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					Version 3

“Achieving our Potential”

Wigan's Local Area Agreement

March 2007 Version 3

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Contents
Part 1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Part 2 1. Introduction Outcomes we are seeking from the LAA Why these are the right outcomes for Wigan Our Partners How we will manage the LAA Funding streams Freedoms and flexibilities Our approach to performance management The story so far Introduction Improving the life chances of children and young people. Measures, targets and freedoms and flexibilities. 2. Safer and stronger communities Measures, targets and freedoms and flexibilities. 3. Healthier communities Measures, targets and freedoms and flexibilities. 4. Economic development and enterprise Measures, targets and freedoms and flexibilities. 86 63 49 Page 6 9 11 28 32 32 32 33 34 35 37

Appendices A B C D E Proposed structure around NRF & LAA Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004 List and Map of Super Output Areas Vulnerable Localities Index Safer and stronger communities Maintenance and Additionality Indicators F G H Healthier communities LPSA2 Summary Annual performance summary 105 107 110 96 97 98 100 104

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Preface
Welcome to Wigan’s Local Area Agreement. This document sets out our overall aspirations for our LAA and our detailed outcomes, measures and targets.

We were a pilot LAA and this document is our “refreshed” LAA for 2006/07. There have been some changes from our original document:

This LAA is much more based on achievements in year 1 and you can see good evidence of performance improvement. It includes a new set of Neighbourhood Renewal mandatory floor target outcomes. It describes how we will use LAA and NRF to reduce inequality in our most deprived areas. It includes a new fourth block that focus on economic regeneration. It includes our LPSA2 targets and measures.

We use LAA and NRF to facilitate more effective partnership commitment to improving public service delivery in our Borough and our quarterly reports to GONW describe the practical outcomes of this work. This approach has also led us to review and strengthen the way in which we provide strategic officer leadership across public services in the Borough to deliver better services for local people. This has led to the development of a new Local Services Management Group to oversee the delivery of the Community Plan, LAA and NRF.

We are also pursuing an innovative approach to establishing a sustainable knowledge management system as part of our NRF programme. We need to understand our priority neighbourhoods better so that we can work with partners and communities to develop approaches to reduce inequalities between neighbourhoods within our Borough and between Wigan and other area across England and Wales.

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We found the development of LPSA 2 targets a challenging process. Part of this was simply the administrative burden of negotiating targets once the pilot LAA was signed off. But also the different approaches to LAA target negotiation and LPSA 2.

Centralised LPSA 2 seems much more prescriptive, with some Whitehall departments taking a more traditional approach to target setting. LAA, on the other hand, feels much more responsive to local needs with GONW having a deep understanding of local conditions and requirements.

At times this integration of LPSA2 seems at odds with the spirit of LAA’s. We hope that as LAA’s and LPSA 2 evolve into a new form of central – regional – local agreement that this early spirit of optimism and devolution can manifest itself once again.

This year’s White Paper on the Future of Local Government gives us great hope in aligning central and local performance management frameworks. We hope this will allow for greater responsiveness to local needs and aspirations and help us meet national standards and secure excellent services.

New forms of governance may also be required to facilitate the full involvement of all partners in delivering to this agenda. Governance which is based on collective performance management frameworks, shared responsibility and ownership, pooled funding and agreement to addressing local priorities and need.

We hope that over the coming years LAA’s will help to reduce the burden of performance reporting to help secure better outcomes for local people. Sadly, we have felt this little so far in delivering our LAA.

Engaging people within their own communities in the democratic process and influencing service delivery is key to our approach in Wigan. This LAA and our plans to deliver our Neighbourhood Renewal targets will help us to do this more effectively.

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Part 1
Part one sets out our vision, gives examples of our excellent partnership working, our community plan goals and principles, the outcomes we are seeking from this LAA and why they are the right ones for us. We also briefly consider the funding streams and freedoms and flexibilities required and how we will manage the LAA.

Part 2
Part 2 sets out the detailed background to each service block. We restate the context in which we are working, our aspirations and the activities that will enable us to achieve the LAA outcomes. You will find the completed LAA templates here, plus baseline measures and stretch targets. Funding streams, freedoms and flexibilities can also be found here.

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Part One
1. Introduction
Our Vision for the Local Area Agreement Our vision for this LAA is to narrow the inequality gap to enable people living in some of our most vulnerable communities to achieve their full potential whatever their age and circumstances.

Our vision sits within our overall Community Plan vision for the Borough which is for Wigan to be a place where: • • • People are happy and prosperous People feel its a good place to live People can have a good lifestyle

This LAA will help us to deliver a number of the high level goals and principles set out in the Borough’s Community Plan. They are: High aspirations, education and skills Provide accessible decent homes in a safe, clean neighbourhood. Similar chances of staying healthy A strong community Social inclusion Make the Borough one of the most environmentally friendly in the region A strong modern, local economy

Broadly our aim is that through this LAA and other related mainstream partnership activity we will begin to narrow the inequality gap. We find deepseated inequality in many parts of our borough and in many aspects of people’s lives. This is reflected in things like low levels of attainment, low skills, worklessness, poor health, substance misuse and high crime.

However, these inequalities do not necessarily all fall in the same geographical areas. Some areas have a greater concentration of inequality. Consequently we

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need a flexible approach, multi - agency working and pooled funding to effectively meet the needs of our residents.

This LAA will target those individuals that will benefit most from the initiatives – those experiencing greatest inequality - and for them it will be life changing. We want to enable them to achieve their potential.

How will we do this?

We will achieve this by building on the already effective partnership working with all sectors involved in our Local Strategic Partnership. We have a clear vision of what we are trying to achieve and strong leadership from our Local Strategic Partnership. There will be clear lines of accountability within our management of the LAA to ensure performance is robustly managed and that any barriers to successful delivery on the ground are overcome.

We will use Neighbourhood Renewal funding to facilitate the targeting of activity in our most deprived areas to address inequalities. We are working in partnership with Wigan and Leigh Housing to establish a sustainable knowledge management system for priority neighbourhoods and deploy it to improve their position relative to the rest of the Borough and in the national context. It is anticipated that a baseline of this information will be available in Summer 2006.

We have the partnership commitment, strong performance management framework and delivery mechanisms in place. This will lead to improved attainment for our young people, increased skills and the consequent opportunities that this brings for getting a better job in the future. It will enhance the safety and health of our communities through targeted interventions.

Unlike some areas we have already introduced pooled budgets e.g. BCU budget pooled and managed by Community Safety Partnership; redesigned services and established more efficient structures to deliver partnership services across health, children’s services, older peoples services and community safety.

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On a wider front our high performance is demonstrated by partnership accreditation. An amber green rating for the LSP- and high quality service delivery across all sectors – 4 star Council, good/fair rated star Acute Trust, good/good PCT, lowest crime rates in Greater Manchester.

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2. Outcomes we are seeking from this LAA
We have set ourselves a number of high level outcomes for each block linked to our Community Plan goals. Full details of these outcomes, detailed measures and stretched targets can be seen later in parts 2 and 3. Children and Young People 1. Be healthy, stay safe, enjoy and achieve. 2. Young people will have healthier lifestyles and increased levels of participation in sport and physical activity. 3. Young people will have higher levels of qualifications and be able to take up education, employment or training. 4. There will be a significant increase in the average attainment of boys in English at KS 2. 5. The gap in educational attainment of looked after children and young people will be narrowed when compared to their peers. 6. Achieve economic well-being (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 1. To reduce crime, the harm caused by illegal drugs, and to reassure the public, reducing the fear of crime. (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 2. Reduce overall crime in line with local Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership targets and narrow the gap between the worst performing wards/neighbourhoods and other areas across the district (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 3. Domestic burglary will have reduced. 4. To build respect in communities and reduce antisocial behaviour (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 5. Representations to drugs treatment services will have reduced 6. To have cleaner, greener and safer public spaces (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 7. Improve the quality of the local environment by reducing the gap in aspects of liveability between the worst wards/neighbourhoods and the district as a whole, with particular focus on reducing levels of litter and detritus. (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 8. Provide a decent home for all 9. To improve the quality of life for people in the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods and ensure service providers are more responsive to neighbourhood needs and improve their delivery (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome)

Safer and Stronger Communities

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Healthier Communities

1. Life expectancy for Wigan borough residents has increased and the gap between Wigan and the national average has narrowed 2. Improve quality of life and independence of older people over 50 years 3. People able to get involved and influence 4. Reduce premature mortality rates, and reduce inequalities in premature mortality rates between wards/neighbourhoods, with a particular focus on reducing the risk factors for heart disease, stroke and related diseases (CVD) (Smoking, diet and physical activity)(Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 1. Reduce level of worklessness. 2. Increase skill levels of the local population with clear reference to local business need. 3. Increasing entrepreneurial activity and supporting enterprise development. 4. Support the sustainable growth and reduce the unnecessary failure of locally owned business.

Economic Development & Enterprise

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3.

Why these outcomes are the right ones for Wigan

Wigan Metropolitan Borough lies mid-way between Manchester and Liverpool, covering an area of 19,000 hectares, two-thirds of which is open land, much of this is green belt. The Borough was formed in 1974 from 14 former authorities, many being urban districts that contained small mining communities.

According to Census 2001 data, black and minority ethnic communities make up around 1.3 per cent of the population. However our Borough’s population is diverse and we respect this and respond accordingly.

The diversity of people’s different backgrounds and circumstances are appreciated and positively valued. We want to be sure that all people have similar life opportunities, and that strong and positive relationships are developed between people from different backgrounds in the workplace, in schools and in communities. This LAA will help us to further our diversity aims. We use the 7 elements of the social identity model to describe the various groups within our population that may experience discrimination. These are: • • • • • • • Class Age Disability Race Gender Sexuality Religion

In our attempts to reduce inequality in this LAA we have targeted certain groups at risk of discrimination. You can read about the range of activity proposed later on but for example. • • • • Class – People living in deprived communities Age - Older people, children and young people Disability - People living with chronic diseases Gender – Boys, Women
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We have a rich and varied community and voluntary sector. There are many small and active groups and organisations and this reflects the geographic make up of the borough as described above. There are fewer of the larger national voluntary agencies that you might normally find in a Borough of this size.

Of great importance to the LAA is the potential for involvement at both strategic and delivery levels of the voluntary and community sector (VCS). By encouraging all partners to include the VCS it can reasonably be anticipated that the level of VCS activity will rise accordingly. Evidence in year 1 is starting to display this.

Ownership and interest in the target areas has an empowering effect on communities. This is complemented by a structured approach to volunteering and training that is being delivered through Wigan and Leigh Council for Voluntary Service (CVS) to ensure that the involvement is in line with best practice in community engagement and governance.

Community involvement will deliver greater practical returns if it can be supported through a strong infrastructure. CVS will use CommunityShip as the technological means to encourage this process.

CommunityShip is the sustainable outcomes of Home Office ChangeUp early spend. It is a web-based portal offering interactive facilities for the VCS.

The Borough’s has four established Community Empowerment Networks Community, Voluntary, Faith and Black & Minority Ethnic. They offer a structured forum for developing good practice in strategic planning and community participation. Their involvement is crucial to the LAA. Members of the Networks contribute as partners to the strategic partnerships and to the Board of the WBP. The Networks themselves offer training, consultation and involvement at a local delivery level as well as providing a strategic Borough wide view. There are many places in this LAA where community and voluntary involvement intersects with other outcomes. Things like

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• •

Vocationally orientated volunteering which enhances the educational work undertaken in offering job opportunities to young people. Physical activity brings potential for considerable involvement of organised sports clubs as well as local community activity. We see the active involvement of the Sports Council and CVS in meeting targets through the added value of voluntary groups and clubs delivering programmes of sport and leisure. At a very simple practical level this may be through the efficient provision of CRB checks for coaches and organisers and the availability of community based transport to activities.

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Mentoring and volunteering opportunities for recovering drug users and ex – offenders target hardening to reduce domestic burglary delivered by the voluntary sector.

Through this LAA we want to develop the infrastructure of the community and voluntary sector further to support groups to work with statutory agencies in the delivery of services.

We are committed to demonstrating a strong evidence base for our work. This is based on the results of market research, public consultation and social, economic and environmental audits of the Borough.

We based the goals and principles of our Community Plan on local aspirations and needs. These were further refined by dialogue with key stakeholders and public consultation. In addition to this every two year we commission the Local Futures Group to undertake an economic, social and environmental audit of the Borough. This provides empirical evidence of conditions in the Borough and helped us to identify the critical interventions needed. The LAA complements our existing strategies.

Through this LAA and with our partners in Childrens Services we will increase our support to schools in terms of equality and diversity.

Examples of this includes:

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1. Conferences, most recently on the Global Dimension to Every Child Matters, with a large pack of teaching materials trialled by a group of Wigan teachers after their Teachers International Professional Development (TIPD) study visit to South Africa. 2. Regular meetings, once per half term, of the Equality & Diversity Working Group, open to all school staff and partner agencies to share good practice 3. Individual visits to schools in response to racist or homophobic incidents 4. Pilot of online recording system for racist, homophobic or other incidents 5. In-school staff training sessions, e.g. on curriculum or policy 6. Central training events, e.g. on disability equality duty for governors and senior school staff 7. Resources via PSHE & Citizenship Team resource library, or tailor-made such as Kick Racism Out of Football pack of materials for teachers and youth workers 8. Anti-homophobia workshops with resource “Living It” bought for pairs of high schools and held by School-Based Police Officers 9. Invitations to all schools in Leigh township to participate in multi-agency Leigh Neighbours Project to improve community cohesion in the Leigh township

High aspirations, education and skills
Our vision for young people is that they lead healthy lifestyles and have the opportunity to gain skills and attain the qualifications necessary to lead a full and active adult life.

The issues affecting us… We have worked hard over the years to counter the economic effects of the decline of the mining and engineering industries primarily affecting male workers and the textile industry, principally affecting female workers. The unemployment rate now stands at below the regional and UK averages, whereas 15 years ago it was almost twice the average.

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We are one of the 88 Neighbourhood Renewal Areas in the UK. Over the last 30 years we have received assistance from the Urban Programme, Single Regeneration Budget, ERDF, NRF, Coalfield Regeneration Trust and other government programmes. Despite this we remain amongst the 15% most deprived authorities in England and have 36.5% of our Super Output Areas (SOAs) in the worst 20% of those in England on the current index of multiple deprivation (Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004). See Appendices B and C.

Our economy is reliant on traditional industries, like manufacturing and engineering with a relatively low proportion of high value, knowledge driven employment and businesses. The knowledge economy is the route to full employment, better jobs and other attributes in the workforce. Education and skill development are critical to this. We need to make sure that young people have the right skills for today’s economy.

Low skills But we have low levels of skills – approximately one quarter of the working population have poor literacy and numeracy. Only 22.3% of the working population is qualified to NVQ4 and above – the second lowest proportion in Greater Manchester. Improvements are necessary in education and skills, reducing educational deprivation and encouraging the growth of knowledge driven employment.

Poor Health Health in the Borough is poor- the 2001 Census showed that our population ranked 37th (from 376 authorities) in people describing their health as “not good”, and 44th for those reporting a limiting long-term illness. In those people of working age, we ranked 28th for those described as “permanently sick or disabled”.

We would be naïve to think that this poor health would not be replicated in the under 18’s. A recent health and lifestyle survey of young people demonstrates this well. 6% of primary and 16% secondary pupils went to school without having
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breakfast; 11% of secondary pupils said they had eaten 5+ portions of vegetables the day before surveyed; 39% of secondary pupils exercised three times a week or more in a way that increased their breathing rate. (Supporting the Health of Young People in Wigan Borough, 2004, Ashton, Leigh and Wigan PCT)

Reducing inequality - Establishing healthy lifestyles and improving attainment This LAA contributes to our overall drive to reduce inequality through establishing healthy lifestyles and improving attainment for those children and young people that are not currently reaching the expected levels for their age. We are targeting for example • Boys under performing in English. We find that predominantly white boys from poorer communities perform less well at KS2 in English than girls generally and boys in more affluent communities. • Children Looked After are a marginalised group that have the potential to experience greater discrimination than the norm and on average under perform academically when compared to their peers. • • • Communities experiencing multiple deprivation – in health, socioeconomic, crime. Schools with pupils not reaching the expected levels of attainment. Disengaged young people. We find that poor attendance can lead to some young people getting involved in crime and anti-social behaviour.

In addition through our mainstream activity we are addressing those schools where organisational improvements are required to stimulate attainment. The combined impact will secure real improvement and contribute to our reducing the numbers of young people not in employment, education or training.

We place great emphasis on the role and contribution that pupils, parents, carers, and the local community play in improving education and lifestyle. We have been working within the principles of extended schools for some time now with activities like breakfast, after school clubs, community use of facilities and family learning well established in some areas.

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We endeavour to build strong links with parents, young people and communities as this brings benefits for individuals, schools and the community.

Our LAA outcomes for Children and Young People focus on establishing healthy lifestyles and improving attainment. They have been chosen as we feel that in targeting here we can have greatest impact on reducing inequality.

Provide accessible decent homes in a safe, clean neighbourhood
Our vision for Safer and Stronger Communities is that the Borough’s residents will know that rates of crime, disorder and drugs misuse have been reduced substantially. They will know why and how this has been achieved and will live more secure and healthy lives as a result. That they will live in a decent home in a clean, green and safe neighbourhood.

The local issues that face us……. Results from consultations and market research with residents of the borough indicate that crime, anti social behaviour and drugs misuse are some of the biggest issues affecting their quality of life.

Although Wigan’s crime rates remain close to the bottom quartile among the 376 Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships across the Country they compare positively to the predicted position ascertained by calculating levels of deprivation and other causal indicators. We have the lowest crime rates in Greater Manchester. The “ Local Futures” audit rated us (out of A with A being the lowest crime comparators to E) “A” within the Greater Manchester group “ B “ for the regional comparison and “ E “ against the National benchmark. We perform consistently better than the average within our Home Office family group.

We now have substantial evidence to underpin our community safety activities. Much of this is also nationally accredited in the field of situational crime prevention.

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However the more challenging world of engaging, diverting and resettling our offending population is also increasingly evidence based. We know that our Prolific and other Priority Offender programme is delivering a reduced re offending rate of 78%. We know that we need to find better ways of delivering the resettle rehabilitate strand of the PPO strategy and have a number of initiatives both in place and in development aimed at doing so. We also know that we need to focus our resources into the most vulnerable of our communities which invariably contain high proportions of at – risk or offending populations.

Our task is to continue to reduce crime, disorder and drugs misuse. This particularly means achieving better outcomes for our estimated 2229 problematic drug users (Hickman and Frischer 2004). Although over 65% accessed drug treatment in 2003/ 2004, levels of injecting, polydrug and alcohol use and the transmission rates of blood borne viruses, are of increasing concern.

New intervention programmes, aiming to deliver an improved set of social outcomes are now in place and we are beginning to evidence their effectiveness.

We also need to change the public perception gap that does not “feel “ that crime is reducing at the rates evidenced by recorded statistics. We can partly achieve this through an effective communications strategy and through other reassurance measures.

Tackling inequalities and reflecting diversity The Community Safety Partnership has a strong record on addressing issues of diversity. This is evidenced by The support role played by GM Police's Community Relations Co-ordinator. The appointment and work programme of a dedicated Hate Crime co ordinator for the partnership, The partnership's action plan to tackle Hate crime and several other measures. These include work around our training and support for the reporting of Hate crime from all agencies, the launch of a dedicated Language line that offers support and sign posting for callers and our

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development of an annual Hate crime awareness week. All of the Borough’s schools also have in place a monitoring and recording system for all hate incidents. Considerable work to address Domestic Violence. This includes a fortnightly, dedicated Domestic Violence court in Wigan which has had a positive impact. More recently additional dedicated resources have been provided in the form of Independent Domestic Violence Advocates and we are currently examining how we can develop what we are rapidly seeing as a valuable resource. We have developed a Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conferencing arrangements (MARAC) to reduce the risk of re-victimisation. We have also been testing out how we can configure services in a different way in the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods to deliver improved outcomes.

Our LAA outcomes for Safer and Stronger Communities focus on reducing recorded crime, improving the quality of our drugs treatment and tackling anti – social – behaviour.

We have a strong community safety partnership and we take a systematic approach, using the National Intelligence Model to identifying and analysing crime threats. That analysis has identified significant challenges from some specific volume crime types for example criminal damage and theft from vehicle. Drawing from an increasingly robust evidence base we use a variety of interventions and approaches to tackle the threat. In addition the Partnership commissions and oversees a substantial programme of evidence-based interventions that deliver situational and social crime and drugs prevention. We have a discreet Anti Social Behaviour Strategy with an associated delivery plan which is part of our overall Respect Agenda.

We are making good progress in our efforts to deliver Neighbourhood Policing in its widest context using some of the learning we have gained from the testing we have carried out on adjustments to the configuration of our services already mentioned

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Cleaner, greener neighbourhoods

Further outcomes in the LAA focus on cleaner greener neighbourhoods. The work already described above relating to different ways of working in disadvantaged neighbourhoods is also one aspect of work we have been doing to both reduce levels of litter and detritus and reducing the gap in aspects of liveability between the worst neighbourhoods and the borough as a whole. We are also in the process of introducing the principles of the National Intelligence Model to environmental issues such as litter and fly tipping to take a more intelligence led/problem solving approach.

Although Wigan Borough is over 75% open green space we still suffer from problems facing urban areas. This includes air pollution, waste, litter and derelict land. We need to manage natural resources prudently, to improve waste management, to reduce pollution, to protect and nurture plant and animal life and to improve the man-made environment.

Decent homes We need to provide access to decent homes for all, to reduce crime and fear of crime, particularly drug crime, and to improve the quality of the local street scene. One of the Councils biggest priorities is to improve all council housing to meet the national 'decent homes' standard. The national target is to do this by 2010, and we are ahead of this. It is also our aim to ensure all social housing is made decent by this date, and we are currently transforming our stock.

Fire Safety

We have added this outcome into our LAA as it can have an impact on many of the other outcomes especially within the Safer & Stronger Communities block. Two of the main problem areas for the borough are accidental dwelling fires, which can have a fatal impact of lives and FDR 3 fires, which are less serious,

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these include grass fires and abandoned vehicles. Although less serious in nature than accidental dwelling fires these incidents can have a high impact on service provision. Community Involvement To achieve the outcomes of the LAA we involve the Partnership’s ten Township Community Safety Groups, which link with the ten Township Forums. This link provides the framework for engaging at township and neighbourhood level with councillors, the voluntary sector, tenants and residents associations and others in the local community.

Similar chances of staying healthy
Our vision for a healthy Wigan borough is one where people have a similar chance of staying healthy. With greater opportunities to live a healthy lifestyle and have increased life expectancy and improved quality of life for vulnerable groups. We will do this through: Getting more of the population living a healthy lifestyle Reducing the increase, or reducing the prevalence of illnesses like diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke Mitigating the negative impact on people’s health with things like pollution by control, undertaking health impact assessments of significant developments Working with vulnerable communities – geographical or social – to help them take action to improve their own health. Increased access to quality health care

Tackling inequalities in health is core to our work. Wigan’s population is very stable, with very low migration and so our poor health is home-grown.

Our industrial legacy created wealth elsewhere, but the workers in the coal and cotton industries bore the brunt of long hours working in poor conditions. These

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working conditions no longer exist but the older people in our community come from those conditions.

Jobs in pits and mills have been replaced with low wage in the food industry and large numbers of people claiming incapacity benefit. It is extremely challenging for Wigan to catch up with the national average in health terms, when starting from such a handicap. Our LAA complements existing activity to address those inequalities.

The local issues that face us……. The proportion of people in our population that are economically inactive is above the UK average. The 2001 Census showed that our population ranked 37th (from 376 authorities) in people describing their health as “not good”, and 44th for those reporting a limiting long-term illness. In those people of working age, we ranked 28th for those described as “permanently sick or disabled”.

Life Expectancy People living here have a life expectancy below the UK average. Even though life expectancy is improving the gap between our local position and the UK average is in fact widening. The most recent life expectancy data in years shows: Wigan Men 74.7 Women 79.2 UK Men 76.0 Women 81

New targets for life expectancy at birth have been set by the Government at 78.6 years for men and 82.5 years for women. We are some way off this in Wigan and it is largely early deaths from Coronary Heart Disease that account for our residents having this lower life expectancy.

Standardised Mortality Ratios (SMRs) Using mortality data from all causes of death, for the years 1999 to 2001, Wigan has an SMR of 120 for men and 122 for women. This means that deaths in Wigan for men and women are 20% and 22% greater than the national

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average.1 Men and women in Wigan have SMRs that are significantly above the national average for mortality from Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke and Cancer (see Table 1 below) Table 1 Summary of Standardised Mortality Ratios for selected causes of death for residents of Wigan (2004) Male Female All causes 127 120 Coronary Heart Disease 152 152 Stroke 107 101 All Cancers 124 98 Targeting services to reduce inequalities To bring about the desired improvements in health will require continued improvements in the overall socio-economic conditions of the Borough, as well as targeted activities on a number of fronts. We need to target services at the most deprived wards, and those groups most at risk – like older people and people with chronic disease. The LAA targets those most deprived areas worst 10%, with extra effort in the 3% most deprived Super Output Areas (SOAs) the 9 SOAs group into 4 groupings, Wigan West, Scholes, Hag Fold and Westleigh (Trees Estate).

Prevention – the healthier lifestyle

Coronary heart disease, (type 2) diabetes and stroke are all influenced by lifestyle – that is they can be prevented, and even if not prevented, the complications of the disease can be reduced and life expectancy increased by action to: • • • • Reduce smoking (increase the number of smoking quitters) Getting more people more active more often Encourage a healthier diet (more fruit and veg – 5-a-day, less saturated fats and processed foods) Reducing the upward trend in obesity

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SMRs are a calculation of the proportion of deaths experienced in an area compared to the number expected, if the area had experienced the same age and sex mortality rates as the standard population of England and Wales in the same year. The SMR for England and Wales in these nationally produced figures will therefore always be 100.

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All of these “healthier lifestyles” are more prevalent in the more affluent parts of the borough, so as well as trying to raise the overall levels of the “healthier choices”, we need to give extra support to the people living in the poorest areas, or in the other less advantaged groups, e.g. the long-term mentally ill, people caring for others, older people living in poverty, which is why as well as the existing mainstream activities in these areas, we need additional targeted work if we are to see our inequalities reduce.

Mainstream service complement LAA Some of this increased activity needs to be delivered by the health services, particularly through primary care services. The LIFT programme in the borough opened three much improved primary care premises in 2005 with further developments coming on stream in 2006/07. We hope this will aid recruitment of new, sorely needed GPs. Other developments in primary care, like the General Medical Services (GMS) contract are improving the quality of services and making sure more of the people who could benefit do so.

The GMS Contract introduced from April 2004 plus more effective management of the medicines budget locally, means that further resources are available from mainstream PCT budgets to benefit patients with chronic diseases. For the first time the PCT has better information about disease, types of treatment provided and can target GP practices to encourage the use of various treatments, particularly those treatments that are seen as most effective in addressing chronic disease and prolonging life. One example of this is prescribed medicines for the treatment of high blood pressure and high blood fats. The PCT is exploring how to do this better through two mechanisms: practice-based commissioning (a national imperative) and the “Knowldege Network” – an exciting local initiative in collaboration with a number of pharmaceutical firms and their overseeing body the ABPI (Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry).

The PCT is committed to targeting elements of its main budget in support of the Local Area Agreement. Initially a proportion of the "enhanced services" element

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of GP contract funding will be targeted in areas of greatest need. Evidence tells us that if we direct this resource to programmes which will improve the detection and treatment for the causal factors of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke and to the management of established disease we will have an impact on SMRs within 2/3 years.

Community and voluntary sector involvement Building a strong community is vital to achieving our goals and the outcomes of our LAA. It means that people take an interest in the place where they live - they get involved - help one another - work together.

Our Community Plan supports this by: • • • Giving a voice for the views and wishes of local people Outlining action to make our communities more attractive and interesting places to live Encouraging people to be more interested and motivated in their neighbourhoods. This LAA includes many cross cutting outcomes that involve the voluntary and community sector in their delivery. This builds on existing local activity like for example, the COMPACT, Townships (see next section for more information) and the Community Empowerment Programme.

This work and our mainstream health and social care investment runs alongside the interventions described in this LAA and are vital in achieving our outcomes.

Economic Development and Enterprise
Our vision for Economic Development and Enterprise in this borough is for local people to have the best possible chances to achieve economic well being, maximise their economic aspirations and the contribution they can make to the local economy.

The local issues that face us…….

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Wigan’s economy is characterised by a number of features. Many of these create barriers for people, preventing them accessing training or employment. Others create barriers to enterprise development. In this next section we briefly describe what our research and stakeholder feedback tells us are the main issues. The key interventions that will tackle the issues are noted, with more detail later in the document. •

A cycle of low aspirations and motivation

There is a recognition that many people living in the most deprived areas are characterised by a lack of motivation, confidence and aspiration. There is often a reference to a ‘benefits culture’, with second and third generation families in Wigan who have only ever known life on benefits. Whilst this is hard to quantify and hard to tackle, in common with our other LAA blocks the raising of personal ambition, confidence and expectations needs to take place. •

Low skills levels

The capacity for skills improvement in Wigan is significant. Wigan currently ranks 328th out of 408 British local authorities for education and skills. In the context of its comparators, only Liverpool has a lower score. (Local Futures Audit January 2006).

Wigan’s level of basic skills is below that of Greater Manchester. Approximately one quarter of the working population have poor literacy and numeracy skills. NVQ level 2 - Only 59.3% are qualified to NVQ level 2 and above (the 14th highest in the North West and the 6th highest in Greater Manchester) NVQ level 3 – Only 38.2% are qualified to NVQ level 3 and above NVQ level 4 - Currently only 19% of the working population in Wigan are qualified to NVQ level 4 and above (the second lowest proportion in Greater Manchester).

The current lack of NVQ level 3 and 4 qualifications within the local workforce has implications for the development of the knowledge sector in Wigan, which tends to require higher-level qualifications. Wigan and Leigh College have

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identified a particular demand from local SME employers in Wigan for Level 3 qualifications.

This lack of lower level qualifications is also a barrier to increasing levels of inward investment into Wigan. It is essential that learning and training is directed towards meeting the current and future skills demands for the Borough, and that effective working relationships with the private sector are maintained and strengthened. • Wage Rates

Minimum wage levels have created a positive differential between employment and claiming benefit for many claimants, but there are still issues of ‘urban myths’ of the relative advantage of working compared with claiming benefits, and of the failure to claim some benefits to assist entry into employment. • Decline in traditional industries and employment

There has been and continues to be a significant decline in manufacturing employment in the Borough. Between 1998 and 2003, 3,500 manufacturing jobs were lost. New manufacturing businesses are not being created to compensate for the loss of employment in established businesses.

As well as offering opportunities for re-training to meet new employer needs, there is a need to create suitable employment opportunities which can utilise existing skills or to support people into self employment. •

Low levels of enterprise and new business start up

In common with many former mining communities Wigan has little tradition of entrepreneurship. This is reflected in the level of self-employment in Wigan, which at 5.7% is the lowest in Greater Manchester.

The level of business start-up amongst women is also low. Only 2.8% of the female working age population are self-employed in Wigan compared to 4.41% for England as a whole. In terms of Social Enterprise, only around 1% of the local economy is based in this sector. This is compared to an average of 10% in England.

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•

Poor Local Transport Infrastructure

Local people, through our Township forums, have identified local transport as a key issue, and as a barrier to accessing employment and training. Wigan is characterised by isolated communities, formerly mining villages where the main employment source has now disappeared.

Over 34,000 (27.5%) households in Wigan have no access to a car (Census 2001), and yet the existing public transport system is unable to meet the needs of dispersed communities.

The overall aim of this Economic and Development and Enterprise block is to • Reduce the level of worklessness

Tackling worklessness is an economic priority, with work recognised as the best route out of poverty. Wigan's Economic Development Plan sets out the vision for accelerating economic growth, referencing the many exciting new developments already planned or underway in Wigan. To achieve a growing and dynamic economy the Plan recognises the need to tap into the skills and experience that those who have the potential to work can offer. It further recognises that the skills base of local residents will have to increase to enable them to take full advantage of new opportunities being created.

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5. Our Partners
The Council and its partners realised some years ago that we could not achieve the significant improvements required in the Borough without working together. This led to the establishment of our Local Strategic Partnership in the late 1990s, prior to the institution of LSPs nationally. It is known as Wigan Borough Partnership (WBP). WBP is supported by 7 thematic partnerships that focus on issues such as environment, health and social care, culture and economy. These bodies are made up of a range of other public sector agencies and the voluntary and community sectors.

Local communities are able to participate in a wide range of discussions on the services that are being provided in their localities and input into the work of WBP via their local township forums. The Borough has been divided into 10 townships, each having a forum that reflects the composition of the WBP itself.

Wigan Borough Partnership is responsible for developing the Community Plan. This strategy was originally produced in 2001 as a long-term vision with a fiveyear action plan. The Community Plan was updated in 2005 with an action plan until 2010. In 2004 WBP undertook a self-assessment of its operation. This was validated by the Audit Commission and awarded a green traffic light rating by GONW. The Neighbourhood Renewal Unit then ratified this award. LAA working group We have established an interagency LAA working group to develop our Local Area Agreement. The Deputy Chief Executive of Wigan Council has led this.

It also includes senior officers from Ashton, Leigh and Wigan PCT, Wigan and Leigh CVS, Wigan Leisure and Culture Trust, Greater Manchester Police and from the Council, Chief Executives, Community Protection, Childrens Services (including Connexions), Adults Services and Planning and Regeneration. Many of the group are also members of the LSP Operations Group, which supports the LSP Board.

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How the partners have been involved Historically we began the process by sharing information with members of Wigan Borough Partnership. This was followed by informal discussions with individual partners to see which initiatives they could bring to the table. Through this process we worked creatively to produce a vision of what the LAA could achieve, agreed a set of high level outcomes for each service block capable of transforming people’s lives. We followed this by setting up a working group, as described above, to take the proposals forward.

The aim of this group was to identify any links between initiatives, any gaps, to think creatively about delivery and to ensure effective consultation and engagement leading to the full commitment of key partners.

We also set a number of milestones to enable this process. During January 2005 we took part in two workshops - one for the WBP and one for the boroughwide Community network. We then discussed and refined our draft proposals at these events.

In February 2006 we held a visioning session to reflect on the first year of the LAA. Partners from the Health Trust, Greater Manchester Police, and the Leisure Trust joined Senior Officers from the Council to discuss any successes and challenges from the first year. The session was a huge success with ideas flowing for new ways of working for the second year. We are therefore able to build upon our initial success.

Partnership working is well embedded within the Borough and the Community and Voluntary Sector are actively involved. We have many examples that demonstrate this – a small selection includes: Neighbourhood Renewal The structure around the commissioning and monitoring of neighbourhood renewal targets is being changed to become more aligned with the LAA and give greater prominence to the benefits that both can bring to addressing inequality in the borough.

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Within each of the thematic partnerships there is an existing LAA officer group. This group will be extended to include a focus on the NRF floor targets and the deployment of NRF resources. These groups will produce business and performance reports for the LAA working group, who will then report to the board of Wigan Borough Partnership. A diagram showing these structures can be found in Appendix A.

As Wigan receives Neighbourhood Renewal funding a number of mandatory outcomes have now been added to our LAA document. These outcomes are specifically targeted at areas of high deprivation. These areas rank in the top 10% of deprivation across Britain. These areas are listed at Appendix B. COMPACT Launched in 2002 at the LSP Convention this local protocol was developed by a partnership wide group and focused on 4 key elements: Information sharing Improved access to grant aid and funding Learning from experience Accountability and development of quality standards

The COMPACT is currently under review. There has been good progress in all areas – and a new improvement plan should be adopted in Spring 2005.

The Community Empowerment Programme The Community Empowerment Programme (CEP) has four active networks (community, voluntary, BME and faith) which all feed directly into the LSP structure. In addition there are networks for the Over 50s and People with Disabilities which are linked to the CEP. These structures - and most importantly the people involved - can help develop local activity and support local decision making whether that be at Township level or in particular target areas.

Grant Aid Over the past 3 years all local funding bodies including Council, Police and local charities have worked together to establish a standardised application procedure
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and a central database to handle all funding requests. The benefits of this include easier access for groups, quicker turnaround for grants, better information about the value of local activities in the community sector, and improved service outcomes from better resource utilisation.

Wigan Borough Partnership - Cohesion Forum Although Wigan has a very small BME population, the WBP has taken an active role in leading work on the local cohesion agenda. Key partnership projects include initiatives on Hate Crime (new hotline) and Asylum seekers (mentoring service). WBP convenes a twice yearly Forum to bring all partners together to review progress and agree priorities. Townships Wigan is very unusual in that the Council has no area committee structures. Instead we have 10 Township areas – each with their own Forum. These work as an integral part of the LSP reporting directly to the Wigan Borough Partnership Board. In practice they are often described as mini LSPs. This is the key route to ensuring that our Boroughwide strategies connect with the priorities and aspirations of local people.

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5. How we manage the LAA
Management of the LAA is being aligned with management of Neighbourhood Renewal and will report to the Wigan Borough Partnership. Wigan Borough Partnership is made up of a number of thematic partnerships. Within each of these there is an existing LAA officer group and each of these groups will report to their relevant partnership. They will also produce performance reports to the LAA working group. This group will then report to the LSP Operations Group and to the board of Wigan Borough Partnership. Our advanced performance management system, facilitates the inter-change of current information with Government Office colleagues.

6. Funding Streams
Details of the individual funding streams and freedoms and flexibilities we would like to see included in the LAA can be found within the four service blocks can be found in part 2.

7. Freedoms and flexibilities
Through our LPSA2 we will receive a pump priming grant of £1,053,846 in 2005/06. This is being distributed across the block areas.

Significant benefits are also derive from making it easier to bid for additional funding and implementing one reporting and monitoring mechanism for funders through the LAA.

Within major budget areas we seek greater flexibility to move resources between budget areas. We would also like to see great flexibility around the requirements and restrictions on matched funding.

We have the ability to carry over any underspend into the subsequent financial years.

Details of the freedoms and flexibilities we require for specific outcomes can be found in part 2.

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8. Our approach to performance management
The performance management of our LAA includes use of our PerformancePlus™ system. This is a best practice, web based performance management tool that allows us to show linkages from day to day activity through to high-level Council and Community Plan objectives. We can also show links through to Local PSAs, National PSAs, Shared Priorities and other national frameworks.

PerformancePlus™ is a flexible tool that brings benefits in planning, monitoring and evaluating the impact of initiatives. An example of PerformancePlus™ causal maps, briefing books and score cards can be seen on request.

PerformancePlus™ is already familiar to our LSP and partners. They now use it for performance managing the Community Plan and Government Office is now familiar with its use.

All performance reports are available on the Wigan Wide Web and are updated on a quarterly basis.

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9. The story so far
Overall performance of all three original LAA blocks are on or above the targets set for 2005/06.

Major successes can be found within each block area. •

In the Children and Young People's block the target around healthy schools is performing exceptionally well.

•

In the Safer and Stronger Communities block the target to reduce burglary is well below the target.

•

In the Healthier Communities block the target to deliver direct payments to people over 50 is exceeding targets set.

These areas are not only exceeding targets but are having a major impact on the quality of life of local residents. A full breakdown of performance can be found in Appendix G. This shows data up to 31/12/05. Regular performance updates can also be found at http://www.wiganmbc.gov.uk/pub/performance/laa/

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Part Two
This part revisits our rationale, describes our approach and translates our vision into high level outcomes with ambitious targets.

The common thread that links the main blocks of our proposal - improving the life chances of children and young people, reducing crime, staying healthy, building strong communities, having cleaner, greener and safer neighbourhoods and improving economic development is, reducing inequality to achieve our potential.

Each of our outcomes link to one or more of our Community Plan goals and principles of • • • • • • • High aspirations, education and skills Provide accessible decent homes in a safe, clean neighbourhood. Similar chances of staying healthy A strong community Social inclusion Make the Borough one of the most environmentally friendly in the region A strong modern, local economy

LPSA2 and its relationship to this LAA The purpose of this LAA is to capture a limited number of high level local priorities, which have the potential to change people’s lives. These outcomes have strong resonance with the Shared Priorities and provide a focus for our collective attention over the next few years.

We have consciously seized the opportunity provided by the LAA initiative to focus our vision on these priorities and their associated indicators.

We have not attempted to replicate our provisional PSA thinking. We do not regard the LAA as a substitute for PSA2. Indeed, our PSA ambition has now been subsumed within the LAA but taken to new levels, with wider ownership and management of outcomes.

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This offers far greater prospects of attainment. However, we remain committed to a number of other initiatives that will run alongside the LAA, including:-

Performance Reward Grant Within each template you will see indicators highlighted in bold followed by (PRG). These are the indicators that form our LPSA2, a summary can be found at appendix F, and that we will be measured on to apply pump priming funds and therefore to receive the Performance Reward Grant for achieving.

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1. Improving the life chances of children and young people
Our vision for young people is that they lead healthy lifestyles and have the opportunity to gain skills and attain the qualifications necessary to lead a full, healthy and active adult life.

We will use the LAA to: • • Tackle areas of bureaucracy and align funding streams to ensure that energy is focussed on outcomes for young people, and not on a process. Directly address those factors that hold Wigan's children and young people back from meeting their potential, such as academic under-achievement, poor ambition, lack of aspiration, and most significantly poor health prospects. These are key objectives for the new Children's Service. • Give children and young people a head start in some of the most deprived wards in the Borough. Bringing forward gains that will ultimately be achieved for all children and young people through the full integration of Children's Services. • Make a reality of personalising services around the child, young person and their family, tailored to specific need. Again, this acts as a prelude to the change in culture and working practice that the integration of Children's Services will bring.

WBP understands that the environment has to encourage children and young people to live safe, healthy and fulfilled lives. We want to help create the climate for success that will lead to high aspirations and achievement. We are building here on the excellent early work that has already taken place in the Borough to respond to Every Child Matters. We have been working for some time to integrate services for children, young people and their families.

Improved educational attainment is predicated on having a positive family environment to be brought up within. To this end, the Borough has established a Children, Young People and their Families Strategic Partnership to integrate a range of statutory and voluntary sector services, aimed at improving the prospects of children reaching their full potential and experiencing a positive family life. A principal delivery mechanism, therefore, for the LAA is through this

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new integrated approach to service provision for Children and young people's Services.

Improved integrated working will significantly enhance the prospects for delivery on the stretch targets for healthy lifestyles and educational attainment contained in this proposal. A major deployment mechanism for this will be through the extended schools agenda currently being rolled out within the Borough.

The first nominated Full Service Extended School (FSES) was PEMBEC @ Kingsdown which received BIP funding in 2004 via the Excellence Cluster. The funding was provided for the development of childcare, health and social care, life long learning opportunities, family learning, parenting support , study support, sports and arts and ICT access. Further funding was made available via the Leigh Cluster for a second FSES in 2005, this is a collaboration of six Primary schools. Many of our schools already do a range of extended services, this has been further enhanced by the appointment of Extended School Co-ordinators who support schools to work in collaboration to challenge barriers to learning and therefore enhance attainment and achievement. All new build Primary Schools take into account the need for Extended Services, the first opened in April of this year with a hydro therapy pool and other services, a second will open in June and a third in November. These both have a range of facilities including Sure Start, Health Services, and Libraries.

The Local Area Agreement is intended to complement and enhance the Borough’s Strategy for the achievement of the 5 key outcomes for children contained in the Children Act 2004, and allied guidance. Namely; for children to be healthy; stay safe; enjoy and achieve; make a positive contribution; and achieve economic wellbeing.

Transforming such outcomes for children and their families requires both structural changes, in terms of the way services are delivered, and cultural change in the way agencies relate to each other. In Wigan, this will be achieved at 3 levels.

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1. For the individual child and their family 2. The local level, i.e. the way services relate to each other locally 3. The whole Children and young people’s system.

The LAA will facilitate a fully integrated approach at each of these levels and is aimed at specifically improving educational attainment in critical academic areas, whilst also tackling underlying causes of poor health in the child population.

The interventions listed below will be co-ordinated with other initiatives across the Children Strategic Partnership, for example the role of Sure Start in preparing children for school and helping them achieve early years outcomes. The interventions will form part of a whole systems response to improving children’s lives and their prospects for the future.

1. Healthy Lifestyle The aim is to provide more opportunities for children and young people to establish a healthy lifestyle and build confidence and self-esteem. This will include work in school on behaviour and nutrition through the Healthy Schools programme and increasing participation in high quality PE and other physical activities. A programme to increase levels of participation in physical education, physical activity and school sport (PEPASS) has been developed as a key priority. In addition outside the curriculum there will be more opportunities for sports and physical activity developed in partnership with the community and voluntary clubs.

2. Improved attainment at age 16 across the ability range. The emphasis will be on delivering a more flexible Key Stage 4 curriculum that motivates and engages young people. With support from the Secondary National Strategy we will offer challenge and support to all our schools and specific programmes have been devised to raise attainment in targeted schools. Students at risk of underachievement will be provided with a personalised GCSE/KS4 programme. We will develop an improved vocational curriculum and strengthen information, guidance, support and mentoring for young people at risk of disengagement from education/training. This will be a focus

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for close partnership working between the LEA, Positive Futures (Connexions), LSC Manchester, Wigan and Leigh College, St John Rigby RC Sixth Form College, Winstanley College, Wigan Training Provider Network and the private sector.

3. Improving the attainment of boys in English at Key Stage 2. We will use a number of different learning methods in target schools and with those boys most at risk of underachieving. This will involve innovative use of information technology resources and a range of teaching approaches designed to improve boys' achievement in English and especially in writing. This programme will be delivered to a targeted group of schools but the good practice will be shared across all primary schools.

4. Narrowing the attainment gap for Looked After Children. This project will seek to strengthen continuity of learning for Looked After Children. It will include development work with teachers, foster carers and others working with this group to strengthen cross-agency collaboration. Each young person will have access to a personalised programme with priority access to specialised programmes to raise aspirations, and access to children's rights, health support and advice. The programme will be rolled out to future cohorts of Looked After Children, having received direct feedback from the first tranche of children and young people and their carers in terms of its overall effectiveness, and the outcomes we collectively achieve.

This outcome has been extended from our original LAA outcome which was aimed at KS2 and KS3. As part of the LPSA2 we are now looking to address KS2, KS3, KS4, young people into education, employment and training and adoption orders, special guardianship orders and residence orders.

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Block: Outcomes:

Children and Young People

1. Young people will have higher levels of qualifications and be able to take up education, employment or training. 2. There will be a significant increase in the average attainment of boys in English at KS 2. 3. The gap in educational attainment of looked after children and young people will be narrowed when compared to their peers. 4. Young people will have healthier lifestyles and increased levels of participation in sport and physical activity. 5. Achieve economic well-being (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) Indicators: Full list of measures, baseline, targets and stretch over leaf. 1. The number of schools that have achieved level 3 of the Healthy Schools Standard by 2008. (PRG) 2. The percentage of young people taking part in high quality PE or physical activity both within and outside of the curriculum for a minimum of 2 hours per week by 2008. 3. The percentage of young people not in education, employment and training in 2008. 4. The average fine graded level achieved by boys in 2008. (PRG) 5. The average points score achieved at age 16. (PRG) 6. Significant progress made by LAC(looked after children) between 2005 and 2008. As measured by 50% reduction in the gap between the average progress made by LAC and the average progress for the cohort. RG) 7. Reduction in the proportion of LAC having more than 3 placements. 8. Percentage of 16-18 year olds not in education, employment or training. 9. Raise standards in English, Maths and Science in areas in receipt of Neighbourhood Renewal. 10. % increase in the number of schools with an approved school travel plan. Block: Children and Young People Funding Streams Pooled Connexions 2005/06 Total funding – Funding Streams to be aligned Children’s Services funding for health, social care and education. See following pages for details.

Allocation 2006/07

2007/08

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Outcomes, baseline measures and stretched targets
No LAA LAA LAA/LPSA2 This would be our existing target for this area if we did not have LAA Our LAA target that does not trigger PRG. Our LAA target/LPSA2 target that triggers PRG

LAA/NRF

Our LAA target and mandatory Neighbourhood Renewal outcome

Outcome 1. Young People will have higher levels of qualifications and will take up education, employment and training. Measures Attainment at age 16 measured by average points score and % young people NEET. Attainment will be measured on the results of 2008 results and NEET on the basis of the November 2008 return. Baseline 2004* results 328.5 average points score 2006 2007 No LAA 335 337 LAA/LPSA2 340 342 *Source: DfES Performance Tables 2004 Baseline 2004* results 9.4% NEET 2006 2007 No LAA 9.1 8.8 LAA 9.0 8.4 *Source: Positive Futures (Connexions) November 2004 return Outcome 2. Boys attainment in English at KS2 will have increased significantly Measures Attainment measured by fine graded level achieved in results of summer 2008. This is derived from the Fischer Family Trust analyses which uses the full marks achieved at KS3 which included separate assessments for reading and writing. Baseline 2004* results 4.25 fine graded level 2006 No LAA 4.25 LAA/LPSA2 4.30

2008 340 363.1

2008 8.5 8.2

2007 4.30 4.35

2008 4.35 4.51

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Outcome 3. The gap in educational attainment of looked after Children and Young People will be narrowed when compared to their peers. Measure a) Attainment at KS3 in English, Maths and Science of LAC measured by achievement of Level 5 of children looked after for at least a year. We will measure the progress of one cohort of LAC who will sit their KS3 exams in May 2008 and measure the gap between the average achievement made by this group and average achievement for KS3 SAT’s - provided these have been in our care for at least one year. Baseline 2004 36% Average achievement made compared to peers 2006 2007 2008 No LAA 50% as well as their peers LAA/LPSA2 60% as well as their peers Calculation of the baseline and targets is based on achievement of Level 5 + at Key Stage 3. The baseline figure is taken from 2004 SAT's results, and compares achievement of Looked After Children to the whole Wigan Y9 cohort. The targets refer to the percentage of Looked After Children (in care for at least 12 months) who achieve Level 5 in all 3 core subjects, compared with the percentage of the whole cohort achieving Level 5 in all 3 core subjects. b) And the stability of LAC placements (BVPI 49). Baseline 2004 12.1% Percentage stability of placements 2006 2007 No LAA 11% 10.5% LAA/LPSA2 10% 9.5%

2008 10% 9%

c) Percentage of looked after children who achieve level 4 or better in English, Maths & Science at KS2. Baseline 2005 1) 40% English 2) 45% Maths 3) 60% Science English 2008 No LAA 45% LAA/LPSA2 55% Maths No LAA 45% LAA/LPSA2 55% Science No LAA 60% LAA/LPSA2 64%

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d) Percentage of looked after children who achieve level 4 or better in English, Maths & Science at KS3 Baseline 2005 1) 25.8% English 2) 19.35% Maths 3) Science 22.58% English 2008 No LAA 30% LAA/LPSA2 35% Maths No LAA 22% LAA/LPSA2 35% Science No LAA 22.58% LAA/LPSA2 35% e) Percentage of looked after children in year 11 that achieve 5 GCSEs at grades A*-C Baseline 2005 17.64% No LAA LAA/LPSA2 2008 17.64% 24%

f) Percentage of looked after children engaged in education, training or employment. Baseline 2005 46% No LAA LAA/LPSA2 2008 75% 86%

g) Percentage of adoption orders, special guardianship orders and residence orders granted for children in care for a minimum of six months. Baseline 2005 7% No LAA LAA/LPSA2 Outcome 4. Increased number of children and young people have the opportunity to develop a healthy lifestyle at school. Measures a) The number of schools achieving the Healthy Schools Standard at Level 3. There are currently 140 crossphase schools in the borough. Measured by: 2007 10% 11% 2008 11% 12%

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1) The % of the schools with 20% free school meals entitlement achieving the standard. 2) 50% of all other schools achieving the standard. b) The percentage of school children spending a minimum of 2 hours each week on high quality sport and PE within and beyond the curriculum.

a) Baseline 2004 25 out of 63 schools that have 20% free school meals entitlement have Level 3 Healthy School Standard 22 out of 77 all other schools have Level 3 Healthy School Standard 2006 2007 2008 No LAA - 20% schools 40 50 63 - Other schools 20 30 40 - Total schools 60 80 103 LAA/LPSA2 - 20% schools 50 63 All the 20% (63) will have it - Other schools 25 40 67 - Total schools 75 103 130 b) Baseline 2004 57% school children in all partnership schools spending 2 hours a week on high quality PE/school sport within and beyond the curriculum. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA 75% 75% 85% LAA 75% 75% 90% Baseline 2004 48% school children in all partnership schools spending 2 hours each week on sports and physical activity within the curriculum. There is currently no requirement for targeted separate achievement for within and beyond the curriculum. Therefore we have no targets without LAA. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA LAA 50% 50% 75% Baseline 2004 19% school children in all partnership schools spending 1 hour each week on sports and physical activity beyond the curriculum. There is currently no requirement for targeted separate achievement for within and beyond the curriculum. Therefore we have no targets without LAA. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA LAA 20% 20% 25% (all schools) (all schools) The percentage annual increase in the number of schools with an approved school travel plan (STP) required to achieve 100 percent STP coverage by

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March 2010. This should be profiled against the current number of schools with an approved STP in place and the appropriate delivery point on a trajectory which would achieve 100 percent coverage by 2010. Baseline 2004 6.5% 2008 No LAA LAA Outcome 5. Achieve economic well-being (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) Baseline 2004* results 9.4% Percentage of 16-18 year olds not in education, employment or training 2006 2007 No LAA 9.1 8.8 LAA 9.0 8.4 *Source: Positive Futures (Connexions) November 2004 return 75.73%

2008 8.5 8.2

Raise standards in English, Maths and Science in secondary education so that by 2008, in all schools located in the districts in receipt of NRF, at least 50% of pupils achieve level 5 or above in each English, Maths and Science 2006 2007 2008 No LAA LAA/NRF At least 45% At least 50%

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Funding streams and Freedoms and Flexibilities
Children & Young People Funding to be aligned with LAA. Children’s services funding for social care, education and health. This will include things like, • Aftercare • Family Placement • Standards Fund • Education Development Plan funding for - school improvement - KS 4 attainment - Primary attainment Narrowing attainment gap (especially elements relating to LAC and boys) • LSC grants to Wigan to support vocational education 14-16 • Elements of Sure Start funding • Children’s Fund • NHS Primary Care funding Choice Protects. Flexibility Required We have negotiated so that mainstream and grant funding is aligned and ultimately pooled by year 3 to meet our LAA outcomes. Statusdiscussions ongoing We anticipate that the creation of the Children’s services department will result in the alignment of funding that mirrors the integration of Children’s services within the LAA. We would also like to see the health element aligned with the Children’s Services outcomes . Status – under discussion Year 2 Year 3 Aligned and pooled – NHS & Local Authority budgets

Maintain our current flexibility with this budget.

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Children & Young People Funding Streams to be included in LAA 1. Connexions - NEET

Flexibility Required Connexions to be paid monthly.

Year 2

Year 3

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4. Safer and Stronger Communities
Our vision for Safer and Stronger Communities is that the Borough’s residents will know that rates of crime, disorder and drugs misuse have been reduced substantially. They will know why and how this has been achieved and will live more secure and healthy lives as a result. That they will live in a decent home in a clean, green and safe neighbourhood.

We have set ourselves a high-level outcome measure for safer and stronger communities to reduce total crime (BCS 10 crime types) by 25% by March 2008. This is supported by three sub measures focusing on reducing burglary, reducing public perception of anti social behaviour, reducing the drugs harm index and increasing residents participation in priority neighbourhoods.

A systematic approach is being taken to achieve this outcome using the National Intelligence Model. The six monthly strategic assessments are utilised to determine priorities for intervention and regular tactical meetings ensure tasking and co-ordinating the efforts of the Community Safety Partnerships’ resources. The strategic and tactical meetings are also used for performance managing the targets.

The target setting assumes no changes to Police crime reporting and recording methodology. Should such changes occur we would require to renegotiate the targets.

The six key areas are 1. Reducing total recorded crime. We use the NIM strategic assessment to focus activity and then undertake strategic and tactical six monthly reviews. Interventions include targeting prolific offenders and situational improvements working with the voluntary sector.

2. Reducing domestic burglary. Our primary approach is to target prolific burglary offenders, roll-out alley gating in hot spot areas and focus home security schemes in areas of greatest impact.

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3. Reducing anti-social behaviour. We use the NIM strategic assessment to focus activity and then undertake strategic and tactical six monthly reviews. Interventions include targeting of hotspots, prolific offenders, and diversionary measures involving communities and the use of “contact cards”. We complement this with a proactive media campaign that reinforces that negative public perceptions are out of step with the public’s actual experience of anti social behaviour.

4. Reducing drugs harm. We make use of the existing strategic assessment and the body of local research to guide further improvements across the raft of Drugs interventions that are in place. The particular focus sees a concentration on developing improved social outcomes for resettling drug misusers.

5. Cleaner, greener & safer public spaces. We target cleansing resources, grounds maintenance and environmental improvements within a robust programme of works which is prioritised on lowest levels of cleanliness.

6. A decent home for all. We will target resources to improve the standard of all council properties. Working closely with Wigan & Leigh Housing.

We continue to increase year on year the volume of people receiving good quality medical drug treatment by developing community based treatment services, delivered out in communities. By adopting a community-based approach to methadone maintenance we keep waiting times low, provide accessible move-on options for approximately five hundred users and ensure expensive specialist provision is freed up and available for those with more complex needs.

We provide additionality by increasing the number of planned discharges from treatment, moving people into appropriate abstinence services and relevant social support services to maximise the amount of time that people remain drug free. We have developed a menu of treatment options that are based on user

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needs and that improve the ability of drug users to engage in meaningful activity through a range of social and clinical interventions. We therefore improve the overall effectiveness of our treatment services, which then allows us to increase our focus on preventing our children and young people from becoming our problem drug users of tomorrow. Within this changed approach, we ensure that a clear focus is maintained on the drug-using population within our most vulnerable communities.

More detail on how we maintain performance and ensure achievement of additionality can be found in the proposed indicators at Appendix C.

Vulnerable Locations Both the NRF and SSCF guidance provides a clear objective regarding reducing the gap between areas with the highest and lowest crime outcomes. The Community Safety Partnership has already begun work regarding this for inclusion within the forthcoming 3-year strategy. The Partnership has started this work using the vulnerable communities' index as a scanning tool to identify those communities, neighbourhoods and streets where this disproportionality is most acute. By focusing services and interventions into these areas, the Partnership is well placed to begin reducing the crime and disorder deficit. In addition, work is underway with our partners in Children's Services, Housing and Health to assess the geographic crossover as regards priority neighbourhoods. This clearly has implications for attaining the key NRF objective of reducing, for example, education and health inequalities across the other two main themes within the LAA bid. A full explanation of progress so far is included in Appendix D.

Respect Agenda The Community Safety Partnership is currently developing an Anti-Social Behaviour Strategy that covers all elements of the Respect Agenda and its six themes. Anti-Social Behaviour is likely to be included on the Partnership New Opportunity Strategy, with Partnership action plans to deliver its key objectives.

Cleaner, Greener Neighbourhoods

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This is a new LAA mandatory outcome. It is already a priority for us. We continue to monitor the borough with an annual inspection. And continue with the perception measures by engaging with the Citizens Panel on an annual basis. Further work is being undertaken to engage with community groups and develop partnership working to ensure we help create ownership of their neighbourhoods. We deploy neighbourhood road safety and cleansing awareness education programmes / awareness raising opportunities for appropriate groups and link strongly with local schools.

We are using a NRF funding to maximise the impact of this work in the most deprived areas. We are targeting the Neighbourhood Renewal areas identified in Appendix C.

Priority Neighbourhoods Our worst performing areas are our most deprived areas as defined by the Index of Multiple Deprivation. These areas are also the focus of the Strategic Priority Reduce the Crime Gap in the Community Safety Strategy 05-08. We are currently developing profiles of these areas, and seeking approval to pilot a joint co-located Partnership team in one of our Priority Neighbourhoods. The Partnership is committed to reducing the gap in these areas, and performance management is embedded in the partnership.

Fire Safety

A number of initiatives are already underway to ensure fire safety across the borough. Risk assessments are carried out within the home and the workplace and free smoke detectors have been fitted in homes, many of these council properties. Already partnership links have been formed with the health trusts to promote smoking cessation and with the Local Authority in the reporting of fly tipping and abandoned vehicles. Actively involved with the Community Safety Partnership.

The additional benefits that the LAA will bring What we do differently

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With the pump priming contained in our LAA proposal we resource additional actions, required by GMAC analysis, to help achieve our key outcome targets. A major lesson we have learned from GMAC is about the need to rapidly deploy/redirect resources as crime and anti-social behaviour is so dynamic. At the moment our resources tend to be fully committed to medium/long term partnership actions. The LAA resources give us greater flexibility.

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Block: Safer and Stronger Communities Freedoms and Flexibilities required: These can be found overleaf Funding Streams Requested: These can be found in the next section Outcomes: 1. To reduce crime, the harm caused by illegal drugs, and to reassure the public, reducing the fear of crime. (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 2. Reduce overall crime in line with local Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership targets and narrow the gap between the worst performing wards/neighbourhoods and other areas across the district (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 3. Domestic burglary will have reduced. 4. To build respect in communities and reduce anti-social behaviour (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 5. Representations to drugs treatment services will have reduced 6. To have cleaner, greener and safer public spaces (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 7. Improve the quality of the local environment by reducing the gap in aspects of liveability between the worst wards/neighbourhoods and the district as a whole, with particular focus on reducing levels of litter and detritus. (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 8. Provide a decent home for all 9. To improve the quality of life for people in the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods and ensure service providers are more responsive to neighbourhood needs and improve their delivery (Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 10. Reduce adult & young offenders. 11. Reduce public perceptions of drug misuse. 12. Improve public perceptions of ASB. 13. Reduce fire authority call outs. Indicators: Full details of the baseline, measures and stretch targets can be found overleaf. (The target setting assumes no changes to Police crime reporting and recording methodology. Should such changes occur we would seek to renegotiate the targets.) 1. Reduction in total recorded crime [As measured by BCS comparator 10 crime types] (PRG) 2. Reduction in domestic burglary (PRG) 3. Reduction in the percentage of people who think Anti social behaviour to be a very or fairly big problem 4. The number of planned discharges from structured drug treatment will have increased. 5. BVPI 199 Cleanliness a) litter b) graffiti c) fly posting d) fly tipping. 6. Proportion of council housing made decent. 7. Improvement in customer satisfaction in the 0-10% deprived neighbourhoods.

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8. Percentage of residents satisfied with the delivery of local services and believing service providers are more responsive to their needs. 9. Reduce gap in overall crime between 32 targeted areas and overall borough 10. Reduce the proportion of adult offenders who re-offend. 11. Reduce the proportion of young offenders who re-offend. 12. Reduce the proportion of PPOs who re-offend. 13. % of people who feel very/fairly safe overall in their area. 14. % people who are very/fairly worried about becoming a victim of car crime. 15. % people who are very/fairly worried about becoming a victim of burglary. 16. % people who are very/fairly worried about becoming a victim of violent crime. 17. % people agreeing or strongly agreeing with the statement 'do you agree or disagree that you are worried about becoming a victim of crime'. 18. % people who think that the police in their area are doing an excellent/good job. 19. % people who think that people using/dealing drugs is a very/fairly big problem in their area. 20. % people who feel very/fairly well informed about what the council is doing to tackle ASB. 21. % people who feel parents in their area do not take responsibility for behaviour of children is a very/fairly big problem. 22. % in the local area who perceive people not treating one another with respect and consideration as a very or fairly big problem. 23. % of people who definitely/tend to agree that theirs is a local where people from different backgrounds get on well together. 24. Reduce number of FDR fires. 25. Reduce number of accidental dwelling fires. Block: Funding Streams requested Allocation None to be pooled 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 Funding Streams aligned - Housing capital allocations, Probation DTO funding, health and social care funding for drugs treatment, SSC Fund, Basic Command Unit Funding, DIP fund, Arrest Referral fund, Restriction on Bail fund, Neighbourhood Renewal. Further details can be found in the following pages

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Outcomes, baseline measures and stretched targets
Outcomes 1. To reduce crime, the harm caused by illegal drugs, and to reassure the public, reducing the fear of crime. 2. Reduce overall crime in line with local Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership targets and narrow the gap between the worst performing wards/neighbourhoods and other areas across the district 3. Domestic burglary will have reduced. 4. To build respect in communities and reduce anti-social behaviour. 5. Representations to drugs treatment services will have reduced 6. To have cleaner, greener and safer public spaces. 7. Improve the quality of the local environment by reducing the gap in aspects of liveability between the worst wards/neighbourhoods and the district as a whole, with particular focus on reducing levels of litter and detritus. 8. Provide a decent home for all. 9. To improve the quality of life for people in the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods and ensure service providers are more responsive to neighbourhood needs and improve their delivery. 10. Reduce adult & young offenders. 11. Reduce public perceptions of drug misuse. 12. Improve public perceptions of ASB. 13. Reduce fire authority call outs. Please note: The target setting assumes no changes to Police crime reporting and recording methodology. Should changes occur we would seek to re-negotiate targets. Crime reduction is dependent on a range of National macro factors as well as local micro interventions. These crime reduction targets are predicated on the assumption that the National factors, such as rates of unemployment, will remain stable or improving over the next 3 years.

No LAA LAA

This would be our existing target for this area if we did not have LAA Our LAA target that does not trigger PRG.

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LAA/LPSA2

Our LAA target/LPSA2 target that triggers PRG

LAA/NRF

Our LAA target and mandatory Neighbourhood Renewal outcome

(1) Baseline 2004 22050 Reduce total recorded crime to 16545 in 2008. [BCS 10 types ] 2006 2007 2008 No LAA 18963 18301 17640 LAA/LPSA2 18742 17640 16538

(2) Baseline 2004 2831 Reduce domestic burglary to 1982 in 2008 2006 2007 No LAA LAA/LPSA2 2321.00 1758.00 2008 2180.00 1930.00

(3) Baseline 2004 49% Reduce the percentage of people who think ASB is a very or fairly big problem. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA 33.25 32.38 31.50 LAA 33.25 32.38 31.50 (4) Baseline 2004 16% Increase the number of planned discharges from structured drug treatment. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA LAA 19% 21% 23% 26% 26% 31%

(5) Baseline 2005 32% To improve street cleanliness in the 0-10% deprived neighbourhoods, measured by BVPI 199 Cleanliness a) litter b) graffiti c) fly posting d) fly tipping. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA LAA 25% 25%

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(6) Baseline 2005 57% Improve the quality of the local environment by reducing the gap in aspects of liveability between the worst wards/neighbourhoods and the district as a whole, with particular focus on reducing levels of litter and detritus. Measured by improvement in customer satisfaction in the 0-10% deprived neighbourhoods. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA LAA 60% 60%

(7) Proportion of council housing made decent 2006 No LAA LAA 18% 18% 2007 14% 14% 2008 11% 11%

(8) Percentage of residents satisfied with the delivery of local services and believing service providers are more responsive to their needs. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA LAA/NRF

(9) Reduce gap in overall crime between 32 targeted areas and overall borough 2006 2007 2008 No LAA LAA/NRF 33.00 33.00 33.00 33.00 33.00 33.00

(10) Reduce the proportion of adult offenders who re-offend 2008 No LAA LAA

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(11) Reduce the proportion of young offenders who re-offend 2008 No LAA LAA

(12) Reduce the proportion of PPOs who re-offend 2008 No LAA LAA

(13) % of people who feel very/fairly safe overall in their area 2008 No LAA LAA

(14) % people who are very/fairly worried about becoming a victim of car crime 2008 No LAA LAA 13%

(15) % people who are very/fairly worried about becoming a victim of burglary 2008 No LAA LAA 18%

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(16) % people who worry about becoming a victim of violent crime 2008 No LAA LAA 14%

(17) % people agreeing or strongly agreeing with the statement 'do you agree or disagree that you are worried about becoming a victim of crime' 2008 No LAA LAA 63%

(18) % people who think overall that the police in their area are doing an excellent/good job 2008 No LAA LAA 30%

(19) % people who think that people using/dealing drugs is a very/fairly big problem in their area 2008 No LAA LAA 21%

(20) % people who feel very/fairly well informed about what the council is doing to tackle ASB 2008 No LAA LAA

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(21) % people who feel parents in their area do not take responsibility for behaviour of children is a very/fairly big problem 2008 No LAA LAA

(22) % in the local area who perceive people not treating one another with respect and consideration as a very or fairly big problem 2008 No LAA LAA

(23) % of people who definitely/tend to agree that theirs is a local area where people from different backgrounds get on well together 2008 No LAA LAA

(24) Number of FDR fires 2008 No LAA LAA 1947

(25) Number of accidental dwelling fires 2008 No LAA LAA 237

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Safer and Stronger Communities Funding to be aligned with LAA. 1. Housing Capital Allocation

Flexibility Required We would like to use some of the housing capital allocation to make improvements to homes and communities by providing residents with a range of improvements that contribute to quality of life and feelings of safety e.g. alleygating and community engagement. By working with the ALMO and housing strategy to achieve the decent homes standard we also reduce crime and fear of crime. We would like to use P2W and other JCP initiatives to target the hardest to help of our unemployed residents, whilst removing barriers to accessing ETE activity such as ongoing premium entitlement. Increasing DTTO commencement targets are at odds with our ethos of improving outcomes in relation to drug related offending. Flexibility around commencement targets is required in order that we can create a menu of community sentence options that are best suited to the needs of the offender and increase the chances of successful completion.

Year 2

Year 3

2. Progress 2 Work Fund

3. Probation DTTO Funding

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Safer and Stronger Communities 4. Mainstream PCT funding for drugs and alcohol treatment provision • Social Services funding for drug and alcohol treatment provision

Flexibility Required Its is essential that mainstream historical funds for drug and alcohol treatment are aligned with the LAA principles in order that re-patterning of resources can occur to achieve true best value in terms of treatment provision.

Year 2 To be included in LAA pot by way of Section 31 to allow reprofiling towards need. Status Under considerati on

Year 3

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Safer and Stronger Communities Funding Streams to be aligned with LAA 5. Safer and Stronger Communities Fund(HO) 6. Basic Command Unit Funding(HO) 7. Neighbourhood Renewal Fund This is a late addition to the SSC element of the LAA, There will need to be further discussion as to the outcomes to be achieved.

Flexibility Required

Year 2 Freedom Basic Command Unit Funding has always from been spent as part of a Partnership single Community pot; we would like this to continue. Status Safety CPA - agreed assessment. Status – not agreed We require flexibility in terms of the LDP CHAI Star Rating process for accessing numbers of drug users into treatment, to allow us to develop our treatment system to provide more effective interventions that are based on drug users social needs as well as providing clinical intervention. Continued focus on quantity will be detrimental to our ability to focus resources on achieving real and sustainable improvements in the social functioning of our most problematic drug users. Proposed targets for maintaining numbers whilst pursuing additionality are detailed at Appendix C With over 65% of our target PDU population in treatment in any year and over two thirds of all presentation being repeats, it is essential that we develop the same social treatment focussed model for our drug using offenders. Our access Development of Drug Harm Index baselines on which to focus improvement Status Would want to see these in place for 2006/7

Year 3 .

1. Adult Drugs Pool Treatment Budget(DoH)

Achievement of social outcome indicators in Drugs PMF

2. Drug Intervention Programme Fund (HO)

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Safer and Stronger Communities

Flexibility Required mechanisms for finding and encouraging drug-using offenders into treatment are well established. New resources around DIP need to be included in the LAA to ensure that there is cohesion between all elements of the drug service system.

Year 2

Year 3

3. Arrest Referral Fund(HO)

4. Restriction on Bail (HO)

Any devolved Arrest Referral monies and new Restriction on Bail monies need to be included for the same reasons. We also require flexibility around capital revenue splits and carry over criteria for all funding streams to allow maximum effectiveness of spend. Status - LAA offers some flexibility for carry over of funding/ No flexibility around capital/revenue splits

5. Neighbourhood Renewal Fund 6. Single Regeneration Budgets

7. 'Respect Your Town' programme

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Safer and Stronger Communities 8. Grand Arcade Development

Flexibility Required

Year 2

Year 3

9. Town Centre Retailers 10. Wigan and Leigh Homes

11. New Defra Chewing Gum Action Group funding (total grant £40,000) 12. Township Environmental Initiative (£20,000 per township)

13. Brighter Borough 21. Existing mainstream budgets

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3. Healthier communities
Our vision for a healthy Wigan borough is one where people have a similar chance of staying healthy. With greater opportunities to live a healthy lifestyle and have increased life expectancy and improved quality of life for vulnerable groups. We will do this through: Getting more of the population living a healthy lifestyle Reducing the increase, or reducing the prevalence of illnesses like diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke Mitigating the negative impact on people’s health with things like pollution by control, undertaking health impact assessments of significant developments Working with vulnerable communities – geographical or social – to help them take action to improve their own health. Increased access to quality health care

Tackling inequalities in health is core to our work – the vision above comes directly from our Community Plan, forms part of the Council’s Vision for the Borough and the delivery plans of all key agencies.

Wigan’s population is very stable, with very low migration and so our poor health is home-grown.

It is extremely challenging for Wigan to catch up with the national average in health terms, when starting from such a low base. Whilst life expectancy has increased in our borough in recent years it has not done so as quickly as the national average, with the result that the disparity between the borough and the national average is in fact increasing.

Our LAA builds on the existing activity in health and social care to address those inequalities. The LAA brings extra pace to the achievement of some of our existing plans, e.g. to pool health and social care budgets. You can see more about this later in the section on required freedoms and flexibilities.

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Local evidence base for tackling health inequalities Our knowledge of health behaviours of local people has been greatly enhanced by local health surveys, the most recent of which is Supporting the Health of Young People in Wigan Borough (2004). This survey focused on a sample of children and young people aged 10-19 years and produced a range of key baseline parameters on factors affecting their health. The data is used by statutory and voluntary agencies in Wigan to improve the health of young people in the Borough. Further, the Wigan Borough Health Survey (2001), completed by a sample of local residents aged 18 years and over who were registered with a doctor, has provided baseline health information related to lifestyles. This allows us to identify health inequalities in the Borough and to target those with greatest need. The survey will be repeated in summer 2006 and the findings used to monitor trends in health related behaviour.

Since 2002 the PCT in partnership with the Local Authority has screened 35 policies/strategies/developments through its Health Impact Assessment (HIA) Panel. The aim of this work is to identify and maximise the potential positive health impacts for local communities and minimise the potential negative impacts on health. The added value of HIA is that it helps to target vulnerable groups and communities that can sometimes be overlooked in the process of planning strategic developments. The multi skill mix of the Panel members, who are equally drawn from ALWPCT and the Local Authority, means that the recommendations from the Panel address a wide range of health related factors, which in turn contribute to the target for increased life expectancy. Particular attention is given to development proposals in areas of deprivation in the Borough.

The second report of the Health Scrutiny Select Committee focussed on Inequalities in health in Wigan Borough (2004). The recommendations included forming a strategic plan to address health inequalities in Wigan Borough. This is currently being developed through Goal 2 in the Community Plan and will be performance managed through the Performance Plus system. It was also recommended that those areas that have greatest health need have increased access to services. ALWPCT is developing more effective
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mechanisms to ensure that health improvement schemes are concentrated in areas of greatest need.

Targeting to address inequalities To bring about the desired improvements in health will require continued improvements in the overall socio-economic conditions of the Borough, as well as targeted interventions on a number of fronts. We need to direct services at the 10% most deprived areas, or groups most at risk – like older people (aged 50+), people with chronic disease, those with long-term mental health problems. We will target our healthy community interventions at the 10% of our borough with the highest levels of deprivation. This is based on Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions Index of Multiple Deprivation (2004). The appendix contains a map showing these areas. In addition, a set of local indicators is currently being identified for Goal 2 of the Community Plan, which focuses on Similar Chances of Staying Healthy. These are monitored using the Local Authority’s Performance Plus system. A development for 06/07 is to enable us to better monitor health and inequality trends within the borough, categorising data into top and bottom 3%, and 10%, in addition to the borough average compared to the England average.

Our Innovations Forum project aims to enable older people to increase their well being and engagement is one example of this targeted activity. Through this, older people will have a better quality of life and decisions made about their future will be theirs – whether they relate to one individual or to groups. We define older people as those primarily aged over 50 years as set out in the NSF for Older People.

Our Innovations Forum vision is that, • There are services and systems in place to help people avoid losing independence and control over their lives at all stages of their journey through the health and social care system. High quality and timely acute and specialist care to those who need it. • All care pathways are based on the needs and wishes of the individual rather within the current capacity of the system.
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•

Care (health and social) is provided at home wherever possible and if not possible then be provided in an environment which provides the least possible risk to the short and long term independence and control of the individual.

In taking forward these proposals for both integrated mainstream services and in partnership with the community of voluntary organisations and other key agencies, priority will be given to early implementation and evaluation in the 10% most deprived areas as described earlier. You can see details of this in the appendix B.

How the PCT is tackling inequalities already The PCT ensures that its plans address service gaps and inequalities. It does this by matching service provision to population need and including here the specific needs of vulnerable groups in the population. Whether it is inequality in access to services or inequality in health outcomes, the reduction in inequality is a key strand running throughout the PCT Local Delivery Plan. The following are some examples: • Targeting smoking prevention and cessation in the Borough, including reducing the number of women that smoke during pregnancy.(see Appendix D for further details) • • • • • Working on food and health issues in more deprived areas to tackle overweight and obesity through the Healthy Weight Strategy. Improving access to physical activity for vulnerable groups (over 50s suffering long-term conditions, or physically disabled). Increasing the number of new mothers known to have initiated breastfeeding. Improving access to sexual health services. Improving access to health services for homeless people, including rough sleepers.

The contribution of Primary Care to reducing inequalities Some of this increased activity needs to be delivered by the health services, particularly through improved primary care services. (See for example the Health
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Poverty Index www.hpi.org.uk, where Wigan’s performance on primary care is much poorer than other similarly deprived boroughs – heavily influenced by the low numbers of GPs).

The PCT has taken on much of the chronic disease management formerly delivered in hospitals, so for instance, patients with heart failure, diabetes and chronic respiratory problems are now treated by specialist nurse teams with a prevention focus. The preventative approach, described later, takes this approach – but in those with less advanced disease, and aims to prevent them from becoming the chronically ill by keeping them active (physically and socially).

The LIFT programme in the borough delivered three much improved primary care premises in 2005, which it is hoped will aid recruitment of new GPs, which is sorely needed. Others are planned for 2006/07. Other developments in primary care, like the General Medical Services (GMS) contract are improving the PCT’s capacity to performance manage individual practices, thereby improving the quality of services and making sure more of the people who could benefit do so.

The PCT is committed to targeting elements of its main “unified” budget in support of the Local Area Agreement. Initially a proportion of the “enhanced services” element of GP contract funding is targeted in areas of greatest need. Evidence tells us that if we direct this resource to programmes which will improve the detection and treatment for the causal factors of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke and to the management of established disease we will have an impact on life expectancy within 2/3 years. What the PCT does differently because of the LAA Investment in health provides us with an opportunity to ensure that the distribution of health benefits reaches individuals and communities that have missed out in the past. Ashton, Leigh and Wigan PCT are committed to reducing health inequalities across different vulnerable population groups and geographical areas in the borough.

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Changing the way we work and doing more The PCT is addressing health inequalities by targeting the 10% of most deprived areas of the Borough.

As we have already described we use the opportunity that the LAA brings to target the ‘enhanced services’ element of GP contract funding in areas of greatest need and so improve the primary care services currently offered. The GMS contract also enables us to understand those areas that have highest levels of need and to target resources most effectively. The Public Health Annual Report (2003), a Health Equity Audit, focused largely on need for services, and compared this to the availability and access to existing services. A key recommendation of the report is that health clinics, practices and services in the areas of the highest deprivation need more resources than those areas that are at the national average level. We hope this LAA will enable us to enhance the pace of this re-distribution of resources.

Prevention Theme Coronary heart disease, (type 2) diabetes and stroke are all influenced by lifestyle – that is they can be prevented, and even if not prevented, the complications of the disease can be reduced and life expectancy increased by action to: • • • • Reduce smoking (increase the number of smoking quitters) Getting more people more active more often Encourage a healthier diet (more fruit and veg – 5-a-day, less saturated fats and processed foods) Reducing the upward trend in obesity

In 06/07 we aim to: • Deliver more smoking quitters, particularly from the 3 % most deprived Super Output Areas, and from other high need groups, such as those suffering from long-term mental health problems

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•

Getting a lot more people over 50 active to participate in a number of the physical activities we have planned through the Active Living Programme, and in volunteering opportunities

•

Targeting the existing Food& Health team work in the 10% most deprived Super Output Areas

We have evidence of long standing robust partnership arrangements in delivering services to Older People. One example is our early strategic investment in intermediate care, and consistently excellent performance on delayed discharges. As with Children’s Services, described earlier, an Older People’s Strategic Partnership has been established involving all key partners who have a contribution to make in terms of the health and welfare of the older population. The aim of this preventative strategy is for older people to live healthier and independent lives, with greater choice of service and more means of support and increased participation.

Care and treatment of older people is arranged more holistically and seamlessly, with fewer service gaps, interface delays and administrative burdens. Much needed capacity has been released in acute services to improve services and choice for people who really need acute treatment in hospital.

The strategy to shift investment down the continuum of care is the main focus of evaluation and performance management. This is being demonstrated through the 20% reduction in bed days target, targets relating to helping people live at home and direct payments, and other sub measures relating to the use and outcomes of the Preventative service.

It is recognised that in the context of Payment by Results this diversion of funds is a potential disincentive for the acute hospital to participate fully in the reforms outlined. Again it is a demonstration of robust partnership arrangements that all agencies are totally committed to the whole system model of improving older people’s services.

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The added benefits the LAA brings Service integration The LAA enhances the work currently underway to integrate services across the Council, NHS and the Voluntary Sector, in order to better align services around the patient or service user as described above.

Just as with Children’s Services, many of the outcomes we aim to achieve within this proposal are predicated on the increased efficiency and effectiveness gained from new joint commissioning processes and integrated teams of Health, Social Care and Voluntary Sector partners. Partners aim to use some of the resources no longer required for older people in the acute sector to develop and enhance preventative health and social care services.

The LAA also brings added pace to our local activity to align and eventually pool budgets. See our requested freedoms and flexibilities later in this section.

Our interventions for older people are based on a whole system approach to the prevention of ill health in older people to increase life expectancy and quality of life. They are based on the principle of Right Service, Right Place, and Right Time. This will include activity to Prevent ill health in the general population. Prevent deterioration in the health of vulnerable older people that do not meet the statutory threshold for services. Prevent the admission to hospital of older people releasing resources for front line care in community, health and social care. Engagement of older people to help them increase control over their own lives Physical activity Our approach increases participation in physical activity amongst sedentary adults/older adults.

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Wigan Leisure and Culture Trust's Active Living Team working with Ashton, Leigh and Wigan PCT and other partners have been implementing a national 'good practice' pilot project (LEAP) encouraging participation amongst people aged over 50 in physical activity and health programmes. LEAP is also piloting collection and analysis of data within the real communities as opposed to research and clinical settings.

It is our belief and this is supported by the Second Wanless Report (2004) that individuals need to be supported to change their behaviour. This is why we are not suggesting a ‘whole population approach’ to increasing participation but rather to build on proven programmes like ‘Steps to Health’ and ‘LEAP’ that focus on support for individuals in making change.

Current mainstream services At present we provide the Steps to Health exercise referral scheme and support 1,295 referrals to become more physically active each year. We are also involved in the national LEAP pilot programme – testing out the effectiveness of targeted interventions with the over 50’s.

The added benefits the LAA brings The extra benefit that the LAA brings includes a greater understanding of what works and an improved ‘physical activity infrastructure’ and increased capacity to further extend and sustain programmes of work. The LAA builds on this current good practice and considerably extends the scope of targeted physical activity programmes.

Our approach establishes four inter-connected settings based interventions with partner agencies. We track and monitor individual participation rates for up to 1 year throughout the programme.

The four settings we are working in are: 1. Healthcare - this builds on the already existing 'Steps to Health' exercise referral scheme.

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2. Social care and older people's networks – this builds on the LEAP programme that has been successful in establishing new approaches to reaching older adults. 3. Targeted Communities – building on the Next Steps programme and targeting both the 10% and 3% areas of highest deprivation. 4. Workplaces - Workplaces have been a proposed 'setting' for government health initiatives for at least the last 5 years.

In order to address the health inequalities in physical activity participation we are tracking participants by age (identifying those aged over 50), gender, postcode (identifying those from six key communities) and health status (identifying those with chronic health needs). This addresses four of the seven areas of the Social Identity Model used by the Council as a classification within its Diversity Strategy. With the capacity to measure adherence we are able to track progress in relation to the above health inequalities.

Participants will be invited to complete the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) when joining an activity programme, and will then be followed up at 3 months*, six months and 1 year using the same measurement tool. Participants that meet agreed will be measured against the LPSA/LAA Physical Activity target criteria (appendix E)

*Steps to health scheme only

Community and voluntary sector involvement Building a strong community is vital to achieving our goals and the outcomes of our LAA. You can see in Part One how community networks and interest groups are full participants in our LSP. You can see from the outcomes already identified in the other service blocks that there are many cross cutting links and opportunities for partnership working with the voluntary and community sector. We are building the capacity of the voluntary and community sector to be more able to jointly deliver the outcomes of this LAA. Given the diverse nature of the Borough’s voluntary and community
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sector and the infrastructure in place already a technological solution is seen to be the most appropriate.

Our LAA approach includes a volunteer centre (market place), a rolling training programme and advice around issues of good practice and governance. The LAA enables CVS to have a designated worker developing these opportunities and assisting groups reach their potential in this context through training, advice and marketing.

The LAA offers the possibility of groups increasing their efficiency in communicating best practice, encouraging involvement in core activities and reaching sections of the community not otherwise accessing volunteering opportunities.

In this work and working towards our LPSA2 target are targeting hard to reach and difficult to attract and we require freedoms and flexibilities in our other funding to contribute to this aim. You can find details of these later in this section.

The added benefits the LAA will bring Our approach with a volunteer market place has been widened to include a specialist market place for older people and groups active within that field, sharing expertise and best practice on how to involve the target groups.

We are also considering how we can provide alternative access to IT for groups without their own IT and would be looking, to develop after 2008 a system where we could provide access through a system of IT stations around the Borough.

We are expanding the use of “Community Champions” as developed by the Healthy Living programme, to provide personal direction to individuals and groups needing extra support that wishing to access volunteering or community participation.

Our LAA interventions include:

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1. Building the capacity of the voluntary and community sector through the use of technology. One of the key features for this work is improving the potential of volunteers. This is being achieved by increasing the ability of groups to use their volunteers more effectively and constructively through more efficient management. The ability to develop volunteer potential will be crucial in volunteer retention and voluntary activity as a whole. This involves: Empowering, enabling and supporting voluntary and community groups to create and maintain their own information on-line, including the promotion of volunteering opportunities, employment openings, training events and good practice. Increasing the levels of volunteering and volunteer retention especially amongst economically inactive and older persons leading to economic and social benefits through enhanced qualifications and experience. An important by-product of this will be an increase in the community identity for each township and cross-generation activity which will help address some of the inter-generational perceptions that give rise to a fear of crime.

2. Increase the percentage of older people participating in physical activity. Initiatives to increase participation are being developed through healthcare, social care, community and workplace settings, in partnership with other key agencies including the private sector. This seizes upon the opportunities presented by the Public Health white paper, Choosing Health, which will be piloted through Spearhead PCT areas, of which we are one. We are also piloting an innovative approach to enable people to access advice and information on personalised physical activities and linking this with health messages, and encouraging people to build more into their daily routine, as well as promoting specific physical activities. We are targeting our physical activity and healthy lifestyle interventions at those areas with 20% highest levels of deprivation.

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Within the costs of the programme we are training up to 20 senior peer mentoring volunteers each year, to support the physical activity interventions. The preventative service is also providing greater opportunities for volunteering and including engaging, supporting and training volunteers.

3. Prevent the admission to hospital of older people thus releasing resources for front line care in the community, health and social care services. This assists in maximising the use of beds for people with chronic and urgent health needs. It includes an increase in support for carers, together with a range of other preventative services that enable people to be cared for in their own homes or in other settings for longer periods.

This preventative work builds on Wigan’s already excellent results for minimising delays in hospital discharge in local acute health facilities and the implementation of the Social Services Department’s preventative strategy in partnership with the voluntary sector.

4. The Development of Integrated Health and Social Care Teams and the establishment of unified commissioning arrangements for Older People. Wigan Council, Ashton, Leigh & Wigan Primary Care Trust and Wrightington, Wigan And Leigh NHS Acute Trust are engaged in a national pilot project under the auspices of the Local Government Association, Innovation Forum (the “Health of Older People” Project). This project focuses on developing new forms of leadership and governance arrangements for integrated complex care teams.

The findings of this project will inform the development of integrated Health and Social Care Teams. A pilot will be implemented from the 1st April 2006, and rolled out across services from September 2006.

Partners have committed themselves to establishing a single point of commissioning for Older People’s Services, initially through the Older People’s Executive Committee, which is overseeing the project. The project
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seeks additional funding streams to enhance the current proposals for the Prevention Service, along with Intermediate Care; and the increased use of Assistive Technology to maintain older people’s independence further. The Innovation Forum Project in Wigan is currently considering the implications of the Payment by Results system; and any possible disincentives for Foundation Trust hospitals to support a strategy to reduce admissions in the context of Payments by Results system.

The implementation of the Single Assessment Process that involves shared risk assessments and outcome-based care planning, is the “thread” which underpins the process of integration referred to above.

The research and evaluation of the project nationally will ensure service improvements are evidence-based and how they are impacting positively on the headline 20% target in reducing “bed days”. Performance in its early stages has exceeded interim targets and provides a foundation for further improvement.

Integrated Service Improvement Plan (ISIP)

The ISIP is the vehicle to deliver ALWPCT's Local Delivery Plan. Service Improvement in the NHS seeks to align process, workforce and technology change initiatives through an integrated approach to planning and delivery in order to maximise the realisation of benefits. The purpose of the Integrated Service Improvement Framework is to: Encourage integrated implementation of change to realise the Strategic Goals of the Service; Engaged and motivate stakeholders; Provide the ability to deliver and monitor the planned benefits, report on them and to provide feedback for learning and control.

The ISIP has provided the PCT with an opportunity to consult with local community and partner organisations on health priorities and objectives
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associated with health improvement and the tackling of inequalities associated with economic status.

In implementing and refining the ISIP, change programme leads have been identified to lead the projects implemented within their respective programmes of work. Key supporting strategies for the change programmes includes workforce, connecting for health and accommodation. The coordination of the ISIP work will align supporting enabling strategies to LHC priority change programmes.

The Ashton, Leigh and Wigan ISIP comprises 6 care delivery programmes, which includes: • • • • • • • Scheduled Care Unscheduled Care Mental Health Children and Young People Choosing Health Cancer Long Term Conditions

ALWPCT has benefited from working in partnership with local partners as part of the local planning structures to develop the ISIP. The context for local engagement includes:

i.

A series of ISIP workshops held during August and September 2005, aimed at drawing together the LHC priorities and proposals. ii. An LHC workshop held on 19th January 2006, which included a benefits realisation planning for all change programmes & their projects, in the context of the LHC priority, care provision in the correct setting.

iii. From February 2006, a series of LHC workshop are being held in order to •

Present the ISIP
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• •

Agree priorities and terms of reference for managing the

change programmes Understand and align enabling strategic planning with

the overall strategic direction contained within the ISIP.

Local structures and Processes

The overall senior level responsibility for the ISIP will be co-ordinated via a joint executive management board with representatives from all of the partner organisations. Clinical priorities for the ISIP will be agreed by the Professional Executive Committee, and Service Planning/Service Re-design Groups will be formed / re-structured by ISIP change programme leads in order to coordinate whole system planning agenda’s for each change programme.

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Block:

Healthier Communities

Freedoms and Flexibilities: Full details of what is required can be found overleaf. Funding Streams Requested: Full details can be found later in this section. Outcomes: 1. Life expectancy for Wigan borough residents has increased and the gap between Wigan and the national average has narrowed 2. Improve quality of life and independence of older people over 50 years 3. People able to get involved and influence 4. Reduce premature mortality rates, and reduce inequalities in premature mortality rates between wards/neighbourhoods, with a particular focus on reducing the risk factors for heart disease, stroke and related diseases (CVD) (Smoking, diet and physical activity)(Neighbourhood Renewal Outcome) 5. Improve health and reduce health inequalities Indicators: Full details of the baseline, measures and targets can be found overleaf. 1. Life expectancy for women in Wigan (years) 2. Life expectancy for men in Wigan (years) 3. Mortality rate from cardiovascular disease under 75’s ( PSA01a) 4. Smoking quitters at 4 weeks ( PSA08a)(PRG) 5. Numbers of individuals involved in physical activity - adherence rates 6. Increase the percentage of sedentary adults participating in physical activity through targeted ‘settings’ based programmes. (PRG) 7. Intensive home care as a % of intensive home care and residential care 8. Direct payments accessed by older people 9. Reduce bed days by 20% by 2008. (PRG) 10. Increase the numbers of people undertaking voluntary activity in the Borough. (PRG) 11. People able to get involved and influence. 12. Reduce health inequalities between the LA and the England population by narrowing the gap in all-age all-cause mortality. Block: Healthier Communities Funding Streams requested No pooled funding Funding Stream to be aligned NHS Primary Care funding, social care funding for preventative services for older people, funding for physical activity programmes, Community Empowerment Fund, Neighbourhood Renewal Funding. Further details can be found in the following pages.

2005/06

Allocation 2006/07

2007/08

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Outcomes, baseline measures and stretched targets No LAA LAA LAA/LPSA2 This would be our existing target for this area if we did not have LAA Our LAA target that does not trigger PRG. Our LAA target/LPSA2 target that triggers PRG

LAA/NRF

Our LAA target and mandatory Neighbourhood Renewal outcome

Outcomes 1. Life expectancy for Wigan borough residents has increased and the gap between Wigan and the national average has narrowed. Measures GONW does not expect additional stretch targets over and above those already given through the LDP process, as shown below. No additional stretch is required regarding Cardiovascular Disease mortality as this is already built in. a) This will be measured by life expectancy in men and women in Wigan in years. b) The mortality rate from cardiovascular disease in under 75’s (PSA 01a) c) Smoking quitters at 4 weeks (PSA 08a) d) Increasing rates of physical exercise. As measured by the number of patients at health risk who do not undertake at least 30 minutes exercise who achieve a minimum increase in physical activity levels of at least 60 minutes per week.

Wigan Life Expectancy Baseline* 2004 Female 79.1/Male 75.0 * Figures based on SHA projections, not actual figures Wigan Life 2006 2007 Expectancy No LAA (based 79.7 (Female) 79.9 (Female) on SHA 75.7 (Male) 76.0 (Male) projections) LAA 79.9 (Female) 80.2 (Female) 75.9 (Male) 76.3 (Male)

(a) 2008 80.2 (Female) 76.2 (Male) 80.5 (Female) 76.6 (Male)

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Mortality rate per 100,000 (directly age standardised) population from cardiovascular disease*) in people aged under 75 Baseline: 2004 = 140 (actual figures) (b) 2006 2007 2008 No LAA (PSA 112 106 99 01a1) LAA 112 106 99 * Heart disease, stroke and other related diseases. (c) Baseline 2004 813 Number of smoking quitters at 4 weeks 2006 2007 No LAA 2370 2370 LAA/LPSA2 2370 2450 2008 2370 2730

(d) Baseline 2004 1231 Number of individuals involved in physical activity 2006 2007 2008 No LAA 1295 1295 1295 LAA 2750 2750 2750

(e) Baseline 2004 0 Number of patients at health risk who undertake physical activity 2006 2007 No LAA LAA/LPSA2 -

2008 255 405

Outcome 2. Improve quality of life and independence of older people over 50 years. Measures a) Reduction in inpatient bed days measured in days. b) The provision of intensive home care as a % of intensive home and residential care (B11). c) The take up of direct payments by older people measured in actual numbers.

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Please note that GONW advised that no further stretch on LDP targets as indicated below would be required. (a) Baseline 2004 Unplanned inpatient bed days 110224 2006 2007 No LAA 112542 114528 LAA/LPSA2 104712 101503 2008 114922 91622 (b) Baseline 2004 27. 8% intensive home care 2006 No LAA 30% LAA 31% 2007 31% 32% 2008 32% 33% (c) Baseline 2004 7 Take up of direct payments 2006 No LAA 20 LAA 40 2007 30 60 2008 40 80

Outcome 3. People able to get involved and influence a) To empower people to have a greater voice and influence over decisionmaking. Measured by annual survey. b) To increase the volume of volunteering, particularly amongst economically inactive and older people. Measured by numbers of people new to volunteering taking part. c) Increase potential for voluntary activity in communities. Measured by numbers of new people recruited from 'difficult to attract' and/or 'hard to reach' groups. Who undertake an average of 2 hours per week formal volunteering. (a) Baseline 2004 not available. Baseline will be taken following research that is to be concluded in March 2005. People to have a greater voice and influence over decision making. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA 5% 5% 5% LAA 8% 12% 15%

(b) Baseline 2004 12,263. The number of new people recruited to volunteering, particularly amongst 'hard to reach' and 'difficult to attract' groups. 2006 2007 2008 No LAA 13000
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LAA/LPSA2

13400

13800

14200

(c) Baseline 2004 Not available. Baseline will be set by CommunityShip database of voluntary activity. Potential for voluntary activity in communities. Number of groups recruiting 5 or more volunteers per year 2006 2007 2008 No LAA 20 20 20 LAA 75 85 100

Outcome 4. Improved health and reduced health inequalities.

Reduce health inequalities between the LA and the England population by narrowing the gap in all-age all-cause mortality. (a) Wigan Life Expectancy No LAA (based on SHA projections) LAA 2008

566 (Female) 781 (Male)

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Freedoms, Flexibilities and Funding Streams –Healthy Communities Healthy Communities Flexibility Required Funding to be aligned with LAA. The Local Authority and PCT have longstanding and good joint planning arrangements and well established infrastructure around the Wigan Borough Partnership. It is proposed to undertake a phased approach to finance arrangements with initial work focusing on identifying and aligning spend on specific services. 1. NHS Primary Care funding • Spearhead PCT • Anything emerging from “Choosing Health” • GMS contract Enhanced services funding. 2. Social Care funding for preventative services for older people 3. Leisure and Culture Trust funding to facilitate physical activity programmes 4. Community Empowerment Fund

Year 2 We require GONW to liase with the central government to help facilitate this process.

Year 3 Aligned and pooled – NHS & Local Authority budgets

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Economic Development and Enterprise
Our vision for Economic Development and Enterprise in this borough is for local people to have the best possible chances to achieve economic well being, maximise their economic aspirations and the contribution they can make to the local economy.

We have set ourselves a high level outcome to increase number of people that become economically active. And an overall aim to reduce the level of worklessness across Wigan.

This aim is aligned with the Wigan Economic Development Plan, the Community Plan and the vision and themes of the Greater Manchester Economic Development Plan.

Worklessness Tackling worklessness is an economic priority, with work recognised as the best route out of poverty, and Wigan’s Economic Development Plan sets out the vision for achieving this. Worklessness is defined as a combination of: • • • • Unemployment Claimants Incapacity Benefit Claimants Severe Disablement Allowance Claimants All Participants in New Deal

Worklessness has declined in Wigan over recent years from over 34,000 in 1998 to 29,600 in 2004. However, the number of people claiming incapacity benefit has remained unchanged; the 2005 level is 22,400, which is the same as in 1999. Worklessness in Wigan is concentrated in specific areas and is often associated with poverty, poor health, housing quality and low skills. In Wigan, we have long recognised the interconnected issues of worklessness and the high numbers of IB claimants. The Economic Development and Enterprise Block of the Local Area Agreement (LAA) will provide the framework
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for all key stakeholders to work together, and align funding, to reduce the number of people claiming IB. There is a key opportunity for the Local Authority, LSC and Jobcentre Plus to collaborate strategically and operationally in making a reality of the “Welfare to Workforce Development” agenda. This will link into the joint planning process already underway between LSC and Jobcentre Plus. The current Economic Development Plan recognises the need to tap into the skills and experience that those who have the potential to work can offer. It also recognises that the skills base of local residents will have to increase to enable them to take full advantage of opportunities being created. The two main outcomes to deal with this issue are: • To reduce the level of worklessness, by removing barriers to facilitate easier access to training and employment, and promoting skills development; • Increase skill levels of the local population with clear reference to local business need.

Enterprise development Enterprise in Wigan has tremendous potential to address the issue of worklessness through the provision of higher value employment opportunities for local people, and providing support to individuals to maximise their potential for enterprise development and self-employment. This in turn will contribute to reducing overall levels of multiple-deprivation in the Borough. Promoting an entrepreneurial culture in Wigan will be a key objective. Stimulating the development of local businesses, in particular social enterprises and wider community businesses, and promoting self-employment is seen as crucial. Work to support existing SMEs will be undertaken, in particular to take advantage of ICT opportunities to grow and sustain their business. In addition, work will be undertaken to promote public procurement and procurement by the larger private companies, as a mechanism to support local business and social enterprise. This will build on progress already being made. The main outcome to deal with this issue is:

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•

Support the sustainable growth, and reduce the unnecessary failure, of locally owned business

•

Increasing entrepreneurial activity and supporting enterprise development.

Community Ambassadors The real key to success will be to ensure that local people from the deprived communities take maximum advantage of opportunities. Our key intervention to address this will be to deploy a number of Community Ambassadors. They will be recruited from within the local community, and will be tasked with doing everything possible to assist people to take full advantage of opportunities, to ensure that Wigan achieves ‘transformational’ change.

They will have a pro-active role in identifying people who could become community leaders and co-ordinators, and will facilitate the growth of strong networks and support infrastructure. They will also be trained to support agencies in dispelling some of the myths surrounding benefits and to provide initial support and advice to residents on their options. They will also focus on promoting self-employment as a viable career option. Community Ambassadors will be crucial in achieving both of Wigan’s high level outcomes, and in promoting the interventions that are noted below.

A series of other interventions have been developed to help us achieve our aim, and these have been aligned with the two high level outcomes we note. However, we recognise that issues cannot, and should not, be addressed in isolation, and interventions will inevitably cut across both of our high level outcomes to some extent.

1. Removing barriers to facilitate easier access to training and employment and promoting skills development

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Our LAA interventions will include:

The 'Engage' project. This will target those on Incapacity Benefit, to identify and alleviate their specific barriers to work and self-employment. It will focus on increasing motivation, self esteem and raising aspirations.

The Intermediate Labour Market will create opportunities for those who are workless, providing high quality, relevant vocational training and work experience to enable local people to access opportunities.

Community Transport. Poor local transport is a recognised barrier to training and employment. A pilot initiative to address this issue is already underway in Higher Folds and the results of this will inform future development of this intervention.

The New Employer Initiative will introduce Local Labour Agreements, and ensure effective liaison between the public sector and regeneration partners, including the private sector.

2. Increasing entrepreneurial activity and supporting enterprise development

Business start-up support. Whilst there is some support available for new start businesses in Wigan, this is limited in terms of numbers that can be supported, and the depth of support that can be offered. This intervention will offer a broader and deeper level of assistance than is currently offered.

Access to finance. This intervention will address the failure of the mainstream financial sector to adequately serve deprived and hard to reach communities. A Community Development Finance Institution will be developed to overcome the barriers faced by new businesses in deprived communities. It will offer additional services such as one to one counselling and business support and advice and will work closely with the business start up support.

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Community Property Ladder. This intervention will support new enterprise development through the creation of a cluster development of employment workspace to support new social enterprises and locally developed businesses.

The added benefits the LAA will bring

Implementation will be through a Commissioning process. This has not been used before in Wigan for economic regeneration, and it will enable us to extend partnerships with delivery agencies, encouraging and promoting joint working and utilising best practice techniques and delivery mechanisms from the region and beyond.

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Block: Economic Development and Enterprise Freedoms and Flexibilities required: These can be found overleaf Funding Streams Requested: These can be found in the next section Outcomes: 1. Reduce the level of worklessness. 2. Increase skill levels of the local population with clear reference to local business need. 3. Increasing entrepreneurial activity and supporting enterprise development. 4. Support the sustainable growth and reduce the unnecessary failure of locally owned business. Possible Indicators: Full details of the baseline, measures and stretch targets can be found overleaf. 1. Number of Incapacity Benefit Claimants who achieve sustained employment of at least 16 hours per week for 13 consecutive weeks. 2. Number of adults gaining a skills for life qualification 3. Number of adults gaining a full NVQ level 2/3 4. Number of New Business Start Ups supported through advice and training, who are successfully established (still in business after 12 months) 5. Number of businesses assisted to improve their performance 6. A reduction of at least 1.6% in the overall benefits claim rate for those living in the LA wards identified by DWP as having the worst labour market position by 2007/08. 7. A reduction of at least 1.6% in the difference in the overall benefit claim rate for those living in the LA wards identified by DWP as having the worst labour market position and England by 2007/08. Block: Funding Streams requested Allocation None to be pooled 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 Funding Streams aligned Neighbourhood Renewal, Objective 3 European Programme, Wigan MBC, Learning Skills Council, Job Centre Plus. Further details can be found in the following pages

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Outcomes, baseline measures and stretched targets No LAA LAA LAA/LPSA2 This would be our existing target for this area if we did not have LAA Our LAA target that does not trigger PRG. Our LAA target/LPSA2 target that triggers PRG

LAA/NRF

Our LAA target and mandatory Neighbourhood Renewal outcome

Outcomes 1. Reduce the level of worklessness Measures a) The number of Incapacity Benefit Claimants who achieve sustained employment of at least 16 hours per week for 13 consecutive weeks. Baseline 0. Number of Incapacity Benefit Claimants who achieve sustained employment of at least 16 hours per week for 13 consecutive weeks. 2006 No LAA LAA 50 2007 50 2008 50

Increasing entrepreneurial activity and supporting enterprise development. 2008 No LAA LAA 56

Support the sustainable growth and reduce the unnecessary failure of locally owned business. 2008 No LAA LAA 14.50%

Outcomes
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2. Increase skill levels of the local population with clear reference to local business need.

Baseline 0. Number of adults gaining a skills for life qualification 2007 No LAA LAA 90 2008 90

Baseline 0. Number of adults gaining a full NVQ level 2/3 2007 No LAA LAA Outcomes 3. Increasing entrepreneurial activity and supporting enterprise development. Measures Baseline 0. Number of New Business Start Ups supported through advice and training, who are successfully established (still in business after 12 months) 2007 No LAA LAA Outcomes 4. Support the sustainable growth and reduce the unnecessary failure of locally owned business. Baseline 0. Number of businesses assisted to improve their performance 2007 No LAA LAA 35 2008 10 40 2008 10 10 2008 10

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Funding streams and Freedoms and Flexibilities
Economic Development & Enterprise LSC Flexibility Required The LSC invests significant resources to support the delivery of national, regional and local targets. We will work in partnership with them to ensure the maximum level of funding will be aligned. Appendix 2 details additional interventions which we would undertake should extra resources become available, particularly Skills for Life and Train to Gain resources. Wigan’s Objective 2 Action Plan offers opportunities to align funding to meet LAA outcomes. We would like to use the first 6 months of the LAA to negotiate this grant funding to be aligned to meet LAA outcomes. Both the LSC and Job Centre Plus provide access to European Co-Finance funding but are undergoing review and change, and this may impact on the ability to access match funding to deliver interventions and projects. We would like to use the first year of the LAA to negotiate mainstream and grant funding to be aligned to meet LAA outcomes. Wigan plans to submit a LEGI proposal for resources in September 2006. This will enable Year 2 Year 3

Objective 2 (ERDF)

Objective 3 (ESF Co Finance)

Local Enterprise Growth

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Initiative (LEGI)

comprehensive delivery of Wigan’s Economic Development Plan, and will align with LAA outcomes. If successful, the additional LEGI resources would enable us to undertake more of the activities outlined in the LAA, but also to carry out additional interventions including: Creating Entrepreneurs, Enterprise Development in Schools, Public Sector Procurement (facilitating the procurement of delivery of public sector services via social enterprise), and encouraging Sector Development and Innovation. LEGI funding will enable us to deliver extra LAA outcomes in line with these interventions. Flexibility around capital and revenue splits, and carry over, criteria for funding streams to allow maximum effectiveness of spends. This is agreed for NRF resources but needs to be negotiated for match funding.

Capital and Revenue split

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Appendix A LSP Board

Local Strategic Management Group LSP Thematic Partnerships

Townships

LAA/NRF working group

NRF Community Engagement Working Group

Encompass

The proposed structure around the monitoring arrangements for the LAA and NRF. (Full details on page 30)

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Appendix B
Wigan South

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Appendix C Neighbourhood Renewal Areas

Ranking 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

Area Norley East Worsley Hall Worsley Hall North Marsh Green West Worsley Mesnes North Hag Fold North Scholes Scholes/Birkett Bank Westleigh East (Trees) Hag Fold South Plank Lane Beech Hill West Marsh Green East Higher Folds North Higher Ince Springfield/Wigan Town Centre Woodcock Drive Estate Shakerley Chapel Fields North Platt Bridge North East Lower Ince/Ince Green Lane Hag Fold West Railway Road/Twist Lane Warrington Lane/Darlington Street East Siddow Common Newtown Platt Bridge North Hag Fold East Higher Ince/Manchester Road Smithwood Lower Ince Westleigh West

% in England 1 1 1 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 10 10 10

Highlighted areas show our top 3% Super Output Areas.

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Wigan's 32 Super Output Areas

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Appendix D

Vulnerable Localities Index The Vulnerable Localities Index (VLI) is a police response to measuring community cohesion. It was developed jointly by the Central Police Training and Development Authority (Centrex) and the Jill Dando Institute for Crime Science. It followed in the wake of the riots that occurred during 2001 in Oldham, Burnley, Bradford and Wrexham as an attempt to predict areas where similar breakdowns in community cohesion might occur.

The index uses a broad range of data to do this, principally due to a need to apply a consistent methodology nationwide. This methodology needed to use data that would be easily accessible and usable (all data is calculated to census Output Area level), involve little or no training for the analysts expected to implement it, produce concise output for managers and be simple and practical to apply yet robust.

Six indices were included in the final set of data, split into four broad categories: Crime data Burglary in a dwelling Criminal damage in a dwelling Deprivation data Income deprivation Employment deprivation Education data Educational attainment below 5 GCSEs or equivalent at grades A*-C Demographic data Population of young people, ages 15-24

The combination of these indices produced an overall index that then identified the “most vulnerable” Output Areas within the Wigan Borough when measured in relation to each other.

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A look at those areas scoring 200 or more (i.e. those that are at least twice as vulnerable as the Wigan average) revealed few surprises in the localities identified. However, the VLI is purely a scanning tool and further evidence to support its findings is needed in order to implement actions in a more focussed manner.

In an attempt to fine-tune this, a further six indices have been calculated at a local level, an “Alternative VLI”, using data believed to be relevant to such an assessment. The six indices chosen were: Crime data Violence in a domestic setting Fire Service data Number of fire incidents At Risk Individuals data Location of individuals engaged with Probation Location of individuals engaged with Community Drugs Team (CDT) Deprivation data Health deprivation Demographic data Lone Parents in a household with dependent children

Using this Alternative VLI identified a number of similar priority areas. The index in this case had a much wider spread of scores due to the nature of some the data chosen. For example, offender data puts a heavy bias towards those areas with offenders as a large number of areas score zero due to no offenders being located there. This means that small numbers of offenders in a location have a large impact on the score. When the two scores are combined this helps to smooth some of the extremes generated by the Alternative VLI data but adds a sharper focus than the initial VLI scores. There is strong correlation between the two indices (Pearson’s R, 0.764, significant at the 0.01 level, 2-tailed) and 10 of the initial top 20 areas feature again in the alternative top 20.

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It will be useful to generate further indices to help give a fuller picture of the Wigan area. Data for consideration includes Ambulance incident data, Youth Offending Team home locations, Adult literacy levels, Housing stock information, Repeat Victimisation levels, ASBO/Contact Card counts and Detection rates. It is likely that a third VLI could be generated from such data and again be combined with the other scores to generate a further overall score to hopefully provide additional focus. The map below reflects the combined VLI using the twelve indices outlined earlier. Again, to practitioners within the Community Safety Partnership, the areas highlighted correlate strongly with traditional maps of the Borough’s chronic persistent hotspots. The index confirms (from the mix of causal/outcome themes) the areas where disproportionality exists. For information, the top 10 highest scoring areas have been highlighted, each of which score over 300.

Vulnerable Localities Index + Alternative Vulnerable Localities Index

There will obviously be different reasons behind each of the areas scoring highly and it will be useful to understand these reasons in attempting to tackle these areas. Similarly, there will be other partner agencies whose priority areas no doubt tie in with these areas to a greater or lesser degree. If this expected correlation exists, a real concentration of effort can be directed to those areas that need it the most and whilst some of these areas may always stay towards
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the top end of such indices, the challenge is to reduce the gap between them and the rest of the Borough.

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Appendix E Safer and stronger communities –maintenance and additionality indicators

Maintenance of current situation: • Numbers in treatment (across the whole system) - continue to report against but the LDP target would be a maintenance target only set at 04/05 level i.e. 1500. • • Waiting times - continue to report against. NTA targets across all six modalities apply. 12+ week retention - continue to report against. LDP target to remain i.e. 68% by 2007/08.

Additionality: • • Numbers in treatment within abstinence based service(s) (this measure would exclude NA clients) Average length of episode within abstinence based service(s) (both 'abstinence' measures would need a clear definition of what constitutes an active client). • • • • Numbers in treatment within primary care prescribing. Numbers in treatment within secondary care prescribing. Number of successful discharges, drug free, from both primary and secondary care prescribing. Monthly rate of representations to secondary care prescribing ('representations' defined as clients who present for treatment that have previously accessed local prescribing services. This client group would not include criminal justice referrals that re present but are already in treatment). • • • •
A

12+ week retention (across the whole system). Stretch target on the LDP - 70% by 2007/08. 12+week retention for prescribing services (primary and secondary care). Gender split of the in-treatment population. Numbers of current and ex users engaging in employment, training and education .

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Appendix F Healthier communities Current Smoking Cessation activity Smoking is one of the largest single causes of premature death in the UK and results in many life-limiting diseases, most commonly coronary heart disease and cancer. The PCTs smoking cessation service “Fresh Focus” monitors the number of people aged 15-74 years who successfully quit smoking at the 4-week follow up.

1-1 Clinics The Stop Smoking Service now offers fourteen 1-1 clinics at 10 locations throughout the Borough. 11 of these clinics are in 7 venues located in the 6 most deprived areas of the Borough. Extra activity is, therefore, being targeted at these wards. Once Primary Care smoking cessation is in place the 1-1 clinics will cater for people who require intense support.

Primary Care A great deal of work is being directed to providing intermediate advice in GP practices. There are development plans for GP practices to provide stop-

smoking services, including quotas and payments for 4 week follow up. Experience indicates that the practice nurse can be very influential in motivating attempts to quit smoking especially with patients on the chronic register. This is an on going project and at this time around 1/3 of the practices are providing advice. The service provides 1-1 advice, at a local venue, by somebody known to the patient. In addition, intermediate advisors are being trained, especially within community nursing sector.

Pharmacy Scheme This is a new scheme where by the pharmacist can give advice, provide (through a PGD) nicotine replacement (NRT) at prescription prices and give ongoing support for up to 12 weeks. This has proved very popular with the public and participating pharmacists are represented in the 6 most deprived areas, and all the superstores. This is particularly convenient to routine and manual workers (many of whom find it difficult to get time off to attend clinics) in that Pharmacies
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are open outside office hours, (late nights and weekends). This service provides 1-1 advice, at a local venue, by (possibly) somebody known to the patient.

Pregnancy Adviser The PCT has a pregnancy adviser who works for 2 days a week in Sure Start areas. Her caseload throughout the Borough is over represented by women from the 6 most deprived areas.

Hospital In-and outpatient stop smoking services are offered in the Royal Albert Edward Infirmary, with home visits for the latter.

Schools A pilot for smoking cessation is being offered in local schools.

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Appendix G LPSA 2 Summary LAA interim target for 2006 N/A 4.30 340 N/A LPSA Interim target for 2006 N/A 4.30 340 N/A LAA interim target for 2007 N/A 4.35 342 N/A LPSA interim target for 2007 N/A 4.35 342 N/A Target in LAA for March 2008 85.42% 4.40 345.00 27% Expected performance with LPSA for March 2008 90% 4.51 363.10 35% Additional stretch through LPSA 4.58% 0.11 18.10 8%

Target 1 - Healthy Schools Target 2 - Improving the academic attainment of boys Target 3 - Improving attainment at Key Stage 4 Target 4 - Improving the academic attainment of Looked After Children*
1. The % of looked after children that achieve level 4 or better in English at KS2. 2. The % of looked after children that achieve level 4 or better in Mathematics at KS4. 3. The % after children that achieve level 4 or better in Science at KS2. 4. The % of looked after children that achieve level 5 or better in English at KS3. 5. The % of looked after children that achieve level 5 or better in Mathematics at KS3. 6. The % of looked after children that achieve level 5 or better in Science at KS3.

7. The % of looked after children in year 11 that achieve 5 GCSEs at grades A*-C. 8. The % of looked after children who were looked after on 1 April in their 17th year (aged 16) who are engaged in education, training or employment

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at the age of 19 (PAF A4). 9. % of adoption orders, special guardianship orders and residence orders granted for children in care for a minimum of six months. Target 5 - Reducing incidents of BCS comparator crimes Target 6 - Reducing burglary Target 7 - Reducing smoking rates Target 8 - Increasing rates of physical exercise** The number of patients at health risk1 who do not undertake at least 30 minutes exercise on three or fewer days a week at the point of referral to Wigan Leisure and Culture Trust Active Living Team who, between the date of referral and 52 weeks later2, achieve a minimum increase in physical activity levels of at least 60 minutes per week. Target 9 - Reducing the number of unplanned hospital bed days Target 10 - People are able to get involved and influence** The number of new people recruited from "difficult to attract"* and/or "hard to reach"** groups who undertake formal volunteering, in groups, clubs or organisations for an average of 100 hours per 12 month period (an average of 2 hours per week), as measured by returns from Community and Voluntary Sector Groups in Wigan. * "Difficult to attract" groups for formal volunteering covers special constables; magistrates; victim support; prison visitors; trustees; school governors (including

18789 2208 2370 N/A

18742 2208 2370 N/A

17684 2067 2450 N/A

17640 2067 2450 N/A

16579 1930 2670 255 (Perfor mance without LPSA)

16538 1930 2730 405

41 0 60 150

103380 N/A

104712 13400

91622 N/A

101503 13800

91622 13000 (Perfor mance without LPSA)

91622 14200

0 1200

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fund raising, helping in school, running pupils’ clubs and mentoring); running evening classes; and mentoring ** "Hard to reach" groups who undertake formal volunteering covers people with no qualifications (unemployed); people from Black and Minority Ethnic communities; and people with disabilities or limiting long-term illnesses * In the LAA this target is only around KS3 English, Maths & Science. In the LPSA there are additional targets around KS2, KS4, EET and adoption orders, guardianship & residence orders. ** This is a new target different to the indicator within the LAA.

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APPENDIX H Annual Performance Summaries Children and Young People

To be added

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Healthier Communities

To be added

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Safer and Stronger Communities To be added

G/PPI Team/Support change & improvement/manage & support performance/LAA performance management/Reports

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