WiMAX Technology Frequently Asked Questions What is WiMAX What

Document Sample
WiMAX Technology Frequently Asked Questions What is WiMAX What Powered By Docstoc
					                                         WiMAX Technology 

                                   Frequently Asked Questions 

What is WiMAX? 
WiMAX (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) uses state‐of‐the‐art technology to transmit 
radio signals from a sectorized base tower to a modem that is about the size of a book.  The modem 
easily connects to a subscriber’s computer, and once the subscriber plugs in the modem, the connection 
is always on and always secure. Increasingly, laptops and other mobile devices are being embedded with 
WiMAX chips and ports to receive WiMAX signals without the need for an external modem. 
 
WiMAX operators currently use licensed spectrum (2.3 and 2.5 GHz) to deliver last‐mile fixed or mobile 
broadband access to subscribers and businesses where traditional wireline services are not available. 
The licensed spectrum ensures greater, more secure coverage without signal interference. 
 
WiMAX also uses— 
 
• IP network infrastructure to accommodate both data and voice without signal loss;  
• Orthogonal Frequency‐Division Multiplexing (OFDM) technology for spectral efficiency, indoor 
     penetration, and more capacity; and 
• Open IEEE standard 802.16 for economies of scale—equipment from all WiMAX Forum® certified 
     vendors is compatible and interoperable. 
 

What are the benefits of WiMAX? 
The benefits of wide‐area broadband coverage via WiMAX include: 

    •   Fast speeds (2‐4 Mbps per user down and 1 Mbps up)  
    •   Carrier‐grade quality of service (licensed spectrum) 
    •   Mobile, portable or fixed end user equipment 
    •   Affordable to the subscriber 
    •   Ease of installation (on average more than 50 percent of subscribers can self‐install an indoor 
        modem in fewer than 10 minutes) 
   • Broad coverage areas (90+ square miles per base station based on a number of factors) 
   • Capital‐efficient (<10 percent the cost of cable/telco networks per household) 
         
These  benefits  have  launched  WiMAX  into  the  global  market  where  the  technology  is  expected  to 
continue  its  impressive  growth  trajectory.   Global  WiMAX  tracks  455  commercial  deployments  in  135 
countries and WiMAX service providers are on a path to reach 800 million people by the end of 2010 




                                                      1 

 
How does WiMAX compare with other Internet access methods? 
No other technology offers a full range of differentiated voice and data in a variety of wireless 
fashions—fixed, portable and mobile. 
 
WiMAX and Wi‐Fi 
Although WiMAX and Wi‐Fi both offer wireless connections to the Internet, WiMAX uses licensed 
spectrum (2.3 and 2.5 GHz), and Wi‐Fi uses unlicensed spectrum (900 MHz, 2.4 and 5.8 GHz). As a result, 
WiMAX covers a broader service area than Wi‐Fi’s “hot spots” and has virtually no signal interference. 
The licensed spectrum also makes WiMAX connections more secure and allows more flexibility than Wi‐
Fi. Some companies have successfully integrated Wi‐Fi into WiMAX networks, but the reverse cannot be 
accomplished. 
 
Numerous device manufacturers are incorporating WiMAX modems in addition to WiFi modems into 
portable devices and mini laptops. The application will automatically select the best connection based 
on the availability of service at a certain location.  
 
WiMAX and WildBlue Satellite Internet 
NRTC believes that extending broadband access to unserved and underserved areas is achievable by 
offering a combination of wireless broadband service based on WiMAX technology and satellite 
broadband.  WiMAX provides a cost effective means to extend broadband to places where wireline 
access may not be economical or where mobility is desired.  Satellite Internet access will still be needed 
for reaching such low population areas as farms or ranches, where neither wireline nor WiMAX 
technologies prove economical. 
 
WiMAX and LTE 
Both WiMAX and LTE are 4G technologies designed to move data rather than voice and both are IP 
networks based on OFDM. WiMAX, however, is based on the open IEEE standard (802.16), and that 
means the equipment is standardized, less expensive and interoperable among equipment vendors.  
 
WiMAX is already in deployment, whereas LTE will take time to roll out, and deployment forecasts say it 
could reach limited adoption by 2012 in urban areas, even longer in rural areas. 
 
Although LTE claims faster speeds than WiMAX, the technologies are similar in performance. Many 
industry experts believe that manufacturers will make equipment that is compatible with both LTE and 
WiMAX. 
 
WiMAX and Fiber
Fiber and wireless co‐exist in the last mile. Although wireless deployment may grow significantly over 
fiber due to ease of deployment and lower cost, especially in rural America, fiber is used where larger 
bandwidth or greater distances are required. 
 




                                                    2 

 
What are the average coverage distances and speeds? 
Coverage areas from the towers are 5–7 miles outdoors (line of site) and 1–2 miles indoors (non‐line of 
site), making an entire town a “hot spot.”  
 
Speeds are from 2 to 4 Megabits per second (Mbps) down and 1 Mbps up on computers with the 
WiMAX modem and any other devices with embedded WiMAX chips and ports. Higher speeds are 
available for Enterprise subscribers.  Technology advancements are expected to increase future speeds 
to up to 12 Mpbs. 
 

Can WiMAX work in any terrain? 
Although some terrain can present special challenges, most conditions can be factored into initial 
network planning and accommodated, because WiMAX uses: 
 
    • Licensed spectrum, not public‐use frequencies 
    • Higher power transmission – typically 40 Watts 
    • OFDM modulation and antenna diversity, which actually thrives on ‘multipath’ 
 
By adjusting the modulation and transmission channel characteristics, non‐line of sight is achieved in 
most cases. Terrain factors are built into both the business case as well as the radio network plan for all 
deployments. 
 

How tall do the towers need to be? How far apart should the towers be? 
The height of the tower, number of towers and propagation pattern are unique to each town or market, 
influenced by building types and density and terrain.  Specific network planning can be completed to 
identify best existing tower and other vertical real estate options for your market.  Generally, the towers 
that DigitalBridge Communications (NRTC’s WiMAX partner) has deployed range from 50 to 200 feet tall. 
 
The distance between the towers varies according to such factors as terrain, foliage and how much 
coverage you want to provide. On average, they are 6 to 7 miles apart. 
 

What equipment vendor does DigitalBridge Communications use? 
Currently, DBC uses Alvarion for both core transmission network gear and for customer premises 
equipment (CPE), but since WiMAX is a standards‐based technology, interoperability with other WiMAX 
gear meeting that standard will be possible. 




                                                     3 

 
What is the latency and are there weather­related outages? 
WiMAX provides high quality of service with virtually no signal interference or weather‐related outages 
and fewer than 60 milliseconds of latency. 

Are WiMAX subscribers subject to a Fair Access Policy? 
There is no limit to the amount of bandwidth subscribers can use, within the terms of the service 
agreement for their particular package.  
 

When is a professional installation necessary, and what is involved? 
On average, more than half of subscribers are expected to be able to perform a self‐installation by 
connecting an indoor modem to their computer.   The remaining subscribers (generally located beyond 
2 to 3 miles of a tower) will require professional installation. The mix of self‐installation to professional 
installation will be determined by the Radio Access Network plan, your coverage goals and how your 
network is built. 
 
NRTC members will have pre‐qualified subscriber addresses based on the certified and approved radio 
network plan, so they will know to a great degree who can be served with a self‐install and who needs a 
professional install.  
 
The professional installation requires placing an antenna under the eve of the roof on the subscriber’s 
house. The work required is significantly less complicated than a DIRECTV or WildBlue antenna 
installation. 
     

What are some typical technical support issues with WiMAX? 
As with many broadband services, DigitalBridge Communications has experienced most support 
requests within the first 30 days of service and most were related to customer education as opposed to 
WiMAX network issues.  Issues include setting up e‐mail and ancillary device configurations, like wireless 
routers and Xbox. 

How can I find information about available 2.3 or 2.5 GHz spectrum in my 
area? 
NRTC is compiling a list of 2.3 and 2.5 GHz spectrum holders in the United States. To date, these are the 
only two spectrums in the WiMAX‐certified license ban. If you are interested in becoming a WiMAX 
provider through DigitalBridge, NRTC and DBC will help you secure spectrum.  You do not need to go to 
spectrum brokers to obtain spectrum. 
         



                                                      4 

 
What is the estimated time to have a WiMAX system operational? 
Once NRTC and DigitalBridge have pre‐qualified you as a WiMAX candidate, and you execute a 
distribution agreement, your system can be operational in as little as four to six months. 
     

I’m interested in learning whether WiMAX is a feasible last­mile solution 
for my community. What do I do next? 
To learn more about how WiMAX from DigitalBridge can expand your existing broadband infrastructure, 
contact your NRTC Regional Business Manager (RBM). Call 866‐672‐6782 or visit www.nrtc.coop.  
 
The Regional Business Manager will answer your questions and, depending on your interest, have you 
complete a WiMAX Technology Interest Assessment to determine the feasibility of deploying WiMAX in 
your area.  Following that, we can complete a pre‐qualification analysis that includes a Radio Access 
Network (RAN) map to estimate the specific build‐out requirements for the areas you want to serve.  
The cost for the pre‐qualification analysis is $7,500. 
 




                                                  5