Human Security Concept and Measurement by tae66661

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 3

									Reading List and Revised Course Assignments for Thailand/Human Security
Course
American University
Professor Julie Mertus (202-885-2215/410-532-0423)

Course Requirements
There will be four assignments: a draft paper to be completed prior to the trip based on assigned
readings, the revision of the paper after the trip, a class journal and participation.

Assignment 1: Paper Draft to Be Completed Prior to Trip: 25%
To prepare for the trip, read the articles listed below and draft a paper considering the following
questions:
     What is “human security”? Is this a useful concept? Who wins and who loses when this
        concept is employed by policy-makers?
     What are the “human security” issues confronting Thailand? How are these issues being
        addressed by the government of Thailand? (According to official reports? To NGOs?)
        How are these issues being addressed by nongovernmental organizations? (According to
        NGOs? To their critics?)
     What has been the role of regional actors and international in addressing these issues?
        Can or should this role be changed?
     Is the issue of human trafficking being adequately addressed in Thailand? Why or why
        not? What difference does it make to frame the issue as “sexual slavery” or
        “prostitution” vs. “sex work”?
     What would you like to know more about human security in Thailand? What issues
        interest you most and why? Make a list of questions to explore re. your area of interest.

Assignment 2: Class Journal: 25%
The Class Journal provides students with an opportunity to make a record of his/her learning
process. The journal should reflect the expectations and preconceptions at the beginning of their
time in Thailand, and their opinions and reflections at the conclusion of the course. What the
student writes is up to him/her, as long as it satisfies three requirements: (1) a response to daily
field trips and interactions with Thais and others during their stay; (2) reference specifically the
readings and/or to class discussion; (3) students must write everyday, and the entry should be at
least a half page in length.

Assignment 3: Final Paper: 25%
Revisit the paper you wrote prior to your trip and revise based on your experiences. This
paper should be emailed to mertus@american.edu by July 20th. Be sure to make specific
references to the readings as well as to speakers and experiences in Thailand. Also be
clear about what is “new” to the paper. (You could, for example, work off of the original
text and make all additions in a different color or font).

Assignment 4: Attendance and Participation Grade: 25%
Students are expected to be engaged and alert at all times during the organized classes and field
trips. Students are expected to ask questions of the people visited during field trips and engage the
professor and guest lecturers.
Reading List (all Web-based)

Note that the most important readings are starred.


*1. Kanti Bajpai, “Human Security: Concept and Measurement,” Kroc Institute
Occasional Paper #19:OP:1, August 2000
http://www.nd.edu/~krocinst/ocpapers/op_19_1.PDF#search='human%20security'

2. Definitions of Human Security
http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/hpcr/events/hsworkshop/list_definitions.pdf#search='huma
n%20security'

3. Kamol Kamoltrakul, “Expanded Concept of Human Rights and the Need for Human
Rights Mechanism in Asia-Pacific Countries,”
2002http://www.geocities.com/kamoltrakul_kamol/ar10.doc

4. ASEAN Annual Security Outlook 2000, Thailand,
http://www.aseansec.org/10940.htm

5. OSCE-Thailand Conference on the Human, Dimension of Security
Bangkok, 20-21 June 2002,
http://www.osce.org/documents/sg/2002/06/334_en.pdf#search='human%20security%20t
hailand

*6. Trafficking and human rights: the role of national human rights institutions in the
Asia Pacific region (surf cite for Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Thailand see, e.g. About
Thailand and Foreign Policy) http://www.mfa.go.th/web/23.ph

*7. Thailand's Actions for the Prevention of Trafficking in Women and Children
http://www.thaiembdc.org/socials/actionwc.html

7. International Labor Organization (ILO)/
Mekong Sub-Regional Project to Combat
Trafficking in Children and Women
(Thailand Country Office)
http://www.humantrafficking.org/countries/eap/thailand/ngos/intl/ilo.html

*8. Pip Dargan, Trafficking and human rights: the role of national human rights
institutions in the Asia Pacific region, Paper to be presented at the Stop the Traffic 2
Conference
Melbourne, Australia, 23-24 October 2003
http://www.asiapacificforum.net/human/issues/apfstoptraffic.htm

9. Human Security: Securing Women’s Human rights
http://www.apwld.org/pdf/human_security_report.pdf#search='trafficking%20in%20wo
men%20thailand%20sex%20work%20human%20security'

10. Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development APWLD NGO on the Roster
in consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations
www.apwld.org/pdf/human_security_report.pdf

*11. Project Hope International: Thailand http://www.phi-
ngo.org/THAILAND/Trafficking.htm

*12. Thai Trafficking Case; http://www.american.edu/TED/thaiwomen.htm

13. Thailand Struggles to Halt Human Trafficking,
http://www.burmatoday.net/kaowao/2003/10/031012_thailand_kaowao.htm

14. Modern Day Slavery: Trafficking of Women and Children. Resources Collection
Burmese American Democratic Alliance (BADA);
http://www.badasf.org/slavery/modernslavery.htm

*15. Redefining Prostitution as Sex Work on the International Agenda
http://www.nswp.org/mobility/redefining.html

*16. The Role of Organized Crime and the Government’s Response
http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~asiactr/haq/200203/0203a001.htm

*17. Physicians for Human Rights, No Status: Migration, Trafficking & Exploitation Of
Women In Thailand
http://www.phrusa.org/campaigns/aids/pdf/nostatus.pdf#search='trafficking%20in%20wo
men%20thailand'

18. Background Briefing
International Trafficking of Women and Children
Testimony before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs, February 22, 2000
http://www.hrw.org/backgrounder/wrd/trafficking.htm

								
To top