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17 Asml Worldwide Contact Information - ASML HOLDING NV - 3-12-2003

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					Exhibit 99.7 ASML G R A P H I C O M I T T E D Environment, Health & Safety Report 2002

ASML Environment, Health & Safety Report 2002 ASML Mission Providing leading edge imaging solutions to continually improve our customers global competitiveness

Contents 4 About ASML 5 Message to Our Shareholders 6 Highlights from 2002 7 Goals for 2002 8 Waste 9 Energy 11 Air 12 Water 13 Cooling Capacity 14 Health and Safety 16 Additional Achievements in 2002 16 Goals for 2003 17 ASML Worldwide Contact Information

About ASML ASML is the world's leading provider of lithography systems for the semiconductor industry, manufacturing complex machines that are critical to the production of integrated circuits or chips. ASML technology transfers circuit patterns onto silicon wafers to make every kind of chip used today, as well as those for tomorrow. This technological advancement of making chips increases as digital products become more pervasive - such as

ASML Environment, Health & Safety Report 2002 ASML Mission Providing leading edge imaging solutions to continually improve our customers global competitiveness

Contents 4 About ASML 5 Message to Our Shareholders 6 Highlights from 2002 7 Goals for 2002 8 Waste 9 Energy 11 Air 12 Water 13 Cooling Capacity 14 Health and Safety 16 Additional Achievements in 2002 16 Goals for 2003 17 ASML Worldwide Contact Information

About ASML ASML is the world's leading provider of lithography systems for the semiconductor industry, manufacturing complex machines that are critical to the production of integrated circuits or chips. ASML technology transfers circuit patterns onto silicon wafers to make every kind of chip used today, as well as those for tomorrow. This technological advancement of making chips increases as digital products become more pervasive - such as mobile phones, consumer electronics, PCs, communications and information technology equipment. With each new generation of chips, personal and business products become smaller, lighter, faster, more powerful, more precise, more reliable and easier to use. In parallel, the global semiconductor industry is pursuing its long term roadmap for imaging ever-finer circuit lines on silicon wafers. ISO 14001 Certified: o Track facility, San Jose, California, U.S. o Corporate headquarters, Veldhoven, the Netherlands

Contents 4 About ASML 5 Message to Our Shareholders 6 Highlights from 2002 7 Goals for 2002 8 Waste 9 Energy 11 Air 12 Water 13 Cooling Capacity 14 Health and Safety 16 Additional Achievements in 2002 16 Goals for 2003 17 ASML Worldwide Contact Information

About ASML ASML is the world's leading provider of lithography systems for the semiconductor industry, manufacturing complex machines that are critical to the production of integrated circuits or chips. ASML technology transfers circuit patterns onto silicon wafers to make every kind of chip used today, as well as those for tomorrow. This technological advancement of making chips increases as digital products become more pervasive - such as mobile phones, consumer electronics, PCs, communications and information technology equipment. With each new generation of chips, personal and business products become smaller, lighter, faster, more powerful, more precise, more reliable and easier to use. In parallel, the global semiconductor industry is pursuing its long term roadmap for imaging ever-finer circuit lines on silicon wafers. ISO 14001 Certified: o Track facility, San Jose, California, U.S. o Corporate headquarters, Veldhoven, the Netherlands ISO 9001 Certified: o Corporate headquarters, Veldhoven, the Netherlands o Lithography facility, Wilton, Connecticut, U.S. o Track facility, San Jose, California, U.S. o Tempe office, Tempe, Arizona, U.S.

Message to Our Shareholders 2002 was year two of the worst downturn in the semiconductor industry's history. Looking at 2003, we see

About ASML ASML is the world's leading provider of lithography systems for the semiconductor industry, manufacturing complex machines that are critical to the production of integrated circuits or chips. ASML technology transfers circuit patterns onto silicon wafers to make every kind of chip used today, as well as those for tomorrow. This technological advancement of making chips increases as digital products become more pervasive - such as mobile phones, consumer electronics, PCs, communications and information technology equipment. With each new generation of chips, personal and business products become smaller, lighter, faster, more powerful, more precise, more reliable and easier to use. In parallel, the global semiconductor industry is pursuing its long term roadmap for imaging ever-finer circuit lines on silicon wafers. ISO 14001 Certified: o Track facility, San Jose, California, U.S. o Corporate headquarters, Veldhoven, the Netherlands ISO 9001 Certified: o Corporate headquarters, Veldhoven, the Netherlands o Lithography facility, Wilton, Connecticut, U.S. o Track facility, San Jose, California, U.S. o Tempe office, Tempe, Arizona, U.S.

Message to Our Shareholders 2002 was year two of the worst downturn in the semiconductor industry's history. Looking at 2003, we see neither rapid recovery nor major improvements. However, our environment health and safety (EHS) policy continued to be important to us in 2002, resulting in some achievements we are proud of, such as the ISO 14001 certification of our headquarters in Veldhoven, the Netherlands. Some EHS activities were curtailed or postponed due to budgetary restraints. However, our objective remains to build and maintain an EHS management system in compliance with international standards. We also intend to receive certification for our global operations through compliance with those standards by means of regular audits by independent experts. For 2003, we have established a number of goals, including: o Implement a new plan for energy and water reduction based on investigations completed in 2002 o Implement a project to separate waste streams to optimize recycling at all major locations o Initiate inclusion of OHSAS 18001 safety management criteria into ASML's management system o Continue to develop and implement a formal management system to drive the continual improvement of our environmental performance Our EHS policy continues to form an integral part of ASML's global company policy. It is based on the following principles: o ASML aims to satisfy EHS legislation and regulations o ASML endeavors to minimize the negative environmental effects of its activities. We will control and restrict emissions into the air, water and soil, as well as control and restrict noise pollution, waste and energy consumption. o ASML will shape its EHS policy by using an effective management system, conforming to international standards. o ASML will ensure that third parties working at ASML comply with our EHS standards.

Message to Our Shareholders 2002 was year two of the worst downturn in the semiconductor industry's history. Looking at 2003, we see neither rapid recovery nor major improvements. However, our environment health and safety (EHS) policy continued to be important to us in 2002, resulting in some achievements we are proud of, such as the ISO 14001 certification of our headquarters in Veldhoven, the Netherlands. Some EHS activities were curtailed or postponed due to budgetary restraints. However, our objective remains to build and maintain an EHS management system in compliance with international standards. We also intend to receive certification for our global operations through compliance with those standards by means of regular audits by independent experts. For 2003, we have established a number of goals, including: o Implement a new plan for energy and water reduction based on investigations completed in 2002 o Implement a project to separate waste streams to optimize recycling at all major locations o Initiate inclusion of OHSAS 18001 safety management criteria into ASML's management system o Continue to develop and implement a formal management system to drive the continual improvement of our environmental performance Our EHS policy continues to form an integral part of ASML's global company policy. It is based on the following principles: o ASML aims to satisfy EHS legislation and regulations o ASML endeavors to minimize the negative environmental effects of its activities. We will control and restrict emissions into the air, water and soil, as well as control and restrict noise pollution, waste and energy consumption. o ASML will shape its EHS policy by using an effective management system, conforming to international standards. o ASML will ensure that third parties working at ASML comply with our EHS standards. o ASML aims for open communication with our neighbors, the authorities and public interest groups. We invite our customers, suppliers, governmental groups and environment, health and safety bodies to work with us to achieve our goals. ASML will continue to do its part as a concerned partner wherever we do business. Doug J. Dunn President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Management ASML Holding N.V. Veldhoven, January 30, 2003

Highlights from 2002 Some of our accomplishments in the environment, health and safety arena are detailed below: o ASML in the Netherlands achieved its ISO 14001 certification based on its Environmental Management System (EMS) (excluding Marketing and Technology). o At our headquarters in the Netherlands, we completed the implementation of a building intelligence system known as PRIVA for better EHS performance of our buildings. o Worked with local engineering consultants in Veldhoven on plans to create an underground hot and cold water

Highlights from 2002 Some of our accomplishments in the environment, health and safety arena are detailed below: o ASML in the Netherlands achieved its ISO 14001 certification based on its Environmental Management System (EMS) (excluding Marketing and Technology). o At our headquarters in the Netherlands, we completed the implementation of a building intelligence system known as PRIVA for better EHS performance of our buildings. o Worked with local engineering consultants in Veldhoven on plans to create an underground hot and cold water storage (aquifer) that does not harm the local habitat. o In 2002, we launched an investigation to determine ways to reduce our water consumption in the Netherlands. o ASML in the Netherlands realized environmental, health and safety benefits from the nitrogen plant that was installed in 2001. o This year, ASML in the Netherlands hired a local consultant to start a project to separate streams of waste for recycling to be implemented in 2003. o We performed a risk assessment survey of soil contamination in the Netherlands. o We continued our waste water analysis project with the Dutch local municipality and made adjustments as needed. o ASML facilities participated in water conservation by using reclaimed water from municipal waste water treatment for landscape irrigation. o ASML chaired a task force for development of the SEMI S19 industry safety guideline for Personnel EHS Training published in 2002.

Goals for 2002 In 2002, ASML focused its environmental program on the following activities: o Making the cleanroom cleaner o Using an energy-saving aquifer for underground water cooling o Risk assessment of soil contamination o Waste Water Composition Analysis o Environmental management on a global scale o Recycling and revamping of packaging o Decreasing water use o Changing from simple to complex gases and using them in a more economical way Activities are described in detail on the following pages.

Goals for 2002 In 2002, ASML focused its environmental program on the following activities: o Making the cleanroom cleaner o Using an energy-saving aquifer for underground water cooling o Risk assessment of soil contamination o Waste Water Composition Analysis o Environmental management on a global scale o Recycling and revamping of packaging o Decreasing water use o Changing from simple to complex gases and using them in a more economical way Activities are described in detail on the following pages.

Waste In 2002, ASML in the Netherlands hired a waste analysis consultant to help us improve our waste performance. The consultant categorized the major streams of waste that ASML produces in our daily business activities. A plan was then prepared for ASML to separate and recycle these major streams, which include wood, plastic, aluminum, stainless steel and plastic foil. In 2002, we started a project to separate these streams. Improvements will be implemented in 2003. Recycling Glass, paper and plastic was collected and recycled at most ASML facilities worldwide. In addition, product shipping containers are returned to ASML for reuse. Our offices in China, Japan and Korea initiated the following office policies in 2002: o Stopped using paper cups o Stopped using wooden chop sticks o Printed documents on both sides
Waste (Veldhoven only) 2001 2002

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Domestic waste 456 408 Paper 196 101 Wood* 123 187 Swill 194 219

(figures in metric tons) * Wood waste is related to our construction activities
Special waste flows (Veldhoven only) 2001 2002

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Electronics 14 16 Sulfuric acid 48 47

Waste In 2002, ASML in the Netherlands hired a waste analysis consultant to help us improve our waste performance. The consultant categorized the major streams of waste that ASML produces in our daily business activities. A plan was then prepared for ASML to separate and recycle these major streams, which include wood, plastic, aluminum, stainless steel and plastic foil. In 2002, we started a project to separate these streams. Improvements will be implemented in 2003. Recycling Glass, paper and plastic was collected and recycled at most ASML facilities worldwide. In addition, product shipping containers are returned to ASML for reuse. Our offices in China, Japan and Korea initiated the following office policies in 2002: o Stopped using paper cups o Stopped using wooden chop sticks o Printed documents on both sides
Waste (Veldhoven only) 2001 2002

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Domestic waste 456 408 Paper 196 101 Wood* 123 187 Swill 194 219

(figures in metric tons) * Wood waste is related to our construction activities
Special waste flows (Veldhoven only) 2001 2002

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Electronics 14 16 Sulfuric acid 48 47 Other chemicals 15 17 Metals 29 63

(figures in metric tons)

Energy Further use of the Energy Management System (EMS) installed in Veidhoven ASML manufactures systems that aid in the production of semiconductor chips. For the production of these systems, we consume and generate large amounts of energy. When energy is generated, harmful gases are emitted to the surrounding environment. Therefore, energy is our main environmental concern and is the major focus of our environmental conservation efforts. In 2002, ASML has implemented many energy=conservation projects that focus on energy reduction in our cleanroom and in our office buildings.
Energy Consumption 2001 2002

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Electricity 117,700 127,374 Co-generator return supply (MWh) (Veldhoven only) 4,906 15,503 Natural gas (1000 m') 10,975 10,284 Fuel oil (1000 ga) (Wilton only) 162,620 206,000

Energy Further use of the Energy Management System (EMS) installed in Veidhoven ASML manufactures systems that aid in the production of semiconductor chips. For the production of these systems, we consume and generate large amounts of energy. When energy is generated, harmful gases are emitted to the surrounding environment. Therefore, energy is our main environmental concern and is the major focus of our environmental conservation efforts. In 2002, ASML has implemented many energy=conservation projects that focus on energy reduction in our cleanroom and in our office buildings.
Energy Consumption 2001 2002

------------------------------------------------------------------------------Electricity 117,700 127,374 Co-generator return supply (MWh) (Veldhoven only) 4,906 15,503 Natural gas (1000 m') 10,975 10,284 Fuel oil (1000 ga) (Wilton only) 162,620 206,000 Propane (GA) (U.S. only) 16,000 16,500 Hydrogen cuft (U.S. only) 107,000 4,500*

* Drop in product (lamps) demand EHS management in our buildings ASML buildings on the ASML campus in the Netherlands were designed with many energy-saving features, including high-efficiency fluorescent lighting, an energy generator to produce our own heating, high-quality heating boilers and wall and window insulation. To complement our energy efficient building design, in 2002, ASML in the Netherlands completed the implementation of the PRIVA building intelligence system in all 10 buildings on the ASML campus in 2002. This system contributes to our environmental, health and safety performance by monitoring various aspects of the buildings so that immediate action can be taken when needed, and by controlling energy use in the buildings. The following are examples of the capabilities of our PRIVA system: o Constantly monitors the gas lines and gas storage, and sounds an alarm when there is a leak or other hazardous situation o Sounds an alarm when a fire or smoke is detected o Continuously monitors and reports on the air quality inside the buildings o Helps save energy by automatically switching off lights and turning down heating and air conditioning after working hours o Monitors wastewater and sounds an alarm when the quality deviates from the defined standard o Increases and decreases the ventilation that purifies the air in our cleanrooms according to the number of systems that are running. This regulation ensures that the ventilation does not run continuously in full force o Allows us to regulate the quantity of process-related utilities such as compressed air

Energy Reduction in the cleanroom Our manufacturing process relies heavily on the use of cleanrooms. Cleanrooms are work areas in which air has been made as clean (a limited number of dust particles per cubic meter) as possible. To achieve these clean conditions, air from outside the work area is filtered, cooled down, moisturized and then cooled to the required temperature. Not only does the air have to be treated the first time, but it must be kept permanently clean. To do so, the air is continually pumped around the room. Dust particles generated within the room are immediately removed by the air flow Three-quarters of the air used can be recycled, and one quarter must be replenished from the outside. Even though air is cooled as it enters the room, the temperature rises quickly because the equipment inside the work area produces a lot of heat. Therefore, in addition to being continually pumped around the room, the air must be constantly cooled. These processes consume a tremendous amount of energy. Because

Energy Reduction in the cleanroom Our manufacturing process relies heavily on the use of cleanrooms. Cleanrooms are work areas in which air has been made as clean (a limited number of dust particles per cubic meter) as possible. To achieve these clean conditions, air from outside the work area is filtered, cooled down, moisturized and then cooled to the required temperature. Not only does the air have to be treated the first time, but it must be kept permanently clean. To do so, the air is continually pumped around the room. Dust particles generated within the room are immediately removed by the air flow Three-quarters of the air used can be recycled, and one quarter must be replenished from the outside. Even though air is cooled as it enters the room, the temperature rises quickly because the equipment inside the work area produces a lot of heat. Therefore, in addition to being continually pumped around the room, the air must be constantly cooled. These processes consume a tremendous amount of energy. Because of the prolonged industry downturn, we delayed the investigation into how we can reduce energy consumption in our cleanrooms. However, at the end of the year, we resumed the investigation, which will continue into 2003. Further energy reductions Apart from the building management system and the investigation into using underground aquifers, in 2002, we also began an additional investigation into energy savings. For example, the investigation is exploring ways to change the cleanroom energy specifications. The ASML cleanroom currently adheres to strict temperature and humidity requirements. We can save energy by building more flexibility into these requirements so that less energy for cooling and heating is required. We are also looking at ways to design our manufacturing systems so that they give off less heat, and in turn, less cooling is required to maintain the needed cleanroom temperatures. These energy-saving ideas were part of a complete plan to save energy; this plan will be implemented in 2003 In Asia, the following every-saving initiatives were implemented in 2002: o In Korea, three offices were combined to one location, saving on energy costs o A solar heater was installed in the China office to warm the water in restrooms o Timers were installed to automatically turn off office lights at set times o An energy-saving air conditioner control system was employed in Japan

Air In 2002, ASML completed the implementation of a new gas management system, which is designed and controlled by an engineering firm known as Hoekloos in the Netherlands. This gas management system is connected to our PRIVA building intelligence system. ASML uses many specialty gases, including helium, krypton and fluorine. Each clean room needs these gases in different quantities, with different compositions and different levels of quality. Using the gas management system connected to PRIVA, we can monitor the flow of these gases on line. Monitoring the gas flow enables us to detect gas leakage, as well as management information such as usage trends. Environmental benefits of new nitrogen plant In 2001, ASML installed a plant to manufacture liquid nitrogen in the Netherlands. In 2002, the nitrogen plant has been in full operation and has been proving beneficial to the environment, as well as to the health and safety of our employees. o ASML needed the plant because of the large amount of nitrogen that we use in our manufacturing operations. This amount is increasing because our newer systems consume more nitrogen than the older systems do. o Before the plant was installed, ASML used approximately 700 liters per week of gasoline in the nitrogen transport trucks. With the new plant, we no longer have to transport the nitrogen we use. Thus, our consumption of gasoline, as well as the emission of gasoline to the air, is reduced.

Air In 2002, ASML completed the implementation of a new gas management system, which is designed and controlled by an engineering firm known as Hoekloos in the Netherlands. This gas management system is connected to our PRIVA building intelligence system. ASML uses many specialty gases, including helium, krypton and fluorine. Each clean room needs these gases in different quantities, with different compositions and different levels of quality. Using the gas management system connected to PRIVA, we can monitor the flow of these gases on line. Monitoring the gas flow enables us to detect gas leakage, as well as management information such as usage trends. Environmental benefits of new nitrogen plant In 2001, ASML installed a plant to manufacture liquid nitrogen in the Netherlands. In 2002, the nitrogen plant has been in full operation and has been proving beneficial to the environment, as well as to the health and safety of our employees. o ASML needed the plant because of the large amount of nitrogen that we use in our manufacturing operations. This amount is increasing because our newer systems consume more nitrogen than the older systems do. o Before the plant was installed, ASML used approximately 700 liters per week of gasoline in the nitrogen transport trucks. With the new plant, we no longer have to transport the nitrogen we use. Thus, our consumption of gasoline, as well as the emission of gasoline to the air, is reduced. o The plant also decreases health and safety risks for our employees, because loading and unloading the nitrogen was a safety risk. In addition, nitrogen was sometimes spilled during loading and unloading. With the new fixed lines in the nitrogen plant, the nitrogen is not spilled, and employees no longer have to handle the nitrogen. Working toward energy reduction The energy reduction investigations that we have undertaken in 2002 will ultimately contribute to the reduction of pollutants to the air. If we generate less energy, we will also emit less harmful gases.
Emissions to air 2001 (Veldhoven only) 2002 (Veldhoven only) 2002 (worldwi _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ C02 (tons) (fuel) NOx (kg) 19,500 22,825 15,819 17,630 27,595

Special gases (Veldhoven only) 2001 2002 _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Specialities* 1,723 4,388 Nitrogen bulk** 2,798 1,109 Nitrogen produced*** 0 5,180 _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (figures in metric tonnes)

* Mainly mixtures of noble gases ** In metric tonnes Higher figures caused by exacter registrations by Hoekloos (Total Gas Management). In 2002, one employee of Hoekloos is present about 10 hours a week on ASML property to manage all storage and transport of gases. *** Nitrogen is produced by the nitrogen plant in Veldhoven.

Water In 2002, we launched an investigation to determine ways to reduce our water consumption in the Netherlands. A consultant in the Netherlands performed the investigation. As part of the survey, we are examining how we can use excess ground water for process water rather than pumping it into the nearby canals. Unfortunately, the amount of drainage water seems to be too small to give a significant water consumption reduction.

Water In 2002, we launched an investigation to determine ways to reduce our water consumption in the Netherlands. A consultant in the Netherlands performed the investigation. As part of the survey, we are examining how we can use excess ground water for process water rather than pumping it into the nearby canals. Unfortunately, the amount of drainage water seems to be too small to give a significant water consumption reduction.
Special gasses (Veldhoven only) 2001 2002 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Total water usage (m3) 418,518 378,921

Breakdown of total water consumption (Veldhoven) 2001 2002 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Water disposed to sewage 364,103 110,330 Cooling water to surface 43,952 71,689 Moisturizing steam (as 2.5% of total use) 10,463 5,191

(figures in cubic meters)

Waste Water analysis In 2001, ASML in the Netherlands made an agreement with the local municipality to continue a waste water analysis program for 1.5 years. The program continued through 2002 and will continue in the beginning of 2003. All results from waste water analysis are communicated to local authorities. Based on the results, agreements will be made for periodic waste water analyses. Soil risk assessment In 2002, we performed a risk assessment survey of soil contamination in the Netherlands. The survey was carried out according to the Dutch NBR-standard. The results of the survey classify the risk of contaminating the soil as minimum at the ASML premises in Veldhoven. Therefore, no additional measures are required by the NBR.

Cooling Capacity Application of underground cool storage in Veldhoven, the Netherlands, to limit consumption. In 2001, we launched an investigation into using an underground aquifer to store cool water underground to cool our cleanrooms. (An aquifer is a geological formation that can hold water.) The water is kept cool by drilling a well in the aquifer, pumping up the water inside, cooling the water and then feeding it back into the aquifer. The water in the aquifer can cool the air in an extremely cost-effective way, saving significant amounts of energy. Additionally, ASML in the Netherlands has a co-generation plant through which we burn natural gas to provide heat and electricity. The surplus heat produced by the co-generation plant is cooled and used in our cleanrooms and offices through a process known as absorption cooling. In winter, since less cooling is required, the surplus heat is lost into cooling towers. However, in the summer, the absorption cooling is not enough, so extra capacity must be provided using normal compression cooling techniques, which use tremendous amounts of energy. To achieve a better balance of cooling and heating, ASML would like to use underground aquifers. The aquifer would result in energy savings for ASML by enabling us to store the excess cool energy in the winter for cleanroom and summertime use. In turn, we could store excess warm air in the summer to heat the offices in the winter. In 2001, the progress on this plan was slowed by concerns from local environmental authorities, that the technique would change the level of underground water flow in the area, and would subsequently endanger the

Cooling Capacity Application of underground cool storage in Veldhoven, the Netherlands, to limit consumption. In 2001, we launched an investigation into using an underground aquifer to store cool water underground to cool our cleanrooms. (An aquifer is a geological formation that can hold water.) The water is kept cool by drilling a well in the aquifer, pumping up the water inside, cooling the water and then feeding it back into the aquifer. The water in the aquifer can cool the air in an extremely cost-effective way, saving significant amounts of energy. Additionally, ASML in the Netherlands has a co-generation plant through which we burn natural gas to provide heat and electricity. The surplus heat produced by the co-generation plant is cooled and used in our cleanrooms and offices through a process known as absorption cooling. In winter, since less cooling is required, the surplus heat is lost into cooling towers. However, in the summer, the absorption cooling is not enough, so extra capacity must be provided using normal compression cooling techniques, which use tremendous amounts of energy. To achieve a better balance of cooling and heating, ASML would like to use underground aquifers. The aquifer would result in energy savings for ASML by enabling us to store the excess cool energy in the winter for cleanroom and summertime use. In turn, we could store excess warm air in the summer to heat the offices in the winter. In 2001, the progress on this plan was slowed by concerns from local environmental authorities, that the technique would change the level of underground water flow in the area, and would subsequently endanger the local habitat. ASML was, however, convinced that a solution could be found that would satisfy the concerns of environmental authorities and still enable us to create the aquifer. With this goal in mind, in 2002, we contracted a local engineering firm to assist us with the plans for the aquifer. Together, we have formulated proposals to prevent the aquifer from harming the environment. One proposal is the formation of a ditch around the aquifer, which would catch and stabilize the water so that it does not affect the surrounding water levels. We are also investigating other more cost-effective ideas. In 2003, we will again approach the environmental authorities with a new economical solution. This solution will allow us to create the aquifer while satisfying environmental concerns.

Health and Safety Incident Rate For the calendar year ending December 31, 2002, the ASML worldwide employee injury rate (all reported injuries) is 2.78 incidences per 100 workers. Average monthly headcount was used for the calculation; therefore, the rate does not account for part-time workers, overtime hours, sick time, vacation, etc. The data accounts for all documented injuries, regardless of severity. Although conservative, this rate is well below the U.S. industry injury rate of 6.1 serious injuries per 100 full-time workers. 2002 ASML work related fatalities = 0 Emergency preparation ASML ensures its employees are properly trained in how to respond in the event of an emergency such as a fire, earthquake, or chemical release. To help ensure the safety of our employees, ASML maintains emergency response teams. These teams are trained to assist and lead employees during dangerous situations. The emergency teams are trained in first aid, building evacuation and fire fighting. ASML always keeps an adequate number of emergency team members to support its employee base. Further 2002 health and safety initiatives

Health and Safety Incident Rate For the calendar year ending December 31, 2002, the ASML worldwide employee injury rate (all reported injuries) is 2.78 incidences per 100 workers. Average monthly headcount was used for the calculation; therefore, the rate does not account for part-time workers, overtime hours, sick time, vacation, etc. The data accounts for all documented injuries, regardless of severity. Although conservative, this rate is well below the U.S. industry injury rate of 6.1 serious injuries per 100 full-time workers. 2002 ASML work related fatalities = 0 Emergency preparation ASML ensures its employees are properly trained in how to respond in the event of an emergency such as a fire, earthquake, or chemical release. To help ensure the safety of our employees, ASML maintains emergency response teams. These teams are trained to assist and lead employees during dangerous situations. The emergency teams are trained in first aid, building evacuation and fire fighting. ASML always keeps an adequate number of emergency team members to support its employee base. Further 2002 health and safety initiatives o In Japan, all employees attended facility safety training 10 times during the year; the training was conducted by the Kawasaki city safety department. o All Japanese employees attended fire and earthquake escape training. o A minimum of two engineers were on duty full time in the cleanrooms of Japanese customer fabs to fulfil customer safety regulation requirements. o In addition to training in emergency procedures, ASML provides personnel with training in the potential hazards associated with their job and appropriate techniques to ensure their protection. Training is offered in topics such as chemical hazards, hazardous energy control and personal protective equipment. o ASML routinely conducts safety audits in its facilities worldwide. For example, in Korea, an audit was conducted, and the suggested safety improvements resulting from the audit were implemented by the end of the year. Examples of these improvements include installing a switch to immediately turn off training test equipment during an emergency situation, placing hazard labels on equipment and protecting all gas lines.

o In Veldhoven, the company doctor moved into a new surgery at the ASML plant itself. Now employees don't have to go outside the campus for their appointments. Occupational Health and Safety Risk Assessment In a cycle of three years, ASML updates its existing Health and Safety Risk Assessment to assess and evaluate any new technology and processes introduced. In 2002, such an update was executed for half of the buildings of ASML's campus, regarding about 40% of the workforce. Based on the results, ASML will adjust its policies and will structuralize them in a management system (OSHAS 18001, see Goals for 2003). In the fourth quarter, our OHSE department gained access to a database for Material Safety Data Sheets. It is now possible to search for any chemical, which ASML was not able to do before. Also, this database allows us to store all the MSDSs of chemicals in use within ASML.

o In Veldhoven, the company doctor moved into a new surgery at the ASML plant itself. Now employees don't have to go outside the campus for their appointments. Occupational Health and Safety Risk Assessment In a cycle of three years, ASML updates its existing Health and Safety Risk Assessment to assess and evaluate any new technology and processes introduced. In 2002, such an update was executed for half of the buildings of ASML's campus, regarding about 40% of the workforce. Based on the results, ASML will adjust its policies and will structuralize them in a management system (OSHAS 18001, see Goals for 2003). In the fourth quarter, our OHSE department gained access to a database for Material Safety Data Sheets. It is now possible to search for any chemical, which ASML was not able to do before. Also, this database allows us to store all the MSDSs of chemicals in use within ASML. Throughout 2002, sessions were organized to provide fire-instructions and building evacuation procedures. Videos showed the measures ASML takes to prevent a fire and the role employees play in the prevention scheme. Our employees from the ICT department were instructed on the inert gas fire-extinguishing system, which is in use in ASML's computer rooms.

Additional Achievements in 2002 ISO 14001 certification ASML in the Netherlands recently received ISO 14001 certification (excluding Marketing and Technology). The ISO 14001 is a standard that sets requirements for planning, measuring, reporting and improving the environmental performance of companies around the world. By achieving this certification, ASML in the Netherlands has shown that it meets the minimum demands of the International Standards Organization's (ISO's) requirements for good environmental performance. It also ensures that there is a system in place for constant environmental improvement. ISO 14001 requires the implementation of an Environmental Management System (EMS). ASML's EMS, as well as the ASML environmental organization in the Netherlands, were evaluated for the ISO 14001 certification. Conducting business in a responsible way Each year, ASML produces an external publication containing our corporate principles of ethical business conduct. This document shows how ASML conducts business in a responsible way in relation to the people with whom we interact, and to the environment. In 2002, Internal Communications translated this document into Internal Guidelines for Ethical Business Conduct. The guidelines address what ethical business conduct means for us internally as a responsible global enterprise. Managers and team leaders were encouraged to stress the importance of the document to employees and discuss how it relates to their daily work. Goals for 2003 For 2003, ASML has set a number of environment, health and safety goals o In Veldhoven, meet with local authorities to come to an agreement for an underground aquifer for energy reduction in our cleanrooms that is in no way harmful to the environment. o Continue investigating additional ways to reduce energy consumption in our cleanrooms. o Implement a new plan for energy and water reduction based on investigations completed in 2002.

Additional Achievements in 2002 ISO 14001 certification ASML in the Netherlands recently received ISO 14001 certification (excluding Marketing and Technology). The ISO 14001 is a standard that sets requirements for planning, measuring, reporting and improving the environmental performance of companies around the world. By achieving this certification, ASML in the Netherlands has shown that it meets the minimum demands of the International Standards Organization's (ISO's) requirements for good environmental performance. It also ensures that there is a system in place for constant environmental improvement. ISO 14001 requires the implementation of an Environmental Management System (EMS). ASML's EMS, as well as the ASML environmental organization in the Netherlands, were evaluated for the ISO 14001 certification. Conducting business in a responsible way Each year, ASML produces an external publication containing our corporate principles of ethical business conduct. This document shows how ASML conducts business in a responsible way in relation to the people with whom we interact, and to the environment. In 2002, Internal Communications translated this document into Internal Guidelines for Ethical Business Conduct. The guidelines address what ethical business conduct means for us internally as a responsible global enterprise. Managers and team leaders were encouraged to stress the importance of the document to employees and discuss how it relates to their daily work. Goals for 2003 For 2003, ASML has set a number of environment, health and safety goals o In Veldhoven, meet with local authorities to come to an agreement for an underground aquifer for energy reduction in our cleanrooms that is in no way harmful to the environment. o Continue investigating additional ways to reduce energy consumption in our cleanrooms. o Implement a new plan for energy and water reduction based on investigations completed in 2002. o Implement a project to separate waste streams to optimize recycling at all major locations. o Initiate inclusion of OHSAS 18001 safety management criteria into ASML's management system. o Implement an integrated data management system to automate key EHS performance data. o Continue to train ISO 14001 strategy throughout the company.

ASML. Worldwide Contact Information Corporate Headquaters De Run 6501 5504 DR Veldhoven The Netherlands Mailing address P.O. Box 324

ASML. Worldwide Contact Information Corporate Headquaters De Run 6501 5504 DR Veldhoven The Netherlands Mailing address P.O. Box 324 5500 AH Veldhoven The Netherlands U.S. main offices 8555 South River Parkway Tempe, AZ 85284 U.S.A. 77 Danbury Road Wilton, CT 06897 U.S.A. Asia main office Suite 603, 6/F One International Finance Center 1, Harbour View Street Central, Hong Kong, SAR Corporate Communications phone: +31 40 268 4941 fax: +31 40 268 3655 e-mail: corpcom@asml.com Investor Relations phone: +31 40 268 3938 fax: +31 40 268 3655 e-mail: investor.relations@asmI.com For more information please visit our website www.asml.com

Exhibit 99.8 [GRAPHIC OMITTED] ASML Social Report 2002

Exhibit 99.8 [GRAPHIC OMITTED] ASML Social Report 2002

ASML Social Report 2002 ASML Mission Providing leading edge imaging solutions to continually improve our customers' global competitiveness

Contents 3 Message to Our Shareholders and Other Stakeholders 4 Showing Our Commitment 5 2002 Highlights 6 Identifying the Right Resources 7 Developing Our Valued Talent 9 Motivating Employees 10 Supporting Employee Involvement 11 Unifying Our Efforts 13 Keeping Employees in Touch 14 Commitment to People 15 A Quick Look at the Organization 16 ASML Worldwide Contact Information

Message to Our Shareholders and Other Stakeholders 2002 was year two of the worst downturn in the semiconductor industry's history. Looking at 2003, we see neither rapid recovery nor major improvement.

ASML Social Report 2002 ASML Mission Providing leading edge imaging solutions to continually improve our customers' global competitiveness

Contents 3 Message to Our Shareholders and Other Stakeholders 4 Showing Our Commitment 5 2002 Highlights 6 Identifying the Right Resources 7 Developing Our Valued Talent 9 Motivating Employees 10 Supporting Employee Involvement 11 Unifying Our Efforts 13 Keeping Employees in Touch 14 Commitment to People 15 A Quick Look at the Organization 16 ASML Worldwide Contact Information

Message to Our Shareholders and Other Stakeholders 2002 was year two of the worst downturn in the semiconductor industry's history. Looking at 2003, we see neither rapid recovery nor major improvement. Moving forward, ASML will focus on its core competence: lithography. As a result, ASML announced its decision to terminate Track operations in December 2002 and the Company also disclosed its intention to divest Thermal operations in 2003. In December 2002, ASML employed approximately 300 people in the discontinued Track operations and approximately 450 people in Thermal operations. In addition, we are implementing actions to rightsize our global lithography organization consistent with market conditions. Regrettably, this means we had to announce the intention to reduce our lithography work force by approximately 700 positions worldwide. The steps we are taking are difficult but necessary to secure ASML's future.

Contents 3 Message to Our Shareholders and Other Stakeholders 4 Showing Our Commitment 5 2002 Highlights 6 Identifying the Right Resources 7 Developing Our Valued Talent 9 Motivating Employees 10 Supporting Employee Involvement 11 Unifying Our Efforts 13 Keeping Employees in Touch 14 Commitment to People 15 A Quick Look at the Organization 16 ASML Worldwide Contact Information

Message to Our Shareholders and Other Stakeholders 2002 was year two of the worst downturn in the semiconductor industry's history. Looking at 2003, we see neither rapid recovery nor major improvement. Moving forward, ASML will focus on its core competence: lithography. As a result, ASML announced its decision to terminate Track operations in December 2002 and the Company also disclosed its intention to divest Thermal operations in 2003. In December 2002, ASML employed approximately 300 people in the discontinued Track operations and approximately 450 people in Thermal operations. In addition, we are implementing actions to rightsize our global lithography organization consistent with market conditions. Regrettably, this means we had to announce the intention to reduce our lithography work force by approximately 700 positions worldwide. The steps we are taking are difficult but necessary to secure ASML's future. Cycles in the semiconductor industry are running deeper and longer than ever before, creating special challenges for suppliers of capital equipment. However, ASML works hard to provide employees with opportunities for professional growth and development during both good and bad economic times. This commitment to our employees was evident in 2002, as detailed in this report. And it will continue in 2003 as we work together to build our core business, sustain our customer focus and strengthen our technology leadership. The Board of Management would like to recognize every employee for their contributions in 2002. We thank them for their creative, hard work. Doug J. Dunn President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Management ASML Holding N.V. Veldhoven, January 30, 2003

Message to Our Shareholders and Other Stakeholders 2002 was year two of the worst downturn in the semiconductor industry's history. Looking at 2003, we see neither rapid recovery nor major improvement. Moving forward, ASML will focus on its core competence: lithography. As a result, ASML announced its decision to terminate Track operations in December 2002 and the Company also disclosed its intention to divest Thermal operations in 2003. In December 2002, ASML employed approximately 300 people in the discontinued Track operations and approximately 450 people in Thermal operations. In addition, we are implementing actions to rightsize our global lithography organization consistent with market conditions. Regrettably, this means we had to announce the intention to reduce our lithography work force by approximately 700 positions worldwide. The steps we are taking are difficult but necessary to secure ASML's future. Cycles in the semiconductor industry are running deeper and longer than ever before, creating special challenges for suppliers of capital equipment. However, ASML works hard to provide employees with opportunities for professional growth and development during both good and bad economic times. This commitment to our employees was evident in 2002, as detailed in this report. And it will continue in 2003 as we work together to build our core business, sustain our customer focus and strengthen our technology leadership. The Board of Management would like to recognize every employee for their contributions in 2002. We thank them for their creative, hard work. Doug J. Dunn President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Management ASML Holding N.V. Veldhoven, January 30, 2003

Showing Our Commitment ASML shows its commitment to customers by ensuring that we have the right employees in the right places at the right time. To have the best employees, we have to be the right kind of company. People are drawn to companies that care about them and provide them with an environment that stimulates achievement and professional development. Our global organization embodies rich diversity in skills, education, culture and working practices. Learning to work together and benefit from one another's strengths has served to enhance the excellence of our worldwide employee base and make us better equipped to face future challenges. [GRAPHIC OMITTED]

2002 Highlights o In December, ASML announced the intention to reduce the worldwide Lithography workforce significantly, the closing of our Track business and plans to divest the Thermal business. In addition, ASML announced salary control measures and bonus cancellations throughout the organization. These measures are aimed at ensuring ASML's ability to succeed in an ever-competitive world market for semiconductor equipment. o Offered structured management development programs to employees around the world. These programs helped us show our commitment to the professional advancement of our employees, even during times of economic difficulty.

Showing Our Commitment ASML shows its commitment to customers by ensuring that we have the right employees in the right places at the right time. To have the best employees, we have to be the right kind of company. People are drawn to companies that care about them and provide them with an environment that stimulates achievement and professional development. Our global organization embodies rich diversity in skills, education, culture and working practices. Learning to work together and benefit from one another's strengths has served to enhance the excellence of our worldwide employee base and make us better equipped to face future challenges. [GRAPHIC OMITTED]

2002 Highlights o In December, ASML announced the intention to reduce the worldwide Lithography workforce significantly, the closing of our Track business and plans to divest the Thermal business. In addition, ASML announced salary control measures and bonus cancellations throughout the organization. These measures are aimed at ensuring ASML's ability to succeed in an ever-competitive world market for semiconductor equipment. o Offered structured management development programs to employees around the world. These programs helped us show our commitment to the professional advancement of our employees, even during times of economic difficulty. o Improved efficiency and consistency for employees around the globe by merging facilities where possible, and aligning jobs, personnel policies and compensation and benefits packages across all locations worldwide. o Stepped up recruitment efforts in Asia to meet the needs of the Asian semiconductor market, which has shown high growth potential. o Introduced employee incentive programs, both on a global and local basis. We designed these programs to be beneficial to employees, and still meet our strict budget requirements. o Converted our European Recruitment Center to a Resource Center. The new Resource Center's task is not only to bring new employees in to the company, but also to ensure that existing employees are in the right job that fits their skills, talents and career goals. o Created internal guidelines for our external publication on ethical business conduct. These guidelines served to help employees understand how to incorporate ethical business conduct in their daily work. o Created the ASML Trust, a non-profit charitable foundation, to reach out to the communities in which we operate.

Identifying the Right Resources Although recruitment for new employees was very limited in 2002, ASML still maintained visibility in the job recruitment markets; this helps us maintain our position as a world-class employer so that when the upturn comes, potential employees are aware of us and what we offer to our employees. We need to be well-positioned in the job market when the upturn comes so that we have the right people for our highly specialized jobs when and where we need them worldwide. Using resources effectively Because of the lack of recruiting activity due to the industry downturn, ASML converted its European

2002 Highlights o In December, ASML announced the intention to reduce the worldwide Lithography workforce significantly, the closing of our Track business and plans to divest the Thermal business. In addition, ASML announced salary control measures and bonus cancellations throughout the organization. These measures are aimed at ensuring ASML's ability to succeed in an ever-competitive world market for semiconductor equipment. o Offered structured management development programs to employees around the world. These programs helped us show our commitment to the professional advancement of our employees, even during times of economic difficulty. o Improved efficiency and consistency for employees around the globe by merging facilities where possible, and aligning jobs, personnel policies and compensation and benefits packages across all locations worldwide. o Stepped up recruitment efforts in Asia to meet the needs of the Asian semiconductor market, which has shown high growth potential. o Introduced employee incentive programs, both on a global and local basis. We designed these programs to be beneficial to employees, and still meet our strict budget requirements. o Converted our European Recruitment Center to a Resource Center. The new Resource Center's task is not only to bring new employees in to the company, but also to ensure that existing employees are in the right job that fits their skills, talents and career goals. o Created internal guidelines for our external publication on ethical business conduct. These guidelines served to help employees understand how to incorporate ethical business conduct in their daily work. o Created the ASML Trust, a non-profit charitable foundation, to reach out to the communities in which we operate.

Identifying the Right Resources Although recruitment for new employees was very limited in 2002, ASML still maintained visibility in the job recruitment markets; this helps us maintain our position as a world-class employer so that when the upturn comes, potential employees are aware of us and what we offer to our employees. We need to be well-positioned in the job market when the upturn comes so that we have the right people for our highly specialized jobs when and where we need them worldwide. Using resources effectively Because of the lack of recruiting activity due to the industry downturn, ASML converted its European Recruitment Center based in the Netherlands into a Resource Center in 2002. The Resource Center's focus is not only on bringing new employees into the company, but also on supporting the transfer of people within the company. The Resource Center ensures that employees are in the right job that fits their skills, talents and career goals. The Resource Center also uses its network outside of the company to help place people who decide to pursue interests beyond ASML. By expanding its scope of employee services, the Resource Center will help us to become better equipped to manage the peaks and valleys of the semiconductor industry. Developing future talent ASML participates in internship programs with local universities in the countries in which we operate. These programs help us to give students work experience, while developing professional and technical skills in potential future employees. The programs also promote an understanding of ASML and our technology among international educational institutions. This year, we sponsored 83 interns worldwide. In 2002, ASML began an initiative to develop specialized lithography talent in China, which has emerged as the

Identifying the Right Resources Although recruitment for new employees was very limited in 2002, ASML still maintained visibility in the job recruitment markets; this helps us maintain our position as a world-class employer so that when the upturn comes, potential employees are aware of us and what we offer to our employees. We need to be well-positioned in the job market when the upturn comes so that we have the right people for our highly specialized jobs when and where we need them worldwide. Using resources effectively Because of the lack of recruiting activity due to the industry downturn, ASML converted its European Recruitment Center based in the Netherlands into a Resource Center in 2002. The Resource Center's focus is not only on bringing new employees into the company, but also on supporting the transfer of people within the company. The Resource Center ensures that employees are in the right job that fits their skills, talents and career goals. The Resource Center also uses its network outside of the company to help place people who decide to pursue interests beyond ASML. By expanding its scope of employee services, the Resource Center will help us to become better equipped to manage the peaks and valleys of the semiconductor industry. Developing future talent ASML participates in internship programs with local universities in the countries in which we operate. These programs help us to give students work experience, while developing professional and technical skills in potential future employees. The programs also promote an understanding of ASML and our technology among international educational institutions. This year, we sponsored 83 interns worldwide. In 2002, ASML began an initiative to develop specialized lithography talent in China, which has emerged as the world's largest growth market for Integrated Circuit (IC) manufacturing. As part of the initiative, ASML is sponsoring a lithography training center at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The training center activities will result in a pool of skilled engineers specialized in lithography and trained on ASML equipment in this very important market for ASML. It also provides a place for ASML to train our engineers in China. Applicant tracking ASML adopted a new worldwide applicant tracking system in 2002. The online system assists us in matching applicant qualifications with vacancies in all ASML locations around the world. Applicants whose qualifications do not match immediate vacancies remain in the applicant tracking database and are considered for future opportunities. This efficient method of applicant tracking will result in time and cost savings for job recruitment efforts. In 2002, ASML in the Netherlands completed a survey of people entered into the applicant tracking system. The intention of the survey was to get ASML in touch with the needs of people in the job market. Based on the results of the survey, ASML has better insight into what people want to know about ASML and when they want to know it. For example, we now know that 94 percent of people in our database in 2002 wanted to have information about vacancies, and 80 percent in 2002 wanted information on education, training and technological developments.

Developing Our Valued Talent ASML has made a firm commitment to develop the careers and competencies of our employees and follows through on this commitment both in good and in bad economic times. Despite the economic slowdown, the Board of Management endorsed development and learning programs in 2002. These programs focus on improving current job performance and on developing competencies to help employees reach the next level in their career paths. Development and Learning (D&L) includes several worldwide activities, such as the Management Development and Planning (MD&P) process, global succession planning, Personal Development Plans (PDP), the Professional Leadership Program (PLP), coaching discussions, functional training and D&L tracking systems for all employees.

Developing Our Valued Talent ASML has made a firm commitment to develop the careers and competencies of our employees and follows through on this commitment both in good and in bad economic times. Despite the economic slowdown, the Board of Management endorsed development and learning programs in 2002. These programs focus on improving current job performance and on developing competencies to help employees reach the next level in their career paths. Development and Learning (D&L) includes several worldwide activities, such as the Management Development and Planning (MD&P) process, global succession planning, Personal Development Plans (PDP), the Professional Leadership Program (PLP), coaching discussions, functional training and D&L tracking systems for all employees. Management Development and Planning The MD&P review process was put in place to identify leadership talent in ASML. Managers identify an employee's career potential and development areas using the MD&P review form. The review form is based on ASML's leadership model, which outlines the competencies that we expect from our leadership. The review information is used as input for succession planning and later for personal development Global succession planning Having the right leaders at the right place and at the right time requires a worldwide system for succession planning. In 2002, ASML implemented a formal succession planning system to ensure quality of leadership at ASML worldwide. All critical positions are identified, and for each position, more than one successor is in place. The identified successors have the required knowledge and skills to perform the critical job functions. This system ensures organizational continuity and minimizes risks to the company when our key talent changes job positions. ASML SOCIAL REPORT 2002 Employees at higher job levels who have shown leadership potential develop a personal development plan with their managers. The PDP identifies an employee's career goals and the personal and professional development needed to reach these goals. Personal development promotes key competencies, such as self management, communication and organizational skills. Professional development includes technical or commercial education and training needed to develop job skills or experience. The PDP focuses on both of these areas that are key to developing leadership potential in employees. Professional Leadership Program ASML offers a Professional Leadership Program to employees in lower management levels who show high potential for career growth. During the program, participants selected from all disciplines, locations and backgrounds work together on project teams. The PLP thus provides an important vehicle for integration across all regions and disciplines within ASML. The program includes modules on performance improvement, high-tech marketing, entrepreneurship, organizational renewal and innovation. ASML will continue adding new leadership programs to develop its employees in the coming years. "Average companies make average decisions. The reason for the PLP is to bring us to a higher level as a company. a recognize we are under financial constraints right now, but it is during these times that we wart to invest in developing our leaders so that we will emerge from the downturn as a stronger company." Peter Wennink ASML Chief Financial Officer

Coaching discussions All employees below management level have yearly coaching discussions with their managers. During these discussions, strengths and developmental areas are identified and a development plan is proposed. The development plan can include learning activities, such as performance coaching, increasing responsibilities and

Coaching discussions All employees below management level have yearly coaching discussions with their managers. During these discussions, strengths and developmental areas are identified and a development plan is proposed. The development plan can include learning activities, such as performance coaching, increasing responsibilities and functional training. Job-oriented development and learning Besides the leadership programs, all employees can attend training workshops or programs at accredited educational institutions to sharpen their job-related skills. Examples of the training employees can receive are personal effectiveness workshops, PC training and mechanics education. In 2002, more than 2200 employees in Europe took advantage of this learning opportunity. In the U.S., the focus was on ASML and SVG integration activities. Therefore, employees attended programs such as change management workshops. They also received training necessary to implement human resource tools such as management development workshops and sexual harassment awareness. In Asia, the focus was on basic managerial skills training. At the ASML sector level, training matrices were developed for Goodsflow and Product Marketing to define minimum training requirements. Development and Learning (D&L) tracking systems To efficiently record and track employee participation in the management development program, ASML implemented an Intranet-based system known as "Pilat" in 2002. Pilat enables upper management to see the positions that employees have held, the training that they receive as part of the program and the input from the MD&P review forms and PDPs. Another tool implemented in 2002 is called e-taf, the electronic training application form. E-taf enables employees to electronically submit and track their own training requests. All employee information is continually updated in ASML's SAP database. These tools were developed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the D&L processes. [GRAPHIC OMITTED] "The PLP was an enriching experience for me. The camaraderie that was shared among my colleagues from various disciplines and cultural backgrounds made me realize how strong we are as a team. This diversity also strengthened my knowledge of other divisions and disciplines and helped me view the company from a broader perspective. When I returned to Wilton, I shared what I learned with my colleagues, which helped to extend the benefits of the program." Rich Da Ros Director of Manufacturing Operations Wilton, Connecticut, U.S.A.

[GRAPHIC OMITTED] Motivating Employees ASML continued to show commitment to the success of our employees during the economic downturn in 2002. We did so by introducing programs that benefited employees, without requiring a large cash investment from the company. Global incentives o To award employee performance, the regular performance appraisals were conducted in 2001. The merit increases resulting from these appraisals were either granted in cash or translated into employee stock options in 2002. o To show ASML's appreciation to employees for meeting company targets in areas such as sales and lead

[GRAPHIC OMITTED] Motivating Employees ASML continued to show commitment to the success of our employees during the economic downturn in 2002. We did so by introducing programs that benefited employees, without requiring a large cash investment from the company. Global incentives o To award employee performance, the regular performance appraisals were conducted in 2001. The merit increases resulting from these appraisals were either granted in cash or translated into employee stock options in 2002. o To show ASML's appreciation to employees for meeting company targets in areas such as sales and lead times, in 2002, eligible employees received a bonus based on company-wide targets achieved throughout 2001. Worldwide stock option programs o To enable employees to obtain stock options at a time when there was no profit sharing, special stock option programs were introduced. Depending on local regulations and requirements, employees had three options for receiving the options: they could be given options as a result of their performance appraisals, exchange specified forms of gross income for options or purchase the options from their net income. o Key employees were nominated across the entire company worldwide and across all salary grades to receive incentive stock option grants. Other benefit programs o In the Netherlands, ASML made use of specific local tax advantages to allow employees to purchase bicycles and computers using gross income or vacation days. ASML is examining whether similar possibilities exist in other regions of the world. Furthermore, in the Netherlands, the number of employees benefiting from the ASML-initiated child day care saw an increase in 2002.

Supporting Employee Involvement To enhance the ASML and SVG integration in 2002, it has been important for employees to work together with their colleagues from different cultures and disciplines. ASML has supported employees' involvement, whether at work or outside the workplace. International ASML projects implemented this year have given employees the chance to get to know their counterparts in different parts of the world and to come to a greater understanding of the organization as a whole. SPRINT Initiated at the beginning of the year, SPRINT was an effort to integrate the processes, structures and information of the former SVG and ASML Customer Support, Logistics and Finance departments. The members of the SPRINT teams represented multiple job functions and lived in various global locations. The final outcome of the project was the consolidation of eight disconnected information systems into a single worldwide system. "Involvement in SPRINT gave me an opportunity to learn about, come to understand, and share working and cultural differences with ASML employees around the world. Projects like these provide a way for me and others to build strong working relationships with colleagues in other parts of the organization." Tony Prunotto Director

Supporting Employee Involvement To enhance the ASML and SVG integration in 2002, it has been important for employees to work together with their colleagues from different cultures and disciplines. ASML has supported employees' involvement, whether at work or outside the workplace. International ASML projects implemented this year have given employees the chance to get to know their counterparts in different parts of the world and to come to a greater understanding of the organization as a whole. SPRINT Initiated at the beginning of the year, SPRINT was an effort to integrate the processes, structures and information of the former SVG and ASML Customer Support, Logistics and Finance departments. The members of the SPRINT teams represented multiple job functions and lived in various global locations. The final outcome of the project was the consolidation of eight disconnected information systems into a single worldwide system. "Involvement in SPRINT gave me an opportunity to learn about, come to understand, and share working and cultural differences with ASML employees around the world. Projects like these provide a way for me and others to build strong working relationships with colleagues in other parts of the organization." Tony Prunotto Director U.S. ITM&S Service Development Wilton, Connecticut, U.S. Install by GF and CS - working toward improvement Another project started in 2002 that enabled people from various disciplines and cultural backgrounds to work together was a cooperation between the Goodsflow (GF) and Customer Support (CS) organizations. ASML's objective for the project, known as "Install by GF & CS," was to create a more efficient workflow for Customer Support and Goodsflow employees and contribute to customer satisfaction by improving installation times and quality. "By working together on projects like these, we are able to solve problems more quickly and increase our own job knowledge along the way." Antonio Puglisi Installation Engineer ASML Italy Staff Association and Works Councils Employees in the Netherlands have a Works Council that consists of employee representatives elected by the employees. The Works Council ensures that the best interests of employees are always considered in business decisions. In 2002, employees established and elected a Works Council in France. Employees in Germany have initiated a Staff Association in 2002. The mission of the association is to promote a sense of unity among employees by organizing events and activities to take place outside of working hours and away from the work environment. Like the association Trendsteppers in the Netherlands, which has been active for many years, the association in Germany has united former SVG and ASML employees by enabling them to get to know one another in a social setting. Helping each other ASML is proud of its motivated employees, who work together and help one another in times of need. In the summer of 2002, Dresden was struck by a major flood, which had a significant impact on people in the city. While the ASML office in Dresden suffered minimal damage, many employees were hit hard on a personal level. ASML Dresden colleagues from around the world offered support and encouragement during this difficult time, and employees in Veldhoven gave technical assistance to help their Dresden colleagues quickly regain

productivity during a period of electrical outage. The Dresden employees worked hard to bring the Dresden office back to productivity, while also helping the city fight and contain the effects of the flooding.

Unifying Our Efforts Before the merger with SVG in 2001, ASML's business activities were concentrated in Veldhoven, the Netherlands. The highest employee population was in Europe, with only a small presence in the rest of the world. That situation has changed drastically. As a result of the merger, ASML had to globalize the way it has done business for more than 15 years. During 2002, we have focused on resolving differences in both corporate and national cultures, eliminating duplication of effort and learning from the best practices of employees around the world. Resolving these differences has required many months of cooperative effort among various departments and disciplines. After more than a year of integrating, improving and refining processes, the company is now functioning as a single, unified global enterprise. Merging of facilities Performing the integration activities of 2002 on a global scale required enormous effort in many different areas of the business. Because many ASML and SVG locations were merged, a major challenge emerged in the area of facilities management. Some buildings were closed, while others were opened. As a result, some employees had to be relocated across the company. With the merging of locations came the combining of legal entities within each country of each region. Integration of HR&O systems In addition to these physical location changes, salary systems, compensation and benefits packages and appraisal systems had to be integrated globally. There are significant differences between ASML regions. These differences in legal and tax issues, cultural customs and market practices among the countries played a major role in the integration process. This process was further complicated by separate HR&O systems and policies within the former SVG organization. Because SVG had two previous owners, many employees had held on to previous HR&O packages. ASML HR&O was faced with the challenge of developing and introducing a single set of ASML policies, payroll systems, information systems and compensation and benefits packages in all regions. HR&O in each region worked closely with local business management to ensure that this effort was managed in a way that protected the best interests of the employees and of the company. Global job alignment Part of the unification process involved creating a unified global organizational structure. To do so, we examined the organization and jobs of employees on all three continents to align them. To accomplish this task, a global organization and job alignment project was undertaken and completed in 2002. The goal of the project was to ensure that the same and similar jobs had comparable titles, requirements, descriptions and grades. For the project, ASML used the job evaluation and job matching techniques of the Hay Group, an international professional consultant that ASML has worked with for many years. The newly integrated organization and job titles were entered into ASML's HR&O database. HR&O alignment with business strategy Because more than half of the former SVG employees were located in the U.S., ASML in the U.S. confronted perhaps some of the greatest integration challenges. Some of these challenges included creating a single payroll system and HR&O information system from four separate existing systems and performing job alignment across the U.S. organization. In addition, due to the restructuring required by the merger, significant headcount reductions were necessary in 2002. To deal with these challenges, ASML in the U.S. undertook initiatives to align employee policies and procedures across the U.S. with the company's global business strategy. The HR&O Leadership Team (HRLT) and the Business Leadership Council (BLC) were two groups formed in 2002 as part of this alignment effort. The goal of the HRLT was to counsel business managers on matters affecting employees and to ensure that the interest of employees was considered in business strategy development. Likewise, the BLC makes certain that HR&O activities support business objectives.

Unifying Our Efforts Before the merger with SVG in 2001, ASML's business activities were concentrated in Veldhoven, the Netherlands. The highest employee population was in Europe, with only a small presence in the rest of the world. That situation has changed drastically. As a result of the merger, ASML had to globalize the way it has done business for more than 15 years. During 2002, we have focused on resolving differences in both corporate and national cultures, eliminating duplication of effort and learning from the best practices of employees around the world. Resolving these differences has required many months of cooperative effort among various departments and disciplines. After more than a year of integrating, improving and refining processes, the company is now functioning as a single, unified global enterprise. Merging of facilities Performing the integration activities of 2002 on a global scale required enormous effort in many different areas of the business. Because many ASML and SVG locations were merged, a major challenge emerged in the area of facilities management. Some buildings were closed, while others were opened. As a result, some employees had to be relocated across the company. With the merging of locations came the combining of legal entities within each country of each region. Integration of HR&O systems In addition to these physical location changes, salary systems, compensation and benefits packages and appraisal systems had to be integrated globally. There are significant differences between ASML regions. These differences in legal and tax issues, cultural customs and market practices among the countries played a major role in the integration process. This process was further complicated by separate HR&O systems and policies within the former SVG organization. Because SVG had two previous owners, many employees had held on to previous HR&O packages. ASML HR&O was faced with the challenge of developing and introducing a single set of ASML policies, payroll systems, information systems and compensation and benefits packages in all regions. HR&O in each region worked closely with local business management to ensure that this effort was managed in a way that protected the best interests of the employees and of the company. Global job alignment Part of the unification process involved creating a unified global organizational structure. To do so, we examined the organization and jobs of employees on all three continents to align them. To accomplish this task, a global organization and job alignment project was undertaken and completed in 2002. The goal of the project was to ensure that the same and similar jobs had comparable titles, requirements, descriptions and grades. For the project, ASML used the job evaluation and job matching techniques of the Hay Group, an international professional consultant that ASML has worked with for many years. The newly integrated organization and job titles were entered into ASML's HR&O database. HR&O alignment with business strategy Because more than half of the former SVG employees were located in the U.S., ASML in the U.S. confronted perhaps some of the greatest integration challenges. Some of these challenges included creating a single payroll system and HR&O information system from four separate existing systems and performing job alignment across the U.S. organization. In addition, due to the restructuring required by the merger, significant headcount reductions were necessary in 2002. To deal with these challenges, ASML in the U.S. undertook initiatives to align employee policies and procedures across the U.S. with the company's global business strategy. The HR&O Leadership Team (HRLT) and the Business Leadership Council (BLC) were two groups formed in 2002 as part of this alignment effort. The goal of the HRLT was to counsel business managers on matters affecting employees and to ensure that the interest of employees was considered in business strategy development. Likewise, the BLC makes certain that HR&O activities support business objectives.

Minimizing employee impact in U.S., Europe

Minimizing employee impact in U.S., Europe In December of 2002, the Board of Management announced its intention to reduce the work force in the Lithography segment worldwide, to divest the Thermal operations, and terminate the Track operations. The reductions in our work force are intended to be implemented in 2003. Nevertheless, ASML worked hard to minimize the impact of restructuring and headcount reductions on employees in 2002. To present alternatives to forced layoffs early in 2002, ASML in the U.S. introduced a work sharing program, and the U.S. and Europe both offered voluntary separation programs and internal transfer opportunities. In addition, employees with appropriate skills from U.S. locations that were closing or were impacted by the decline of business were given the opportunity to transfer, with benefits, to other U.S. locations. The U.S. was also able to meet 2002 cost objectives by introducing a reduced employee workweek. In Europe in 2002, ASML reduced the flexible part of its labor force, including contractors and temporary payroll employees. Gearing up for growth in Asia While the U.S. and Europe had to deal with reductions due to restructuring and freezing of hiring activity, ASML Asia's challenges in 2002 were of a different nature. Asia worked to enlarge its workforce to prepare to serve the semiconductor needs of the region's growing economy. Thus, along with the integration efforts in 2002, ASML Asia launched recruitment and hiring campaigns throughout the region. To attract competent, well-skilled technical talent in Asia, ASML embarked on aggressive corporate branding and recruiting activities. Corporate image and recruitment ads were placed in Asian newspapers and industry publications. While recruitment activity took place throughout Asia, the major focus was in the high-growth market of China, where we increased our headcount by 42 percent in 2002. As part of the hiring activity, ASML placed new local Customer Support managers in various Asian countries. While these positions were previously filled by expatriate employees, the new managers were hired from local job markets. This localization of leadership in Asia will help ASML better address the needs of the local markets. Other activities related to compensation and benefits in Asia include the following: o ASML Asia worked with HR&O in the U.S. to develop a compensation structure for sales account managers. o A salary update project was initiated in Asia to automatically calculate salary increases in line with annual performance appraisals. Asian employee base salaries were reviewed and needed adjustments were made. o To ensure that HR&O policies remain competitive in the job market, HR&O in Asia conducted various surveys with independent consulting firms throughout the year. These surveys included a field survey of the cost of living of each country, a compensation and benefits survey, a survey of market salaries and a survey of working conditions. Using the results of these surveys, ASML examined its own HR&O policies and has made needed adjustments. o Insurance and housing policies in Asia were reviewed against local market practices and revised where needed. Global organizational reporting Now that all former SVG and ASML systems and information have been integrated, we are able to approach the task of organizational reporting in one clear and consistent manner. A worldwide reporting method implemented in 2002 assists ASML management in the decision-making process by presenting a clear worldwide view of key organizational elements such as organizational and cost center structures.

Keeping Employees in Touch One key to a successful global organization is efficient global communications. In 2002, ASML worked to improve the effectiveness of existing communication tools, as well as introduce new tools to keep employees in all

Keeping Employees in Touch One key to a successful global organization is efficient global communications. In 2002, ASML worked to improve the effectiveness of existing communication tools, as well as introduce new tools to keep employees in all locations informed in a timely and efficient manner. The aim of the 2002 communication initiatives was to improve the stream of information to and among employees, while realizing savings in costs and employee time. Informal meetings were organized between employees and Board members in various locations worldwide. These meetings allowed Board members to get employee feedback directly. In addition, a New Year's meeting was held in 2002 to inform employees about last year's financial results and give an outlook of the year to come. For the first time ever, this meeting was organized as a worldwide event that took place in all locations with corporate input and support. Besides these meetings, most countries had quarterly employee update meetings to address local issues. Improving our communication tools Because the Intranet is very actively used within ASML, in 2002, ASML created a plan to enhance the effectiveness of this important communications tool. The main goal was to improve the corporate news and information function of the Intranet. The plan to improve the Intranet will be carried out in 2003. In addition, we have looked at ways to make our internal publications, such as Spectrum magazine, more useful and relevant to employees.

Commitment to People Since ASML was founded in 1984, the promise of commitment has been consistent with the core values of ASML. Our commitment is the foundation for our relationships with all of our stakeholders, and we stress this commitment through the ethical way in which we conduct business and through actions that demonstrate care and concern for people. Maintaining ethical business conduct ASML has produced an external publication containing our corporate principles of ethical business conduct. This document demonstrates ASML's promise of commitment to our customers, employees, suppliers and investors, and to our physical environment. In 2002, ASML translated this document into Internal Guidelines for Ethical Business Conduct. The guidelines address what ethical business conduct means for us internally as a responsible global enterprise. Managers and team leaders were encouraged to discuss the document with employees at a local level, underscoring the importance of the document, and helping employees understand how it relates to their daily work. Commitment to society: ASML Trust To emphasize commitment to the communities in which we operate, the ASML Trust was established in 2002. The Trust gives financial support to projects of non-profit organizations and societies located in countries where ASML is present. The local projects supported by the ASML Trust focus on technical education, along with other activities to improve the quality of life for children and the underprivileged.

A Quick Look at the Organization The total number of ASML employees on December 31, 2002 was 6,683. The following table compares these figures with totals for 2000 and 2001 for each business sector. The total number of personnel employed per sector was

Commitment to People Since ASML was founded in 1984, the promise of commitment has been consistent with the core values of ASML. Our commitment is the foundation for our relationships with all of our stakeholders, and we stress this commitment through the ethical way in which we conduct business and through actions that demonstrate care and concern for people. Maintaining ethical business conduct ASML has produced an external publication containing our corporate principles of ethical business conduct. This document demonstrates ASML's promise of commitment to our customers, employees, suppliers and investors, and to our physical environment. In 2002, ASML translated this document into Internal Guidelines for Ethical Business Conduct. The guidelines address what ethical business conduct means for us internally as a responsible global enterprise. Managers and team leaders were encouraged to discuss the document with employees at a local level, underscoring the importance of the document, and helping employees understand how it relates to their daily work. Commitment to society: ASML Trust To emphasize commitment to the communities in which we operate, the ASML Trust was established in 2002. The Trust gives financial support to projects of non-profit organizations and societies located in countries where ASML is present. The local projects supported by the ASML Trust focus on technical education, along with other activities to improve the quality of life for children and the underprivileged.

A Quick Look at the Organization The total number of ASML employees on December 31, 2002 was 6,683. The following table compares these figures with totals for 2000 and 2001 for each business sector. The total number of personnel employed per sector was
For year ended December 31 2000 2001 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Marketing & Technology 1,860 1,689 Goodsflow 1,923 1,526 Customer Support 1,931 1,964 General 711 716 Sales 203 144 Track & Thermal (discontinued) 1,495 1,031 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Overall result 8,123 7,070

The total number of personnel employed per region was

For year ended December 31 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Europe U. S. Asia --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Overall results

Total continuing operations For year ended Decernber 31 2000 2001 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------6,628 6,039

A Quick Look at the Organization The total number of ASML employees on December 31, 2002 was 6,683. The following table compares these figures with totals for 2000 and 2001 for each business sector. The total number of personnel employed per sector was
For year ended December 31 2000 2001 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Marketing & Technology 1,860 1,689 Goodsflow 1,923 1,526 Customer Support 1,931 1,964 General 711 716 Sales 203 144 Track & Thermal (discontinued) 1,495 1,031 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Overall result 8,123 7,070

The total number of personnel employed per region was

For year ended December 31 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Europe U. S. Asia --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Overall results

Total continuing operations For year ended Decernber 31 2000 2001 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------6,628 Total discontinued operations For year ended December 31 2000 2001 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1,495 1,031 6,039

Number of nationalities Over 48 nationalities are represented within our ASML organization worldwide.

ASML. Worldwide Contact Information Corporate Headquaters De Run 6501 5504 DR Veldhoven The Netherlands Mailing address P.O. Box 324 5500 AH Veldhoven The Netherlands

ASML. Worldwide Contact Information Corporate Headquaters De Run 6501 5504 DR Veldhoven The Netherlands Mailing address P.O. Box 324 5500 AH Veldhoven The Netherlands U.S. main offices 8555 South River Parkway Tempe, AZ 85284 U.S.A. 77 Danbury Road Wilton, CT 06897 U.S.A. Asia main office Suite 603, 6/F One International Finance Center 1, Harbour View Street Central, Hong Kong, SAR Corporate Communications phone: +31 40 268 4941 fax: +31 40 268 3655 e-mail: corpcom@asml.com Investor Relations phone: +31 40 268 3938 fax: +31 40 268 3655 e-mail: investor.relations@asmI.com For more information please visit our website www.asml.com


				
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