Curious Leaders Decision Making In High Performance Teams - Part Three

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					Curious Leaders Decision Making In High Performance Teams - Part Three
“Most discussions of decision making assume that only senior executives make decisions or that only senior executives' decisions matter. This is a dangerous mistake”.

Peter F. Drucker

Continuing with our question - ‘how do you elicit and manage divergent views’ we looked last time at Jung’s attitudinal preferences of Introversion & Extraversion and how they might affect communication in meetings. We outlined two questions: 1. Is the person in front of me an Introvert or an Extravert ?, and 2. Do they mostly have a Thinking preference or a Feeling preference? The answers determine and predict an accurate range of strengths and weaknesses and the manner in which views are expressed (or not). You were asked to pick two people you knew. 1. Your first question divided the circle vertically. ‘Am I looking at an Introvert or an Extravert?’ (which we covered in detail last time).

Introvert

Extravert

2. Question two - ‘Does this person have a Thinking Preference or a Feeling Preference?’

Thinking Preference

Feeling Preference
Question 2 divides the model horizontally. You will see why in a moment. You will also realise that this question is harder to answer than the more physically observable Introvert/Extravert, question 1.

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Someone with a Thinking Preference would have the following characteristics: formal, impersonal, analytical, detached, objective, strong-minded, competitive, correct, task and systems focused. Someone with a Feeling Preference would be seen as Informal, personal, considerate, involved, subjective, caring, accommodating, harmonious, relationships and morale focused. We all think and we all feel, of course, but we tend to ‘default’ to one position more than another in any decision making. The main thing to note is that neither position is right nor wrong and both have their relative strengths and weaknesses. The Feeling Preference person tends to have more empathy and sees the possible ramifications on all ‘people’ issues more clearly and faster than the Thinking Preference person, who is much more oriented to the importance of the task. Meetings or team decisions can stalemate when the preferences ‘collide’. We all want our doctor to be empathetic. He or she is more likely to truly understand our situation with more empathy present. However, take the ‘Triage’ concept first used in the Napoleonic wars. With limited resources, some medic must decide who of the seriously wounded not to treat. If the doctors and surgeons had felt tremendous empathy for each patient, they would not have been able to make the decision to abandon treatment when confronted by visible agony. In WW1, particularly, the system is credited with saving many, many thousands more lives than if it had not been used. To be able to make such decisions with true conviction, one has to make a task focused - ‘Thinking Preference’ - decision (sacrifice some for the sake of the majority). Many doctors, in fact, couldn’t and left such decisions to senior field surgeons. In less dramatic circumstances, you see the clash of the ‘Thinking’ v. ‘Feeling’ preferences in key meetings. A Thinking Preference will often have blind spots on the potential fall-out from people issues and the disruptions they can cause. A Feeling Preference will sometimes neglect the importance of the challenge at hand in favour of the people issues. We can tighten the predictability of decision making even further by ‘overlapping’ our circles. Let’s say you have decided that one of your chosen people for the exercise is an Introvert (Question1) with a Thinking Preference (Question 2).

Thinking Preference Introvert

IT

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Where the spheres overlap you now have a quadrant – called Jung’s Introvert Thinking type – ‘IT’ . In the next article, we’ll examine how you can predict in considerable detail the decision making and team meeting interactions and characteristics of people in this quadrant - and the remaining three. Until the next newsletter, Kind regards

Jay Hurwtiz www.teamssynergy.co.uk

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