Running Head Case Study Analysis

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					                                                                   Case Study Analysis 1



Running Head: Case Study Analysis




            Case Study Analysis: ABC Inc., Department of Campus Recruitment

                                        Name
                                     Class/School

                                     May 16, 2009
                                                                               Case Study Analysis 2



                                        Case Study Analysis


                                      Introduction/Background

This report evaluates the performance of the recruiting office in ABC, Inc. and provides

systemized alternatives and solutions in order to improve the process flow of that department.

The report is organized according to the principles and strategies of Gerson and Gerson (2002).



The campus recruiter is responsible for conducting the recruitment efforts for ABC, Inc., and

recently, the new recruiter faced several problems. The new recruiter was able to bring in several

new hires, but many procedures were not completed on time which delayed the orientation as

well as the actual hire dates for the recruits. A few weeks before the anticipated orientation dates,

the recruiter realized that some new trainees still had incomplete applications and none of the

new trainees had been sent for the mandatory drug screen. Additionally, there were insufficient

orientation manuals for the 15 new trainees, and even those few manuals had missing pages.

Furthermore, there was no space reserved in time for the orientation.



In addition to resolving the current situation to the best extent possible, the purpose of this report

is to identify and analyze the problem areas that led to the delays in procedures, and to develop

procedures and recommendations based on the findings to repair the problem areas and

deficiencies. The outcome of this analysis and report, through proper application of proposed

recommendations, will be smoother, on-time operations for future recruitments.



                                           Key Problems
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The following key problems interfere with the recruitment operations at ABC, Inc.



Inadequate training of new recruiter – The new employee received incomplete training in his

duties as a recruiter. While his salesmanship skills are well developed, allowing him to bring in

several hires with only six months into his new job, the new employee does not appear to have

been briefed on other aspects of his duties (such as the coordination of training schedule,

orientation, manuals, policy booklets, physicals, drug tests, and other relative issues).



Under-supervision or no-supervision of new employee – It seems that there is no one around to

oversee that the new recruiter successfully completes his duties. Although Monica, operations

supervisor, contacted him ―about the training schedule, orientation, manuals, policy booklets,

physicals, drug tests,‖ and other issues, she seems to be satisfied by the new recruiter’s simple

and brief answer that all ―would be arranged in time.‖ There is no direct person supervising the

new recruiter’s preparations for his first orientation and hiring process. There seems to be no one

that Carl can reach out to; nowhere that he can go to get guidance for problem solving. When

everything goes wrong, Carl ―thought to himself‖ about what he is going to do; he turns to

himself instead of asking someone else about his options. The lack of resources for Carl also tie

into the lack of teamwork and communication as discussed below.



Faulty Time Management – The staff in ABC, Inc. lacks forethought or planning. Carl recruited

the new hires in early April; yet it isn’t till a month and a half later (on May 15th), only a month

before the orientation date, when Monica, the Operations Supervisor, contacts him to about the

schedule, orientation, manuals, booklets, physicals, drug tests, and other issues. It is another 10
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days later, after Memorial Day, that Carl even looks at the files to finalize paperwork, despite his

assurance to Monica that all would be arranged in time. Even when he finds that he does not

have enough orientation manuals, he does not act immediately on the problem; instead, he goes

for a walk. Upon his return to the office, he still does not take actions to remedy the incomplete

applications and the missing manuals. Rather, he decides to check on the training room which, he

finds, is already booked. Still, he does not immediately move forward to make calls for

alternative reparations; instead, he procrastinates again by putting his head down on his desk in

despair.



Lack of team work and communication – No one seems to know who does what at this office.

The new recruiter only learns about the incomplete applications when he checks on the files of

the new hires. Someone in the office put those files together and was supposed to make sure that

the contents were completed on time. Was this person waiting for direction from Carl, the new

recruiter? Was Carl under the impression that someone else would just automatically know what

to do and when? Carl also assumed that someone would reserve the training room in time for the

orientation because he did not check on the availability of the training room, rather he decided to

walk in and check out the facility which he thought was available. But he walked in only to find

that someone else had already booked the room through June. The lack of communication and

ambiguous roles and responsibilities of individual employees will eventually prove detrimental

to the success of the company by hindering its on-time operations.



                                  Possible Solutions/Alternatives
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Provide adequate training – The new recruiter must be provided with specific knowledge and

training on handling details such as what steps to follow, when to follow them, and whom to

contact to ensure timely progress of paperwork, drug screens, room reservations, etc.



Ensure proper supervision – A new recruiter should be under supervision through the entire first

cycle of his or her recruiting duties—from his or her first recruiting efforts through to the

planning and completion of the first orientation program. Rather than trusting a new recruiter to

arrange everything on time, a mentor or supervisor should follow up frequently (or at least at

regular intervals) to ensure that each step is being taken on time.



Systemize procedures – There need to be systemized procedures and schedules (with task-

specific deadlines) in place that indicates planning dates and dates of execution. For instance, if

an orientation is planned for June 15, then the recruiter should look for a confirmation e-mail or

some correspondence confirming the reservation for the training room 45 days prior to the

training, or some such guidelines. There needs to be a similar confirmation system or an

organized checklist of completion for other time-sensitive areas such as on-time completion of

drug screens and physicals.

Establish a clear list of roles and responsibilities, and position descriptions – Employees need to

revisit their list of duties expected of them. Someone was supposed to have made various

arrangements, and it needs to be clearly stated who is responsible for what part.



Communicate – The employees at ABC, Inc. need to improve their communication. They must

utilize e-mail and copy in any associates who may benefit from being in the loop. There should
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be a mandatory turn-around time of no more than 24 hours for responding to correspondence

such as e-mail, voicemails, etc. If an employee will be out of office for more than a half day, he

or she must leave a proper phone greeting or e-mail auto-reply indicating what time or day the

employee will return to the office, and whom to contact for help during the absence. Employees

should also communicate more clearly about the steps they are taking to meet deadlines and get

things done on time.



Establish new-employee support networks and/or regular meetings – ABC, Inc. will benefit from

a departmental support network for new employees, where the employee(s) meet once a week

(for half hour or an hour at a time) with their supervisor or mentor to ask questions on areas that

need clarification. During these meetings, the supervisor will also have the opportunity to ask

about the employee’s progress on specific tasks. Regular departmental meetings where

employees touch base and give reports on what’s going on would also be helpful, though the

newer employees, like Carl, may not feel as comfortable sharing their doubts or confusions at

these biggner meetings as they would in smaller, support-oriented meetings. What’s more, the

new employee may not be aware that he or she is missing something when going through quick

reports in a large meeting. A smaller network where more individual attention can be given will

help catch oversights.



                               Proposed Solution/Recommendation

Given the constraints of budget, time, and personnel, not all of the possible alternatives stated

above may be appropriate. However, ABC, Inc. will have an adverse impact on their financial

standing unless they implement at least some of the more doable, economical solutions, such as
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enhanced communication via e-mail, creating checklists, following up on new subordinates, and

having regular meetings as time permits.



Following is a proposed solution to rectify the current situation. An experienced recruiter should

step in to help Carl sort through the procedures for the upcoming orientation, which may need to

be rescheduled to allow more time for completion of paperwork, drug screenings, reservation of

another facility to conduct the training, and so on. The experienced recruiter would be more

familiar with various contacts within the company to move things along, such as who can help

with the ordering or printing of additional, complete orientation manuals. However, Carl should

remain involved in the reparations in order to learn the resources and procedures for future

success. Having an experienced employee temporary step in would be the best option for

repairing the situation without having to delay too much the proper hiring and orientation of new

recruits.



                                            Conclusion

This case study examined the structure and practices in place at ABC, Inc. in order to suggest

better management practices to improve employee performance, and especially new employee

performance. The report identified areas that need improvement, as well as immediate and long-

term solutions, in order to prevent further situations that may hinder or delay the operations in

the company, leading to financial setbacks.



Reference:
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Instructor’s Last Name, Instructor’s First Initial. (2009). Case study analysis for student

assignment.

Gerson, S. J., & Gerson, S. M. (2002). Technical writing: Process and product. Retrieved on

May 15, 2009 from http://www.ecf.utoronto.ca/~writing/handbook-shrtrept.html#Introduction




                                        Executive Summary

This case study analysis was conducted in light of the current situation where a new recruiter was

unable to make timely arrangements for an upcoming new trainee orientation. The research

found key problems including insufficient training and inadequate supervision of new recruiters,

faulty time-management practices, a lack of teamwork, a lack of recognition of roles and

responsibilities, and inadequate communication within and between departments. Accordingly,

possible solutions and recommendations include proper training and supervision of new

recruiters; organized systems including procedures, checklists, and schedules; enhanced

communication; and a new-employee support network and regular meetings. It is recommended

that an experienced recruiter step in immediately to help remedy the current situation and prevent

further delays.