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DRUG DELIVERY METHODOLOGY

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					DRUG DELIVERY METHODOLOGY

Dr Oren Scherman and his team have generated ternary host-guest complexes using cucurbit[8]uril which non-covalently joins one guest molecule to a second guest molecule which can then be released by stimuli e.g. electrochemical potential, pH, light or oxygen.

Potential Uses Ternary host-guest drug complexes have great potential to treat many conditions with poorly soluble drugs and also peptides by:
• Improving ADMET properties • Extending circulatory life • Allowing controlled release

For further information please contact: Dr Iain Thomas iain.thomas@enterprise.cam.ac.uk +44 (0)1223 760339
Cambridge Enterprise Limited, University of Cambridge 10 Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1QA UK www.enterprise.cam.ac.uk

Case Ref: Sch-2100-07

Background The ADMET properties of many drugs hinder their use in patients, this is often due to their physicochemical properties e.g. poor solubility, low bioavailability and toxicity. Any host-guest complex which can ‘mask’ the drug, increase the solubility, extend its circulatory life and has the ability to control where and when a drug is released thereby improving efficacy and safety could offer significant advantages in the treatment of a wide range of conditions. Technology Researchers at the University of Cambridge have discovered that cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) (Figure 1) may be used to non-covalently to join one guest molecule attached to a lipophilic/hydrophilic polymer with another guest molecule attached to a lipophilic/hydrophilic small molecule or peptide drug (Figure 2) in aqueous media through the formation of a ternary host-guest complex. These complexes are strong and exhibit covalent-like properties, but remain in dynamic equilibrium that can be controlled (addressed) by external stimuli such as electrochemical potential, pH, light or oxygen. Application to drug delivery A complex produced in this way would ‘mask’ the drug working effectively as a pro-drug to potentially improve the ADMET properties of the drug, extend its circulatory life and allow it to be released from the complex by appropriate stimuli when required. It is envisaged that this technology could be applied to a wide range of poorly soluble drugs e.g. doxorubicin or paclitaxel and also to peptide drugs to treat many conditions and potentially to others which are currently untreatable.

Figure 1: Structure of cucurbit[8]uril

Figure 2: Complex formation

Commercialisation Patent protection has been sought on this technology. We are currently looking for commercial partners for licensing, collaboration and development of this exciting technology.

Sch-2100-07


				
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Description: DRUG DELIVERY METHODOLOGY