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					The Educator
School of Education & Continuing Studies in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Issue 5 New Directions
Welcome to the fifth edition of the Educator. I hope you will find the information about provision here interesting. Please do contact us if you would like any further details about any of the items mentioned. As usual we are working in a changing national context, which is full of opportunity. We now have some very clear steers from government and national bodies. We are considering how best to respond to the DfES five year strategy and associated developments in provision for the children. As you may know, our Faculty includes the Institute for Criminal Justice Studies and we currently share the St George’s Building with colleagues engaged in social work training. We are considering how we might best meet the emerging needs of the school workforce in conjunction with them. The Teacher Training Agency is to be renamed the Training and Development Agency for Schools to reflect its increased remit. Ralph Tabberer, the TTA's chief executive, talked about schools as a people business when he addressed the North of England Education Conference on January 5, 2005. He highlighted three critical areas for action - to make the most of the increased teaching and support staff, further improvements in training and development for all staff, and using investment in the children's agenda to improve school standards (taken from www.tta.gov.uk). The responsibility for professional development for all staff is particularly relevant for us, given our long history of providing degree level studies for teaching assistants (and now Foundation Degrees and Higher Level Teaching Assistant training). We have made a point of including in this issue some examples of our international involvement. In particular many local schools will be aware that we have a strong cohort of overseas students on our MSc Education and Training Management programme. Also, students on our BA Education and Training degree are planning a visit to Ghana this summer to observe and assist provision in schools there. As we are now half way through the academic year, our thoughts inevitably turn to the summer and the celebration of the success of those who finish their studies this year. We are holding an Award Ceremony for successful candidates on the Graduate Teacher Programme, the Student Associate Scheme, Access to HE and Certificated Learning Support Programmes on Thursday 14th July at 4.00 pm and the Graduation Ceremony for the School is on Saturday 23rd July in the Guildhall at 3.00 pm. We look forward to seeing many of you at these events. Mike Coeshott Head of School

March 2005

Inside this issue: Using our heads Evaluating Trainee Teachers Students get a taste of Africa National Training Award Winner National Partnership Projects School News Staffing changes Forthcoming Dates

Teaching the teacher

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HELEN SHOWS YOU TOO CAN AIM HIGH
Helen Loizides wanted to show her children she could achieve something more than the factory floor. She felt if she could lead by example, they in turn might aim higher in their chosen careers. So Helen paid a visit to Portsmouth University – and four years later has her sights set on teaching. Helen, 39, said: “I seemed to fail at every turn at school, I went into nursery nursing for a time when I left and then took a job in a factory. But four years ago I really got the urge to try to show my two children there could be more to life than that.” Helen dipped her toes in with GCSE English, followed up with an access course and is now in the second year of a history degree. She added: “I received tremendous encouragement at the University. My English tutor. Gill Hawkins, did so much more than just teach. Gill gave me the confidence to take the access course as my next step and the teachers on that were also excellent. “I passed the course in one year and have just gone from strength to strength. I really started to enjoy learning and I love it now.” Helen of Southsea, plans to take a teacher training course after the degree, then seek employment in a primary school. She said: “It may sound like a cliché, but learning has opened up a whole new world for me.”
This article is from the Spring 2004 edition of the Take Life Further paper- Portsmouth edition, which promotes education and learning events/opportunities throughout the local area. The article features a student from our Access to Contemporary Studies course who successfully completed in the summer of 2002 and hopes to continue onto a teacher-training course. More information about the Take Life Further paper can be found on their website www.takelifefurther.com

GRADUATE TEACHER PROGRAMME
There are currently 75 GTP trainees on this employment-based programme and in addition there are five Overseas Trained Teachers (OTT) and five Registered Teacher Programme (RTP) trainees who are undertaking training. All GTP trainees are attending central training at Portsmouth and many are now undertaking their second school experience. As many of you will already know, the period of accreditation of the Portsmouth Area Designated Recommending Body, which runs the Graduate Teacher Programme, comes to an end this summer. Any further period of accreditation would have depended on an additional full Ofsted inspection during this academic year, but we were unable to accept this at a time of major staffing change. The School of Education has expressed its willingness to continue to be involved in this provision, and we do intend to apply again for funding to provide employment-based routes to gaining Qualified Teacher Status when the opportunity arises. The Responsible Officer, Mike Coeshott, the GTP Coordinator, John King and the Partnership Manager, Ann Patey, along with the team of dedicated staff who are currently working on the programme, would like to thank their Partnership Schools for their continued support this year. The programme is benefiting from consultancy support from the Teacher Training Agency and the provision has been enhanced by the use of specialist tutors from the School staff. For trainees on the Primary route in particular, there have been additional training sessions and tutorial support visits. We are grateful for the assistance of the Portsmouth Primary SCITT in improving the provision in this respect.

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University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

EVALUATING TRAINEE TEACHERS WHAT CAN PUPILS TELL US?
John Edwards and three of the Portsmouth Initial Teacher Training partnership schools – Admiral Lord Nelson, City of Portsmouth Girls’ School and Springfield School – over the past two years have been involved in a collaborative research project to explore the potential for involving pupils in the evaluation of trainee teachers’ progress towards meeting the standards for Qualified Teacher Status. Pupils in each of the schools worked in pairs to provide written and verbal feedback to trainee teachers in their classrooms. A pilot report on the project was published in 2002. The project has sparked considerable interest from the Teacher Training Agency and other national bodies. Presentations on the progress of the project were made at the University Council for the Education of Teachers’ 2003 annual conference and at a number of national Teacher Training Agency events. In March, John Edwards and a group from the City of Portsmouth Girls’ School presented a video and displayed the project work at the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) Leading Edge Partnership Programme Conference in London. Pupils and a trainee teacher from the school explained the project to conference delegates throughout the day. It is planned to further disseminate the work of the project at both national and international conferences during 2005. John Edwards

MORE ABLE MATHEMATICIANS DAY
Over 300 Yr 7 and 8 students from 27 local schools in the region took part in last year’s Able Mathematicians Days on June 21st and 22nd. The aim of the sessions is to allow the brightest young mathematicians in schools to take part in a variety of challenging and exciting extension activities prepared by Portsmouth’s trainee mathematics teachers in collaboration with trained staff in schools and tutors from the University. Activities ranged from Dam-busting – working out how the RAF were able to destroy the Mohne Dam during WW2 - to Cha-Cha Vectors – using vectors to make dance routines. Students found out that maths is not just an activity that you do sitting down! As well as seeing how maths fits into all aspects of our world and work students also had an opportunity to work and socialise with students from other schools in a supportive and friendly environment. “It was great fun and interesting to do. I had a good time. “ Sophie Yr7 “We played puzzle games to stimulate our minds, get to know different people and cooperate with each other to achieve our best. “ Erin Yr 7 For further information on this year’s “Able Mathematician Days”, 20th and 21st June 2005, please contact maria.dawes@port.ac.uk

University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

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Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

THE UNIVERSITY OF PORTSMOUTH’S ABLE LINGUIST DAYS
250 students from local schools in Portsmouth, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, took part in last year’s ‘Able Linguist Days’. Students aged between 12 and 15 came to the University’s School of Languages in Park Building to attend one of the sessions on the 21st and 22nd June 2004. The aim of the day was to identify gifted linguists in schools and to enable them to work alongside their peers and take part in challenging and stimulating language activities. The sessions were designed to be enjoyable, as well as educational and they gave the students opportunities to: use the latest technology, have access to a wide range of authentic resources, (including native speakers), indulge in some cultural refreshments and make new friends. The students took part in a variety of extension activities, which were designed to enrich the work already carried out in school. Each activity was prepared by the University’s PGCE trainee teachers and delivered in a supportive and friendly environment. For further information on ‘Able Linguist Days’, 20th and 21st June 2005, please contact tanya.riordan@port.ac.uk

ELEARNING BID IS SUCCESSFUL FOR SECONDARY PGCE
The secondary PGCE course leaders are delighted that a £20,000 bid to develop eLearning facilities has been approved by the Teacher Training Agency (TTA). The money will be spent developing an eLearning centre for the PGCE courses which will include online training activities, electronic documentation, WebCT facilities and chat rooms for the trainees to swap lesson plans and ideas. A large amount of hard work still needs to be undertaken, but it is intended to have the project up and running by September 2005. The bid also includes money to appoint a specialist eLearning coordinator to set up, run and maintain the site. It is hoped that the new eLearning facilities will add a new dimension to teaching and learning on the PGCE programme and enable more communication between tutors, trainees and mentors. The site will also provide trainees with a more flexible learning environment. Watch this space for further information and details as the project develops over the coming months.

UPDATE ON THE HIGHER LEVER TEACHING ASSISTANT TRAINING
After a slow start the applications for candidates for Higher Level Teaching Assistant status training are now coming in thick and fast. Four Local Education Authorities are working with the University of Portsmouth to provide training under a Teacher Training Agency funded scheme. After the national moderation in November, we are very pleased to report that 7 candidates trained by the consortium were awarded HLTA status. The status recognises the high level and significant contribution that support staff in schools make to the learning of young people. In February we will be starting an innovative pilot project to train Teaching Assistants in the specialist area of speech and language support alongside the HLTA status. This is being delivered in collaboration with the NHS Speech therapy department and the Portsmouth Psychology Service. Over 60 Teaching Assistants applied to join this project, which is a clear demonstration of the relevance of this type of training in schools. For further information on the HLTA programme please contact Sarah Spink, programme administrator on 023 9284 5202 or Sue Parfect or Chris Neanon at the School of Education and Continuing Studies. Chris Neanon

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University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

BA EDUCATION AND TRAINING STUDENTS GET A TASTE OF AFRICA
This summer a group of students on the BA Education and Training degree will fly to Accra, the capital of Ghana, to work with educational establishments as part of their study programme. This placement opportunity has three clear objectives: • To address the issues of escalating globalisation and the fact that trainers and educators in the UK will increasingly come in contact with people from a range of different countries and cultural backgrounds. • To support the schools and colleges in Accra with a number of curriculum developments. • For BA students to use the experience to inform and develop their employing organisations curriculum - an example of this could be a module on third world education and development added to the Citizenship programme. This two-week placement will offer students the chance to see at first hand the challenges faced by young Africans attempting to access educational opportunities in a developing country. Each of the six schools involved in the project was visited in September 2004 and meetings were held with staff to discuss areas of the curriculum they felt would benefit from input by our BA students. High on their list of priorities was the development of information technology. Head teachers, in particular, identified this as being important both for their own teaching staff (many of whom have not had the opportunity to use computers) as well as for students, whose learning and career options could be considerably enhanced by access to ICT. Other schools identified projects ranging from: • The establishment of a fiction and non-fiction library in schools where funds have not been available to provide this very basic educational facility. • The production of laminated charts on topics such as health, hygiene geography and science to add interest to the frequently bare classroom walls. • Sessions for teachers on interactive techniques to add to the predominantly ‘chalk and talk methods’ they currently use in the classroom. This placement opportunity, although not mandatory, will be offered to all our BA Education and Training students, both at Portsmouth and our partner colleges. We believe it offers a real opportunity to support a developing country, as well as bringing insights about the challenges faced by African educational institutions together with a real appreciation of the richness of the their cultural heritage. Penny Betts

University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

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Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

EARLY YEARS - THE PRACTITIONER TALKING
Tea and cakes were the order of the day at the nursery’s ‘accreditation presentation’. It was a relaxing fun afternoon when we celebrated our achievement in gaining the Pre-school Learning Alliance accreditation, ‘Aiming for Quality’ and showed the parents what their children get up to all day at nursery. During the past eighteen months I’ve not only guided the nursery through the development that goes alongside this award, but also undertaken my own professional development by enrolling as a student. I’m studying the Early Years Care and Education foundation degree and my own personal improvement has enhanced the nursery to develop. One of the most valuable lessons I’ve learnt during the past year and a half is the importance of taking time to review what we do, why we do things, how we can change and what others do. As a nursery, we always strive for improvement and as a person I’m always looking forward. Most importantly, I’ve learnt that we’re always learning, and that the children and I have much more in common than just our love of potato printing. Catherine Carpenter Nursery Supervisor (PM) University of Portsmouth Nursery

HUGE SUCCESS FOR STUDENT ASSOCIATE SCHEME
The Student Associate Scheme (SAS) is now in its second year. It has been a very successful initiative that has been evaluated by both schools and students in a positive way. Many students have said that the scheme has helped them decide that they want to go into teacher training. One commented that ‘it was really good to work with mixed ability children, it gave me a real insight into what teaching is really like’. The SAS is aimed at students considering a career in Primary and Secondary teaching to allow them to gain experience of working in schools. The scheme also provides University students with an opportunity to develop and evidence key transferable skills which are so important in today’s employment market. Schools have also given very positive feedback, with one commenting: ‘Both associates have fitted into school life extremely efficiently. Wish we could have both working as staff - an excellent scheme’. A total of 90 students were recruited to the scheme last year, of these, this year 20 are moving on from level one to level two. Associates will be asked to build upon the knowledge gained so far and will focus on the impact they can now start to make with individuals or groups. Two students who participated in the Scheme from last year are already enrolled on the PGCE course at Portsmouth. One student has registered on the Graduate Teacher Programme and another has joined the Portsmouth Primary SCITT (School Centred Initial Teacher Training). Another six students have been accepted onto the PGCE course to commence in September 2005, with further interviews being arranged.The full impact of the scheme may not be seen for a few years, once Associates complete their degrees and decide teaching is the career for them. 120 students have been recruited to the Scheme for 2004/5 and will be undertaking their placements over the next few months.

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University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

NATIONAL TRAINING AWARD WINNER 2004
Trevor Pearce, a former student from the School of Education and Continuing Studies has just been presented with a prestigious National Level Award at last year’s National Training Awards Ceremony held in Winchester. Trevor, from Hayling Island, had polio as a child, which left him with a withered arm and poor health, but this did not stop him from joining The Hampshire Red Cross Corps of drums and The British Red cross as a cadet when he was eight. Later after leaving school Trevor and completed an apprenticeship as a blacksmith and then went on to become a Marine Engineer Officer with The Ministry of Defence (MOD). During his spare time Trevor continues to be an active member of the lifeboat service, having served with the Hayling Island Coastguard for 27 years. He helped to set up and operate a privately run lifeboat service, which was eventually taken over by the Royal National Lifeboat Institute (R.N.L.I) and he was Deputy Auxiliary in charge of the R.N.L.I’s Hayling Island Station. As a result of his hard work and unfailing courage Trevor and his colleagues made many rescues over the years, and as a direct result Trevor has been awarded two gallantry vellums and a Ralf Glister Award. However Trevor’s life dramatically changed when in 1990, whilst deployed by the M.O.D, he was involved in an accident that left him with a serious spinal injury. ‘There was a stark reality to be faced’, said Trevor, ‘either let the injury beat me, or draw up a plan of action for the future’. So despite enduring a lot of physical discomfort and having to walk with crutches Trevor enrolled at the School of Education and Continuing Studies on the Certificate in Education course, which he followed with a BA (Hons) degree in 1994. Whilst studying for his degree Trevor set up Haven Ambulance Service to provide first aid training to: H.M. Coastguard, Defence Fire Service, and many companies. This soon became a recognised training organisation licensed by the Health and Safety Executive and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. Trevor also recognised a need for similar training in organisations such as: uniformed voluntary organisations, cadet forces, rescue forces, rescue crews etc and so he established a Trust to provide this training with little or no charge. This venture has been a great success. The Trust has built up close relationships with all of the companies it works with, which has proven invaluable. It has helped to develop the understanding that academic training for people with years of practical experience behind them may the way forward. Following this principle a considerable number of R.N.L.I staff have attended the School of Education and Continuing Studies and a R.N.L.I training team has been developed that provides all forms of training to a variety of groups including: school children, ships masters and the offshore Oil Industry.

THE DAME JUDITH BURSARY TRUST AWARD
The Dame Judith Bursary Trust awards are offered to trainees on any ITT Training Programme in Portsmouth, who are able to submit a piece of written work of 1,000 words to demonstrate their vision, enthusiasm and commitment to teaching. There also needs to be a commitment to undertake the substantive part of their teacher training programme in a school within the City, to apply to undertake their NQT year within a school in the City and to apply for their first substantive post within the City (if a suitable vacancy occurs). Two trainees, Nicola Piper and Pratheeshya Chandradas who are both studying the PGCE, received the award this year. Congratulations are offered to them both from the staff at the School of Education and Continuing Studies.

University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

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Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

NATIONAL PARTNERSHIP PROJECTS Teacher Training Agency South East Regional Partnership Project Promoting Good Practice in Partnerships through ICT
The School of Education and Continuing Studies was awarded a sum of money from the Teacher Training Agency (TTA) to establish a website dedicated to the exchange of information and material relating to ITT. The site features a facility for mentors and trainees to post and exchange information and ideas and to provide training material used in the delivery of the teacher training programmes run by the School of Education and Continuing Studies, including the Portsmouth Primary SCITT programme. Kay Mackie, the Project Coordinator, and myself as the School’s representative on the TTA Steering Committee, organised the project, which enabled the mentors from pairs of schools to have the experience of being able to discuss and exchange views about good practice in schools in contrasting environments. This included the role of the Professional Mentor, the delivery of the new QtT standards, the recruitment from ethnic minority groups, Professional Studies’ programmes and how this integrates with University provision, School ITT policies, welcome packs for trainees, support strategies, mentor training and how this links with University provision. Videos have been made at two schools, one with a Science trainee and mentor and one with an English trainee and mentor. These videos have been used in mentor training programmes and identify varying levels of practice in teaching and mentoring and have provided the topic for interesting discussion. The website will continue to be developed and maintained and will be available for school mentors in due course. Following on from this project another smaller sum of money has been awarded to Developing 14-19 ITT Provision in Business Studies. Again Kay Mackie is leading on this project which has the aims of creating and consolidating placements for trainees in the 14-19 Business Studies sector, developing the linking of schools and post-16 institutions across KS4 and 5 ensuring continuity in the training of teachers, and to standardise trainee assessment between placements at KS4 and 5 through joint lesson observations and mentor training on QtT standards (working in conjunction with the Economics and Business Education Association). This project is in its infancy and will be reported on in the next edition of the Educator. If any further information is required on either of these projects, Kay Mackie can be contacted by email: kay.mackie@port.ac.uk Ann Patey

ISSIAKA DOFONNOU
My name is Issiaka Dofonnou. I was born in the French speaking country of Benin, situated in West Africa. I was awarded a first class honours for an Engineering degree in China in 1988. I moved to England shortly after my graduation and have since obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in IT, a PGCE in Maths and the City and Guilds 730 in IT. I speak fluently in English, French, Chinese, Hausa and Fon. I currently teach Maths at Bridgemary School and I am also the Numeracy Coordinator in our school. I am working for the School of Education and Continuing Studies on the teacher training programme and I advise and help ethnic minority trainees who are undertaking the one year PGCE.

A COMMENT TO PAT STALLARD, COURSE LEADER FOR THE MSC EDUCATION AND TRAINING
I would like to thank you for your kindness and patience during my year in Portsmouth. I found the course very useful, particularly the topics on: Management of Change, Conflict Management and Organisational Structure. For me, the best part of the whole course was the three-day workshop I attended on Management and Leadership, which covered the different types of organisational structures, and cultures, as well as John Adair’s work. Hessa Al Mannai, SC Education and Training Student

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University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

FORTHCOMING EVENTS
Recruitment Open Evening Monday 14th March 2005 from 5pm - 7pm in St George’s Building Bill Rogers - Behaviour Management Conference Friday 10th June 2005, Richmond Building, University of Portsmouth Gifted and Talented Days for Business Studies, Science, Maths, Geography, English and Modern Foreign Languages 20th and 21st June 2005 Award Ceremony for successful candidates on the Graduate Teacher Programme, Access to HE and Certificated Learning Support programmes Thursday 14th July 2005 from 4.00pm - 6.00pm Graduation 2005 Saturday 23rd July 2005 at 3.00pm

BILL ROGERS - BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE
Bill Rogers is coming to the University of Portsmouth on Friday 10th June 2005. Bill Rogers is respected internationally for his work on behaviour management issues. A teacher by profession, he now works as an educational consultant around the world, lecturing at tertiary institutions, conducting teacher in-service programmes and is Adjunct Professor in Education at Griffith University, Australia. Bill’s work is well known in both the United Kingdom and Australia, especially for his commitment to a skill-based approach to discipline and behaviour management, and the importance of whole school peer support. He has published many books that offer practical advice to teachers and produced a new training video for staff. The School of Education has a limited number of places on the one-day conference organised for our PGCE Trainee Teachers and Teaching Assistants on our FdA Learning Support and the BA (Hons) Learning Support programmes and for colleagues from our Partnership schools. Bill will be talking on a range of issues relating to Behaviour Management in schools and copies of some of Bill’s papers on ‘Developing Student Behaviour Agreements’, ‘Dealing with Disruptive Behaviour’ and ‘Colleague Support’ will be available as part of a package for delegates attending the Conference. The cost for this will be £65 and more information can be gained from the Administrator by email karen.nixon@port.ac.uk Places are limited and will be offered on a first-come first-served basis.

University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

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Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

STAFFING CHANGES
Terry Ward left us in August 2004 to take up voluntary work in Pakistan. Terry is now training teachers in Pakistan’s northern territories, near the border with Afghanistan. He is working with his wife Sue, a former teacher at Priory School, Southsea, during the two year stint arranged by Voluntary Services Organisation. Communications received from him have been full of the work he is doing and the situations both he and Sue have been finding themselves in. The staff at the School of Education have collected £1000 to help Terry to set up a school in the village in which they are working. We all wish both Terry and Sue well in this venture. Dr. Louis Murray retired in September. He had been working as Course Leader on the PGCE Geography course. We wish him well in his retirement. Pat Stallard, who for many years worked at the School and who will be remembered for her work on the MSc Education and Training Management course, decided to take retirement in December. We all wish her well. Dr Sue Parfect joined the School in September to work on the Higher Level Teaching Assistant programme with the Learning Support Team. She can be contacted on extension 5328 and is based in Room 2.06. Jane Wood also joined us in September to work with John Edwards on the PGCE ITT (English) programme. She is also based in Room 2.06 and her telephone extension is 5239. Dr Roy Birch has been appointed on a temporary contract to work on the MSc Education and Training Management programme.He is based in Room 2.14 and is on extension 3660. Several new administrative staff have also joined the School. Charlotte Pearson, who started in August works on the BA (Hons) Education and Training programme and the MSc Education and Training Management programme. Charlotte is in Room 2.10 extension number 5532. Emma Patey commenced in September and works part time on the School’s enquiries. She is based in the School Office, Room 2.17, extension 5204. Stephanie Farrugia has also joined the School. She has responsibility for the MSc Education and Training Management - International students. Stephanie is also based in the School Office and is on extension 5224. We also welcomed both Andrea Pearce (PGCE ITT Science Course Leader) and Debbie Wilkins (School Secretary) back after their maternity leave.

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University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

Issue 5 l February 2005 l The Educator

FORTHCOMING DATES
Staff/Student Consultative Committees MSc Education and Training Management Thursday 10th March 2005 PGC/MA Learning and Teaching in HE Thursday 10th March 2005 FdA Early Years Care and Education Tuesday 15th March 2005 BA (Hons) Education and Training Wednesday 16th March 2005 FdA/BA (Hons) Learning Support Thursday 17th March 2005 Student Associate Scheme Monday 23rd May 2005 Access to HE Wednesday 25th May 2005 Programme Boards CertEd/PGCE PCE (part-time) Wednesday 23rd February 2005 Wednesday 8th June 2005 PGCE ITT (FE)/PCE (full-time) Thursday 24th February 2005 Tuesday 7th June 2005 PGCE ITT (Schools) Thursday 19th May 2005 Unit Assessment Boards PGCE ITT (Schools) Monday 25th April 2005 Friday 24th June 2005 CertEd/PGCE PCE (part-time) Wednesday 2nd March 2005 Wednesday 22nd June 2005 MSc Education and Training Management Wednesday 6th July 2005 PGC/MA Learning and Teaching in HE Wednesday 6th July 2005 BA (Hons) Education and Training Wednesday 6th July 2005 CertEd/PGCE PCE (part-time) Wednesday 6th July 2005 PGCE ITT (FE) PCE (full-time) Friday 8th July 2005 PGCE ITT (Schools) Thursday 7th July 2005 PGCE ITT (FE)/PCE (full-time) Friday 4th March 2005 Friday 24th June 2005 FdA Early Years Care and Education Monday 20th June 2005 FdA/BA (Hons) Learning Support Tuesday 21st June 2005 BA (Hons) Education and Training Wednesday 22nd June 2005 MSc Education and Training Management Thursday 23rd June 2005 PGC/MA Learning and Teaching in HE Thursday 23rd June 2005 Examination Boards FdA Early Years Care and Education Tuesday 5th July 2005

Feedback
Thank you for taking the time to read this issue of The Educator. We value your feedback about the newsletter, or any other aspect of the School’s work. If you would like to comment, please contact: Ann Patey (School Manager/Partnership Manager) Telephone: Facsimile: Email: (023) 9284 5340 (023) 9284 5365 ann.patey@port.ac.uk

University of Portsmouth l School of Education and Continuing Studies

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School of Education and Continuing Studies St George’s Building 141 High Street Portsmouth PO1 2HY 023 9284 5204 023 9284 5365 secs.enquiries@port.ac.uk www.port.ac.uk/departments/secs
MD 0205 1874


				
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