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Digital Cultural Heritage_ Networked Virtual Museums and Memory

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					Digital Cultural Heritage: Networked Virtual Museums and Memory Institutions1

by

Dr. Hatto Fischer Athens 21.11.2004

Working Paper for the HERMES Project Volos Status: draft

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The title is taken from announcements by the Maastricht McLuhan Institute (MMI), AmsterdamMaastricht Summer Unversity (AMSU), Maastricht 10 – 13 July 2002

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer Contents

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0. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Introduction basic trends since 2002 key persons involved key terms potentialities of the virtual world link to world portal for cultural heritage case studies cultural innovation three kinds of memory institutions: museums, library, archive issues and philosophical questions in view of these developments

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer Introduction

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―All over the world, the titles and contents of the great libraries, museums and art galleries are becoming available on-line. While interoperable, technological standards are emerging, problems of interoperable applications, tools, interfaces and usability remain.‖ 2 Museums were considered in the past often as places where time slept in the corner and cobwebs would cover half closed windows at the back, if only to be startled if someone unexpected wandered off the street to find another time still breathing the air of back then, when it all began and happened. The visitor could expect a different world from what he or she sees normally once outside again in the streets. Still museums are very much like streets of a magical world. They take the visitor down memory lane and allow thus for flashbacks independent from where the visitor stands. It could be 1945, 1967, 2000 or 2004, but, so the startling assumption, the look back will always be the same as if it was the role of the museum to preserve in order to allow a glance in the rear mirror as civilization continues to drive on and has by now entered the 21st century. But is it really so that a presentation of a certain time period shall always remain the same? And only our perspectives change as we search in the past for possible answers that we do not have in the present? Without wishing to distract, entering any museum is following this peculiar time line the moment you climb the stairs and enter the front hall, the welcoming area where visitors are greeted but also seen off once they are ready to leave that building after having made that journey. It is a journey of varied experiences. Some would compare it to Alice in the Wonderland, others to a mystical ride by means of their imagination but also what causes such hallucination. For instance, the Heritage Museum in Ottawa, Canada devotes one space completely to the life of one Indian tribe in their village. The amazing reconstruction which takes the visitor into this other world suggests certain dexterity is needed to entertain the thought of difference between curators, museum experts, exhibition constructors etc. and people visiting that particular space. It can be a grandmother with her grandchildren overseeing their way of seeing and imagining what Canada was like when only Indians lived on this land. Together it combines, however, with what stories are being told today such as Indians having a great wisdom with regards to nature compared to yesterday when children were led to believe Indians are ‗no good‘, they only drink, squander their land and end up in jail for having become aggressive against other people. The story to be told goes with what is being done in reality when it comes to treating Indians as distinct people with their own culture and customs, rituals and abilities. A museum may give recognition to their achievements but in reality they may be more than just mistreated as if discarded by history. The moment the story to be told no longer follows a strict line but begins to be problematic, then, of course, further aspects would be needed: documentation and such narratives that tell what has really become of them. Therefore, a museum has here to be already a departure point for following up more questions and viewpoints about this subject matter.
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announcement by the Maastricht McLuhan Institute (MMI) for Amsterdam-Maastricht Summer Unversity (AMSU), Maastricht 10 – 13 July 2002

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The demands upon any modern museum are, therefore, by all means not easy. The way the presentation is limited then to just signs of inhabitation that are the evidence of the existence of this Indian tribe, this then is a part of the focus and delineation from other contexts of understanding. A natural presentation goes hand in hand with other aspects such as trees, rock formations, types of birds and animals nearby all to substantiate that look of the one Indian standing up on a rock and seeing down below how people unload a canoe. If the tale does continue, then because the artifacts used in the exhibition allow the imagination of the visitor to slip into that scene and continue the story without a script. In terms of the lay-out of the exhibition, there must be another place for the imagination able to land like the eagle. And there is the tent out of which comes the smoke and in front of which children gather to watch a young man paint the dance of the rattlesnake on his shield. A lot of what we know in the present stems from what has been handed down from one generation to the next while new discoveries were made along the way. The Indian exhibition in the Canadian Heritage Museum in Ottawa, Ontario is more so than ever also an expression of several policy principles. They combine with a new way of making the museum become not a collection of cobwebs but as part of living history it wishes to come to terms with people caring about past, present and future. At this point, it is not so important to analyze at this point the way an exhibit is constructed in the museum but for the sake of becoming conscious of the official policy behind a museum and its exhibitions, several levels come to mind:   the federal level of wishing to preserve and to promote Canada‘s cultural heritage changes in museum policy on how to cover and to expand areas exhibited so as to include things neglected and therefore not passed on as much as it should have been the case when it comes to learning from Indians on how to live with nature city policy towards cultural tourism and specifically what will attract visitors to the city for purpose of extended visits and experiences made in conjunction with a multiple offer by institutions to make that stay worthwhile cultural rights policies in the making as a way of also overcoming the neglect of culture at the margins of societal and economic life so as to ensure consistency in identities and to give recognition to their existence

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In that respect a lot has changed in Canada since the world exhibition was held in Montreal 1967 where there was devoted for the first time next to the Canadian pavilion an extra one for Indians. Now this example tells a great deal about linking up the museum with what happens in real life. A very natural way of presenting things is, of course, also the way the story can be told. Crucial is that means for presentation do not exceed or alienate visitors‘ own sense perceptions. But once a self convincing logic is applied to make this make-belief model of a village into a strong message as to what does exist just outside the building located at the Ottawa River vis a vis Parliament and despite of official governmental policy, then the museum is an opening for mediation between facts and fictions, claims and history, legends and stories. What will live on, what shall be forgotten, that cannot be the orientation in the present and yet the many varied currents affecting how things will turn out to be is more than just following the flow of the river or going upstream to the very source.

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In that sense, ‗the power of the real exhibit‘ limits and strengthens at the same time the language of the imagination. Once, however, the museum enters the virtual world and opens up still newer possibilities of presenting materials by which the story can be told, then a contrast begins to exist in this and every world. The virtual world will deviate from how things were presented as long as emphasis was given to the most natural means i.e. no technology, just real existing artifacts such as a tent, canoe, paddle, a shield with the design of the rattle snake on it. So when it comes to decide about use of the new media in museums, then a very different model of experience applies and the level of seeing changes. A visitor can visualize things through contrasts between seeing and images conjured up on the monitor screen. Then, while gathering in data as much as sense experiences by going through an exhibition with multiple levels of seeing, hearing, recording etc., the museum must clear about its various and different portals to new experiences. For the ‗virtual world‘ is like having a new horizon hovering over an elongated street stretching into the far distant future. Indeed, the use of the new media introduces notions of the future into what can be shown to have existed in the past. And the emphasis upon the authentic shifts towards the dominance of images conjured up by means of light and speed. This rush of images is above all an attempt to bring back the imagination from the future into the present. If done well, then the museum can open up new possibilities to explore not only the past but a still unknown future.

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer 1. basic trends since 2002

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Improvements in web based information systems reflect the progress made in the digitalization of cultural heritage and cultural artifacts. With it comes better presentation of virtual worlds linked to interesting exhibition models developed to serve as bridge between the ‗virtual‘ and the ‗real‘ 3(Peter Higgins). As part of a cultural infrastructure, web based experiences aim to expand the horizon and scope of museums while attracting visitors over these websites to come and to see in reality what the museum or cultural space has to offer. Agendas In looking at the calendar, conferences indicate relevant topics and / or trends in view as to what is being asked by the European Commission, national or local / regional governments, museums themselves and by users of all kinds in response to what technical innovations bring about changes in communication, archiving things and presentation. At a conference on ‗culture and technology‘ held in London, July 2003, there were presented a range of discussion and research papers reflecting state of the art, current issues of book preservation and archiving, ‗intelligent cultural heritage‘, virtual worlds etc. A full range of these topics will need to be examined and taken further in terms of relevance for pending decisions on how to plan the future of museums challenged but also enriched by these new possibilities.4 A more recent overview of conferences being held on this subject matter gives a further indication as to current trends. Of interest here is the concern for ‗memory‘ and what goes with the new data base, knowledge management systems and ways of not merely preserving but presenting materials. Computer simulations of ancient theatres just as much as ‗inter-librarian‘ loans when everything is available on-line makes the entire museum landscape both more accessible and challenging. November 2004 10-11 November 2004 The future of Memory: preservation of culture in the digital world Torino, Italia This convention, organised by the CSI-Piemonte Technical Scientific Committee, will focus on exploring the way in which technical evolution is changing the processes of conservation, diffusion and transmission of knowledge. Three interdisciplinary work sessions will analyse the technically problematic areas, the social implications of ICT innovations, the changes in traditional professions (archivists, historians, librarians) and the juridical See lecture by Peter Higgins, How museums fit into the cultural landscape In a review of the presentation made by Peter Higgins Land Design Studio, UK in ―About modern museums‖ as Advise to the City of Volos, 11.6.2004. Review paper is part of the Volos HERMES project by Hatto Fischer Athens June 2004 4 See Annex 2: CULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY – lectures / research papers EVA Conference 'Culture x Technology' Across Europe & Internationally The following papers are being presented at the Institute of Archaeology UCL, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, 21st – 29th July 2003
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repercussions. The European Commission, Directorate-General Information Society will be represented by Patricia Manson, Head of Unit Technology-enhanced Learning; Cultural Heritage. 15-16 November 2004 Community Memory in the World Belgrade, Serbia This is the last of two Balkan workshops organised by CALIMERA. It addresses country co-ordination groups, national representatives and industry participants in the 'Balkan' countries. The workshops intends to demonstrate and raise awareness of core technologies for local services, understand the nature of local conditions and barriers to be overcome and to facilitate active participation in the Sixth Framework programme. Contact: Breda.Karun@nuk.uni-lj.si & ninkovnj@eunet.yu 15-17 November 2004 IST 2004 - Participate in Your Future The Hague, Netherlands This year's IST event is designed in cooperation with the Dutch Presidency of the European Union. It includes a conference, an exhibition of research results and networking facilities. DigiCult will be present with several projects in the exhibition and with a round table workshop on 'Interactive Living Heritage', coordinated by CALIMERA, and with a networking session on 'Access to and preservation of cultural and scientific resources' as strategic objective of the IST work programme 2005-2006. For more information please download the overview of the programme dedicated to DigiCult and TeLearn activities (PDF, 260KB) European Workshop on the Integration of Knowledge, Semantics and Digital Media Technology 25-26 November 2004 London, UK This conference plays host to the launch of the revised work programme for the fourth and fifth calls of FP6. The commission representatives will be available in the afternoon of the 1st and 2nd day, for bilateral talks with prospective IST project proposers. Contact: E paola.hobson@motorola.com W http://ewimt.qmul.net 29 November-3 December 2004 EVA 2004 Moscow Moscow, Russian Federation The topics of the conference are: Russian and international programmes & projects, international co-operation, presentation of the EC FP6 projects, information society

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technologies in museums, galleries, libraries, archives, contemporary art, from information society to knowledge society, digitisation of and access to cultural and scientific heritage, multilingual access to information, legal issues, technologies, standards & meta-data, digital heritage preservation and long-term access, new services for citizens and culture and business. Organized by the Centre on the Problems of Information in the sphere of Culture of the Ministry of Culture of Russia (Centre PIC), The State Tretyakov Gallery and EVA Conferences International Participating DigiCult projects are CALIMERA and MINERVA Contact: CENTRE PIC T/F +7 (0)95 940 0284 E nbrakker@evarussia.ru W www.evarussia.ru December 2004 1-2 December 2004 ECHOLOT - 2004 The Fourth International Conference - Audiovisual Heritage: Culturology, Archiving, New Technologies Moscow, Russia The conference is organised by the Russian Ministry of Culture, under the aegis of the Ministry of Culture and Mass Communications of the Russian Federation, the Federal Agency of Culture and Cinematography and the Russian Committee of the "Information for All" UNESCO Programme. Main Topics:  Audiovisual culture and audiovisual collections: problems and perspectives,  The place of audiovisual collections in the world cultural heritage,  Audiovisual culturology and art - on disks, on the screen, on the radio, on the Internet,  Intangible cultural heritage preservation (language, traditions, folklore.),  Actual problems of audiovisual materials collecting, preservation, description and use,  Audiovisual heritage and IST,  New technologies and audiovisual heritage preservation and restoration,  Access to audiovisual heritage; standards and meta-data,  Organisational and legal problems of audiovisual heritage publications,  Inter-sector, inter-regional and international co-operation. The conference is designed for researchers, specialists and administration of archives, museums, libraries, theatres, cinema studios, audio studios, radio, TV, creative unions and professional associations, research centres and Universities, mass media professionally interested in the conference topics. Contact: Centre on the Problems of Informatisation of Culture of the Ministry of Culture of Russia (Centre PIC) T/F +7 (0)95 940 0284 E nbrakker@evarussia.ru W www.echo-net.ru/eng

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer 7-10 December 2004 VAST 2004 -

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Interdisciplinarity or “The Best of Both Worlds”: The Grand Challenge for Cultural Heritage Informatics in the 21st Century The 5th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology and Cultural Heritage.
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Incorporating: Second Eurographics Workshop on Graphics and Cultural Heritage (www.eg.org) Location: Conscience-auditorium, Brussels and Ename Center, Oudenaarde Belgium

The 5th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology and Cultural Heritage is being organised by the EPOCH Network of Excellence in collaboration with the Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage Presentation. It will focus on interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary research interests including those of monuments, sites and museums as manifest in the EPOCH Network, covering every phase of the cultural heritage informatics, from initial data capture to information processing, and the dissemination of results to the scientific community and the general public. This year‘s VAST Symposium will be dedicated to the theme:
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Data Capture and Processing Data Management Standards and Documentation Innovative Graphics Applications and Techniques Digital Reconstructions and Visualisation Archaeological Analysis and Interpretive Design Interactive Environments and applications The Economics of Cultural Informatics and Tourism Story-telling and design of heritage communications Novel internet applications in heritage Usability, effectiveness and interface design for heritage applications Cultural Informatics Education and Training Professional and Ethical Guidelines

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer January 2005

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1-5 January 2005 A Defining Moment: Museums at the Crossroads AAM (American Association of Museums) Annual Meeting & Museum Expo 2005 Indianapolis, USA Contact: T +1 202 289 9113 E annualmeeting@aam-us.org W www.aam-us.org/am/ 20-21 January 2005 A New Kind of Access Copenhagen, Denmark This policy workshop aims to develop a closer co-operation between local archives, museums and libraries in the digital era. The workshop will deal with best practice and national tools and policies to create a new kind of access, and it is directed at agencies, councils, ministries and similar national bodies in charge of museums, archives and libraries. The workshop will be organised jointly by the Danish National Library Authority - in its capacity as a CALIMERA project-partner - and NAPLE. NAPLE (a forum of national authorities on public libraries in Europe). CALIMERA is an IST funded EU-project aimed at developing closer cooperation between archives, museums and libraries in the digital era, with special focus on the needs of the end-user. It involves 42 countries throughout Europe. Museums and the Web 2005 13-16 April 2005 Vancouver, Canada Museums and the Web addresses the social, design, technological, economic, organizational and cultural issues of culture and heritage on-line. Taking an international perspective, senior speakers with extensive experience in Web development review and analyse the issues and impacts of networked cultural and natural heritage, and look ahead to the transformation of communities and organizations. Contact: T +1 416 691 2516 F +1 416 352 6025 E mw2005@archimuse.com W www.archimuse.com/mw2005/

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer 2. Experts MLA, UK

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Mrs Batool Khan Team Coordinator Museums Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) 16 Queen Anne's Gate London SW1H 9AA Tel: 0207 273 1465 Fax: 0207 273 1404 Email: batool.khan@mla.gov.uk Website: www.resource.gov.uk

Henrietta Hopkins - she worked for 15 years for the international policy making section of Resource or known as: Museums & Galleries Commission (now called the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) - has set up with Anita van Mil, formerly of the Dutch Museums Association, the Hopkins van Mil consultancy supporting museums in the international work and marketing programmes.

Proposal by Yiorgos Papakonstantinou A. Vassilis Bourdakis, architect, studies in Greece and UK, specialized in the design of virtual environments, vas@prd.uth.gr. He is the one in charge of the Argo project that you have seen Aggelos Floros, architect with studies in Greece and USA, specialized in the design of interactive environments, agelosfloros@hotmail.com Spyros Papadopoulos, architect-director, with studies in Greece and Spain, specialized in the production of films and interactive multimedia, spap@tee.gr Alexis Psichoulis, an artist that has produced many interactive installations and artistic CD-ROMS, psycool@uth.gr

B. In the department of History (IAKA) - Dimitris Bilalis, historian specialized in the organization of internet sites and the search of historic information in the Web, has worked in the Foundation of Hellenic World (IME), mbilalis@uth.gr

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Themis Dallas, computer scientist specialized in the internet design

C. Ioulia Pentazou (wife of D.Bilalis) is a historian, has worked in the Foundation of Hellenic World (IME). She is the best interactive scenarios writer in Greece. pentazou@yahoo.com New technologies specialists in Greece: - Panayiotis Kyriakoulakos, specialized in 3D modeling and multimedia productions, manager of Post-Reality, teaches in the Department of Multimedia of the Aegean University in Syros. He is in charge of several interactive projects concerning Ancient Olympia. pank@aegean.gr - Maria Roussou, specialized in interactive production and virtual environments. She was responsible for the creation of a CAVE environment in the Foundation of Hellenic World (IME). She is still collaborating with IME but she has formed her one firm: www.makebelieve.gr - Chryssa Kontaki, computer scientist, she is in charge of the electronic editions of the Benaki Museum - Dimitris Xaritos, architect-musician, specialized in the design of interactive virtual environments, teaches in the MME Department of the University of Athens, virtual@media.uoa.gr - Aigli Dimoglou has mentioned a woman that is in head of the technological museum of Patras. Specialists in France: - Stephane Singier, architect and multimedia envirinments designer, has worked several times with museums, stephane.singier@wanadoo.fr. I have a demonstration video-tape with his works that I will bring you next time we meet. - Xavier Perrot, specialized in interactive applications in museums, www.ichim.org

Patricia Manson - works for the European Commission, Directorate-General Information Society and is Head of Unit Technology-enhanced Learning; Cultural Heritage (2004). Dr. Kim H. Veltman - Scientific Director of the Maastricht McLuhan Institute - Co-ordinator of European Network of Centres of Excellence in Digital Cultural Heritage - Cross cultural studies, Ph.D. in history and philosophy - Work on history of perspective and Leonardo da Vinci Amsterdam-Maastricht Summer University P.O. Box 53066 1007 RB Amsterdam Tel. +31 20 620 02 25 FAX +31 20 624 93 68 www.amsu.edu

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer Abdelaziz Abid -

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studied at University of Tunis and University of Montreal, Canada Masters degree in Library and Information Science Served as Secretary General of the National Library of Tunesia 1976 joined UNESCO as expert and later as chief technical advisor of the UNDP funded project of the School of Library and Information Science (Rabat, Morocco) 1985 joins UNESCO‘s headquarters In charge of ―Memory of the World‖ program and projects related to libraries and access to information Coordinates joint IFLA/UNESCO library and information work

Francesca Bocchi Prof. of Medieval History at University of Bologna Prof. of Urban History at the IULM University (Milan) Currently Italian representative on the Commission Internationale pour l‘Histoire des Villes President of the Italian Committee of Cultural Heritage (UNESCO) Co-director of the Atlante Storico delle Citta Italiene National coordinator for the research project (40% funding) on the Atlanti storici delle citta italiance Head of the NuME project (New Electronic Museum of the City – Bologna)

Eelco Bruinsma independent multi-media developer, interface designer and consultant since 1996 lectured in Computing in the Humanities at Leiden University (1997 – 2000) served as director of the Netherlands Digital Heritage Association (DEN) (1999) worked on the TaskForce eCulture that wrote the eCulture vision-document for State Secretary for Culture van der Ploeg member of numerous juries to assess the quality of educational and general digital heritage projects co-ordinator of the NOW ICES-KIS consortium co-ordinator and editor of the Dutch national pages following the Lund principles

Anne Van Camp currently Manager of Member Initiatives for the Research Libraries Group, Inc. (RLG), an international consortium of over 160 research institutes was director for 8 years of Archives of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University Vice President for Information Services at the Chase Manhattan Bank Currently serving on the Historical Advisory Committee for the US State Department Fellow of the Society of American Archivists

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David Green executive director of the National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage (www.ninch.org), a membership coalition to bring together libraries, museums, universities, arts centers to work together in creating a more integrated networked cultural heritage

Maruja Gutierrez-Diaz currently head of the new Multimedia unit of the DG for Education and Culture joined the European Commissionin1988, as specialist in the introduction and promotion of new technologies, and is in charge of the eLearning initiative served as Deputy Head of the Central Library, in charge of its modernization and networking and later as head of the Publications Unit, as member of the Europe server launching team and of its interinstitutional editorial board before joining the Commission she worked as consultant and as Head of the Centre for Information and Documentation of the Madrid Metropolitan Area, in charge of both technical and citizen orientated information systems

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Cary Karp Director of the Internet Strategy and Technology at the Swedish Museum of Natural History and for the International Council of Museums (ICOM) Since 1980‘s participated in numerous projects intended to establish a position for the museum community on the international digital communication networks President and CEO of the Museum Domain Management Association (MuseDoma) which is responsible for the newly established museum top-level domain on the Internet

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Christian Lahanier currently Head of the Documentation and Imaging Technologies Department at the Centre of Research and Restoration of the Museums in France Ph.D. in Physics From 1968 managed Department of Physics at LRMF and developed X-ray technologies for 15 years As Head of the Laboratory at LRMF in 1984, he set up the acquiring of a particle accelerator for non-destructive material analysis From 1989 – 2002 he managed or contributed to 10 RTD EU projects: VASARI, NARCISSE, VISEUM, MENHIR, ACOHIR, CRISTSAL, ARTISTE, CRISATEL, CHERI and SCULPTEUR He worked to set-up new 2D and 2D digital technologies, relational data-base management systems at the C@RMF to give access, through a multilingual

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thesaurus, to the rich scientific documentation containing 250 000 photo archives and 10 000 analytical and restoration reports He contributed to CD Rom and multimedia products to diffuse in exhibitions, and synthesis of research made on works of Art

Christian Lahanier
Laboratoire de recherche des musées de France 6, Rue des Pyramides Paris 75001 France

www.archimuse.com/ichim03/bios/au_2932.html

Paul Miller holds the post of Interoperability Focus at UKOLN which is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC – www.jisc.ac.uk) of the United Kingdom‘s Further and Higher Education Funding Councils, and by Resource, the Government agency responsible for libraries, museums and archives (www.resource.gov.uk) currently responsible for encouraging and facilitating the development of interoperable solutions across a range of domains, principally museums, libraries, archives and government sits on a wide range of committees and working groups e.g. executive committees of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI – www.dublincore.org) and CIMI Consortium (CIMI – www.cimi.org)

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Bernard Smith studied applied physics in the UK and was researcher in nuclear centres in Italy, Germany and France, before joining the European Commission in 1981 since with the European Commission‘s information and technology programmes, he has been Head of Unit of Cultural Heritage Applications in the Information Society Directorate General in 1993 and 1999 interests are new technologies, cultural and scientific heritage resources and institutions, digitization policies and programmes, digital library research and increasingly digital preservation issues he is a member of INMM, IEEE and ACM

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Manfred Thaller senior research fellow at Max Planck Institute for History since 1978 responsible for design and implementation of a general database orientated programming system for history (CLIO/KLEIO), which was the first software for the treatment of historical archives and documents conducted research on a general methodology of historical computer scienc

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research director at the Humanities Information Technologies Centre at the University of Bergen - currently teaches at the University of Cologne as Professor of Cultural Heritage Computer Science Address: Manfred Thaller University of Cologne thaller@spinfo.uni-koeln.de Patricia Young rejoined the Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN) as Manager of Professional Programs in January 1999 she is responsible for various professional resources, documentation standards, and skills development responsible for Find A Museum, Calendar of Events, Image Gallery, and Teachers‘ Centre of the new public Web site launched in march 2001 called the ―Virtual Museum of Canada‖ from 1990 – 1996 Pat held positions as Chief of Business Development and Chief of Documentation Research with CHIN from 1996 – 1998 Pat was Head of the Vocabulary Program with the Getty Information Institute active member of the International Committee for Documentation of ICOM and held position of Chair from 1998 – 2001, and Secretary from 1995 - 1998

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Trine Nielson TNI@bs.dk www.calimera.org Organises in January 2005 conference on ―gaining access‖ – policy questions with regards to digitalisation of museums, libraries and archives (connected to the Danish library system) Peter Higgins Land Design Studios 7, Blake Mews Kew Richmond-upon-Thames Surrey TW9 3QA Tel. +44 (0)20 8332 6699 e-mail: peter@landdesignstudio.co.uk www.landdesignstudio.co.uk archive of HERMES – Volos: How museums fit into the cultural landscape A review of the presentation made by Peter Higgins, Land Design Studio, UK ―About modern museums‖: as advise to the City of Volos as part of the HERMES project – Hatto Fischer, Athens 11. June 2004

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer 3. Key terms Knowledge management Virtual and imaginary museums Mega bites, gigabytes Superposition Interactive techniques Museum world Video games Networked websites New broadband networks Cultural heritage Linux database Production street for the digital library Online data base Digitalization Podcasting From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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Podcasting is a way of publishing sound files to the Internet, allowing users to subscribe to a feed and receive new audio files automatically. Podcasting is distinct from other types of audio content delivery because it uses the RSS 2.0 protocol. This technique has enabled many producers to create self-published, syndicated radio shows. Users subscribe to podcasts using "podcatching" software (also called "aggregator" software) which periodically checks for and downloads new content. It can then sync the content to the user's portable music player, hence the portmanteau of Apple's "iPod" and "broadcasting". Podcasting does not require an iPod; any digital audio player or computer with the appropriate software can play podcasts. Contents [hide] 1 History 1.1 Origin of podcasting 1.2 Origin of the word 2 Unique attributes 2.1 Differences from traditional broadcasting 2.2 Differences from other forms of online audio 3 Radio stations 4 See also 5 External links [edit]

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer History [edit] Origin of podcasting

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By 2003, a number of blogs already published audio online, and the RSS protocol was widely used for summarizing or syndicating content. Using RSS, former NPR host Christopher Lydon attached audio files to his weblog. Lydon's full-length interviews, which focused on blogging and coverage of the 2004 U.S. presidental campaigns, helped to inspire Adam Curry's iPodder script. Indeed, blogs would become an important factor in the popularization of podcasting. [edit] Origin of the word One of the first uses of the term "podcasting" was in an article in The Guardian [1] (http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,1145689,00.html) on February 12, 2004, though it didn't detail the RSS protocol or automatic synchronization. In September of that year, Dannie Gregoire used the term to describe the automatic download and synchronization idea that Adam Curry had developed [2] (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ipodder-dev/message/41). Gregoire had also registered multiple domain names associated with podcasting. That usage was discovered and reported on by Curry and Dave Slusher of the Evil Genius Chronicles website. [edit] Unique attributes [edit] Differences from traditional broadcasting Unlike radio or streaming media, podcasts are time-shifted, meaning that listeners have control over when they hear the recording. This has disadvantages, since podcasts cannot have live participation or reach large audiences as quickly as radio can. However, podcasting has one significant advantage over traditional methods of broadcasting -- it allows individuals to easily transmit content worldwide without the need for expensive equipment or licenses. [edit] Differences from other forms of online audio Podcasting differs from broadcasting and webcasting in the way that content is transmitted. Instead of a central audio stream, listeners download audio files remotely and automatically. Podcasts can also include metadata such as dates, titles, and descriptions. Podcasting differs from autocasting in terms of content; podcasts are generally voice broadcasts while autocasting is a speech-synthesized version of

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regular text blogs. Audioblogs can be easily made into podcasts if they add support for RSS to facilitate automatic retrieval. [edit] Radio stations Some radio stations have begun to find podcasting suited to their style of programming. Some examples:
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In the U.S., on October 4, 2004, Leo Laporte began re-broadcasting his KFI Los Angeles radio show as a podcast feed, apparently one of the first to do so. In 2005 the trend began to go the other way: In San Francisco, a poorly performing Infinity Broadcasting-owned radio station, KYOURadio, began broadcasting podcasts made by listeners in May, while Adam Curry hosts a program on Sirius Satellite Radio discussing and airing podcasts. In Canada, CBC Radio One is experimenting with the format. Corus Entertainment radio stations across Canada are also providing podcasts for specialty shows. In Australia, the ABC's Radio National and Triple J Networks are making a number of programs available. Cyber Shack offers each week's show on their podcast page. In Spain, private radio station Cadena Ser is podcasting many programs. In the UK, the BBC has launched a download and podcasting trial. In Sweden, the public radio operator Sveriges Radio has started to podcast programs.

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[edit] See also
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media RSS Category:Podcasts

[edit] External links
 

What is Podcasting? (http://www.ipodder.org/whatIsPodcasting) at iPodder.org Podcasting VODcasting whitepaper (http://edmarketing.apple.com/adcinstitute/wpcontent/Missouri_Podcasting_White_Paper.pdf) at apple.com (PDF file)

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podcasting"

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer 4. Potentialities of the virtual world

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While the focus shall be on recent developments concerning virtual and imaginary museums, there needs to be noted that museums should not be seen as completed end products after a period of time has finished. Instead museums must open up themselves to an ongoing learning process and facilitate that society and individuals can deal with the numerous issues facing people in future compared to what they had to deal with in the past. That symmetrical reflection of present to future anticipation is the yearning people have about wishing to know what will come next. They will want to know where all these developments shall lead up to. In order to be able to judge these contemporary developments they need a compass and some other tools for measuring from the past. The potentialities of the virtual world are huge but can also be misleading. The latter issues shall be discussed at the end of this study. Right now here the focus will be on the positive aspects or what creates at first an excitement in the atmosphere surrounding the creation of these new kinds of museums. ―In the early 1990‘s virtual museums typically entailed images of a few paintings in the context of a Quick Time reconstruction of museum rooms. In the meantime the size of scanned images typically ranges from 30MB to Gigabytes. Reconstruction include not only cultural objects and museums but archaeological sites, sections of cities which in rare cases are linked with satellite photographs of entire territories. The advent of augmented reality allows a superposition of such models of real landscapes. New interactive techniques are leading to new links between the museum world, video games, interactive public games and even films. Networked websites and new broadband networks for education and tourism are being discussed.‖5

5

Digital Cultural Heritage IV: Networks Virtual Museums and Memory Institutions, AMSU, Amsterdam 2002 www.amsu.edu

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5. Link to world portal for cultural heritage As part of international developments, there needs to be both examined and taken into further consideration the ―dramatic rise of museum web sites and discussion of broadband networks‖. ―Thanks to the efforts of UNESCO and ICOM, there is an emerging world portal for cultural heritage.‖ ―The efforts of the European Commission are leading to new tools for museums and digital culture as a whole.‖ Reports about these three aspects need to be made in order to assess state of the art, international co-operation in this field and potential funding possibilities for ongoing work e.g. EU funds for digitalization of culture.

European Commission

News
eContentplus - online digital content fuelling the EU's information needs Online digital content is an increasingly important source of information, education and entertainment. This allows the Internet to open exciting opportunities for citizens and for business. The European Commission proposed on 13 February 2004 a new programme - eContentplus (2005-2008) - to support key content areas so that these opportunities are accessible to all Europeans. eContentplus builds on the previous eContent programme (2001-2004), which helped to develop a then embryonic digital content market. The text of the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council is available below. The Commission proposal was analysed by the European Parliament and Council ('Codecision procedure'). The first reading was completed by the Parliament in April 2004, while the Council adopted its common position in September 2004. Currently, the second reading is on-going. The proposal is called ‘Proposal for a Decision of the european parliament and of the council establishing a multiannual Community programme to make digital content in Europe more accessible, usable and exploitable - eContentplus(2005 - 2008)' Please see Cordis website: www.cordis.lu/ist/directorate_e/telearn/econtentplus.htm EPSS - Electronic Proposal Submission System Due to a planned maintenance intervention related to the electricity service, the EPSS - Electronic Proposal Submission System will be unavailable from Friday 26 November 2004 at 21:30 until Saturday 27 November at 08:30. Further information available: http://fp6.cordis.lu/fp6/calls.cfm

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Project reporting in FP6- Guidance notes available This document provides guidance and instructions to assist the consortium in preparing the reports and deliverables, which are submitted by the project coordinator on behalf of the consortium. It also describes the procedures for their submission to the Commission and contains brief explanations of the review procedure. Please see: www.cordis.lu/fp6/find-doc.htm#reporting Consultation on Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7) As part of the preparation for FP7, the European Commission is currently undertaking a wide-ranging consultation of key stakeholders of European Research policy. The research community is invited to provide their views on what they consider to be the key research challenges in the future. Further information available at: http://europa.eu.int/comm/research/future/ssh/index_en.html Commission responds to calls for a new information society strategy Just two months after a Dutch Presidency report called for a rethink of Europe's policy agenda for information and communication technologies (ICT), the Commission has taken a first step towards that goal by publishing a communication on the EU's information society strategy beyond 2005. Further information available from: http://fp6.cordis.lu/fp6/home.cfm The New Work Programme The Commission is in the process of revising the work programme in preparation for the future calls. The process involves a public consultation process including a number of workshops. Details can be found on the Commission’s website: http://www.cordis.lu/ist/workprogramme/wp0506-consultation.htm The process has so far revealed little need for change so it is expected that a similar set of strategic objectives to those found in Work Programme 2003-4 will appear again.

DIGICULT – Digital Heritage and Cultural Content EU: www.cordis.lu/ist/directorate_e/digicult/index.htm This activity is administered by the Information Society Directorate General Unit E5 (Interfaces, Knowledge Content Technologies, Applications, Information Market) and provides information on the IST Priority of the 6 Framework Programme with the focus on Access to Cultural Heritage. Unit E5‘s new mission for the duration of the 6th Framework Programme is to support: ‗the early adoption of new technologies for accessing and preserving Europe‘s cultural, artistic and scientific resources, thus making archives, museums and libraries accessible to everyone, everywhere and at any time. The work involves research and prototype application development that will lead to the adoption of automated digitisation, and digital restoration and preservation techniques, as well as the creation of large-scale interactive networks of cultural resources and new environments for intelligent heritage and tourism, and community memory. The unit implements collaborative networks on the digitisation of cultural heritage, long-term digital preservation, and the benchmarking of the quality and accessibility of digital cultural resources‘. DIGITAL ARCHIVE + Cultural Content (IST) The General direction Information Society, Cultural Heritage Applications, sustains itself an electronic information service, which gives to libraries, museums and archives diverse practical guidelines. Projects which deal primarily with digital storage and accessibility of cultural content and/or archives, have with this IST Program, which is a part of the research framework program, better financial means and greater possibilities than the culture promotional program Culture 2000.

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Further information can be obtained from: http://www.cordis.lu/ist/ka3/digicult/newsletter.htm
Open calls There are currently no calls open that might be applicable to this context. For forthcoming deadlines please check future Alerts. News st A special issue of the DigiCult newsletter on the first DigiCult Projects under the 1 FP6 call has been published. You can access this using the link below. To subscribe to the DigiCult newsletter and view issues published so far please access www.cordis.lu/ist/directorate_e/digicult/newsletter.htm Events An events listing can be found at www.cordis.lu/ist/directorate_e/digicult/events.htm Please also have a look at the events section under IST – FP6 Priority 2 in this newsletter (See above).

IST (Information Society Technologies) – FP6 Priority 2
UK: http://fp6uk.ost.gov.uk/page.aspx?SP=1105 EU: www.cordis.lu/ist/ The objectives of the Information Society Technologies (IST) thematic area in FP6 are to ensure European leadership in the generic and applied technologies at the heart of the knowledge economy. It aims to increase innovation and competitiveness in European businesses and industry and to contribute to greater benefits for all European citizens. Of the strategic objectives under IST, Measures 2.3.1.12 Technology-enhanced learning and access to cultural heritage and 2.3.2.7 Cross-media content for leisure and entertainment are of special interest to the arts and cultural sector IST National Contact Point UK: Peter Walters UKISHELP T 0870 606 1515 F 020 8848 6660 E help@ukishelp.co.uk

Open calls
Aeronautics and space Galileo 6FP 2nd Call [Area 1:User Segment deadline 08/10/04, Area 2: Mission Definition and Implementation deadline 24/09/04, Area 3:Innovation and International Activities deadline 17/09/04] FP6-2004-TREN-3: Periodic call in the area of 'Aeronautics and Space', 'Sustainable energy systems' and 'Sustainable surface transport' FP6-2004-Hydrogen-1: Thematic call in the area of Component development and systems integration of hydrogen and fuel cells for transport and other applications FP6-2004-Hydrogen2:Thematic call in the area of 01/06/2004 08/10/2004 € 66.9 million Closed

Aeronautics and space

29/06/2004

08/12/2004

€252.000.000

Open

Aeronautics and space

29/06/2004

08/12/2004

€ 35.000.000

Open

Aeronautics and space

29/06/2004

08/12/2004

€ 4.500.000

Open

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer
Support of the co-ordination, assessment and monitoring of research to contribute to the definition phase for a hydrogen communities technology initiative Citizens and governance in a knowledge based society

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Citizens & Governance

-

13/04/2005

€60 million

Available soon

Future Calls Call 5 opens June 2005, with a proposed budget of 1.1 billion euro. W http://fp6uk.ost.gov.uk/events.aspx?WCI=htmCalls

Events
A calendar of events can be found at http://fp6.cordis.lu/fp6/home.cfm

EVA 2004 Moscow Moscow, Russia 29 November - 3 December 2004 Organised by the Centre on the Problems of Informatisation in the sphere of Culture of the Ministry of Culture of Russia (Centre PIC), The State Tretyakov Gallery and EVA Conferences International. Conference topics are Russian and international programmes & projects, information society technologies in museums, galleries, libraries, archives and contemporary art, digitisation and preservation of and access to cultural and scientific heritage etc. Participating DigiCult projects are CALIMERA and MINERVA. Please see website for additional information: http://conf.cpic.ru/eva2004/eng/info/default.asp An events listing can be found at www.cordis.lu/ist/directorate_e/digicult/events.htm Please also have a look at the events section under IST – FP6 Priority 2 in this newsletter (See above).

Technology-enhanced learning information day Luxembourg, 29 November 2004 The information day aims at streamlining project proposals addressing the strategic objective Technology-enhanced learning in the IST Work Programme 2005-2006. It should help to build consensus on trends and challenges in future research on technology-enhanced learning, to better understand the FP6 instruments, to facilitate sharing of ideas and experiences, and to find partners for project consortia. Further information available from: www.cordis.lu/ist/directorate_e/telearn/events.htm Additional information on the National Representatives Group on Digitisation at: www.cordis.lu/ist/directorate_e/digicult/nrg.htm Contact: Rossella Caffo at rcaffo@beniculturali.it

WEB based links and extensions from data banks to ongoing projects seeking to preserve and to promote cultural heritage: http://echo.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/home http://www.lessing.org www.klara.be

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer 6. Case Studies

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Digital Cultural Heritage – impact of new technologies upon museums this new form has implications not only for the museum itself, but figures greatly in combination with several EU directives (e.g. Information Society, Lisbon Resolution: Knowledge Society) so that funding of museums will be promoted and favored if it means going in a certain direction the term ‗cultural adaptation‘ is crucial on how a museum will incorporate the new needs while not foreclosing future developments the rate of innovation in technology is so great that it will be difficult for any museum with a limited budget to keep up with this rate of change brought about by constant new technical innovations

-

The Amsterdam Maastricht Summer University (AMSU) examined in 2002 following case studies: France Model for public access to cultural heritage ―The Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (CRRMF, Paris) is working on a Linux database to make 26,000 cultural objects each with some 150 images each freely available online.‖ Netherlands ―the government in conjunction with its National Research Council (NOW) has formed a consortium for a long-term project (2003 – 2010) to create a ‗Production Street for the Digital Library‘ which integrates materials from the national library, national museum, national archives, national audio-visual archives and film archives.‖ Canada ―Canada continues to develop its distributed virtual museum, which integrates cultural objects from museums across an 8000 km. expanse.‖ United States ―The United States also has a National Initiative for Networked Cultural Heritage (NINCH)‖.

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer 7. cultural innovation

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Term used by CIED (Cultural Innovation and Economic Development) Maurizio Charta: innovative network of museums learning places how to approach old things anew history of innovation (industrial heritage: new products new way of life and what imprint this leaves on a city so that a museum of the city must trace also these developments and indicate how suddenly a city can be transformed: demonstration of impact when a huge brick factory is built and with it comes the railway, another transportation mode and new people) absorption rate of incoming things (money, people, ideas, flow of goods) to be translated into improvement of standard of living, quality of life, and becoming an export of goods, ideas and services so as to have alternate possibilities of economic and cultural survival

Case studies discussed at the summer University of Amsterdam-Maastricht Case studies at national level but with focus on specific innovations Germany ―In Germany, for instance there is a project to create an on-line distributed database of slide collections of individual professors, which can be made accessible for education throughout the country.‖ United Kingdom ―In the United Kingdom, there are efforts to co-ordinate various digitization projects in creating new resources for the educational system as a whole.‖ Italy ―In Italy, the Nuovo Museo Elettronico (NUME) treats the whole inner city of Bologna as a virtual museum and allows users to trace the development of the city in the course of the past millennium.‖ United States ―In the United States, the Research Libraries Group (RLG) is developing new links between library and archival records and cultural heritage.‖6

6

www.amsu.edu

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8. Three kinds of memory institutions: museums, library, archive If philosophy is about organizing the mind in a certain way to remember things, then similarly museums, library and archives serve the same purpose. Yet there is a difference between recollection and remembering again things by telling stories, getting feed-backs from others and associations through new images while learning new things as others reveal their part of the story. The unfolding of history in a story is not as simple as it takes time to bring together clues and especially to stand above mere rumors of the day where hear-say, events, shouts and joys but also worries about the next day intermingle with all kinds of self assumed possibilities or alternatives to what is being done that day. Time structures are important when shown as sequence of events leading up to one single event. That differs from other linear time lines e.g. what workers, middle class, upper class do at the same time. The problem of digitalization enters here in the form of being an iterative process based on the binary logic asking only for a yes or no in order to continue. Cornelius Castoriadis makes the point that if a young person learns to think in only such a way, it does not allow him to come to terms with contradictions. - Bieri: subjective, objective and historical time - Kosselek: difficult times not even understand then, when it all happened but also not really comprehendable from a different perspective and another time e.g. Fascism, Dictatorship / political iconographic reading of monuments - time scale in a sea shell with more than 2000 years visible at the micro scale - tree rings and other measures of time: what it takes to grow - Sartre: le vecu – lived experiences - time differences / time scales : big important events like the coming of the railway and how can it be shown what impact it had upon people‘s lives? What kind of testimonies do we need? Can digitalization help to transcend time borders back in time and go forward at the same time? There is the film a Space Odyssey or what is being shown in the Planetarium in Athens: the endless voyage because man seeks and never finds what he or she is looking for! - rushing time and images rushing by: Andre Malraux – ‗we are guests temporarily present in life‘ / Gaeste am Voruebergehen / Derrida: intensiver moment - time paths of experiences e.g. boy growing up in a different world than his father – how can people still remember how it was back then – the problem of story telling if it does not go deep enough – the paths everyone they take, think they are on and in which real direction they are driven by developments – here the voice of Katerina Anghelaki-Rooke: forward looking – not amused – I don‘t understand these times anymore – confounded and perplexed – the example of how to make a living archive work with the imagination of those participating and recording their own speeches, writings, voices, photos, everything they can think and imagine of as being important to them to be remembered by – and then history comes like a big broom and just brushes everyone and all his belongings simply away. Video games are of such conceptualization of time as sequence of events terminating in either defeat or victory. The end point is also the starting point. Only the levels of complexities mark the differences so that young people especially like this challenge in order to test their skills. The games give them a feed-back, a most important aspect

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if one remembers the saying by Robert Musil that the worst thing for young people when sending out their ideas into the world is not no criticism, but no answer at all. 7 - time is lost in video games due to contributing to a blur of images - the thrust is the same: an overwhelming of the senses If the library of Alexandria was constructed, so they say, according to the different faculties of the brain to allow human perception and intelligence, then this type of categorization and classification is already significant over and beyond the simple question, but what is significant enough to be remembered? Freud spoke about the different kinds of memory systems and distinguished above all the short-term from the long-term memory. To visualize that he used the metaphor of the wax plate which one used in the past to make photocopies or more copies than one. While the writing on the folio above the wax plate can vanish once lifted, the scratches of the pen remain fixed in the wax itself. Very different is the memory system of a city: scratches on walls not noticed for a long time until a photographer comes along and transforms as did the artists Astrid Kokka Athens into ―her gallery‖ by just taking a closer look through the camera at street signs, doors, walls in terms of their iconographic distinctions. ‗The writing on the wall‘ became through this work an extension of testimonies of time. We know that writings on the wall can be erased over night as was the case in Warszawa once Marshall law was declared. The Polish government had over night all signs of Solidarnosz removed as if that movement never existed. To make people forget is one thing, the conscious cutting off from other memory sources shows how self-understanding can be governed or rather be controlled through having access or not to specific memory systems. Here a Polish photographer by the name of Anna Bohdziewicz countered this through her own photographic work holding onto those signs of another period (see http://www.fototapeta.art.pl )

7

Robert Musil, ‗The Man without Attributes‘ transl. into Greek by Toula Sieti

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9. Issues and philosophical questions in view of these developments Where are we heading by entering the virtual world based on digitalization of images? What new roles are emerging for museums and memory institutions? How is multimedia transforming our knowledge organization? What are the implications for learning?

At the outset, there was made the statement about a certain trend: - improvements in web based information systems reflecting the progress made in the digitalization of cultural heritage and cultural artifacts. - Better and novel presentation of virtual worlds linked to interesting exhibition models developed to serve as bridge between the ‗virtual‘ and the ‗power of the real‘ (Peter Higgins). If ‗power of the real‘ is replaced by ‗language of the real‘ (and keeping in mind the old question ‗how real is reality‘), museum displays and arrangements can be evaluated out of following perspectives: Orientation Trust in senses Inner outer world Image effects Energy loaded images Messages Communication And this in terms of judging how visitors and users identify and enter the process of - how they manage to gain through this new kind of access to information ‗better‘ rather than distorted knowledge about cultural heritage, for some of the issues mentioned during conferences are reflected already in such metaphorical titles as ‗shadows of the past‘ and ‗digital ruins‘ - the storage capacity may be a technical issue when it comes to facilitate all of this through a data bank requiring definite solutions in terms of knowledge management, but then there is memory and human resources willing to be tapped into by key questions people have due to living at a certain period of time with definite expectations, problems, attitudes and range of values from wishing to safeguard their properties and family possessions to being curious as to what the neighbours are doing and not only they. - This amounts to appraising what contributes towards an understanding of the different experience-based models that exist and which can take advantages of the new media to facilitate the visitor and viewer / user of the exhibitions key insights into what could be potential answers to the challenges of the situations as referred to or shown. - Simulation technique is a near approximation to reality but never on a 1 : 1 scale while analogies and other models serving the purpose of illustrating some key term and event will have to avoid being highly induced, equally suggestive.

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Indicative is the first sampling of users / viewers reactions: Multi media in the museum
Don‘t like it all Preference for traditional museums Like it a bit balanced mix like it a lot exploitative of new media

-

best practices and national tools and policies to facilitate cross-sectorial cooperation on a national and local level different national policies and organisational models within the policy area of museums, archives and libraries European perspectives on access to information and cultural heritage whereas section two mainly focuses on concrete co-operation between museums, archives and libraries seen from different point of views.

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Annex 1: Leading institutes and organizations AMSU ―The Maastricht McLuhan Institute was set up to study and develop methods for knowledge organization and knowledge management in a digital, distributed, multimedia world. The aim of the MMI is to create comprehensive strategies for searching, structuring, using and presenting digital resources more coherently and efficiently; to integrate past knowledge and to produce ordered knowledge that leads to new understanding and insights.‖ http://www.amsu.edu www.calimera.org

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Annex 2: CULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY – lectures / research papers

EVA Conference 'Culture x Technology' Across Europe & Internationally The following papers are being presented at the Institute of Archaeology UCL, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, 21st – 29th July 2003 Abstracts of the papers can be downloaded from the Internet under W www.vasari.co.uk/eva/london/index.htm Where Next? Future Directions for Research in Intelligent Cultural Heritage By David Arnold, University of Brighton Size Matters: Web And Book Archiving By Michael Lesk, Internet Archive USA Virtual Worlds & an Inhabited Virtual Worlds Movement By Jan de Bruin Tilburg University NL SIMCITYTM Models & Panoramas from Glasgow By Mic Starbuck, Clyde Heritage Trust Scotland The Interaction of Cultural & Technological Processes: Lessons of Mobile Media By Patrick Allen, Bradford University Online Access to Cultural & Educational Resources For Disabled People: An International Challenge By Marcus Weisen, Resource The Eye of the Beholder By D Crombie & R Lenoir, FNB NL Russian Network of Cultural Heritage& Multimedia Education: Current Trends By Olga Shlykova, Moscow State University Defining the Question: Approaches to Providing Online Collections Information at The Fitzwilliam Museum By David Scruton, The Fitzwilliam Museum England Pictura Paedagogica Online By Stephanie Kollman, Bibliothek für Bildungsgeschichtliche Forschung, Berlin The Certosa Museum, City of Memory By Antonella Guidazzoli, Maria Chiara Liguori, Bologna University Large-scale Art Exhibitions in the Web EUROMUSE By Monika Hagedorn-Saupe, SMB Berlin

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The Impact of 3D Reconstructions, Impetus or Obstacle to Learning? By Wolfram Grajetzki, UCL Protection of Intellectual Property: a Must in Digital Content Exploitation By Jean Barda, Netimage, France The Visible Museum By Ebelien Pondaag, Museon & Justin Savage, The Council of Museums in Wales Web Access to Cultural Heritage for the Disabled By Professor of Computing, London, South Bank University Exhibiting Performance By Andrew Morrison & Synnne Skjulstad, InterMedia, Norway Virtual Olympians from Ancient China By Ling Chen, Tsinghua University, China The Use of Technology to Extend Performance Experiences of Comparative Organ Tonalities By Lucy & Peter Comerford, Bradford University Hitting the Right Note: Enhancing Access to Music By David Crombie & R Lenoir, FNB NL Audiovisual Mega-Preservation By Richard Wright, BBC UK

Machine-Representation & Visualisation of a Dance Notation By Royce J. Neagle and Kia NG, Icsrim, University of Leeds, England Veridical Imaging of Transmissive & Reflective Artefacts By L MacDonald & A Giani, Derby University, England Memorial Project - a Complex Approach to Digitisation of Personal Records By A Geschke & E Fischer, ZFB Germany Museums With a Personal Touch By Silvia Filippini Fantoni, European Centre for Digital Communication NL Colour Encoded Stereoscopy as a Low-Cost Virtual Exhibition Medium By Per Hansen, Consultant, Denmark

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Content and Concept-Based Retrieval and Navigation Tools In SCULPTEUR By Fabrizio Giorgini, Giunti Italy COST ConGAS: Gesture Controlled Audio System By Nicola Bernardini and Kia NG, Icsrim, University of Leeds Virtual Museum Technology: Human's Specifics & Organization of Discourse By David Shapiro, Institute of Computer Tech, Russia MusicNetwork: Music Industry With Interactive Multimedia Technology By Kia NG, Icsrim, University of Leeds, England A Deer for Europe: A Distributed European Electronic Resource By Suzanne Keene, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, London The ORION Network and Research Roadmap David Clarke, National Museums of Scotland et al

HERMES – Volos Hatto Fischer Annex 3: Digital presentation

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Digital Cultural Heritage

ERPANET Seminar on the Preservation of Born Digital Art 8 October 2004 Glasgow, UK One of the major aims for this seminar is to provide an international forum to exchange information about born digital art collecting and archiving practices across different institutional and national contexts. It is aimed at all people involved in the creation and management of born digital art. The aims of this seminar are:  To identify some of the challenges that the ‗permanent retention‘ of born digital artworks, particular those that are ‗network-dependent‘ pose.  To identify key platforms, operations, users, contexts of presentation and experiences with born digital art  To consider selected current collecting policies for born digital artworks  To review selected current accessioning and documentation procedures for born digital art  To consider selected current storage and long-term access/care procedures for born digital art  To identify precedents for standards in collecting/accessioning/storage/longterm care policies and procedures across the ‗permanent retention contexts‘ Presentations will explore the preservation of born digital art from the perspective of both the artist and the collecting organisation. A panel discussion will examine issues arising from the presentations, such as developing specific collecting policies, addressing technical issues, managing born digital resources, and enabling long-term access to born digital art. During this session, workshop participants will have the opportunity to share their own experiences. Contact: E british.editor@erpanet.org, tinalouisefiske@aol.com W www.erpanet.org/events/2004/glasgowart/index.php

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Annex 4: Other Information Society Programmes (Directorate-General Information Society) eTEN (TEN-Telecom) UK: http://fp6uk.ost.gov.uk/page.aspx?SP=1106 EU: http://europa.eu.int/information_society/programmes/eten/index_en.htm eTEN is the European Community Programme designed to help the deployment of telecommunication networks based services (e-services) with a trans-European dimension. It focuses strongly on public services, particularly in areas where Europe has a competitive advantage. The programme aims to accelerate the take up of services to sustain the European social model of an inclusive, cohesive society. Its objectives are at the very heart of the eEurope mission of "an information society for all". It promotes public interest services which give every citizen, enterprise and administration full opportunity to gain from the e-Society, bridging the digital divide which threatens to create an information underclass. eTEN helps bring new services and applications to the European market. The Trans-European Telecommunications networks programme could help you launch a new service based on communications networks and it can provide financial support at the planning stage or for the initial investment. eTEN is aimed at:  applications and services of public interest;  developing European market opportunities;  encouraging the development of an inclusive Information Society;  improving the competitiveness of European Industry;  strengthening the internal European market;  improving European economic and social cohesion;  encouraging new activities leading to job creation. Open calls The current eTEN call for proposals closed in June 2004. The Commission received more than 200 proposals and the funding requested exceeded the call budget by about a factor of four. Successful applicants will be called for negotiation in the autumn. The next call is anticipated early in 2005 with a probable budget exceeding 40M€. Results of call 2004/1 can be obtained from: http://europa.eu.int/information_society/activities/eten/library/calls/cfp20041/results/i ndex_en.htm News Updates can be found at http://fp6uk.ost.gov.uk/Page.aspx?SP=1867 Events Please visit the Europa website for details of coming events: http://europa.eu.int/information_society/activities/eten/index_en.htm

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eContent UK: http://fp6uk.ost.gov.uk/page.aspx?SP=1107 EU: www.cordis.lu/econtent The eContent programme, launched at the beginning of 2001, is a market-oriented programme which encourages public and private partnerships. It aims to stimulate the development and use of European digital content on the Internet and to promote the linguistic diversity of European websites in the Information Society. The eContent programme has a four-year budget of €100m with which to support (larger) proposals for 'demonstration' proposals or (smaller) 'definition' proposals. It is based on three interdependent Action Lines:  Action Line 1: Improving access to and expanding the use of public sector information (with around 40%-45% of the budget);  Action Line 2: Enhancing content production in a multilingual and multicultural environment (similarly allocated 40%-45% of the budget);  Action Line 3: Increasing the dynamism of the digital content market (with around 10%-15% of the budget). Open calls Continuous submission scheme (Call part identifier: EC-Y03-C3-P2) Action line 1: Improving access to and use of public sector information Subline 1.1: Cross-border information services based on public sector information Identifier: AL 1.1 — FP Subline 1.2: Establishment of European digital data collections Identifier: AL 1.2 — FP Action line 2: Enhancing content production in a multilingual and multicultural environment Subline 2.1: Partnerships for multilingual and multicultural content Identifier: AL 2.1 — FP Subline 2.2: Strengthening the linguistic infrastructure Identifier: AL 2.2 — FP Deadline for receipt of proposals was 14 May 2004. A successor programme is envisaged – further information on this is expected late in 2004.


				
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