you're a student at age 19 or 30). Take time to see a home football and basketball game (even if you don't like sports), hang out in the union or student lounge (even if you don't like crowded places), people-watch on the mall and parks (even if you don't like the outdoors), visit all the buildings on campus at least once (even if you don't have class in them), participate in at least a few of the special events (even if you don't have a lot of money), and take a class that sounds interesting (even if it's not "in your major") -- you never know what kind of cool things you'll see and learn!

Julie Tracy Network Engineer, Infotex E-mail: jtracy@infotex.ws Ms. Tracy earned a BA in Psychology from Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL, and then attended graduate school at UIC School Public Health, pursuing a PhD in Epidemiology while working as a Research Associate at Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine. She has over 10 years of experience in the IT field and hold certifications from Microsoft and CompTIA and currently works with Infotex, a security and networking consulting firm with offices in Kokomo, Lafayette, and Wabash. Julie’s Three Words of Advice  Have thick skin. You will work with a lot of men who say comments in a manner they don't intend and you need to not let this bother you.  The job never quits even when you go home. As we move to a more mobile work force, your work follows you home. Many in the IT field check e-mail from home before they leave for work in the morning and first thing when they get home. When users have a problem, they don't want to wait for you to be in the office.  You can never stop learning. As soon as you feel like you master an operating system or an application, a new one is out there and the one you mastered is gone. You have to keep up with the tide or the tide will roll over you.

Women & Hi Tech also wishes to acknowledge and thank our other networking volunteers for the evening: Teresa Bennett, Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) Julie Nahvi, Bitwise Sue Ream, IUPUI Career Center and President of Women & Hi Tech Rhonda Tamulonis, President, MBR A special thank you also goes out to the IUPUI Planning Committee: Mary Chappell, Kelley School of Business Christine Fitzpatrick, Office of the Vice President for Information Technology Crystal Foutz, University College
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Robyn Gibboney, School of Nursing Tia Hamilton, School of Informatics Shannon McDaniel, School of Nursing Sandy Merritt, IUPUI Middle School Program Kim Nguyen, School of Science Sue Ream, IUPUI Career Center Karen Siurek, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology Terri Talbert-Hatch, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology

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