Jobs, Families and the American Dream by edc15331

VIEWS: 54 PAGES: 36

									2 0 0 5 – 2 0 0 6
spirit of giving guide

Jobs, Families and the American Dream
in   t he   Washington,   D.C.   Region
2 0 0 5 – 2 0 0 6

spirit of giving guide

Table of Contents

Jobs, Famil ies and the Am er ican Dr eam                  2

The Selection Process                                      6



2005–06 Featured Organizations                             7

RECRUITMENT OPPORTUNITIES                                  8

3r d & Eats Restaurant                                     9

Academy of Hope                                           10

Busines s Development As sistance Group                   11

Carlos Rosario International Career Center                12

Enterprise Staf fing Solutions                            13

Infant / Toddler Family Day Care                          14

J obs for Homeless People                                 15

Jubilee Jobs                                              16

Newcom er Comm unity Ser vice Center                      17

Senior Em ployment Res ources                             18

STRIVE DC                                                 19

Suited for Change                                         20

U rban Alliance Foundation                                21

Vir ginia Justice Center                                  22

Workfor ce Organizations for Regional Collaboration       23



A n Ov e r v ie w of Wo r k f o r c e De ve l op m e nt   24

Results                                                   30

H o w To I n v e s t i n T h e s e E f f o r t s          32

W h o We Ar e                                             33
Success Stories
The Spirit of Giving Guide is prepared each year by The Community Foundation for the National Capital
Region as a tool for donors. It's purpose: to highlight a critical issue in the Washington region and 15 non-
profit organizations that are doing something about it. This year the Spirit of Giving Guide looks at the issue
of employment and the nonprofit workforce development programs that are putting people to work in our
community. These programs touch hundreds of lives; below are the stories of two people who have found
success and much more.



Twenty-one-year-old Janice Clagett is a graduate of a 22-week office skills program that connects
low-income adult breadwinners with employers who need motivated, tech-savvy administrative staff.
Here, in her own words, is her story:

“I grew up in a negative environment. When I was eight, there was an argument in my home and I got
caught in the crossfire and shot in both legs. By 15, I was pregnant and had left home. At 18, my second
daughter was born at 27 weeks, clinging to life by a thread. I knew if I could make it through this, I could
m a ke it through any ordeal. Since I was 15, I had worked in grocery stores and fast food restaurants. I
had to stop working because I didn’t have transportation or childcare. That is when I tested for Northern
Virginia Family Service’s Training Futures Program. Within a week I knew it would change my life. I have
worked as an administrative assistant in the Fairfax County Department of Family Services for more than
a year and a half. It is a fulltime, permanent job with benefits. It’s ironic that I go to work every day in
the very same building I went to for my social services benefits. In my family, I stand out because I broke
the cycle. I turned things around for my two girls. They are the future. My hopes and dreams are their
hopes and dreams.”

“You see I want more than ordinary. I want extraordinary.”

Ed Cohen, senior director of Booz Allen Hamilton, is the primary architect of Booz Allen’s partnership
with Training Futures. He describes that relationship:

“The synergistic partnership we’ve created with Training Futures is a model for other businesses. Employment
programs like this help employers meet their need for a skilled workforce. However, I think it’s a fallacy that
there is a shortage of skilled workers. There is a shortage of opportunities. Opportunities for people to walk
through the door who have the right baseline of skills and who are then welcomed into the corporate world.
Organizations like Training Futures act as translators, as conduits. They help workers understand what
employers need and what it takes to survive in the corporate world. When it comes to filling the gap in
our region, I don’t believe corporations can do it alone. I don’t believe nonprofits can do it alone.”

“It wi ll take all of us worki ng together.”


                                T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   1
                                                  Jobs, Families and the American Dream




                                                  Janice Clagett and the other individuals profiled in this Spirit of Giving Guide are
                                                  good examples of why America is known as the land of opportunity. Removing
                                                  barriers to opportunity are what the workforce development programs highlighted
                                                  in this publication are all about. Through a variety of approaches, they help people
                                                  achieve their full potential, support their families and dream of a better future for
                                                  their children.




                                                  your              tool        for         giving

                                                  The Community Foundation launched the Spirit of Giving Guide three years ago
                                                  to invite donors to join us in helping to make such dreams a reality. The Guide is
                                                  designed to provide donors and others with a tool for their giving, one that offers
                                                  information as well as inspiration. The results have in turn inspired us, as people
                                                  have responded with financial support, in-kind donations and volunteer time
                                                  for the featured groups. More than $700,000 in cash and in-kind contributions has
                                                  been raised through the Guide for the organizations featured over the past two
                                                  years. With an annual production budget of $30,000, the Guide has yielded an
                                                  11 to 1 ratio of return for The Community Foundation’s investment.


                                                  This year our topic is workforce development, at first blush not the most warm
                                                  and fuzzy issue. But a closer look reveals the connections of this topic to many
                                                  others, including outcomes for children, family and neighborhood stability, and the
                                                  inequities in our region that continue to deepen. The fact is that while our regional
                                                  economy continues to be one of the strongest in the country, poverty is increasing
                                                  at a rapid rate—32 percent over the past 10 years. Our community’s prosperity
                                                  and job growth are starkly contrasted by more and more people falling behind.




2   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
a     pa th           out          of        p over ty

Workforce development programs offer people the opportunity and means to take
part in our regional economy. The web of organizations involved in workforce devel-
opment is vast, but nonprofit organizations play a critical role. For the 15 organiza-
tions highlighted in this Guide, the objective is not merely to place people in the first
job that comes along. It’s about helping people prepare for a lifetime of employment,
with wages and benefits that can sustain their families and jobs that provide the
potential for advancement. It is about finding a path out of poverty and beginning
to share in the prosperity that many of us enjoy.




be       insp ir ed

We hope this publication will inspire you to invest in the 15 organizations high-
lighted in the Guide. Do this by donating directly to the nonprofit organization,
donating through The Community Foundation (if you are a Community Foundation
donor) or by donating online through www.TouchDC.org. To find more information
on how to give, see page 32; for some in-depth background on workforce issues,
turn to page 24.




“I had never been in an office like that. I was scared to death when I
first got there. But the experience brought me out of my shell. It prepared
me for life. Urban Alliance did a heck of a job preparing me for the work
world. Today, I could walk into any work environment and succeed.”
Char les       Rei d,     pl aced       at    Fannie        Mae       Foundati on
by   Ur ban        Al liance




                                T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   3
                           think                   dif fer ently

                           We hope this Guide will make you think differently about the many people in our region who are either
                           unemployed or are stuck in low-wage jobs with nowhere to go. The values of hard work, self-suffi-
                           ciency and providing for one’s family are a fundamental part of the American dream. That is true
                           for the new immigrant who has limited English proficiency. It is true for the prisoner who is transitioning
                           from incarceration to the community. And it is true of the single mother striving to create a better life for
                           herself and her children. People who need jobs come from a variety of backgrounds. Some have strong
                           work histories. Some have worked sporadically over the years and some have hardly any work experience
                           at all. Their stories may be very different but they have this in common: their desire to find a job and
                           the self-esteem and financial security that comes with it.


                           The results affect us all. We know the impact of poverty on families. Income is strongly linked with a host
                           of outcomes concerning children’s health, education, safety and life chances. It affects our neighborhoods,
                           where hopelessness takes root. And, it has widespread implications for our region’s economy with its
                           unmet demand for a growing, reliable workforce.




“I didn’t know how to get a job in my field. I didn’t know how to get
an interview. I didn’t have any money. I was staying with friends and
relying on food stamps. [Now] this is my country. It is where I own a
house. It is where I send my children to school. It is where I pay taxes!”
Ak li lu    G ul uma,            pol itical         asylee    f rom    Ethi opi a,
placed        at        Inova      Mount           Ver non   Hospi tal      by    Newcomer s
Communit y               Ser vice         Center




4   S p i r i t   o f    G i v i n g   G u i d e
your giving can create change

Between now and 2015, the region is projected to generate close to 1 million new
jobs in technology, business and professional services, health care, construction and
other sectors. With leadership and investment, the inequities in our community can
be addressed. More adults will have the skills to take advantage of these job opportu-
nities. More children will grow up in homes without poverty and with dreams for a
brighter future.


Your giving can help to create these changes—and the organizations profiled
here are your partners in that transformation. Come learn more….and find
yourself changed as well.




“The childcare providers we trained last year collectively earned $2.5 million.
That money finds its ways back into the local economy as they buy houses, expand
their businesses and send their children to college.”
Ileene       H of f man,      di rector,         Inf ant/Toddler
Fami ly      Day    Car e     of    Nor ther n        V ir ginia




                                T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   5
                                                   The Selection Process
selection committee                                The organizations highlighted in this year’s Spirit of Giving Guide were selected
                                                   by an advisory committee of experts including researchers, representatives of local
RUBIE COLES, THE MORIAH FUND                       foundations and nonprofit organizations, and donors to The Community Foundation.
CAROLINE CUNNINGHAM, GREATER                       These individuals generously gave their time and expertise to identify small but
WASHINGTON BOARD OF TRADE                          effective nonprofits. Why small? All of the groups profiled in the Guide have operat-
KAREN CZAPANSKIY, UNIVERSITY                       ing budgets under $2 million, a criteria that is intended to support groups without
OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF LAW AND                      the organizational resources to do extensive promotion on their own. Without this
COLUMBUS SCHOOL OF LAW OF                          Guide, their stories might not make it to your kitchen table or desk, or even to your
CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY
                                                   bedside table. The Guide is a way for them to connect with you and vice versa.
BRIAN P. FOLEY, NORTHERN VIRGINIA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
                                                   The committee reviewed close to 60 applications. In the end, these 15 organizations
PATRICIA HARRIS, GREATER                           stood out for their capacity, financial standing, strong leadership and demonstrated
WASHINGTON YOUTH PHILANTHROPY
                                                   outcomes. They operate across the region, represent a broad range of approaches,
INITIATIVE
                                                   work in a variety of sectors and meet the needs of diverse populations.
MISSY HORNING-YOUNG

BOMANI JOHNSON, THE COMMUNITY                      All of the groups met The Community Foundation’s definition of workforce development:
FOUNDATION FOR THE NATIONAL
CAPITAL REGION                                     Programs that seek to effectively transition low-income adults and youth to economic
HERB & MARCIA MARKS                                self-sufficiency and stability. They develop pathways through which unemployed and
                                                   underemployed individuals can attain livable wages and benefits, maintain employment
NANCY MILLS, WORKING FOR AMERICA
INSTITUTE                                          and realize opportunities for professional and personal advancement. Workforce devel-
                                                   opment efforts seek employment solutions that benefit employers as well as employees
MARK OUELLETTE, DC CHILDREN AND
YOUTH INVESTMENT TRUST                             and their families. Workforce development strategies include training, education, place-
CORPORATION                                        ment, coaching, comprehensive social services and industry networking and advocacy
NISHA PATEL, WASHINGTON AREA                       to improve policies, services and overall systems.
WOMEN’S FOUNDATION

MARTHA ROSS, BROOKINGS
INSTITUTION

MARGARET SINGLETON, DC CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE

DAVID STEWART, GREATER
WASHINGTON YOUTH PHILANTHROPY
INITIATIVE

JONELLE STACHURA WALLMEYER,
ALEXANDRIA COMMUNITY TRUST

THOMAS WATERS, MARSHALL
HEIGHTS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
ORGANIZATION

ANNE WEXLER, THE WEXLER GROUP

BOB WITTIG, JOVID FOUNDATION




6    S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
2 0 0 5 – 2 0 0 6
featured organizations



“A steady paycheck is far more than money, it is a source of self-esteem
and the catalyst for changing lives. Our goal is to ensure that the people
we assist in finding a job and a home are never going to need an
investment like this again.”
Contessa     Ri gg s,   executiv e         dir ector,
Jobs   for   Homel ess     People




                        T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   7
Seeking hardworking, enthusiastic and reliable employees?
RECRUITMENT OPPORTUNITIES
PLEASE CALL THESE ORGANIZATIONS FOR MORE
INFORMATION ABOUT THE INDIVIDUALS THEY
ARE LOOKING TO PLACE IN EMPLOYMENT.




                                                                                                               SPECIAL CONDITIONS


3RD & EATS RESTAURANT                                                              •
WILL DOSCHER, 202-997-1272

ACADEMY OF HOPE                                       •                  •              •         •
KATHRYN SOMMERS, 202-328-2029

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE GROUP                     •    •    •    •    •
LAURYN HAN, 703-993-4873

CARLOS ROSARIO INTERNATIONAL CAREER CENTER                               •         •         •    •
LAURA GRIEP, 202-797-4700

ENTERPRISING STAFFING SOLUTIONS                                     •                        •    •
JOSEPH JACKSON, 202-232-4830

INFANT/TODDLER FAMILY DAY CARE                            •
WYNNE BUSMAN, 703-352-3449 X102

JOBS FOR HOMELESS PEOPLE                                                                          •   •
CONTESSA RIGGS, 202-544-9096

JUBILEE JOBS                                              •    •    •         •         •    •    •   •        AFTER 6 MONTHS ON THE JOB,
LAURA MARKLE, 202-667-8970                                                                                     LOOK FOR CAREER-ORIENTED
                                                                                                               POSITIONS

NEWCOMER COMMUNITY SERVICES CENTER                    •                       •         •    •
VILAY CHALEUNRATH, 202-462-4330

SENIOR EMPLOYMENT RESOUCES                                               •    •                   •            OFTEN LOOKING FOR PART-TIME,
SUSAN ALLAN, 703-750-1936                                                                                      ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPOR-
                                                                                                               TATION, POSITIONS THAT DO NOT
                                                                                                               REQUIRE EXTENSIVE STANDING

STRIVE DC                                             •                       •         •    •    •
CHRIS HART-WRIGHT, 202-484-1264

SUITED FOR CHANGE*                                                            •         •    •
MICHELL YORKMAN, 202-293-0351 X5

URBAN ALLIANCE FOUNDATION                             •                  •              •         •            LOOKING PRIMARILY FOR PRO-
VERONICA NOLAN, 202-266-5722                                                                                   FESSIONAL PAID INTERNSHIPS
                                                                                                               W/ DC BUSINESSES

VIRGINIA JUSTICE CENTER*                                            •
LAURA STACK 703-778-3450

WORKFORCE ORGANIZATIONS                             FOR PRE-SCREENED WORK-READY CANDIDATES READY TO WORK IN A VARIETY OF
FOR REGIONAL COLLABORATION                          INDUSTRIES, CONTACT WORC’S ONE CLICK CLEARINGHOUSE (WWW.WORCONLINE.ORG),
SUMMER SPENCER 202-857-5991                         A WEB-BASED JOB POSTING BOARD THAT LINKS ORGANIZATIONS OFFERING EMPLOYMENT
                                                    OPPORTUNITIES TO OVER 100 AREA SERVICE PROVIDERS


* NOTE THAT THE ACTIVITIES OF THESE ORGANIZATIONS DO NOT LEND THEMSELVES DIRECTLY TO PLACEMENT OPPORTUNITIES




8   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
3rd & Eats Restaurant
It’s been a long journey for Belinda Chambers from selling newspapers on a street
corner and living in abandoned buildings to working at the world famous Willard                           giving oppor tunities
Hotel and buying her own home. Vivacious and highly motivated, Chambers couldn’t                          FUNDS: TO TRAIN AND FIND A PLACE-
have done it without the help of 3rd & Eats Restaurant, Inc.                                              MENT FOR A CHEF, PURCHASE A
    Founded in 1991 by Community Family Life Services (CFLS), 3rd & Eats culinary                         TRUCK FOR CATERING DELIVERIES
arts training program provides classroom instruction and on-the-job work experience                       AND A COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATOR.
in the food service field to unemployed and underemployed men and women from
throughout the Washington metropolitan region. Many participants are homeless or                          GOODS: MEDIUM THREE-RING
formerly homeless.                                                                                        BINDERS; NON-PERISHABLE FOOD.
    Trainees receive practical experience at 3rd & Eats Restaurant, at two locations in                   ABLE TO PICK UP DONATIONS.
downtown Washington (500 3rd Street, N.W. and 400 2nd Street N.W.), and through                           TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO MENTOR
its catering business, New Course Catering. The restaurants combined serve 450–500                        TRAINEES AND STAFF SPECIAL EVENTS.
people a day and, in 2005, New Course Catering had a record year in catering gross
sales of $211,000.
    Under the supervision of the restaurant’s chef and other staff—some of whom are                       contact
graduates themselves—a class of 15 trainees enters the 17-week program every two
                                                                                                          WILL DOSCHER, PRESIDENT
months, receiving hands-on experience preparing food and greeting customers in the
restaurants.                                                                                              3RD & EATS RESTAURANT
    In addition to job training, 3rd & Eats provides ongoing case management and                          500 3RD STREET, NW
assists with job placement through its partnership with CFLS. Upon completion of                          WASHINGTON, DC 20001
the program, participants receive their “Basic Food Supervisor’s License” from the
                                                                                                          202-997-1272
D.C. Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs. On the average, 95 percent
of graduates secure jobs in the food industry. “Many employers have partnered                             WDOSCHER@AOL.COM
with us over the years, including Marriott Corporation, Hilton and Hyatt Hotels,                          WWW.NEWCOURSECATERING.COM
Olive Garden Restaurants, The Willard Hotel, The Four Seasons and literally hun-
dreds of small restaurants in the Washington metropolitan area,” said Rev. Tom                            OPERATING BUDGET: $375,000
Knoll, chairman of the 3rd & Eats board.

   As for Chambers, she loves her job as a prep cook at the Willard where,
she says, “My work is more than a job. It’s an extended family.” She is
coming up on her eighth anniversary at the hotel.
   “We are happy that we could help Belinda find a family here at the Willard
where everybody loves and respects her,” said Hervé Houdré, general manager of
the Willard InterContinental. “We hope that her success further illustrates the
important role that local businesses can play in enhancing people’s lives while
serving bottom-line needs.”




                               T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   9
                                                   Academy of Hope
                                                   Angelon Swann dropped out of school at 17 and went to work at McDonalds. As
giving oppor tunities                              time went by, she landed more rewarding jobs, but she was always haunted by her
                                                   lack of education. “I was embarrassed and ashamed that I had never gotten a high
FUNDS: TO ASSIST WITH RELOCATION
                                                   school diploma,” said the native of Oxon Hill, Maryland, now 42.
EFFORTS, WHICH WOULD ALLOW FOR
                                                      A neighbor told her about Academy of Hope. Founded in 1985, the organization
THE HIRING OF ADDITIONAL STAFF TO
                                                   provides high quality education and job skills training to low-income and at-risk
SERVE MORE LEARNERS IN THE
                                                   adults. Beyond that, as the name indicates, the group gives hope to individuals who
EXTERNAL DIPLOMA PROGRAM, AND
                                                   may have felt like giving up on the American dream.
INCREASE THE CURRENT COMPUTER
                                                      Half of the Academy’s clients are immigrants, mostly from African countries.
LAB FROM 9 TO 13 STATIONS.
                                                   Some, like Swann, come to Academy of Hope to work on their GEDs. For others, the
GOODS: FREE STANDING BLACK-                        goal is to improve their ability to read or to take tests or to increase their incomes.
BOARD, BOOKSHELVES, OFFICE AND                     Academy students are typically adults who struggle with problems relating to
CLASSROOM SUPPLIES (COPY PAPER,                    finances, health or housing. Dramatic personal circumstances, such as the death of a
STAPLERS, PENCILS, CARD STOCK,                     child or health problems, may cause them to drop out of the Academy for awhile.
ETC), SCRAP PAPER (BLANK ON BOTH                   But many come back.
SIDES FOR TESTING—OLD LETTER-
HEAD WORKS WELL). ABLE TO PICK
                                                      “Our goal is to help adults acquire the high sc hool di ploma or the
UP MOST ITEMS, UNLESS THEY ARE                     basic ski lls th at wi ll lead to good jobs and a living wage,” sa id Su san Ely,
EXTRA LARGE.                                       executive di rec tor of Academy of Hop e. “Ma ny of the people we work with
TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO TEACH SMALL                    a re trapped in a cyc le of poverty because they lack basic readi ng, writi ng
GROUP CLASSES (OFTEN WITH A CO-                    a nd math ski lls .”
TEACHER) OR TUTOR ONE-ON-ONE (2–3
                                                      The Academy’s four-year-old Workplace Literacy Program, developed in coopera-
MONTH COMMITMENT), PARTICIPATE IN
                                                   tion with Literacy Volunteers of America, focuses on helping individuals currently
ONE-DAY WORKDAYS DOING LIGHT CON-
                                                   employed move into better jobs with the same employer through additional educa-
STRUCTION PROJECTS (E.G. PAINTING).
                                                   tion and skills training.
                                                      After working with employers for four years, Academy of Hope staff report that
contact                                            the employers now call them to request classes for workers they want to promote but
                                                   who are in need of specific training.
KATHRYN SOMMERS,                                      Highly motivated and working two jobs to make ends meet, Swann hopes to com-
DEVELOPMENT MANAGER                                plete her GED in six months and maybe go on to college. “I don’t know where this
ACADEMY OF HOPE                                    will take me,” she said. “All I know is, for many years, doors were closed. Now they
1501 COLUMBIA ROAD, NW                             are all wide open.”

WASHINGTON, DC 20009

202-328-2029
AOHDEV@YAHOO.COM

WWW.AOHDC.ORG

OPERATING BUDGET: $662,160




10   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
Business Development
Assistance Group
Toa Do came to the United States as a refugee from Vietnam and resettled in Arlington
in 1980. With the help of two friends, he started a company that produced computer                        giving oppor tunities
cables. Within two years, they had 30 employees. Their success did not go unnoticed.
                                                                                                          FUNDS: TO PROVIDE SERVICES TO A
One day Do got a call from a county official. “There are a lot of people coming behind
                                                                                                          WIDER GEOGRAPHIC AREA, MORE
you,” Do remembers the man saying. “What can you do to help them?”
                                                                                                          IN-DEPTH TECHNICAL SERVICES (E.G.
   Thus was born the Business Development Assistance Group, Inc. (BDAG).
                                                                                                          DEVELOPING BUSINESS PLAN),
   Founded in 1992, BDAG helps small and minority-owned businesses in Northern
                                                                                                          INCREASE THE NUMBER OF CLIENTS
Virginia become more viable through educational programs, workshops, training
                                                                                                          SERVED FROM 1200 PER YEAR TO 1500
seminars and one-on-one counseling. BDAG targets immigrants looking to start, stay
                                                                                                          AND OPEN ANOTHER SATELLITE OFFICE.
in and expand their businesses.
                                                                                                          GOODS: OFFICE SUPPLIES AND COM-
   Marina Kim, who owns an advertising and marketing company, has                                         PUTER GRAPHICS EQUIPMENT (E.G.
been in business for nearly 10 years. She had trouble getting government                                  COLOR PRINTER, PHOTOSHOP SOFT-
contracts until BDAG’s staff walked her through the process, step-by-step.                                WARE, ETC.).

“Toa Do has been a mentor and friend to countless business owners over the                                TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO SERVE AS MEN-
years,” she said. “It’s hard to imagine where we’d be without his expertise,                              TORS FOR SMALL START-UP BUSINESS-

contacts and moral support. I call him my angel.”                                                         ES; BUSINESS COUNSELOR OR TRAIN-
                                                                                                          ER IN TAXATION, LAW AND MARKETING;
    BDAG initially worked with many Asian Americans. More recently, with the                              ASSISTANCE WITH CONFERENCE PLAN-
influx of Latino immigrants to Northern Virginia, more than 50 percent of BDAG’s                          NING AND FUNDRAISING ACTIVITIES.
clients are Hispanic.
    Francisco Escobar met Do at a small business conference. A native of Honduras,
Escobar was in the process of creating a software company. Do provided him invalu-                        contact
able contacts and continues to look out for business opportunities. Escobar considers
                                                                                                          LAURYN HAN, BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
Do much more than a mentor. He calls him his friend.
                                                                                                          DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
    No problem is too large or too small for the BDAG staff. The most common ques-
tion they get is: “How do I set up a business and make a lot of money quickly?” Do                        BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

says with a laugh. They get frequent inquiries about the W-2 form and other tax                           GROUP

matters, marketing and loans.                                                                             6245 LEESBURG PIKE, SUITE 410
    Between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, BDAG served nearly 1,300 clients, pro-                       FALLS CHURCH, VA 22044
viding in-depth assistance to 78 businesses. During that time period, 54 new busi-
                                                                                                          703-993-4873
nesses were created and 24 expanded.
    “I love helping with current and future businesses,” says Do. And, he doesn’t                         LHAN@BDAG.ORG
mind the fringe benefits. Like when he’s invited to a new Vietnamese restaurant to                        WWW.BDAG.ORG
taste test the recipes.
                                                                                                          OPERATING BUDGET: $200,000




                               T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   11
Carlos Rosario International Career Center
                                                   For 35 years, Carlos Rosario International Career Center has been providing a vibrant
giving oppor tunities                              learning environment for immigrant communities throughout the nation’s capital.
                                                   The Center and its education and career development programs are considered
FUNDS: TO ESTABLISH AN EVENING
                                                   national leaders in the field of adult education and pioneers in educating and train-
PROGRAM THAT WOULD DOUBLE THE
                                                   ing new immigrants in our community.
NUMBER OF CULINARY STUDENTS
                                                       Beyond its impressive track record—which includes English language training,
AND OPEN A COMPUTER LAB TO
                                                   high school GED (General Equivalency Diploma) preparation, citizenship classes,
INCREASE THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE
                                                   computer skills and leadership training, counseling and job placement assistance to
WITH TECHNOLOGY SKILLS.
                                                   more than 50,000 immigrants—are thousands of individual success stories.
GOODS: INDUSTRIAL GRADE KITCHEN                        Consider William Berrios, a native of El Salvador who dropped out of school at 17
ITEMS, UP-TO-DATE TECHNOLOGY                       when his girlfriend gave birth to their child. Forced to grow up quickly, he got a job
EQUIPMENT FOR COMPUTER TRAINING                    first as a bus boy and then for a pest control company. Nine years later, he remem-
PROGRAM.                                           bers thinking, “I am going to wake up one day and be 40 years old and still working
                                                   as a pesticide applicator.”
TIME: PROFESSIONALS TO MENTOR
                                                       When the company he worked for went bankrupt, Berrios turned to the Career
AND HOLD MOCK INTERVIEWS FOR
                                                   Center and began studying for his GED. His timing could not have been better. The
STUDENTS ENTERING THE WORK-
                                                   Center was opening its permanent facility in Columbia Heights and expanding its
FORCE; VOLUNTEERS TO ASSIST WITH
                                                   services to include workforce development training in high-growth and high-demand
SPECIAL EVENTS (E.G. COMMUNITY
                                                   employment sectors with living wages and career ladders, such as the culinary arts,
DAY) AND ACT AS TUTORS OR CONVER-
                                                   health care and technology fields.
SATIONAL PARTNERS IN CLASSROOM
                                                       As the Center continues to expand, workforce development remains at the core of
SETTINGS.
                                                   its mission. “The long term change this program seeks is the empowering of residents
                                                   of the diverse immigrant communities of the Washington, D.C., area so they can bet-
contact                                            ter provide for their families, become participating members of American society and
                                                   contribute to the economic vitality of our nation’s capital,” said Laura Griep, aca-
LAURA GRIEP,                                       demic director of the Career Center.
ACTING ACADEMIC DIRECTOR
CARLOS ROSARIO INTERNATIONAL
                                                      “It’s a win-win situation,” adds Claudia Lujan, workforce director at
CAREER CENTER                                      the Center. “We not only meet the work and life needs of our students, but
1100 HARVARD STREET, NW                            we’re meeting the needs of the business community and of the economy.”
WASHINGTON, DC 20009                                   In 2004, Berrios enrolled in the Rosario Center’s technology certification training
202-797-4700                                       program. Today he is working as a computer support specialist at the National
                                                   Council of La Raza. Last September, he bought a house in Hyattsville, where he is
LGRIEP@CARLOSROSARIO.ORG
                                                   raising his two children. “I thought I would be working with pesticides the rest of my
WWW.CARLOSROSARIO.ORG                              life,” said Berrios. “Thanks to Carlos Rosario, and to my wonderful co-workers at La
                                                   Raza, my life took a different path.”
OPERATING BUDGET: $1.2M




12   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
Enterprising Staffing Solutions
The people who pass through the doors of Enterprising Staffing Solutions (ESS) are
often in the middle of a job hunt. They get help finding employment and much more                         giving oppor tunities
when they meet with ESS general manager, Joseph Jackson.
                                                                                                          FUNDS: TO HIRE A SALES MANAGER
    According to his clients, Jackson has strong connections with area businesses, is
                                                                                                          AND AN EMPLOYMENT COACH FOR
good at providing his employees with the support they need and, perhaps most
                                                                                                          WORKERS.
importantly, listens to them without passing judgment.
    Founded in 1998, ESS is a full-service staffing firm that provides temporary, tem-                    GOODS: NONE AT THIS TIME.
porary-to-permanent and permanent employment opportunities. The community-
                                                                                                          TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO ASSIST WITH
based firm is the brainchild of Shaw-based Manna Community Development
                                                                                                          ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANCE, MARKET-
Corporation and the Boston-based ICA Group, a national nonprofit organization that
                                                                                                          ING RESEARCH, AND TO COMPILE A
supports local efforts to create and save jobs by developing and strengthening
                                                                                                          TRAINING PROGRAM LIST.
employee-owned cooperatives and community-based projects. While some employ-
ment services organizations combine job training with employment search services,
for now, ESS steers clear of training. “ESS very consciously does not do job train-                       contact
ing,” said Jackson. “Our aim has been to work with various job training programs in
the area, in order to create a pipeline to more jobs and employers than any one pro-                      ENTERPRISING STAFFING SOLUTIONS

gram could provide alone.”                                                                                C/0 MANNA COMMUNITY
    ESS’ unique model is based on placing unemployed or underemployed adults—                             DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
residents of Washington, D.C.’s Shaw neighborhood and other low-income commu-                             DOMINIC T. MOULDEN,
nities—in temporary entry-level jobs, then providing them the support they need to                        EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
excel in those jobs, develop marketable skills and, eventually, move into secure,
                                                                                                          614 S STREET, NW
higher paying positions. ESS employees who take temporary jobs with the agency
for a year can purchase shares in the company. When they become employee-own-                             REAR CARRIAGE HOUSE
ers, they are eligible to receive worker bonuses on a quarterly basis. “Many of our                       WASHINGTON, DC 20001
workers have families to support; they might be juggling multiple jobs in order to                        202-232-2915
make ends meet,” said Jackson. “The supplemental income from their worker-owner
                                                                                                          DMOULDEN@MANNADC.ORG
bonuses helps them substantially.”
    Tandie Shears met Jackson during the summer of 2004. A native of Shaw, Shears                         WWW.MANNADC.ORG/MANNACDC.HTM
had her first child at 19. By 23, she had three children and was on welfare.                              WWW.ESS-DC.ORG
    “I walked away from a lot of good jobs,” said Shears, who has worked for ESS in
both housekeeping and food services. “In the past, no one ever said to me, ‘you have                      OPERATING BUDGET: $650,288
to take the good with the bad, the bitter with the sweet.’ There’s so much about the
work world I didn’t know.”

   “The people at ESS are real,” she added. “They had confidence in me
when I didn’t have confidence in myself. Over and over, they said, ‘hang
in there. Don’t give up.’ And I didn’t.”

                               T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   13
                                                   Infant/Toddler Family Day Care
                                                   Bayan Sindi is a Kurdish refugee from Iraq who “didn’t have a chance of getting an
giving oppor tunities                              education in her country,” said Ileene Hoffman, director of the Infant/Toddler Family
                                                   Day Care of Northern Virginia. Sindi came to this country in 1991 with limited
FUNDS: TO HIRE ADDITIONAL QUALI-
                                                   English skills after spending three years in a refugee camp. Yet, with the help of
FIED STAFF, INCREASE THE NUMBER
                                                   Hoffman’s organization, she not only earned a childcare certificate from Northern
AND INTENSITY OF ESOL COURSES,
                                                   Virginia Community College, but she is running her own business and providing
PURCHASE AND MAINTAIN A RESOURCE
                                                   much needed childcare services to working families in Northern Virginia. Witnessing
VAN FOR A LENDING LIBRARY AND
                                                   her graduation in cap and gown was a thrilling moment for Hoffman and her staff.
LEARNING LAB FOR CHILDCARE
                                                       Sindi’s remarkable journey is repeated over and over at Infant/Toddler Family Day
PROVIDERS.
                                                   Care, where women from Iraq and Afghanistan and Pakistan and many other coun-
GOODS: A VAN, TOYS, CHILDREN’S                     tries receive the education and skills to become licensed childcare providers. At the
BOOKS, INFANT EQUIPMENT IN EXCEL-                  same time, Infant/Toddler offers working parents of Northern Virginia a safe and
LENT CONDITION, INFANT HOME SAFE-                  stable source of family child care providers.
TY DEVICES, LAP TOP COMPUTERS FOR                      Founded in 1983, Infant/Toddler was the first organization in Northern Virginia to
STAFF AND CHILDCARE PROVIDERS.                     offer a workforce development program featuring ESOL and skills training and men-
                                                   toring for childcare providers. In addition, the organization guides participants
TIME: VOLUNTEERS AS ESOL TRAIN-
                                                   through the licensing process, provides comprehensive training including college
ERS, CHILD DEVELOPMENT SPECIAL-
                                                   preparation and additional educational opportunities, helps childcare providers mar-
ISTS AND TECHNOLOGY TRAINERS.
                                                   ket their services to the public and gives them furniture and other equipment they
                                                   need to do business. “Our primary goal is to help immigrants become successful, well
contact                                            trained childcare educators,” said Hoffman. “That results not only in an expanded
                                                   child care industry—for which there is a great need in our area—but in children who
WYNNE BUSMAN,                                      are well prepared for school.”
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR

INFANT/TODDLER FAMILY DAY CARE
                                                      For many participants, creating a home-based childcare business is a
10560 MAIN STREET #315
                                                   good segue into American culture. “In many cases, their cultures don’t per-
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
                                                   mit women to work outside the home,” said Hoffman. “Childcare meets
703-352-3449 X102
                                                   their cultural and financial needs at the same time it allows them to
WBUSMAN@INFANTTODDLER.COM
                                                   interact with American women who do work outside the home. Not only
WWW.INFANTTODDLER.COM
                                                   that, but they become great role models for their own children.”
                                                       In addition, Hoffman notes that being a family childcare provider helps women
OPERATING BUDGET: $978,885                         like Sindi, who has a one-year-old, address their own childcare needs at the same
                                                   time they are serving others.
                                                       “The childcare providers we trained last year collectively earned $2.5 million,”
                                                   said Hoffman. That money finds its ways back into the local economy as they buy
                                                   houses, expand their businesses and send their children to college.”



14   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
Jobs for Homeless People
The business centers at Jobs for Homeless People, Inc. (JHP) are like many others:
they include computers with Internet access, fax machines and support staff. The                          giving oppor tunities
main difference: JHP’s business centers are located in nine homeless and domestic
                                                                                                          FUNDS: TO PROVIDE SERVICES FOR
violence shelters in Washington, D.C., and Prince George’s County.
                                                                                                          50 MORE CLIENTS PER YEAR AND
   JHP helps homeless people achieve a safe and stable lifestyle through case man-
                                                                                                          INCREASE THE AMOUNT OF SUPPORT
agement, counseling, education and job development. Residents of the shelters—many
                                                                                                          GIVEN TO CLIENTS AFTER THEY
of whom are single mothers—are encouraged to take advantage of free job assess-
                                                                                                          SECURE A JOB.
ment and testing, resume preparation, job and housing searches, rental assistance,
substance abuse counseling and life skills and computer training. Since 1988, JHP                         GOODS: COMPUTERS AND LAPTOPS IN
has served more than 9,000 people—preparing and enabling them to enter the work-                          GOOD CONDITION WITH MODERN
force, gain the skills necessary to keep and advance in the job and ultimately move                       OPERATING SYSTEMS. NOT ABLE TO
into permanent housing.                                                                                   PICK UP DONATIONS.
   By addressing the barriers that keep people unemployed (such as poor education,
                                                                                                          TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO ASSIST WITH
lack of work experience, behavioral or substance abuse issues and housing problems)
                                                                                                          ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANCE; SERVE
JHP aims to help transform individual lives while improving the quality of life in the
                                                                                                          AS BOARD MEMBERS; WORK DIRECTLY
communities they serve.
                                                                                                          IN SHELTERS HELPING WITH DEVELOP-
   Last year, in Prince George’s County alone, JHP placed 132 of the 208 clients
                                                                                                          ING RESUMES AND LEADING WORK-
enrolled in its program in jobs, achieving a 90 percent retention rate after one year.
                                                                                                          SHOPS ON TOPICS SUCH AS BUSINESS
Nearly 80 percent of those clients placed in employment were able to transition out
                                                                                                          ATTIRE, EMPLOYER EXPECTATIONS AND
of homelessness.
                                                                                                          BALANCING BUDGETS.
   LaSheela Strother is an example of someone who is moving from homelessness to
home ownership. Two years ago, the mother of six was earning $30,000 a year.
When she lost her job, she and her family fell into homelessness and had to live in a                     contact
shelter in Capitol Heights, Maryland. There, JHP gave her job readiness training,
offered her bus tokens to get to interviews, arranged for childcare and helped her                        CONTESSA RIGGS,
find a four-bedroom rental house with an option to buy. “We’re not giving you a                           EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
handout, we’re giving you a hand up,” the JHP staff told her.                                             JOBS FOR HOMELESS PEOPLE
   Strother, who is working at a temp agency, says she is finally back on her feet.                       1526 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, SE
Her life goals include buying her home and providing her children a good education.
                                                                                                          WASHINGTON, DC 20003
Thanks to JHP, she says she is “ready to fly.”
                                                                                                          202-544-9096
   “A steady paycheck is far more than money, it is a source of self-esteem                               CRIGGS.JHP@JOBSHAVEPRIORITY.ORG
and the catalyst for changing lives,” said Contessa Riggs, JHP’s executive                                WWW.JOBSHAVEPRIORITY.ORG
director. “At JHP, our goal is to ensure that the people we assist in finding a
job and a home are never going to need an investment like this again.”                                    OPERATING BUDGET: $600,000




                               T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   15
                                                   Jubilee Jobs
                                                   In the midst of the recession of 1981, several residents of Jubilee Housing gathered
giving oppor tunities                              to strategize about how they and other low-income people could survive the eco-
                                                   nomic hard times. “If we have our health and a job, we can take care of ourselves,”
FUNDS: TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF
                                                   they believed. With that in mind, they decided to open an employment agency. That
CLIENTS SERVED, HIRE AN ADDITIONAL
                                                   small cadre of poor and struggling residents of Adams Morgan gave birth to Jubilee
JOB COUNSELOR TO SERVE THE EXIST-
                                                   Jobs, Inc., an agency focused on connecting vulnerable but eager residents with
ING LARGE POOL OF APPLICANTS, PRO-
                                                   jobs and careers.
VIDE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR APPLICANTS
                                                      In 24 years, Jubilee Jobs has placed more than 14,500 people—including ex-
ATTENDING SCHOOL TO ACQUIRE ADDI-
                                                   offenders, addicts, homeless people and recent immigrants with limited English lan-
TIONAL SKILLS AND TRAINING.
                                                   guage skills—into jobs they desperately needed, and then guided them in moving
GOODS: MEN’S DRESS SHIRTS AND                      from entry level to better paying employment. Many have moved into leadership
TIES, FOOD AND BEVERAGES FOR                       roles and become employers themselves. Changes in the job market, the economy
MONTHLY JOB FRIENDS EVENTS.                        and the character of neighborhoods have prompted new strategies, but always with
                                                   the same goal: life sustaining and meaningful work for all who are able and ready.
TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO CONDUCT
                                                      Every Monday morning, Jubilee Jobs invites unemployed people to a one-week
INTERVIEW AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION
                                                   work readiness orientation. Participants spend their days in job counselor interviews,
WORKSHOPS, WORK ONE-ON-ONE WITH
                                                   reference checks, resume preparation, conflict management and workshops on inter-
APPLICANTS TO DEVELOP RESUMES,
                                                   viewing. Within weeks, most everyone is placed in an entry-level position.
CHECK REFERENCES, MAKE FOLLOW-
                                                      For those who want to move on to higher level positions, Jubilee recently intro-
UP PHONE CALLS TO EMPLOYERS, ACT
                                                   duced the Move Up program, which prepares participants for better jobs with more
AS ROLE MODELS AND PROVIDE ONE-
                                                   responsibility and a defined career track.
ON-ONE MENTOR SUPPORT TO MOVE-
                                                      Jubilee Jobs’ recent accomplishments include the successful placement and reten-
UP APPLICANTS, OFFER PROFESSIONAL
                                                   tion of 599 applicants in 2004. Of those placed, 209 were ex-offenders, 255 were
EXPERTISE SUCH AS PUBLIC RELA-
                                                   homeless and 172 were receiving public assistance when they joined the Jubilee Jobs
TIONS AND HELPING IN OTHER CAPACI-
                                                   program. The 2004 applicants represent 17 countries of origin. Applicants come
TIES, DEPENDING ON VOLUNTEER’S
                                                   mainly from the neighborhoods surrounding Adams Morgan, Northeast and
SKILLS AND INTERESTS.
                                                   Southeast Washington and Prince George’s County.
                                                      Thornton Holland was born and raised in Washington, graduating from Bell
contact                                            Vocational High School. That’s when he started getting into trouble and spent several
                                                   years in jail.
LAURA MARKLE,                                         “I didn’t know which way to turn,” said Holland. Jubilee found him work at an
DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE                              auto parts store; at night he went to school to be an auto mechanic. His dream is to
JUBILEE JOBS                                       become a Metro bus mechanic.
2712 ONTARIO ROAD, NW                                 “Jubilee Jobs offered me something much bigger than a job,” said
WASHINGTON, DC 20009                               Holland. “They offered me financial and emotional stability. If I tell peo-
202-667-8970                                       ple there was a time when I was locked up, most people don’t even believe
LMARKLE@JUBILEEJOBS.ORG                            me. That’s because they see me for who I am today—a hard working and
WWW.JUBILEEJOBS.ORG                                upstanding member of society.”
OPERATING BUDGET: $657,000




16   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
Newcomer Community
Service Center
Not all that long ago, Aklilu Guluma visited the Newcomer Community Service
Center’s (NCSC) 16th Street offices in Washington. A recent political asylee from                         giving oppor tunities
Ethiopia who had worked as a registered nurse (RN) back home, Guluma felt lost in
                                                                                                          FUNDS: TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF
his adopted country. At the time, he remembers, “I didn’t know how to get a job in
                                                                                                          CLIENTS SERVED, HIRE A FULL-TIME
my field. I didn’t know how to get an interview. I didn’t have any money. I was stay-
                                                                                                          ESL COORDINATOR AND INCREASE THE
ing with friends and relying on food stamps.”
                                                                                                          NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION TOKENS
   Like the many immigrants who walk through the doors of the NCSC, Guluma had
                                                                                                          GIVEN TO CLIENTS.
come to the right place. Founded in 1978, the organization helps refugees and immi-
grants achieve economic self-sufficiency and become productive and participating                          GOODS: FOOD AND BUSINESS ATTIRE.
members of American society. Despite the fact that the Center’s clients often have                        ABLE TO PICK UP DONATIONS, BUT
extensive educational and work backgrounds, approximately two-thirds live at or                           PREFER DROP-OFFS.
below the poverty level.
                                                                                                          TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO TEACH
   NCSC’s offices in Washington, D.C., and Falls Church, Virginia, are staffed by for-
                                                                                                          EVENING ENGLISH CLASSES (MON–
mer refugees with close contacts to newcomer communities who help clients with
                                                                                                          THURS 6:30–8:30 PM) AND BE A
everything from identifying available positions to understanding the rights and
                                                                                                          GUEST SPEAKER AT JOB CLUBS.
responsibilities of employees to maintaining legal immigrant status.

    “One of the challenges we face is convi nc i ng employers to hire refugees ,”                         contact
sa id Joy Drac hm a n, NC S C’s program manager. “But becau se we work with
well known compa nies — C VS, Wash i ngton Sports Club, Whole Foods and                                   VILAY CHALEUNRATH,
                                                                                                          EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Wyndham Hotel, for exa mple—we have a lot of credi bi lity in the com-
                                                                                                          NEWCOMER COMMUNITY SERVICE
mu nity. Not only th at, but our clients’ exp erience and work ethic sp eaks                              CENTER
for itself. They are hard worki ng people determined to support themselves                                1628 16TH STREET, NW
a nd their fa mi lies .”                                                                                  WASHINGTON, DC 20009
   After enrolling in NCSC’s employment program, Guluma got his first job, at 7-                          202-462-4330
Eleven. From there, the program helped him obtain a job as a pharmacy technician
                                                                                                          VILAY@NEWCOMERSERVICE.ORG
at CVS and then as an RN at Inova Mount Vernon Hospital. Now Guluma proudly
proclaims, “This is my country. It is where I own a house. It is where I send my chil-                    WWW.NEWCOMERSERVICE.ORG

dren to school. It is where I pay taxes!”
                                                                                                          OPERATING BUDGET: $807,077




                               T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   17
                                                   Senior Employment Resources
                                                   When she unexpectedly found herself widowed at age 41, Cheryl McKenzie was dev-
giving oppor tunities                              astated. “My whole world was turned upside down,” she says. Living in Florida at the
                                                   time, she took on a series of part time jobs with no benefits and couldn’t make ends
FUNDS: TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF
                                                   meet. Eventually she lost everything.
PLACEMENTS BY 125 PER YEAR BY
                                                      It’s been a long road back.
HIRING A PART-TIME COMPUTER TRAIN-
                                                      A year ago, McKenzie returned to this area. A friend suggested she meet with
ER TO TEACH SENIORS HOW TO USE
                                                   Senior Employment Resources (SER), an Annandale, Virginia-based job placement
COMPUTERS AND CURRENT OFFICE
                                                   service that works with hard-to-place job seekers ages 50 and older. SER “built up
SOFTWARE, AND AN EMPLOYMENT
                                                   my self-esteem and gave me job leads that matched my skills and experience,” said
COUNSELOR TO WORK INDIVIDUALLY
                                                   McKenzie, now 52. “They really know their business. I needed someone who could
WITH HARD TO PLACE SENIORS.
                                                   unlock the door and they had the key.”
GOODS: MEETING SPACE ON A BUS
ROUTE IN THE NORTHERN VIRGINIA
                                                      Most of SER’s job seekers are on Social Security, have a job with very low
AREA (1000 SQ. FEET).                              income, or are disabled. Many are new immigrants who want to be near
TIME: VOLUNTEERS IN MARKETING
                                                   their children who are recent immigrants as well. Some clients are in their
AND PROMOTION, COUNSELING, BUSI-                   80s. “Seniors bring so much expertise to small businesses,” said Sue Allan,
NESS AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH.                       SER’s director. “They come to work on time. They know what it means to
                                                   do a day’s work. Employers tell me this all the time.”
contact                                               SER—which maintains a job bank and sends letters to 250 employers in Northern
                                                   Virginia each week—helps clients locate, apply for and gain paying jobs. They also
SUSAN ALLAN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
                                                   provide counseling, resume preparation, a monthly networking support group and
SENIOR EMPLOYMENT RESOURCES                        technology training. SER was among the first local agencies in the area to recognize
4201 JOHN MARR DRIVE, SUITE 236                    the importance of providing computer training to older workers. All of SER’s staff
ANNANDALE, VA 22003-3204                           and volunteers, such as 71-year-old Jim Martin who teaches the weekly computer
                                                   classes, are seniors themselves.
703-750-1936
                                                      McKenzie, who previously worked as an accountant, was recently hired as a
OFFICE@SENIORJOBS.ORG                              bookkeeper at an educational institution. The job “is a perfect match,” she said,
WWW.SENIORJOBS.ORG                                 adding that it comes with full benefits. This fall, her employer rewarded her hard
                                                   work with a bonus. “You get out of life what you put into it,” she said.
OPERATING BUDGET: $119,000




18   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
STRIVE DC
Since graduating from high school in 1997, Symarion Burton has worked as a sham-
poo assistant, a cashier and a waitress at work places too numerous to mention. Her                       giving oppor tunities
last job lasted two weeks.
                                                                                                          FUNDS: PROVIDE MORE FREQUENT
    She is hoping things are about to change. The 26-year-old Burton recently
                                                                                                          AND PERSONALIZED FOLLOW-UP SUP-
enrolled in STRIVE DC, Inc.’s three-week training program for unemployed youth and
                                                                                                          PORT TO GRADUATES BY HIRING A
adults. Participants include chronically unemployed people, ex-offenders, long-term
                                                                                                          LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER
welfare recipients and residents of high-crime neighborhoods in the Washington, D.C.
                                                                                                          AND ADDITIONAL CLIENT SERVICES
metropolitan area.
                                                                                                          COORDINATOR, AWARD $2,500 TO
    “STRIVE DC is not like traditional vocational training programs,” said the organi-
                                                                                                          NEEDY RESIDENTS TO COMPLETE
zation’s executive director, Chris Hart-Wright. It’s more like boot camp for the unem-
                                                                                                          TRAINING AND RECEIVE TWO YEARS
ployed. Through role-playing and mock interviews, participants learn the rudiments
                                                                                                          OF FOLLOW-UP SUPPORT.
of applying for and keeping a job. The crash course is designed to build confidence
and skills at the same time. Participants learn how to write resumes and how to dress                     GOODS: BUSINESS ATTIRE (INCLUDING
for interviews. “The training is intense, confrontational and emotional. For many, it’s                   SHOES FOR MEN AND WOMEN), ESPE-
the wake-up call they need to succeed,” said Hart-Wright.                                                 CIALLY IN NEED OF LARGER SIZES
    After completing training, graduates are placed in entry-level positions earning                      ( S H I RT SIZES 17+ FOR MEN AND PLUS
$7–$12 an hour. Following placement, STRIVE DC offers two years of post-place-                            SIZES FOR WOMEN), CLEANING SUP-
ment follow up support—such as counseling, social service referrals and mediation                         PLIES, OFFICE SUPPLIES, PAPER GOODS.
with employers—to help individuals retain their job. The post-placement support is                        NOT ABLE TO PICK UP DONATIONS.
considered key to STRIVE DC’s high job retention rate.
                                                                                                          TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO CONDUCT
    Since its founding in 1999, STRIVE DC has graduated more than 900 partici-
                                                                                                          MOCK INTERVIEWS, HELP PARTICIPANTS
pants, 30 percent of them under the age of 21. Of the 900, 78 percent have been
                                                                                                          WRITE RESUMES. STUDENT VOLUN-
placed in employment or education. More remarkable is the fact that 81 percent
                                                                                                          TEERS ARE ABLE TO EARN COMMUNITY
keep those jobs.
                                                                                                          SERVICE HOURS.
   A week into the STRIVE DC training, Burton already had a clear sense
of her goals. “I’d like a job with benefits,” she said. “I want to improve my                             contact
communication and customer service skills. I need to maintain and stay
                                                                                                          CHRIS HART-WRIGHT,
focused. Most importantly, I’d like to keep a job.” Burton continued, “I have                             EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
big dreams. Someday, I’d like to own my own business. STRIVE DC has                                       STRIVE DC
helped me to see that nothing is impossible.”                                                             715 I STREET, NW

                                                                                                          WASHINGTON, DC 20009
                                                                                                          202-484-1264

                                                                                                          INFO@STRIVEDC.ORG
                                                                                                          WWW.STRIVEDC.ORG

                                                                                                          OPERATING BUDGET: $630,921




                               T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   19
                                                   Suited for Change
                                                   Six years ago, coming off a decade of domestic violence and drug abuse and a
giving oppor tunities                              spotty employment history, Leary Short walked into Suited for Change in search of
                                                   something she could wear to a job interview at Xerox Corporation. She left with
FUNDS: TO INCREASE THE NUMBER
                                                   far more than a suit.
OF CLIENTS AND REFERRAL AGENCIES,
OBTAIN LARGER/NEW SPACE, PUR-                        “The last thing I heard as I walked out the door of Suited for Change
CHASE CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES,                    was ‘now go out there and dazzle them,’” she said. “Their encouragement
HIRE ADDITIONAL STAFF TO OFFER
MORE SEMINARS, PRODUCE AND MAR-
                                                   was like oxygen to the soul.”
KET A PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL                        Founded in 1992, Suited for Change provides professional clothing and ongoing
DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM.                            career and life skills education to low-income women so they can increase their
                                                   employment potential and contribute to their economic independence. Over the
GOODS: GENTLY USED SUITS AND PRO-
                                                   years, more than 11,000 women like Short have been referred to Suited for Change
FESSIONAL ATTIRE, ESPECIALLY PLUS
                                                   by 137 job training and social service agencies throughout the region. Clients come
SIZES (16+), SHOES (9+), HANDBAGS,
                                                   from Washington, D.C., Northern Virginia and suburban Maryland and include
JEWELRY, PANTYHOSE AND SCARVES.
                                                   homeless women, survivors of domestic violence, teen mothers, senior citizens, ex-
NOT ABLE TO PICK UP DONATIONS.
                                                   offenders, those who have overcome addiction and new Americans. Each month,
TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO ASSIST                         Suited for Change helps more than 150 women transition into the workforce.
CLIENTS IN SELECTING APPROPRIATE                       Their downtown headquarters includes a boutique with suits, dresses, separates
INTERVIEW ATTIRE AND GUIDE THEM                    and accessories contributed by generous donors including Janet Reno, Tipper Gore
THROUGH THE CAREER EDUCATION                       and ordinary citizens. (Before making a donation the staff suggests you ask your-
SERVICES AVAILABLE TO THEM; TO                     self—would you wear this outfit to an interview?)
GREET DONORS AND REVIEW DONATED                        Monthly seminars are offered to clients on resume writing and interview skills,
ITEMS; TO HELP LEAD SEMINARS ON                    financial management and nutrition. A partnership with the Washington Literacy
TOPICS INCLUDING INTERVIEW SKILLS,                 Council provided free training for women who lack a high school diploma or GED
PERSONAL PRESENTATION.                             while the Inter-American Development Bank co-hosted personal and professional
                                                   development seminars in Spanish.
                                                       “It’s all about empowerment,” said Michell Yorkman, Suited for Change’s program
contacts
                                                   director. Added executive director Mary-Frances Wain: “It is our hope that women
FOR FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS:                       leave our office not only with a new suit but with a new confidence that they will
                                                   succeed in the working world.”
MARY-FRANCES WAIN
                                                       By the way, Short got the job and has been climbing the corporate ladder at
SUITED FOR CHANGE                                  Xerox ever since. In addition, she serves on the Suited for Change board and will be
1712 I STREET, NW SUITE B100                       testifying before Congress about the needs of the working poor. Said Short, “There’s
WASHINGTON, DC 20006                               no doubt that they make you look good. They give you clothes, a pocket book, shoes.
                                                   But it’s what they give you on the inside that lasts much longer than that suit.”
202-293-0351 X1

MARY-FRANCES@
SUITEDFORCHANGE.ORG
WWW.SUITEDFORCHANGE.ORG

FOR TIME AND GOODS:

MICHELL YORKMAN
202-293-0351 X5

MICHELL@SUITEDFORCHANGE.ORG

OPERATING BUDGET: $275,000




20   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
The Urban Alliance
Foundation
Nine years ago, when business leader Andrew Plepler spoke at Anacostia Senior High
School’s career day, he challenged the students to tell him: “What do you need from                       giving oppor tunities
us to succeed?”
                                                                                                          FUNDS: TO HELP SPONSOR STUDENT
    The answer came back loud and clear: we need jobs.
                                                                                                          SALARIES AT UNPAID INTERNSHIPS,
    With that in mind, Plepler founded The Urban Alliance Foundation, Inc., dedicated
                                                                                                          SUCH AS THOSE AT NONPROFITS AND
to preparing youth from poor neighborhoods in Washington, D.C., for the work world
                                                                                                          GOVERNMENT OFFICES.
and a life of self-sufficiency through education and career-oriented internships.
    In the first year, the organization helped six Anacostia students. Today, Urban                       GOODS: NONE AT THIS TIME.
Alliance is partnering with 10 D.C. public and charter schools and serves 150 juniors
                                                                                                          TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO BE PROFES-
and seniors each year.
                                                                                                          SIONAL MENTORS TO STUDENTS (ONE
    In addition to skill building, college preparation, public speaking and financial
                                                                                                          YEAR COMMITMENT AND PLACE OF
management workshops, students participate in paid internships, working part time
                                                                                                          BUSINESS MUST SPONSOR INTERN-
during the school year and four days a week in the summer in order to gain employ-
                                                                                                          SHIP) AND MAKE PRESENTATIONS
ment experience and develop relationships with supportive and caring adults who act
                                                                                                          ABOUT PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES
as long-term mentors.
                                                                                                          DURING SUMMER SPEAKER SERIES
    Urban Alliance has an impressive performance record: more than 80 percent of its
                                                                                                          (TWO HOUR COMMITMENT ON A FRIDAY
participants have enrolled in college, as compared to 46 percent of inner city stu-
                                                                                                          AFTERNOON).
dents nationwide, according to the U.S. Census.
    Its newest initiative—the Health Alliance program which is offered in partnership
with the University of the District of Columbia and Providence Hospital—targets high                      contact
school graduates who have not gone on to or completed college. Participants receive
training to become Certified Nursing Assistants, scholarships for an associate’s degree                   VERONICA NOLAN,

in nursing and a guaranteed salary of $45,700 working as a registered nurse upon                          EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

graduation.                                                                                               URBAN ALLIANCE FOUNDATION

    Perhaps the best way to measure the success of Urban Alliance is                                      600 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE, NW
                                                                                                          9TH FLOOR
through the achievements of its graduates. Charles Reid, one of the original
                                                                                                          WASHINGTON, DC 20037
participants, grew up in Southeast Washington. Urban Alliance helped
                                                                                                          202-266-5722
him get an internship at Fannie Mae Foundation. “I had never been in an
                                                                                                          VNOLAN@
office like that,” he said. “I was scared to death when I first got there. But                            URBANALLIANCEFOUNDATION.ORG
the experience brought me out of my shell. It prepared me for life.Urban                                  WWW.URBANALLIANCEFOUNDATION.ORG
Alliance did a heck of a job preparing me for the work world. Today, I
could walk into any work environment and succeed.”                                                        OPERATING BUDGET: $939,113

   Now a senior at Virginia Union University, Reid is a social work major. Last sum-
mer he returned to the Urban Alliance office to help guide a new crop of eager high
schoolers. His advice: “Don’t be quick to say no to a new experience. Don’t judge
people by their color. And don’t knock something new until you’ve tried it.”



                               T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   21
                                                   Virginia Justice Center
                                                   We all deserve to be paid for the work we do. “Unfortunately, there are unscrupulous
giving oppor tunities                              employers throughout the Washington area who violate that basic rule and steal their
                                                   workers’ labor,” said Laura Stack, managing attorney with the Virginia Justice Center
FUNDS: TO HIRE AN INTAKE PARALEGAL
                                                   (VJC). “Our job is to make sure that, if you do a hard day’s work, you get paid for a
AND AN ADDITIONAL STAFF ATTORNEY,
                                                   hard day’s work.”
INCREASE THE LEVEL OF ADMINISTRA-
                                                       Founded in 1998 as a state-wide project of the Legal Aid Justice Center in
TIVE SUPPORT TO IMPROVE THE ORGA-
                                                   Charlottesville, the VJC supports low-wage immigrant workers in their efforts to find
NIZATION’S CAPACITY TO SERVE IMMI-
                                                   justice and fair treatment in the workplace. The VJC’s clients include people who per-
GRANTS OF THE DC METRO AREA.
                                                   form some of Virginia’s most dangerous jobs, such as construction and farm work,
GOODS: NONE AT THIS TIME.                          and lowest-paying jobs, such as restaurant dishwashing and food preparation, clean-
                                                   ing offices and houses, and caring for children.
TIME: BILINGUAL (ENGLISH/SPANISH)
                                                       In 2001, VJC opened its Falls Church office in response to numerous calls from
VOLUNTEERS TO ASSIST WITH INCOM-
                                                   day laborers in Northern Virginia who were being cheated out of their pay on a reg-
ING CALLS AND WALK-IN-CLIENTS
                                                   ular basis.
(COMMITMENT OF 7.5 HRS/WEEK);
                                                       “I began working as a carpenter and mason, looking for jobs at the corner in
VOLUNTEERS TO SERVE ON A NEW
                                                   Shirlington,” said one client. “And then something happened that had never hap-
NORTHERN VIRGINIA ADVISORY BOARD
                                                   pened before—I worked for someone and he never paid me!” The VJC filed a lawsuit
TO LAUNCH AN INDIVIDUAL GIVING
                                                   in Fairfax County District Court. When the carpenter had his day in court, he won a
CAMPAIGN.
                                                   judgment for $5,234.36.
                                                       Another client worked as a laundromat attendant for a company that promised to
contact                                            pay her $6 an hour but, in the end, paid her only $2.65 an hour. “I asked for the rest
                                                   of the pay and they fired me,” she said. She later recovered more than $3,000 in
LAURA STACK, MANAGING ATTORNEY                     unpaid wages.
VIRGINIA JUSTICE CENTER                                In addition to representing low-wage workers in court and administrative pro-
6066 LEESBURG PIKE, SUITE 520                      ceedings, VJC staff regularly visit day labor hiring sites to educate workers about
                                                   their legal rights and responsibilities; coordinate and attend community meetings to
FALLS CHURCH, VA 22041
                                                   address issues related to day labor; and help workers develop their voices and
703-778-3450                                       become involved in the ongoing dialogue regarding day labor in the region.
LAURA@JUSTICE4ALL.ORG
                                                      “We believe in maximizing our impact by trying to address the under-
WWW.JUSTICE4ALL.ORG
                                                   lying causes that allow exploitation to occur,” said Stack. The VJC accom-
OPERATING BUDGET: $326,014                         plishes this by leading efforts to create stronger worker protection laws,
                                                   establish workers’ centers and shape policies that recognize the contribu-
                                                   tions of the region’s hardworking immigrants.




22   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
Workforce Organizations
for Regional Collaboration
Hundreds of organizations across the Washington metropolitan area are busy put-
ting people to work. Workforce Organizations for Regional Collaboration (WORC)                             giving oppor tunities
knows just about all of them.
                                                                                                           FUNDS: TO HIRE ADDITIONAL STAFF TO
   Founded in 2000, WORC is a connector, bringing together employers and job-
                                                                                                           WORK WITH 5–6 WORKFORCE DEVELOP-
seekers, private and public service providers, community colleges and training organ-
                                                                                                           MENT ORGANIZATIONS TO HELP BUILD
izations, unions and social services agencies to help put people into jobs. They focus
                                                                                                           CAPACITY, RESULTING IN AN INCREASE
on the needs of employers and workers, helping businesses stay competitive and
                                                                                                           IN THE NUMBER OF JOB PLACEMENTS
developing a better skilled workforce.
                                                                                                           FOR THOSE ORGANIZATIONS.
   “Ultimately, our goal is to provide individuals in the Washington, D.C.                                 GOODS: MICROSOFT PROJECT SOFT-
region with pathways to sustainable careers and independence,” said                                        WARE, MEETING SPACE, PRESENTATION
Summer Spencer, WORC’s executive director.                                                                 TOOLS (E.G. LCD AND OVERHEAD PRO-
                                                                                                           JECTORS, SCREENS, COLOR PRINT-
    WORC coordinates recruiting visits to employer sites to give nonprofit organiza-
                                                                                                           ERS). ABLE TO PICK UP DONATIONS.
tions like those featured in this Guide a better idea of the work environment and the
expectations of employers. As a result, service providers not only develop stronger                        TIME: VOLUNTEERS TO DESIGN PRO-
working relationships with employers, but are also better able to prepare their clients                    GRAMMATIC INITIATIVES THAT WILL
for success in the workplace.                                                                              HELP MEET THE NEEDS OF THE BUSI-
    “One of the reasons employers commit to working with us is because WORC                                NESS COMMUNITY, GREET JOBSEEK-
member agencies actively assess and screen clients to ensure they are an appropriate                       ERS AT JOB FAIRS AND INTRODUCE
match for positions posted by employers,” said Spencer.                                                    THEM TO EMPLOYERS IN THE ROOM,
    The model works. For instance, a recruiting session co-sponsored with The                              REVIEW RESUMES AND PARTICIPATE IN
Washington Post led to the placement of nine workers at the paper’s Springfield,                           MOCK INTERVIEW WORKSHOPS THAT
Virginia, printing plant.                                                                                  ARE HELD FOR GROUPS OF NONPROFIT
    “WORC is one of the rare organizations that attempts to know the employer and                          ORGANIZATIONS, ESTABLISH EVALUA-
respond specifically to job requirements,” said Martha Lequeux, director, human                            TION TOOLS (I.E. LOGIC MODELS) TO
resources, The Washington Post.                                                                            ASSIST WITH TRACKING THE SUCCESS
    In the past year, WORC hosted two regional career fairs and sponsored seven                            OF VARIOUS PROGRAMS.
Employment Recruitment Sessions. The spring 2005 career fair had 250 job seekers,
30 employers and 40 nonprofit organizations.
                                                                                                           contact
    WORC designed its One Click Clearinghouse to make it easier for employers to com-
municate their openings to service providers. WORC recently updated the web-based                          SUMMER SPENCER,
tool in order to track employment and retention statistics at 30, 90 and 365 days. Since                   EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
its start in September 2004, the Clearinghouse has resulted in postings of more than
                                                                                                           WORKFORCE ORGANIZATIONS FOR
300 jobs and 1,200 referrals to employers.
                                                                                                           REGIONAL COLLABORATION
    In April 2005, WORC and Goodwill of Greater Washington combined operations
in an affiliation that will further strengthen the workforce development services                          1725 I STREET, NW SUITE 200
that both organizations provide.                                                                           WASHINGTON, DC 20006

                                                                                                           202-857-5991

                                                                                                           SSPENCER@WORCONLINE.ORG
                                                                                                           WWW.WORCONLINE.ORG

                                                                                                           OPERATING BUDGET: $369,600




                                T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   23
                           An Overview of Workforce Development

                           intr oduction

                           The profiles on the previous pages represent outstanding examples of organizations working throughout
                           our region to ensure that more people are successful at gaining and maintaining employment. The stories
                           represent innovative and sometimes new approaches to workforce development. However, neither the topic
                           nor The Community Foundation’s commitment to helping people take part in the American Dream is new.


                           For more than 30 years, The Community Foundation has directed philanthropic dollars and public attention
                           to the needs of disadvantaged residents in our region. Given the widening gaps in income and wealth in the
                           region, there is a greater urgency to our efforts. Through this Guide and other Community Foundation ini-
                           tiatives, we will increasingly draw attention to approaches that help low-income and low-skilled adults and
                           youth overcome barriers to work and achieve financial success. From our unique vantage point, we will
                           encourage others to recognize that the programs described in this report not only benefit workers and their
                           families, but also employers and every resident in this region.


                           With this in mind, the following pages take a closer look at why “working for a living” is about so much more
                           than getting a job. It is about transforming lives and developing our region as a more equitable community.




                           a      critical issue for our region

                           The Washington region boasts one of the nation’s most vibrant economies, with some of the highest
                           median income levels and lowest unemployment figures in the country among major metropolitan areas.
                           We also have the most highly educated population of any region, with 42 percent of adults holding at
                           least a college degree and the largest percentage of adults (18.7 percent) with an advanced degree.1 The
                           region is experiencing robust job growth in the health care, construction, business services and high-tech
                           fields. During the five-year period between 1999 and 2004, the region gained 223,000 jobs, over 50 per-
                           cent more than the next highest growth areas of Phoenix and Las Vegas.2


                           Yet, many people are not benefiting from this economic vitality. In the midst of prosperity, poverty rates
                           in the region are increasing. Between 1990 and 2000, the number of people living in poverty in the
                           region increased by 32 percent.3 While the region’s unemployment rate is at approximately 3.7 percent
                           and is far better than the national average of approximately 5.7 percent, the District’s unemployment rate
                           hovers around 8 percent with pockets topping 15 percent.4 Thousands of residents are unable to move
                           beyond low-skilled, low-paying jobs to more sustainable incomes and careers.



“The American Dream is at risk for far too many citizens, especially for minorities,
immigrants and low-income families.”
Marlene            Seltzer,            Jobs        for   the   Futur e   P r es ident        and   CE O



24   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
                                                                                                    POVERTY IN THE WASHINGTON
                                                                                                    METROPOLITAN AREA, 2000


                                                                                                    PERCENTAGE OF POPULATION IN POVERTY
                                                                                                    BY TRACT

                                                                                                               0.0 – 9.9

                                                                                                               10.0 – 19.9

                                                                                                               20.0 – 29.9

                                                                                                               30.0 – 90.3


                                                                                                    SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS 2000




There are also great gender and geographic differences in our regional economy. Women-headed families
suffer disproportionately from our region’s growing poverty; close to 70 percent of families in poverty in
the District of Columbia are women-headed households. More so, women still earn less than their male
counterparts. In Fairfax County, for example, women receive a median annual income of $41,800 com-
pared to $60,500 for men. 5


The Brookings Institution highlighted the geographic differences in their landmark 1999 report, The
Region Divided: The State of Growth in Washington, DC. They detailed the concentration of poverty and
low-income households on the eastern side of our region: neighborhoods west of 16th Street in Washington,
D.C., and throughout close-in Prince George’s County, Maryland. Job growth and opportunities often follow
similar patterns, with the region’s greatest job growth concentrated primarily on the western side of the
District of Columbia and in the Maryland and Virginia suburbs west of I-95.6 These trends are likely to con-
tinue with the suburbs projected to generate four to five times more jobs than the District, with much of the
growth concentrated in the technology corridors of Northern Virginia and Montgomery County, Maryland.7


There are numerous—and often debatable—factors contributing to these inequities including land use
decisions and development patterns, economic development strategies, family structure, affordable hous-
ing and transportation issues and immigration patterns over several decades. Chief among them are the
issues of literacy and education—and how well our young people are being prepared for jobs that can
provide sustainable wages.




                                T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   25
                           “Too often employment vacancies remain unfilled while our region’s young people are not prepared to fill
                           these jobs,” says Lori Kaplan, executive director of the Latin American Youth Center. “Only through a first-
                           class workforce development system and commitment to education will young people be able to fill these
                           vacancies, move out of poverty and continue on their path to successful adulthood.”


                           Regardless of their origin, these inequities challenge our region’s continued vibrancy and its overall quality
                           of life. Workforce development represents one strategy for closing these gaps and enabling a greater percent-
                           age of residents to both contribute to and benefit from our community’s prosperity.




                           bar riers                  to       employme nt

                           The challenges facing low-income and low–skilled adults and youth trying to secure employment are
                           numerous, but four themes emerge:

                           Jobs in the Washington area have higher skill requirements than the national average. The region
                           has more professional and managerial occupations compared to the nation’s economy and the share of jobs
                           requiring post graduate education is more than triple the national average. 8

                           At the same time, the basic skills that employers seek are often missing. A survey of employers by
                           the District of Columbia Chamber of Commerce in 2003 identified the top three skills needed as communi-
                           cations (written and oral), social/interpersonal skills and basic business skills such as problem solving and
                           critical thinking. Developing these “soft skills are as much about changing behaviors as about imparting
                           knowledge,” says the Chamber report.9

                           Low-income and low–skilled workers often need additional supports beyond skills training. The
                           Annie E. Casey Foundation has documented the range of supports needed, including child care, language
                           training, mental health and health services, substance abuse treatment and assistance returning to a com-
                           munity following incarceration. Because many people face more than one of these barriers simultaneously,
                           the foundation advocates that approaches be “integrated and comprehensive.”10 “It is important to recog-
                           nize that people aren’t just workers,” says Nat Chioke Williams, executive director, Hill Snowdon
                           Foundation. “They are members of families and communities who need other supports.”

                           The complex mix of funding and programs is often missing the critical connection to employers
                           and to jobs that can pay family-sustaining wages. Good workforce programs serve two clients:
                           w o r kers and employers. Understanding the “bottom line” realities of employers is crucial. Summer
                           Spencer, executive director of Workforce Organizations for Regional Collaboration (WORC), puts it most
                           succinctly: “Programs that have failed have done so because of the lack of buy-in and feedback from the
                           employers at the front end of the process. If they are not engaged from the beginning, there is little rea-
                           son for employers to have faith in the quality of workers coming out of a program. Employers need to be
                           able to help shape the process.” At the same time, workers need wages and benefits that are sustaining,
                           particularly in a region with rising costs for housing, child care, transportation and other basic expenses.
                           “I want more out of life than a job flipping burgers at McDonalds. I want a coat and tie job,” says 18-
                           year-old David Stewart, a member of The Community Foundation’s Youth Advisory Council.




26   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
ma ny            players,                     one            g oal

The workforce arena is a complex mix of programs and funding sources all focused on putting people into
jobs. A summary includes:


Government: The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 is the federal government’s primary workforce pro-
gram, linking funds with locally focused boards (Workforce Investment Boards) and programs (one stop centers).
The goal: to increase skills, employment and earnings. But between 1985 and 2003, WIA funding decreased by
close to 30 percent. State and local funding often augments these federal dollars, but in our region, the District
of Columbia invests little of its own resources in workforce programs and the states of Maryland and Virginia
have dramatically reduced funding for workforce programs over the past several years.


For-profit providers: Proprietary schools, trade schools and other groups may be the fastest growing
segment of training, fueled by Federal student aid and loan programs. In our region, Strayer University has
opened 16 campuses in the region in the past 24 years.


Community colleges: The community colleges of Northern Virginia, Prince George’s and Montgomery
County offer extensive workforce training and are augmented in the District by the University of the District
of Columbia and other post-secondary institutions.


Public education systems: Provide adult education as well as career and vocational education for youth.
But a growing percentage of young people aged 16–19 are not in school and don’t have their degrees, and
require special outreach and programs.


Employers: Some employers deliver pre-employment training programs for high demand positions but this
kind of employer-driven effort is rare. Unions also deliver training programs, especially in the skilled trades.


Nonprofit organizations: Nonprofit programs are often modest and under-resourced but are often uniquely
suited to work with low-income and low-skilled workers who frequently face multiple barriers to finding and
keeping a job. Special populations such as the disabled, recent immigrants and people returning from incar-
ceration also need the focused attention and supports that nonprofits can provide.




“Workforce development is an essential component to our continued economic survival
and success, and it plays an imperative role in ensuring everyone an opportunity to take
part in our county’s economic prosperity. Programs like these create a higher quality
of life for everyone.”
Council        P r es ident        T homas        P erez,        Montgomer y               County          Council




                                 T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   27
                           appr oa ches                        that            wo rk

                           Attempts have been made for years to improve the job-readiness of disadvantaged people. Most have expe-
                           rienced mixed results, with “lessons learned” pointing to an emphasis on comprehensive programs that are
                           linked to specific sectors or industries and employers. The nonprofit programs described in this Guide strive
                           to put these learnings into practice with features such as:

                           • Pre-employment preparation including career and job-readiness counseling

                           • Literacy, basic education and GED training

                           • Language education, often combined with job-related skills training

                           • Access to support services, including child care, transportation, mental health counseling and others

                           • Placement and ongoing, in-job support and mentoring to focus on retention and promotion

                           • Career management services to help low-wage workers advance toward higher paying jobs, including
                           career planning, financial education and asset building

                           • Industry networking to establish and strengthen linkages between school systems, community colleges,
                           nonprofit organizations and major employers; and to create pipelines of training, support and placement.




                           acr oss                 the        r egion

                           In addition to the individual programs working throughout the region, there are a number of efforts where
                           stakeholders are joining forces to move forward the “sector-based” approaches advocated by many. A prime
                           target is the health sector and its growing workforce needs. For example, in 2004, the Greater Washington
                           Board of Trade undertook a study of the region's health care workforce needs. Now it's working to invest in
                           innovative models and leverage its members’ support for policy changes. Another effort is the Northern
                           Virginia Healthcare Alliance, a coalition of business, academic, health care and community leaders that is
                           spearheaded by Dr. Robert Templin, president of Northern Virginia Community College. The Alliance recently
                           announced an action plan to address shortages in Virginia's health care workforce, including leveraging more
                           than $24 million in public and private spending. And, the DC Chamber of Commerce and the DC Hospital
                           Association are also working together to address issues facing health care employers in Washington.




“If I tell people there was a time when I was locked up, most people don’t even
believe me. That’s because they see me for who I am today—a hard working
and upstanding member of society.”
Thor nton           Holland,            placed     by    Jubi lee       Jobs




28   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
futur e                 of        work for ce                          de ve lopment

How can we strengthen our workforce development system? By 2015, the region is projected to generate
close to 1 million new jobs, in technology, business and professional services, health care, construction and
other sectors. With leadership and investment, these opportunities could yield dramatic improvements in the
life circumstances of our region’s most vulnerable members. What will it take? Interviews with a number of
workforce experts in the region and nationally identified the following elements of an agenda for change:

• Expanded career exploration and academic preparation for young people, in and out of the traditional
school setting. Starting in elementary school, youth need to understand the academic and workplace learn-
ing required to be successful in the global marketplace

• Increased funding for workforce programs, particularly nonprofits, many of whom have reduced their
services in recent years or shut their doors

• Stronger connections between employers, workforce providers and economic development agencies to
recruit and retain businesses

• Regional collaboration around transportation and affordable housing challenges that pose significant
barriers to employment

• Policy changes to support long-term self-sufficiency rather than short-term placement goals

• More data to help identify needs, make appropriate funding decisions and strategically plan to meet the
gaps in industries and in services


The challenges can seem overwhelming, many noted, but not addressing them will be far more costly.


“If we don’t prepare students, the unemployed and low-income workers for jobs that pay good wages and
benefits, we will end up with families unable to make ends meet and city coffers, overburdened, making up
the difference through public benefits and work supports,” concludes Joan Kuriansky, executive director,
Wider Opportunities for Women.




notes

1. US Census 2000
2. ULI Washington, “Reality Check: Envisioning Our Region's Growth," 2005

3. Washington Area Women's Foundation, “A Portrait of Women and Girls in the Washington Metropolitan Area," 2003
4. DC Networks Labor Market Analyzer, 2004

5. Washington Area Women's Foundation, “A Portrait of Women and Girls in the Washington Metropolitan Area," 2003
6. Brookings Institution, “A Region Divided: The State of Growth in Greater Washington, DC," 1999
7. DC Department of Employment Services, Office of Labor Market Research and Information, “Employment Projections
by Industry and Occupation 2000–2010,” June, 2003
8. DC Chamber of Commerce, “Workforce Development Needs in the District of Columbia,” Summer, 2003

9. DC Chamber of Commerce, “Workforce Development Needs in the District of Columbia,” Summer, 2003
10. Annie E. Casey Foundation, “Good Jobs and Careers,” 2004




                                     T h e   C o m m u n i t y    F o u n d a t i o n    f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   29
                           Results

                           In just two years since the first Guide was distributed in November 2003, the Spirit of Giving Guide has
                           raised awareness about issues facing our community and the role of small nonprofit organizations in
                           addressing these challenges. Donors from across the region and beyond have responded enthusiastically to
                           the Guide and generated significant resources for its featured nonprofit organizations. In addition, The
                           Community Foundation has helped leverage support from its donors and has provided direct funding to the
                           30 organizations featured in our first two Guides. The 2003–04 Guide offered an in-depth look at neigh-
                           borhoods East of the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., showcasing 15 nonprofit organizations working
                           directly with children and families to address issues ranging from education to AIDS to youth violence. The
                           2004–05 Guide focused on civic engagement, an approach to creating community change across a variety
                           of issues and neighborhoods. The resulting Guide highlighted the work of 15 organizations that bring
                           together residents, youth and community leaders in creative and inclusive ways to make change happen.




                           incr eased                       r esour ces

                           Donors are moved to give by many factors and it is often difficult to accurately track the sources of support
                           to nonprofit organizations. But our efforts to capture the results of the Spirit of Giving Guide show that at a
                           minimum, donors have provided approximately $700,000 in cash and in-kind contributions over the Guide’s
                           two years. With an annual production budget of $30,000, the Guide has yielded an 11 to 1 ratio of return
                           for The Community Foundation’s investment.


                           Direct donations: Several organizations included the Guide page in their annual appeal and have reported
                           increased contributions; one organization reported doubling the contributions received in the year following
                           their selection to be featured in the Guide. The value of the direct donations ranged from a low of $50 to a
                           high of $80,300.


                           Donations through The Community Foundation or its partner donors: The Community Foundation
                           actively leverages grants to the organizations featured in the Guide. Almost two out of every three organiza-
                           tions featured (19 of the 30) received a donation from a Community Foundation donor or through one of
                           our partners. Several of these organizations were first-time recipients of the funds. The value of the grants
                           ranged from $3,470 to $40,000.



“You have done a wonderful job of helping us grow and develop; whether
it has been through financial assistance, the developmental opportunities
you are providing, or your ongoing moral support and encouragement.”
Ben     Johnson,              dir ector            of   development,
Life Pieces to Masterpieces, SOGG 2003–04




30   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
mor e            than              mone y

The Guide is also about much more than money—it is a tool for raising awareness
about the needs and issues facing our community and the smaller organizations
working to address those issues.


Each year we are reaching more people from across the region. In total, we’ve
touched over 26,000 individuals through the last two years of the Spirit of Giving
Guide, including our donors, the region’s private foundations, individuals of high net
worth, policymakers, the media and business leaders. As one donor put it, “the Guide
is what I turn to get ideas for my giving.” More and more people seem to agree, as
the 2004–05 Guide had to be reprinted in order to handle all of the special requests.


Awareness building: The Spirit of Giving Guide and its featured organizations
have received publicity through a variety of media, including the Today Show, NBC
Channel 4 News, The Washington Post, Washingtonian magazine, the East of the River
newspaper (a 16-month series of articles) and other local print and broadcast outlets.


We’ve also worked hard to involve the organizations in the Guide in Community
Foundation events, including our annual Galas the past two years, donor tours, our
Putting Race on the Table forums, and other community events. In short, we look
for every opportunity we can to promote the efforts of these outstanding nonprofit
organizations and leaders.


Strengthened capacity: The Community Foundation has committed itself to helping
the organizations featured in the Guide grow stronger and be more sustainable over
time. To that end, special capacity building efforts followed each release of the Guide
in 2003 and 2004:

• For the organizations featured in the 2003–04 East of the River Guide, The
Community Foundation has funded a two-year organizational development program.
The effort includes a mix of training workshops as well as individualized technical
assistance and capacity building.

• For the civic engagement organizations profiled in the 2004–05 Guide, The
Community Foundation sponsored their participation in workshops by nationally
recognized experts in advocacy, communications, and messaging.

• For all 30 organizations featured in the first two Guides, The Community
Foundation is now partnering with Greater DC Cares to provide technical assistance
around effective use of volunteers, and to match the groups with volunteer resources.

• All 30 organizations were also able to participate in two fundraising fundamen-
tal sessions designed to strengthen their efforts around marketing and individual
donor development.




                               T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   31
How to Invest in These Efforts

It is easy to make a direct donation of dollars, goods or time to any of the nonprofit organizations featured in this Guide.
Here’s how:


donate             funds

Donate directly to the nonprofit organization(s) you wish to support. Make the check payable to the name of the organiza-
tion(s) you have chosen. Mail your checks directly to the attention of the contact person listed in the organization’s profile. If you
have any questions, call or email the organization’s contact. Please tell the organization you found them in the Spirit of Giving
Guide by writing “SOGG” in the memo line of your check.

Donate through The Community Foundation by mailing a check made out to the Community Leadership Fund. Choose
whether you would like to support one or more organizations or support the Guide itself. Donors of The Community Foundation
may fill out a donor suggestion form and mail or fax it to us.

Donate online by visiting www.TouchDC.org or the websites of the individual organizations. Please tell the organizations
you found them in the Spirit of Giving Guide by writing “SOGG” in any space available for Notes. You may support multiple
organizations and/or the Guide by visiting our website at www.cfncr.org and clicking on the Donate Now link.


donate             goods

It is always wise to call first to ensure your donation will be used effectively. Call or email the nonprofit organization’s contact in
advance, then package and mail your donation directly to the organization. If the donation is large and/or requires a special deliv-
ery, additional arrangements should be made.


volunteer                 y our        ti me

Call or email the nonprofit organization’s contact to introduce yourself and arrange for an appropriate volunteer placement.


r ecr uit           for      a     pos ition

Call or email the nonprofit organization’s contact to introduce yourself and discuss recruiting possibilities. Or, contact WORC’s
One Click Clearinghouse (www.worconline.org), a web-based job posting board that links organizations offering employment
opportunities to over 100 area service providers prepared to refer pre-screened work-ready candidates.


for     mor e            infor mation

If you would like to talk with our staff about the groups in this Guide or other giving opportunities in the metropolitan
Washington region, contact Kristin Scotchmer, program officer, at 202-263-4769 or kscotchmer@cfncr.org.




32   S p i r i t   o f   G i v i n g   G u i d e
Who We Are

Whether you are a donor or a nonprofit organization in search of funding, The Com-                             THE MISSION OF THE
munity Foundation for the National Capital Region can assist you. We help donors                               COMMUNITY FOUNDAT I O N
connect with the people and issues they care about. We provide grants to nonprofits
                                                                                                               IS TO FA C I L I TATE INDIVIDUAL,
serving the community. We listen carefully to what each of our stakeholders has to
                                                                                                               FA M I LY AND ORGANIZAT I O N A L
say. And then, working together, we find solutions that build a stronger community
and enrich the quality of life for present and future generations.                                             GIVING AT ALL LEVELS TO

                                                                                                               C R E ATE A PERMANENT SOURCE
Since 1973, The Community Foundation has managed the philanthropic dollars of                                  OF PHILANTHROPIC CAPITA L
metropolitan area families, individuals, corporations and institutions. Today, The
                                                                                                               TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY
Community Foundation has 480 funds, each as unique as the donor who created it.
                                                                                                               OF LIFE IN THE METROPOLITA N

We offer a wide array of flexible options to encourage and nurture charitable giving                           WASHINGTON REGION.

at all levels. Our knowledgeable staff is plugged into the community and provides                              WE ACCOMPLISH THIS BY:
donors with information on local nonprofit organizations to help guide donors in
making solid community investments. We also host a variety of issue-based forums                               PROVIDING EXPERTISE AND

to bring donors, community groups, and business and government leaders together.                               S E RVICES TO DONORS ON
And, we can work with you directly to create personal giving plans, conduct estate                             HOW TO REALIZE THEIR GOALS
planning and help involve your family in creating a legacy of giving.
                                                                                                               IN PHILANTHROPY;


The Community Foundation and its three regional affiliates—The Alexandria Commu-                               CONNECTING OUR DONORS
nity Trust, The Montgomery County Community Foundation and The Prince George’s
                                                                                                               TO ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING
Community Foundation—are ready to assist you with all of your giving needs.
                                                                                                               EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS;


                                                                                                               S E RVING AS A CONVENER

                                                                                                               AND CATA LYST ON EMERGING

                                                                                                               ISSUES; AND
credits
WRITING                                                                                                        PROVIDING SOUND FINANCIAL
JANICE L. KAPLAN
                                                                                                               MANAGEMENT OF ASSETS.
DESIGN
PENSARÉ DESIGN GROUP, LTD

SUCCESS STORIES
THE TWO INDIVIDUALS FEATURED ON PAGE 1 ARE BOTH CONNECTED WITH
THE TRAINING FUTURES PROGRAM OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA FAMILY SERVICE,
ONE OF THE REGION'S PREMIER WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS.
MORE INFORMATION ON TRAINING FUTURES IS AVAILABLE AT WWW.NVFS.ORG.
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTOS BY ERIN MARIE DEY, EXCEPT:
COVER — CORBIS
PAGES 7 AND 22—TOM COGILL, COURTESY OF VIRGINIA JUSTICE CENTER
PAGE 10 — COURTESY OF ACADEMY OF HOPE
PAGE 12 — COURTESY OF CARLOS ROSARIO INTERNATIONAL CAREER CENTER
PAGE 17 — COURTESY OF NEWCOMER COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTER
PAGE 21 — PRIYA SAMBASIVAN, COURTESY OF URBAN ALLIANCE FOUNDATION




                                    T h e   C o m m u n i t y   F o u n d a t i o n   f o r   t h e   N a t i o n a l   C a p i t a l   R e g i o n   33
“Our region is blessed with many grassroots groups addressing the
need for real solutions and doing the tough work—whatever work is
needed—to prepare residents for stable, living wage employment.”
Ker r y O’ Brien, co-dir ector,
D.C. E mpl oyment Jus tice Center




                                                                    PRESOR TED
                                                                    S T A N D A R D
                                                                    U . S. P OS TA G E


                                                                    PA I D
                                                                    PERMIT #5309
                                                                    WASHINGTON, DC



1201 15TH STR EET, NW
SUITE 420
WASHINGTON, DC 20005

TEL 202-955-5890
FAX 202-955-8084

www.cfncr.org

								
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