Assembly Line Laboratory Experiment by mgb63241

VIEWS: 17 PAGES: 3

									                   ISE 311: Ergonomics & Work Measurement
                     Assembly Line Laboratory Experiment
                         (Due: Friday, February 20, 2009)

Purpose:    To perform an operations analysis of a job, and to demonstrate the effect
            of workstation design on performance.

Equipment: Ergonomic workstation
           Stopwatch
           Boxes
           Overhead transparency markers

Procedure

     Reserving your time in the lab

     You will need to schedule at least one session (two would be better) of
     approximately 1-2 hours in the Human Factors lab (room 215). I will have a sign-
     up sheet outside my door today with the available times listed. I will make every
     attempt to have the lab open and to be available while you are in the lab, but that
     may not be possible in all cases. If the lab is not unlocked when you arrive, you
     may find me, Dr. Burtner, Dr. Schultz, or Mr. Campbell to open it for you.

     Part A: Workstation Set-up

     Work with at least one partner. Choose one person to perform the work in the
     experiment and the other(s) to time and record all the necessary data.

     1. Raise or lower the workstation using the hand crank so that it is
        approximately 2 inches below the worker’s elbow level. Record this height.

     2. Ensure that the wall is stored on the back ledge of the workstation and that
        the tilt angle is at 0°.

     3. Place the boxes in their proper positions according to the given assembly
        template.

     Part B: Given Layout Process Analysis and Timing

     1. At the beginning of the task, the worker is located at the center front of the
        workstation.

     2. Using the given layout, the worker will place each of the red, lettered boxes
        (except box E) in the larger packing box ONE AT A TIME. Be sure to place
        each of the boxes in its proper place in the larger packing box, matching the
                                                                                 1
   letter on the box to the corresponding area on the inside of the box. For
   example, box A should be placed in the area marked A in the larger box.

3. After all the lettered boxes (except E) have been properly placed in the larger
   packing box, the worker will remove the lid from Box E and place the
   numbered boxes in their corresponding positions within Box E. Once the
   numbered boxes are in their proper places, replace the lid. Place Box E in its
   place in the larger packing box and move the box to the far left corner of the
   workstation.

4. Record the time it takes to complete the task. Begin timing when the first box
   is picked up, and stop timing when the last box is in place and released.

5. Unpack the boxes and return them to their starting positions as given on the
   template.

6. Repeat steps 1 – 5 nine (9) times.

7. Develop an appropriate process analysis of the task as performed using the
   given layout and preceding instructions. Evaluate the process in preparation
   for part C (at a minimum, this should include a right and left-hand process
   chart and a process flow chart, along with suggestions for how you will
   improve the process – eliminate operations, simplify, etc.).

Part C: New Layout

1. Design a new workstation layout and work methods. In addition to changing
   the location of the boxes at the start and the method the packers use, you
   may also change the height of the workstation, the tilt angle, and you may
   use the side work areas. However, the boxes must be arranged in the same
   way in the larger packing box. Be sure to sketch your new layout for inclusion
   in your report. Perform an operations analysis (using, at a minimum, the
   same charts as you did for the original design).

2. After you have designed your new layout and methods, trace the layout with
   the overhead transparency markers and label each outline with the
   appropriate letter or number. This will allow you to repeat your time study.
   (You will probably want to remove the template for the given layout from the
   workstation – be sure you set it aside in a safe place so you can return it after
   you have finished.)

3. Using your designed layout and work method, pack the larger packing box.
   Be sure to place each of the boxes in its proper place in the larger packing
   box, matching the letter on the box to the corresponding area on the inside of
   the packing box. Also, place the numbered boxes in their proper places
   within box E.
                                                                            2
      4. Record the time it takes to complete the task. Begin timing when the first box
         is picked up, and stop timing when the last box is in place and released.

      5. Unpack the boxes and return them to their starting positions as given on the
         template.

      6. Repeat steps 3 – 5 nine (9) times.

      After You Have Finished

      Using the cloth and cleaner provided, clean the Plexiglas surface of markings
      from your new layout. Return the original layout template to its original place
      and, if necessary, set the workstation height to its lowest setting and the tilt angle
      to 0 degrees.

Results:

      1. Provide a sketch of your new layout in the Results section. Identify the
         specific improvements in the design.

      2. In your narrative describe the differences between your revised process and
         the original process given in the lab. The original and revised process and
         flow charts should be included in the appendix.

      3. Calculate the mean and standard deviation of the packing time using the
         original and revised workstation and work methods. Create a table of these
         values and discuss the differences in the narrative.

      4. Using Excel or Minitab, perform a t-test to determine if there was an
         improvement in packing time due to your redesign. State the results in the
         Results section and include the Excel or Minitab output in an appendix.

Conclusions:

      1. Did your revised workstation and work methods design result in shorter
         packing times? If so, what contributed to the improvement? If not, why not
         and what might you do differently in the future to improve the process?

      2. What did you learn about workstation and work methods design from this lab
         exercise?

      3. For this exercise, you were confined to the ergonomic workstation in your
         design. If you were allowed more options in designing a packing workstation,
         what additional design improvements might be possible?




                                                                                    3

								
To top