Microsoft Office Outlook - Memo Style - Get as PDF by luckboy

VIEWS: 44 PAGES: 2

More Info
									Tom Fernandez
From: Sent: Subject: Tom Fernandez [tom@tomfernandezproduction.com] Sunday, February 08, 2009 9:46 PM Alarm & Muster - Weekly Email - 2009.02.08

This past week I had an opportunity to meet someone who has never been to  America but wishes to in the near future.  And though our meeting spanned  the amount of time it took her to braid the hair of my new wife, the time we  spent talking was far more valuable than hours of conversation spent with an  average “dote.”      As many of you know, and perhaps some of you may not, I was married to my  beautiful sweetheart this past Saturday (January 31st) and left the following  day on a honeymoon to the Western Caribbean.  We visited the island of  Roatan (Honduras), Belize, and Cozumel, Mexico.  The time away was relaxing  and I feel that I caught up on some much needed rest; at least for another  year.  =)  While walking the “tourist portion” in Belize, vendors held out their goods for sale and solicited us to enter  their stores.  We kindly smiled and passed each of them while walking along the cobblestone walkway.  When we were  approached by a young woman asking for hair‐braiding, we immediately accepted (Darlene wanted her hair braided and  this was an opportunity; you can see her in braids below).    She quickly took us off the “beaten‐path” and we ended up in between two (2) small buildings on top of a pallet  carpeted by torn wallpaper and shaded by corrugated metal for a roof.  Not an appealing area at best but I kept my mind  open and put my faith in her (while remaining alert to our surroundings).  While braiding Darlene’s hair, I quickly  discovered just how educated she was.      I asked her for her name: “Erica she said, but everyone around here calls me Mama Dreads,” appropriate for the way  she had her hair.    I asked her about her education and how she knew English so well (she sounded like an American College Grad with top  grades in literature).  She was born speaking English she told me and though she had such a command over it, she had  no goals to pursue a graduates degree.  I eventually turned the conversation towards her native country (Belize) and its  political‐state.    She shared the history of their democracy and how they are free to vote for their Prime Minister and other public  officials. She even spoke of how everyone in Belize loves the government model of America and how they all love new  United States President, Barack Obama.  I finally asked her, “Are people allowed to own firearms in Belize?”  Her  immediate answer, “Oh no.  The government doesn’t let anyone own guns.  They try to put it into your head that  owning a gun is dangerous and only criminals own guns.”    She informed me that anyone caught with a firearm will serve a mandatory prison sentence yet voiced her frustration  that it only keeps the guns out of the law abiding citizens.  She said she even lived in a bad part of town and feared for  her safety so often that her cousin was going to help her get a pistol on the “black‐market” for her personal protection.   “But you’ll go to jail,” I said to her.      “I don’t care.  I’m 22‐years old and there’s a lot of bad men where I live.”  I felt courageous for this young woman.     

1

She continued by sharing with me the unjust encroachments of the government  but people can’t do anything about it.  Workers are deported from the country  for suggesting formations of a union.  Farms and ranches that might compete  with the government are shut down and the owners are pushed out of town by  the military and local law enforcement.      “Do they have guns?” I asked.      “Yes.  They’re the government!”  My heart filled with sorrow and I truly wanted  to cry.      She finished her braiding and I paid her the going rate and even tipped her an additional amount for the conversation.  I  encouraged her to go to school to better her education and seek to come to America and become a citizen; legally!       Brothers and sisters, I have come to this conclusion from a dream I had in the past two‐weeks and feel even more of a  conviction after speaking with this young woman from Belize.  It is not liberty if it is not whole.  It is not freedom if it is  not whole.  Even if a sliver of liberty is taken from the whole, then liberty altogether fails.  You cannot have freedom,  unless it is complete.  When Patrick Henry told the Virginia Convention in March, 1775, “give me liberty or give me  death,” I really don’t think he was looking for a negotiated freedom.  He wanted it all; unbroken, unfettered, and with no  strings attached.  Said he, “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery?  Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!”    I stand with him in saying, “Forbid it.  In the name of our Heavenly Father, forbid it!”    Each of you enjoy this upcoming week and look for additional updates as to an introduction to a West United States POC  and for those of you who already know your Regional POC, additional contacts are going to be made as the week  progresses.    May our Father in Heaven have mercy on each of us as we appeal unto Him for our redresses.    Humbly your friend,   

___________ Tom Fernandez North Port, Sarasota County, Florida Email: Tom@TomFernandezProduction.com Cell: 941.626.8933 (accepts text, picture, and video)  

2


								
To top