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					Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences Upper School Advanced Study Course List
Crossroads Advanced Study: Studio Art 4 The Advanced Studio Art 4 class makes it possible for highly motivated seniors to do college-level work. The first semester is devoted to students refining their painting, drawing and design skills while completing a series of concept driven projects. Students also work on developing an artist’s statement and portfolio for college admissions. The class participates in a departmental review critique in December. In the second semester students concentrate on developing a series of works that represent an independent, in-depth investigation of a specific theme. Students are responsible for mounting and digitally documenting their second semester work for the Senior Thesis Show in May. While a majority of work will be completed during class, students should expect to work on art projects at home. Weekly sketchbook assignments, critiques, gallery visits and research assignments will be an important component of this class. Crossroads Advanced Study: Photography 4 Advanced Photography makes it possible for highly motivated, advanced photography students to do college-level work. Students continue to refine their skills while working on completing a series of concept-driven projects. We work on developing an artist’s statement and a portfolio for college admission. Students participate in a department review critique in December. In the second semester, students concentrate on developing a series of images that represent an independent, in-depth investigation of a specific theme. Students are responsible for mounting and documenting their work for the Senior Thesis Show in May. Critiques, research, short papers, and gallery reviews will be an important component of this class. Students must supply their own photographic film and paper. Crossroads Advanced Study: Ceramics 4. This Advanced Ceramics class makes it possible for highly motivated, advanced ceramics students to do college level work. The first semester is devoted to students refining their technical skills while completing a series of concept driven projects. Students also work on developing an artist’s statement and portfolio for college admissions. The class participates in a departmental review critique in December. In the second semester students concentrate on developing a series of works that represent an independent, in-depth investigation of a specific theme. Students are responsible for mounting and digitally documenting their second semester work for the Senior Thesis Show in May. Weekly sketchbook assignments, critiques, gallery visits and research assignments will be an important component of this class. Crossroads Advanced Study: Graphic Design and Motion Graphics 4. In this college-level, advanced class students define an area of concentration, develop a timeline for completion, and work towards a portfolio of work and thesis exhibition. Students are encouraged to develop a series of works that relate in theme or content. Previous projects have included: developing corporate identities and implementing these in logos, signage, letterhead, product design, and web banner design; developing a series of artist’s books; developing a font and using it to typeset a small book; and developing complex websites. Again, as in previous Graphic Design classes, each student is responsible for assembling a presentation portfolio of (this and previous years’) work by June. Weekly sketchbook assignments, gallery visits, research assignments, and a term paper will be an important component of this class. Crossroads Advanced Study: Latin Poetry and Prose. Advanced Studies in Latin Poetry and Prose introduces students to a variety of authors and genres or an individual author in depth, with a view to a sophisticated appreciation of Latin Literature, its cultural context, and legacy. Students admitted to this course must meet all criteria: to be highly motivated, to have excelled in Latin 4 Honors, and to maintain excellent standing throughout the end of the semester in Latin 4 Honors. The aims and skills approximate those of a college-level course of the fourth through sixth semesters. Readings will be selected from such authors as Cicero, Catullus, Vergil, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Pliny, Seneca the Younger, and Tacitus, representing such genres as epic, lyric, love elegy, history, oratory, and letters. Crossroads Advanced Study: Ancient Greek Poetry and Prose.

Advanced Studies in Ancient Greek Poetry and Prose works at a college pace and at a higher level of rigor than Greek 4. As in Greek 4, Advanced Studies students read the original Greek of authors such as Herodotus, Thucydides, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, Demosthenes, and Homer. The texts are The Crossroads Greek Anthology and Athenaze II. Topics of discussion include Athenian law, Greek oratory, pre-Socratic natural science and philosophy, Socratic humanism and ethics, and the relation between god, fate, and mankind. Students read another Greek drama in translation and discuss the nature of Greek drama and its continuing influence in Western literature. The Perseus program continues to be used as a teaching and research tool. Advanced Studies students are expected to be highly motivated and to have excelled in Greek 3. Students who meet the criteria and express interest in the Advanced Studies course must pass the Placement Exam in February and maintain excellent standing through the end of the semester in Greek 3. This course may be offered concurrently with Greek 4, depending on enrollments. Crossroads Advanced Study: Computer Science. Advanced students extend their knowledge of computer programming by examining and dissecting an existing sophisticated computer program. Students will study the Java Case Study associated with the Advanced Placement Computer Science curriculum. Students will also study arrays and arraylists, recursion, and search and sort algorithms. Students may need to purchase a compiler in addition to texts. Students without computers or Internet access at home have to spend some time at school working on projects for this class. Class enrollment is limited to 12 students. Crossroads Advanced Study: The Other Side of History You’ve read about the French revolution, but have you heard of the Tupac Amaru Rebellion? Sendero Luminoso? The Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sang? The Righteous Harmony Society? The Movimento dos Trahabaldores Rurais Sem Terra? No? Then, in this class, you’ll learn something truly new about militant political action which will challenge your thinking. Your iPod can hold thousands of songs. But does your MP3 player warn you that certain kinds of music can get you killed? Does it tell you that Greek generals once outlawed Rembetika? That Brazilian generals turned against Tropicalia? You may think you’re familiar with the people you’ll meet in The Other Side of History. You’ve seen them on CNN and Fox, making cameo appearances as the pathetic victims of tsunamis, of drought, and of corrupt leadership, not to mention slavery, colonialism and corruption. Make no mistake: this class explores the legacies of natural and man-made catastrophe. But this is not a class about victims. Our assumption here is that Latin Americans, Africans and Asians have constructed their own histories and, in doing so, are reconstructing North America and Europe. Students in The Other Side of History wrestle with all the questions of modernity: economic development, religious and cultural change, global migration, and the contest of ideologies. The poor play their part, as do political elites; women as well as men; the obscure as well as the famous. Two warnings: First, don’t expect a morality play – this isn’t a class which demonizes Europeans and sanctifies nonEuropeans. History is politically and morally complicated. Second, don’t expect an easy ride. This is an honors class. It is as demanding an academic experience as you’ve ever had at Crossroads. Crossroads Advanced Study: Differential and Integral Calculus. This course covers the same topics as Calculus but in greater depth and at a higher level of rigor. Additional topics include differential equations, area and volume, and solids of revolution. Students in this course will be required to apply previously-learned concepts in new situations and are expected to be highly motivated and independent. Note: Students must maintain at least a C+ average in the first semester to continue in 2nd semester. Crossroads Advanced Study: Integral Calculus and Topics in Advanced Math.

This is a two-semester calculus course whose content closely follows the recommendations of the Committee on Mathematics of the Advanced Placement Program. Topics discussed include integrals, techniques of integration, applications of the integral, polar coordinates, differential equations, parametric equations, sequences, series, and Taylor and Maclaurin Polynomials. Note: Students must earn at least a C+ average in the first semester to continue in 2nd semester. Crossroads Advanced Study: French Language. This course is designed for the student who demonstrates a strong level of oral and written proficiency in French and is motivated to refine his/ her writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills through exposure to aspects of French and Francophone culture. The class is exclusively conducted in French. Each semester will have a designated topic as its main theme. The instructor picks texts (novels, current event news articles, poems), films, documentaries that are representative of the topic and engages students in daily classroom discussions. In addition, students continue to improve their grammatical skills with an intensive review and special attention given to the refinement of syntax. Grammar and vocabulary are studied in the context of the chosen Francophone cultural topics. Topics could include literature and culture of West Africa and the Caribbean, issues affecting contemporary France such as the consequences of colonization and immigration, France during the occupation, French and Francophone culture through comic books, French popular culture (forms of talk, humor, advertising, songs, TV shows, and current ideas / events stimulating public debate). Students read various forms of texts (literary works, poems, articles, comic strips), view films / documentaries / TV5 programming, conduct their own research and produce oral and written work based on their findings. In addition, students participate in the Modern Foreign Language’s annual International Week festivities. Crossroads Advanced Study: Spanish Language. This course is designed for students who have demonstrated an excellent command of Spanish and who are interested in improving and/or polishing their language skills while becoming better critical thinkers. The course offers an intensive review of grammatical structures and syntax and introduces students to new idiomatic expressions and special nuances of the language. Grammar and vocabulary are practiced in the context of selected cultural topics particular to the Hispanic world. Some of the topics presented in this course include: the role of women in society, the culture of “machismo”, traditions and customs, political regimes, social and racial issues, among others. Students are required to read and analyze articles and literary works, research pertinent material on websites and in other sources, watch related films, listen to live broadcasts, write essays, and do oral presentations. In addition, students participate in the Modern Foreign Language’s annual International Week festivities. Advanced Biology Series The Advanced Biology Series course is composed of an alternating yearly curriculum. Students have the option of taking the course for a single year or they may complete the series in two years. The nature of the course does not require students to take both courses or to take the series in a particular order. The course is divided into two chapters of life (each a year long taught in alternating years) and takes a reverse chronological approach to the study of life’s development, evolution, and ecology. Our pilgrimage begins with humankind and then travels backwards through the four billion years of life that our planet has seen. Stops are made at each branching point in our evolutionary history where we examine our common ancestor’s physiology, genetics, ecological role, and unique characteristics. This in depth analysis of the kingdoms in reverse provides a unique perspective into the unity of life and the great similarities we share with the other members of the kingdoms of life. Both courses address the subject matter through laboratory analysis, lab write-ups, lecture, and classroom discussion. Course descriptions, below. Crossroads Advanced Study: Evolutionary Biology. Biology Exodus - Exodus is a thorough analysis of the explosion of animal life seen from the Cambrian period (Cambrian explosion) to present day’s Holocene epoch. This 550 million year stretch of time marks the dawn of Kingdom Animalia. We begin our focus with humankind and examine what it means to be human, how we are unique, the important physiological adaptations we have obtained, and our role/interaction with the environment. In our journey

back through time we stop at approximately 30 major branch points that make up the bulk of Kingdom Animalia. At each branch point a representative extant species is analyzed. This zoological approach allows a better understanding of the similarities and differences we share with the other species in our kingdom. Particular attention is also paid to the environmental conditions of each time period and the effects that these had on the animal species living on the planet. Major topics covered are: the important physiological adaptations obtained by animals, zoology, evolution, genetics, systematics, phylogeny, population ecology, and community ecology. Crossroads Advanced Study: Cellular Biology. Biology Genesis - Genesis continues our journey into the past, beginning with the Cambrian period and taking us to the dawn of life roughly 3.8 billion years ago. We will meet up with the other Kingdoms of life on this pathway: Plantae, Fungi, Protista, Eubacteria, and Archaebacteria. The major branch points are again addressed with representative extant species. Major topics covered are: molecular biology, cell biology, evolution, genetics, botany, mycology, bioenergetics, and microbiology. Crossroads Advanced Study: Environmental Chemistry. Environmental Chemistry is the study of the origins, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in natural places; and the effect of human activity on these. It is an interdisciplinary science that includes atmospheric, aquatic, and soil chemistry. This course gives students an opportunity to deepen their understanding of chemistry by applying chemical principles to the study of the environment. It is geared towards students in their junior or senior year, who are looking to take an advanced science class. The course is divided into three distinct sections. The first is chemistry of the atmosphere, which involves the study of the chemical composition of the atmosphere, the ozone layer, acid rain, photochemical smog, and the greenhouse effect. The second section is chemistry of the hydrosphere; topics include the study of the chemical composition of seawater, the process of desalination, and the effects of variables such as dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and dissolved solids on water quality. The third section is chemistry of the soil, which involves the study of inorganic and organic soil components, with an emphasis on the environmental significance of soil solution-solid phase equilibria, ion exchange processes, reaction kinetics, redox reactions, and acidity processes. Students perform a diverse selection of labs, which encompass concepts from all three sections of the class. Examples include the detection and identification of ions in water solutions, synthesis of biodiesel, determining the pH of acid rain by titration, and purification of a foul water sample. Crossroads Advanced Study: Organic Chemistry. Organic Chemistry is a specific discipline within the subject of chemistry. It is the scientific study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and synthesis of chemical compounds consisting of primarily carbon and hydrogen. Multi-carbon compounds are major constituents in many products (e.g. plastics, food, drugs, and petrochemicals), and almost without exception, they form the basis of all life processes. This class takes place over the course of two semesters, and provides students with a broad introduction to the principles, theories, and applications of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics include modern structural theory, organic nomenclature, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and kinetics, and an introduction to functional group chemistry. The laboratory work involves an introduction to the major synthetic and analytical techniques of organic chemistry, including the synthesis of organic compounds (e.g. aspirin) and the isolation of compounds from natural sources (e.g. lavender oil). Students are also exposed to the current trend of green reactions in organic chemistry (e.g. reactions in water using microwaves). Crossroads Advanced Study: Calculus-based Physics. Advanced Topics in Physics is a two-semester science lab class is calculus based and covers topics in physics including Newtonian mechanics, thermodynamics, wave theory and optics, electricity and magnetism, and quantum mechanics. This course is not limited to these topics and has a component to investigate the moral and ethical aspects of physics in the modern world. This course is for those students who wish to explore more deeply the concepts of physics which they may have encountered in a previous science class. Students complete a self determined project in an area of physics that is of interest to them. This course also includes the use of computers to simulate phenomena in physics.


				
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