Monologue Book Report - DOC - DOC

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					                         Monologue Book Report
         After reading your contemporary or classic fiction novel, you will choose one of the main
characters and write a one-and-a-half to two minute monologue in their voice. This monologue
should be their spoken account of what they learned as a result of the events that took place in the
novel. It should NOT be a summary of the novel, as we don’t want to spoil the opportunity of
others in the class to read the book you read. Instead, the monologue should be this character’s
final chapter, in which they detail the lessons they learned throughout the book. The monologue
should have enough references to things that happened in the book that Mrs. Liautaud can tell you
read the book, but not so many details that you give away the plot for the other students! Really
well done monologues will interest other students to read the book.
         After writing the monologue, you will need to put together a costume that this character
would wear. Be creative! You should have several props as part of your costume. For instance,
Harry Potter would not just have his wand and a black robe, but also a lightning bolt scar, and
maybe a white owl (poster board) with him. Then you will practice, practice, practice your
monologue because you will memorize it and present it, in costume, to the class on the due date.
Bring a copy of your monologue with this paper attached to the back of it on: ________________
Parent Signature:______________________________
This project is worth 30 points distributed as follows:
Monologue 14 points: creativity, literary accuracy, writing mechanics and project directions.
Presentation 8 points: memorization, eye contact, audible voice, and dramatic ability.
Costume 8 points: creativity and props.




                         Monologue Book Report
         After reading your contemporary or classic fiction novel, you will choose one of the main
characters and write a one-and-a-half to two minute monologue in their voice. This monologue
should be their spoken account of what they learned as a result of the events that took place in the
novel. It should NOT be a summary of the novel, as we don’t want to spoil the opportunity of
others in the class to read the book you read. Instead, the monologue should be this character’s
final chapter, in which they detail the lessons they learned throughout the book. The monologue
should have enough references to things that happened in the book that Mrs. Liautaud can tell you
read the book, but not so many details that you give away the plot for the other students! Really
well done monologues will interest other students to read the book.
         After writing the monologue, you will need to put together a costume that this character
would wear. Be creative! You should have several props as part of your costume. For instance,
Harry Potter would not just have his wand and a black robe, but also a lightning bolt scar, and
maybe a white owl (poster board) with him. Then you will practice, practice, practice your
monologue because you will memorize it and present it, in costume, to the class on the due date.
Bring a copy of your monologue with this paper attached to the back of it on: ________________
Parent Signature:__________________________
This project is worth 30 points distributed as follows:
Monologue 14 points: creativity, literary accuracy, writing mechanics and project directions.
Presentation 8 points: memorization, eye contact, audible voice, and dramatic ability.
Costume 8 points: creativity and props.