'Why 6g A summary of the scientific evidence for the salt

Document Sample
'Why 6g A summary of the scientific evidence for the salt Powered By Docstoc
					'Why 6g, A summary of the scientific evidence for
the salt reduction target'
3 October 2005
MRC Human Nutrition Research today published an overview, Why 6g, A
summary of the scientific evidence for the salt reduction target aimed at health
professionals and science journalists. The publication summarises the evidence
behind the public health target to reduce salt intakes to 6g per day.
On average, adults in Britain consume 9.5g/d salt. Evidence from dietary surveys
show that at present only 15% of men and 31% of women consume 6g/d or less
of salt. A high dietary salt intake is associated with the development of high blood
pressure, a risk factor for stroke and coronary heart disease. A salt reduction
target of 6g of salt a day for adults by 2010 was set by the Government as a
challenging but achievable goal. It is estimated this will lead to a 13% reduction
in stroke and a 10% reduction in heart disease.
Author of the review, Dr Susan Jebb, MRC Scientist said, “In Britain, 32% of men
and 30% of women have hypertension or receive treatment for high blood
pressure. It is important for people to understand the links between salt and high
blood pressure and to recognise the importance of reducing salt intake as part of
broader lifestyle changes to decrease the risk of heart disease and stroke.”
For more information contact:
Dr Toni Steer or Nilani Sritharan (MRC Human Nutrition Research) on Cambridge
(01223) 426359
Why 6g, A summary of the scientific evidence for the salt reduction target was
funded by the Food Standards Agency and can be downloaded from
http://www.food.gov.uk/ or from The Medical Research Council, Human Nutrition
Research website: www.mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk. or directly here:
Why 6g, A summary of the scientific evidence for the salt reduction target (PDF
3.5mb)
A hard copy can be obtained by e-mail:Foodstandards@ecgroup.uk.com, please
state title of report or telephone: 0845 606 0667.




1