Annual Report of ISSC Research Committee on

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					 Annual Report of ISSC Research Committee on
Gender, Globalization, and Democratization 2002
            and Plan for 2003-2004
                  submitted by

                   Jane Bayes,
                     Chair




                        1
                               Table of Contents



I. Introduction – Objectives of the Research Committee   3


II.. Organization of the Research Committee              4


III. Scientific Activities                               5


IV. Research Activities during 2002                      6


V. Publications                                          8


VI. Conferences and Conference Papers in 2002            9


VII. Finances                                            9


VIII. Plans for the Future : 2003-2004                   10

       A) Research Plans                                 10

       B) Website                                        13

       C) Conferences planned for 2003                   13

       D) Financial Plans for 2003-2004                  14




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                      Annual Report of ISSC Research Committee on
                     Gender, Globalization, and Democratization 2002
                                 and Plan for 2003-2004

                                submitted by Jane Bayes,Chair


I. Introduction.

The Research Committee on Gender was initiated by the International Social Science
Council as a Scientific Committee in 1998. The major aim of the GGD Research Committee
is to provide and distribute sound and reliable knowledge gathered from all parts of the world
that can be used to improve the social, economic and political position of women in this era
of globlization. To this end, we seek knowledge about the gendered impact of globalization
on various populations and about the prospects and initiatives for democratization understood
as the full and equal participation of women and men in political and economic decision-
making.

The Objectives of the GGD Research Committee are:

    to offer a global organizational structure to bring together scholars working in different
    academic disciplines and in different regions of the world to perform high level
    collaborative research on the intersection of the themes of gender, globalization, and
    democratization.

    to develop joint research projects to generate knowledge that can be used as a foundation
    for policy initiatives to improve the lives of women.

    to provide an output of scholarly publications, workshop materials, syllabi, training
    manuals, and course materials that can be shared globally on the internet and in other
    ways as a means of understanding and addressing problems generated for women by
    globalization.

    to establish an inclusive international scientific network of researchers working in the
    field of globalization and gender, one that reaches out to include young scholars and
    scholars from the majority world.

   to collaborate with international, national and local organizations including other
    ISSC member organizations to establish an organizational network and on-going working
    relationships that will foster a foundation for a long term research and training program
    on globalization, gender, and democratization.




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II.. Organization of the Research Committee

 The resources of the GGD Research Committee are drawn from the various institutional,
national and international resources of its members. Members of the Scientific Committee
are responsible for defining projects and cooperating with one another to find funding to
execute these projects. A major strength of this committee lies in the diversity of the
members, the access the members have to funding in a variety of different places, and in the
leadership of various members of the Scientific Committee. Project leaders identify
appropriate projects for which they can obtain at least some funding; recruit other members
of the Research Committee who want to participate in the project; recruit scholars who are
not members of the Research Committee whose expertise and interest are valued (especially
young scholars and scholars from the majority world and other ISSC member organizations);
and take responsibility for the planning, fund raising, and execution of the project. The
responsibilities of the Chair of the Research Committee are: 1) to work with members of the
Scientific Committee to plan a cohesive and appropriate research and project agenda for the
committee; 2) to facilitate the outreach and fund raising functions of the research committee
in whatever ways possible; 3) to serve as the contact for the research committee with the
ISSC Secretariat; 4) to write and submit annual reports, 5) to help develop future plans
including the scheduling of meetings, conferences, and workshops, and 6) to maintain the
research committee’s web page.

Chair: Jane Bayes- USA – political science – jbayes@csun.edu

Scientific Committee Members
Grace Bantebya Kyomuhendo – Uganda –anthropology-gendermu@africaonline.co.ug
Gunnel Gustafsson, Sweden – political science - gunnel.gustafsson@pol.umu.se
Mary Hawkesworth – USA – political science- mhawkes@rci.rutgers.edu
Kinhide Mushakoji – Japan – political science - QWD00105@nifty.ne.jp
Achola Pala Okeyo – Kenya – anthropology – achola70@hotmail.com
Marian Simms- New Zealand – political science - marian.simms@stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Yi Zhaoyin – China –history- yizhaoyin <yizhaoyin@hotmail.com
Brigitte Young - Germany – political economy- byoung@uni-muenster.de

Current Membership
Grace Bantebya Kyomuhendo- anthropology – Uganda- gendermu@africaonline.co.ug
Jane Bayes – political science – USA – jbayes@csun.edu
Yassine Fall- economics – Senegal - yassine.fall@undp.org
Laura Gonzalez - anthropology - USA/Mexico- glezla@utdallas.edu
Suranjana Gupta – sociology – India -Suranjanagroots@aol.com
Gunnel Gustafsson - political science – Sweden- gunnel.gustafsson@pol.umu.se
Seiko Hanochi - political science – Japan- seiko@hanochi.com
Nancy Hartsock - political science – USA- hartsock@u.washington.edu
Mary Hawkesworth - political science – USA- mhawkes@rci.rutgers.edu
Monique Leyenaar – political science – Netherlands - monique@leyenaar.cc
Kinohide Mushakoji - political science – Japan - QWD00105@nifty.ne.jp
Achola Pala Okeyo –anthropology -Kenya– achola70@hotmail.com
Nancy Russo, psychology – USA - nancy.russo@asu.edu


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Marian Simms - political science – New Zealand- marian.simms@stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Urvashi Soni-Sinha – economics – Canada / India- urvashi@uwindsor.ca
Yi Zhaoyin - history – China - yizhaoyin@hotmail.com
Bang Soon Yoon - political science - USA/Korea- yoonb@cwu.EDU
Brigitte Young - political economy – Germany- byoung@uni-muenster.de

III. Scientific Activities

The ISSC Research Committee on Globalization, Gender, and Democratization published a
book edited by Rita Mae Kelly, Jane H. Bayes, Mary Hawkesworth, and Brigitte Young
entitled Gender, Globalization, and Democracy (Rowman and Littlefield 2001) which is the
major collective achievement of the Research Committee to date. This book represents the
mission and the scope of the Research Committee. It contains contributions from almost all
members of the Research Committee and is intended to define the theoretical and empirical
approaches that the Research Committee will continue to develop in its subsequent work. As
the book and Research Committee titles indicate, the committee seeks to study the impact of
globalization processes on women and explore the prospects that globalization may bring for
the political recognition of women and the effective participation of women in political
processes.

Major themes of the book and the committee’s research

A summary of the major themes in the book portrays the scope of the Research Committee’s
mission. The first chapters define globalization and its impact on women from three
different regions, Europe, Africa, and Australia to show that globalization is understood
differently in different regions and that its impact on women is often context specific and
uneven. One of the major strengths of this book (especially for classroom use) is its
presentation of different points of view on the topic of globalization. Most books in the
globalization literature do not present a variety of views concerning globalization from
different parts of the world.

Another group of chapters deals with changes in gender relationships created by economic
globalization processes. Migration, changing patterns and modes of production, the
increased number and strength of transnational organizations, and the rampant growth of sex
trafficking are explored in Asia, Mexico, and the United States.

The final section analyzes the prospects that globalization offers for democratic processes
that include women. These chapters attempt to identify contradictions that may foster a more
democratic recognition of women or the effective participation of women as globalization
disrupts old patriarchal gender regimes. It also identifies some of the barriers that exist and
the strategies that women are using to surmount these barriers.

This book was selected for a half day review and discussion by The Feminist Theory
Conference in the United States on 19 March 2002. This conference is held annually prior to
the Western Political Science Association meetings and draws feminist theorists from across
the United States and from other countries. The group selects a recently published book



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deemed noteworthy for a morning of prepared critiques and discussion. To be selected for
such an intensive review by this group of scholars is a great honor.


IV. Research Activities during 2002

The Research Committee’s activities suffered in 2002 because of the illness and death of our
chair, Rita Mae Kelly. She died in October 2001. During 2002, various members of the
research committee pursued some of the themes raised in the initial book by organizing
conferences on sexual trafficking, migration, and women’s leadership. We conceive the
ISSC Research Committee on Gender, Globalization and Democratization to be an umbrella
organization initiating, directing, coordinating, distributing, and publicizing group projects
on selected themes raised in our initial book, Gender, Globalization, and Democratization.
Most of these projects will take more than one year to produce a publication or product,
although they are expected to have a result in terms of workshops, conferences, website
postings, policy recommendations, conference proceedings, and planning meetings every
year. During 2002, these themes were: 1) Women and Leadership Around the World; 2)
Education and Outreach ; 2) Sexual Trafficking; and 3) Migration and Gender.

Women and Leadership Around the World

Gunnel Gustafsson, our interim chair, initiated this project in 2002 on “Women and
Leadership Around the World,” one which we have expanded and are continuing in 2003. In
September, Dr. Gustafsson held a conference on this topic hosted by Umea University in
Umea, Sweden. Five research committee members (Gustafsson, Bayes, Hawkesworth,
Simms, Gonzalez) attended that meeting, presented papers and made plans for future
research activities for the group. Dr. Gustafsson successfully applied for funds for the group
to come to the ISSC Fiftieth Anniversary Conference in Vienna in December 2002.
Presenting papers on a panel at this conference convened by Dr. Gustafsson on “Women and
Leadership Around the World” were four members of the research committee (Bayes, Yoon,
Yi, and Bantebya-Kyomuhendo). The next meeting of this group will be in Durban, South
Africa on July 2,3, and 4 , 2003 at the International Political Science Association meetings.
Members of the research committee scheduled to present papers on the topic of Women and
Leadership Around the World and to engage in further writing, editing and planning for a
publication on this project include: Gustafsson, Hawkesworth, Bayes, Yi, Banebya-
Kyomuhendo, along with some new participants from Argentina, India, China, Paraguay,
Ivory Coast, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Pakistan, and the USA.

Research Design Summary on Women and Leadership : This project seeks to use women in
leadership as a lens through which to explore the gendered relationship between
globalization, modernization, and democratization in the world. We assume that
globalization disrupts patriarchal gender regimes. This disruption can create a policy window
for women and governments who want to put gender on the public agenda during processes
of democratization in newly established as well as in traditional democracies which are still
unfinished. In practice, women around the globe continue to share the experience of unequal
access to power. The research agenda will deal with the different actions women leaders



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undertake in this situation, what their visions and strategies are and what kind of responses
they receive in various contexts and situations. As a starting point, an overview will be given
of women’s parliamentary representation globally and how this has developed over the last
twenty years. Then an attempt will be made theoretically and empirically to link women’s
organising in a broad sense to democratization processes. The following are examples of
questions which will be analysed and discussed: What characterises women’s leadership in
different parts of the world? What are the main similarities and differences with regard to
how women organise as women, what they want to accomplish, and the kind of resistance
and support they experience? What does the character and status of women’s leadership in a
society tell us about that society? What conditions, policies, and characteristics have been
successful in developing women’s leadership in different countries and in different contexts?
To what extent is developing the capacity of women to lead a major priority for those
interested in democratization. What evidence is there that democratizing countries
understand the importance of women’s leadership?

Education and Outreach

The education and outreach element of the Research Committee’s work involves exploring
the use of the internet for international distance learning purposes, developing course
curricula and workshops on the topics of globalization, gender, and democratization,
collecting and exchanging relevant syllabi and bibliographies from scholars around the
world, experimenting with and exploring the possibilities of translation ( initially
English/Spanish ) for course materials and other communications. In 2000, Rita Mae Kelly
and Jane Bayes were awarded a four year $200,000 grant from the Fund for the Improvement
of Post Secondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education in 2000 on Globalization
and Governance focussing particularly on Canada, the United States, and Mexico with
emphasis on the gender aspects of globalization. Since then, ISSC Research Committee
members Mary Hawkesworth and Laura Gonzalez have become integral parts of the grant
and its activities in this area. Part of that grant involves developing an integrated curriculum
on gender, globalization and democratization, a project that synergistically works to advance
this third initiative of the GGD Research Committee. To date, courses have been developed
on “The Politics of Globalization,” “Gender and Trade,” “Gender, Globalization and
Democratization” “ Gender and Development.,” “Transnational Feminisms,” Some of these
have been established as web assisted courses. Some are web courses suitable for use as
distance learning modules. Other topics for future courses or modules include: “Gender and
Migration,” “Global Finance and Gender,” “ Sexual Trafficking and Human Security.”

Sexual Trafficking

As documented in our book, Gender, Globalization and Democratization, globalization has
greatly increased the incidence of sexual trafficking around the world. Research committee
members Brigitte Young, Kinhide Mushakoji, Seiko Hanochi, and Nancy Hartsock
participated in a conference in Canada at York University in October 2001 organized by
Isabella Bakker and Stephen Gill entitled “Gender, Political Economy and Human Security.”
Papers from this conference are being published as a book entitled Power, Production and
Social Reproduction: Human In/Security in the Global Political Economy (Palgrave 2003)



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with contributions from research committee members, Brigitte Young, Kinhide Mushakoji,
and Seiko Hanochi. Kinhide Mushakoji and Seiko Hanochi made presentations at the
Second World Congress Against Sexual Exploitation of Children December 17-20, 2001,
Yokohama, Japan at a Workshop on Human Security and Trafficking in Children organized
by the International Movement Against All Forms of Discrimination and Racism (IMADR).
See proceedings at : www.imadr.org/project/petw/ yokohama-congress-trafficking.html.
Participants were from Japan, Canada, Mali, Nigeria, South Africa, China, Philippines,
Taiwan, Spain, Thailand. A report can be found at :
http://www.imadr.org/project/petw/yokohama-congress-trafficking.html

Kinhide Mushakoji and Seiko Hanochi organized a Women and Poverty Conference on
Trafficking, Migration and Gender Insecurity held on 3 January 2003. The purpose of this
seminar was to gather activists and researchers from South and South East/East Asia to
compare the effects of the global economy as it creates the exploitative structures and root
causes of trafficking and undocumented migration. The seminar also sought to encourage
participants to share suggestions for fighting sexual trafficking and to develop a South/South
network against trafficking and exploitative migration. Participants were from Japan, the
Philippines, Korea, Nepal, India, Sri Lanka. For more information, see:
http://lists.iww.org/pipermail/iww-news/2002-December/000789.html.

Migration and Gender

Another topic of concern to the Research Committee is that of gender and migration. Initially
this group has focussed its attention on migration between the United States and Mexico and
its impact on women, gender regimes, and women’s political participation (Kelly, Bayes,
Gonzalez). Drs Bayes and Gonzalez along with others have held meetings, organized panels,
and written papers presented in San Francisco at the American Political Science Association
in August, 2001, the International Studies Association meetings in New Orleans in March,
2002 , at California State University, Northridge in May 2002 and at the La Frontera
Conference held in La Paz, Mexico in February, 2002. All of these conferences have
involved other younger faculty and graduate students. The La Paz conference involved
undergraduates. Another migration conference is planned for May 1, 2003 at California State
University, Northridge. The focus of this conference will be on migration between Mexico
and Central America and the United States. Research committee member Marian Simms is
planning to join this effort with a major conference in New Zealand in 2004 which will
expand the committee’s focus beyond that of the Americas.

V. Publications

The research Committee had no publications in 2002, but did have two publications in 2001
and several members have chapters in a book being published in 2003. The two 2001 books
are:

Rita Mae Kelly, Jane H. Bayes, Mary E. Hawkesworth, and Brigitte Young, eds. Gender,
Globalization, and Democratization. Boulder, Co: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001.
       This book has contributions from thirteen members of the Research Committee covering Oceania,
       Europe, Africa (especially Senegal), Mexico, the United States, Canada, India, Japan, and Korea.



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Jane H. Bayes and Nayereh Tohidi, eds. Globalization, Gender, and Religion: The Politics
of Implementing Women’s Rights in Catholic and Muslim Contexts. N.Y: Palgrave, 2001.

       This book has contributions from the United States, Ireland, Spain, Costa Rica, Turkey, Iran,
       Bangladesh, and Egypt, with each author writing about her own country.

The 2003 book is Isabella Bakker and Stephen Gill eds. Power, Production and Social
Reproduction: Human In/Security in the Global Political Economy (Palgrave 2003) with
contributions from research committee members, Brigitte Young, Kinhide Mushakoji, and
Seiko Hanochi. This is the product of a conference held at York University in Canada in
October 2001 “Gender, Political Economy and Human Security.”

VI. Conferences and Conference Papers in 2002

A) Women and Leadership Conference held in Umeå, Sweden in September 2002
     organized by Dr. Gunnel Gustafsson. Paper givers included research committee
     members Marian Simms, Mary Hawkesworth, Laura Gonzalez, and Jane Bayes.

B) Women and Leadership Around the World held in Vienna, Austria in December
     2002. organized by Gunnel Gustafsson,. Paper givers included: Marian Simms, Bang
     Soon Yoon, Yi Zhaoyin, Grace Bantebya Kyomuhendo, and Jane Bayes

C) Women and Leadership panels held at the International Political Science
     Association meetings in Durban, South Africa July 2-5, 2003. Participants included:
     Gunnel Gustafsson, Achola Pala Okeyo, Monique Leyenaar, Mary Hawkesworth,
     and Jane Bayes, with a number of other scholars from around the world who applied
     to present their papers on these panels and were accepted. Global interest was very
     high at IPSA as judged by the number of applicants wanting present papers on the
     topic.

D) Globalization and Migration panel organized by Jane Bayes at La Frontera Conference
      in LaPaz, Baja del Sur, Mexico February, 2002.

E) Gender and Migration panel held at the International Studies Association meetings
      in New Orleans, LA in March 2002. Papergivers included Laura Gonzalez and Jane
      Bayes.

E) Gender and Migration Conference held at California State University, Northridge
      in May 2002 organized by Jane Bayes. Invited speaker was Laura Gonzalez.

VII. Finances

The Research Committee has no permanent source of financial support. The administrative
headquarters for the committee resides at the home institution of the current chair. The ISSC
granted the committee US $10,000 to hold its initial conference in Paris. Interim Chair Dr.
Gunnel Gustafsson also obtained US$5000 through the ISSC from the Austrian government


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to hold our session on “Women and Leadership Around the World” at the Fiftieth Year
Celebration of the ISSC in Vienna in 2002. These monies from these grants were spent
entirely on travel, primarily for those coming from the majority world. All other monies
supporting the research committee’s activities have come from the fund raising efforts of
individual members and leaders of the scientific committee in cooperation with other entities
for specific events or particular aspects of the committee’s research agenda. In the past, our
chair, Rita Mae Kelly, and interim chair, Gunnel Gustafsson, were deans at their respective
institutions, the University of Texas at Dallas in Texas and Umeå University in Sweden.
Their offices gave the committee both administrative and some monetary support. The home
institution of the current chair, California State University, Northridge, has provided a server
for the committee’s new web page and has continued to provide telephone service.

For most conferences, research committee members have received travel monies from their
home institutions. The International Political Science Association provided travel monies for
two scholars, one from India and one from Africa, to participate in our Women and
Leadership sessions at the IPSA meetings in Durban, South Africa in July, 2003. Sometimes,
research committee members have separate funding for projects whose objectives overlap
with those of the ISSC Research Committee. For example, Drs Laura Gonzalez and Rita
Mae Kelly received a four year $600,000 grant from the Fund to Improve Post Secondary
Education (FIPSE) of the US Department of Education to work on recruiting Hispanic
students in Texas to four year university programs. Part of that grant involved doing research
on US Mexico migration and training Hispanic students in anthropological field methods,
research work that is very important to the ISSC research agenda and which continues to
inform and shape future research projects. Rita Mae Kelly and Jane Bayes received another
four year $400,000 grant from FIPSE to provide an integrated curriculum on globalization
and governance for North America working with their two US home institutions and with
two Mexican and two Canadian universities. A part of that grant involves working on
developing web based or web assisted courses, developing ways to share course materials
internationally, developing gender and globalization workshops. This is another case of
synergistic overlap between other funded projects and the work of the ISSC GGD Research
Committee. The FIPSE grant covers only North America, but what we learn and develop for
North America also advances our knowledge about how to do similar work in the rest of the
world.

Grants to fund the participation of research committee members at conferences that
addressed the research agenda of the committee include the Toyota Corporation, the
Volkswagen Corporation, the California Wellness Foundation. The support of the home
institutions of research committee members for travel and special events or special speakers
continues to be extremely important to the functioning of the committee.


VIII. Plans for the Future : 2003-2004

A) Research Plans
The ISSC Research Committee on Gender, Globalization and Democratization has specific
plans for 2003 which include : 1) consulting with the regional associations of ISSC with



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regard to our projects; 2) putting up a web page (see web page at www.isscggd.org); 3)
seeking out and involving younger scholars, graduate students and young faculty in our
activities; 4) engaging in capacity building for women on a practical level as well as
engaging in scientific research; and 5) developing an organizational structure that will reach
out to include those from the “majority world.” In particular, we plan four major projects
for 2003 – 2004. One will be on 1) Women and Leadership; a second will be on 2) Sexual
Trafficking and Human Security; a third will be on 3) Education and Outreach,
including course syllabi, gender workshops, distance learning modules and internet use; the
fourth will be on 4) Migration and Gender.

First, we intend to continue and complete the project begun by Dr. Gunnel Gustafsson on
Women and Leadership Around the World. Specifically, we intend to do a study using
leadership as a lens through which to view countries and their governance in a comparative
way. As reported above, the research committee has already held two international
conferences on this topic, one in Umea, Sweden in September 2002 and one in Vienna in
December 2002 paid for in part, by a grant from the Austrian government. The December
meeting was particularly noteworthy as we were able to include an anthropologist from
Uganda and an historian from China in our research project. A major third conference
advancing this project and including scholars from the “majority world countries of
Argentina, Paraguay, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Pakistan, India, China, Uganda, and Kenya is
planned for Durban, South Africa from July 2-4, 2003 in conjunction with the International
Political Science Association meetings there.

Second, we intend to work with regional Asian and African associations to continue the
workshops and research project on sexual trafficking and human security begun by Kinhide
Mushakoji and Seiko Hanochi in 2002. This will include planning for a conference on the
topic in Korea in 2005 to be headed by research committee member, Bang Soon Yoon.

Third, we have plans to work with FLACSO, the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias
Sociales Sede Mexico on a workshop on gender bias in data gathering and on the use of the
internet for the distribution of syllabi and other teaching materials related to gender,
globalization and democratization. Jane Bayes will be visiting Mexico City in March 2003
to begin to plan for this project with FLACSO, a regional association of ISSC. Jane Bayes
and Breny Mendoza from Honduras and the United States have been invited to give gender
and globalization workshops for teachers at ITESO University in Guadelajara and at the
University of Zacatecas in Mexico in 2003/2004. Our plans for 2003-2004 involve 1)
developing contacts with other universities around the world who might be interested in
sharing courses, course modules, and sponsoring short term faculty exchanges and gender
workshops. ITESO University and The University of Zacatecas have expressed interest. 2)
continuing to develop new courses and course modules and gender workshop materials; 3)
working on resolving some of the technical difficulties of web based communications
between universities with asymetrical techological abilities. 4) working on the problems of
how to get some of these materials translated into Spanish and on getting Spanish materials
translated into English.




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Fourth, in Febrary 2003 our plan in 2004 was to expand our Gender and Migration project
with a major conference/workshop in New Zealand organized by Dr. Marian Simms.
Recently, (October 2003), we have had several other opportunities emerge causing us to plan
a series of conferences for 2004-2006 which will combine two of our research iniatives –
gender and migration and sexual trafficking and human security producing a series of smaller
conferences around the world which will culminate in a major conference on Gender,
Migration, Sexual Trafficking, and Human Security jointly organized by the ISSC and
the International Political Science Association in 2006. One of our research committee
members, Dr Kinhide Mushokouji, is a past president of the International Political Science
Association. He has been asked to be on the program committee of the 2006 IPSA meeting in
Japan and has proposed that our research committee organize a joint session with IPSA on
gender and migration and sexual; trafficking and human security. We plan for this to be a
culminating experience for our two research initiatives, one that will build on migration and
gender conferences held 1) at California State University in May 2003 between nine scholars
and community activists from Central America and Mexico and scholars in Los Angeles; 2 )
a Workshop on “Women and Migration” led by Laura Gonzalez in Berlin on July 26, 2003
and attended by participants from Bulgaria, Ukraine, India, Thailand, Turkey, Argentina,
New Zealand and Germany. 3) a follow-up to the May 2003 conference of Central American
scholars and others to be convened by Drs. Breny Mendoza,. Laura Gonzalez, and Jane
Bayes in Central America in 2004; 4) a gender and migration conference convened by Dr.
Marian Simms in New Zealand in 2004; 5) a gender and migration session to be held in East
Europe as a part of the Böll Foundation Summer School in 2004; and 6) a conference
focussing on sexual trafficking and human security in Korea in 2005 organized by Dr. Bang
Soon Yoon. Each of these conferences will attempt to reach out to other ISSC affiliated
organizations. Each will attempt to involve community and international policy-makers,
academic scholars, and community activists. At the 2006 joint conference between the ISSC
and IPSA on this topic in Japan, the agenda will be to use the typology and data we have
gathered to develop policy recommendations.

Research Design Summary on Gender and Migration/ Sexual Trafficking and Human
Security :

Drawing on what we have learned from the literature and from the migration and gender
conferences we have held to date, we believe that a major need for our Research Committee,
and for the field in general, is a typology of gendered migration and its consequences. To this
end, we propose a planning conference and then a series of conferences in different parts of
the world where scholars interested and knowledgeable about gender and migration and
sexual trafficking in their part of the world would come together to help develop a typology
of types of migration and different ways each impact men versus women (such as legal
versus illegal migration – types of state sponsored migration - voluntary or involuntary
migration – migration in different sectors and labor markets – regional patterns of migration
–major policy issues raised by each kind of migration, such as citizenship, documentation,
exploitation,.). The gendered aspects of : 1) the impact of capital flows and direct foreign
investment on migration, 2) the remittances sent home by migrants, 3) the interrelationship
between trade and trade policies and migration, and 4) the politics of transnational migrant
organizations are topics for investigation. This planning conference will also attempt to map



                                              12
the gendered flows of migrants in the major regions of the world and identify a set of
questions and distinctions to be addressed in the subsequent work of the committee on this
topic. After holding regional meetings in Central America, Eastern Europe, New Zealand,
and Korea, we plan to hold a policy oriented culminating session in Japan in 2006.

B) Website

The Research Committee now has a website at www.isscggd.org. This website is currently
incomplete but it does now include some basic information and will soon include more
complete information about the GGD mission, history, members, research initiatives,
meetings, publications, bylaws, research designs, annual reports, and links to related
organizations and data sources. The construction of this website is one of the plans of the
research committee for 2003.

C) Conferences planned for 2003

1) A Women and Poverty Conference on Trafficking, Migration and Gender Insecurity
held on 3 January 2003 organized by Kinhide Mushakoji and Seiko Hanochi in Japan. The
purpose of this seminar was to gather activists and researchers from South and South
East/East Asia to compare the effects of the global economy as it creates the exploitative
structures and root causes of trafficking and undocumented migration. The seminar also
sought to encourage participants to share suggestions for fighting sexual trafficking and to
develop a South/South network against trafficking and exploitative migration. Participants
were from Japan, the Philippines, Korea, Nepal, India, Sri Lanka. For more information, see:
http://lists.iww.org/pipermail/iww-news/2002-December/000789.html.

2) The Second Annual Migration Conference at California State University,
Northridge 1 Mat 2003

3) First Transnational Central American Women’s Encounter at California State
University, Northridge 2-5 May 2003. This conference involves inviting ten women from
Central America and Mexico to come to Los Angeles to dialogue with members of the
Diaspora immigrant communities in Los Angeles to be funded by California State University
Northridge and by The California Wellness Foundation.

 4) Women and Leadership Research Initiative will meet in Durban, South Africa on July
2, 3, and 4 , 2003 at the International Political Science Association meetings. Members of
the research committee scheduled to present papers on the topic of Women and Leadership
Around the World and to engage in further writing, editing and planning for a publication on
this project include: Gustafsson, Hawkesworth, Bayes, Yi, Banebya-Kyomuhendo, along
with some new participants from Argentina, India, China, Paraguay, Ivory Coast, El
Salvador, Costa Rica, Pakistan, and the USA.

5) At the “Engendering Economic Policy in a Globalizing World: Liberalization,
Services and Care Economies,” Conference in Berlin in July 2003, research committee




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members Drs. Brigitte Young and Laura Gonzalez both will participate. Dr. Brigitte Young
will help in organizing this conference funded by the Böll Foundation.

6) Women and Migration Workshop in Berlin on July 26, 2002. The moderator, Dr
   Laura Gonzalez. Participants: scholars from Bulgaria, Ukraine, India, Thailand, Turkey,
   Argentina, New Zealand, and Germany.


D) Financial Plans for 2003-2004

A key item on the agenda for the research committee for 2003 concerns writing grant
proposals to fund our research initiatives on 1) gender and migration/sexual trafficking and
human security and on 2) women and leadership and 3) education and outreach.




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