Summary of Impacts

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					         13 SUMMARY OF IMPACTS AND THEIR DISPOSITION



SIGNIFICANT EFFECTS WHICH CANNOT BE AVOIDED

LAND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS UPON NATIVE OAK TREES
The proposed project will result in the removal of approximately 19 trees adding to a
total of 211 inches. This equates to 37% of the total number of oak trees, and 33% of
the total inches. The removal of these trees is considered a significant environmental
impact. Other impacts to native oak trees include encroachment and potential pruning
impacts. Compensatory mitigation is recommended for those trees that will be removed
and substantially encroached upon, and protective mitigation is recommended for those
trees that will be retained. Even with mitigation, impacts are expected to be significant.



SIGNIFICANT EFFECTS WHICH COULD BE AVOIDED
WITH IMPLEMENTATION OF MITIGATION MEASURES


LAND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS TO CULTURAL RESOURCES
The cultural resource survey indicated no evidence of surface archaeological remains or
historic resources. However, subsurface cultural remains could be present due to the
natural burial of prehistoric or historic sites by alluviation through periodic flooding or
other natural phenomena.

The possibility exists for potentially significant unidentified cultural materials to be
encountered on or below the surface during the course of future development or
construction activities. Mitigation has been added to ensure that impacts to potential
subsurface cultural resources by ground disturbance from future construction are less
than significant.

AESTHETIC IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH LOSS OF TREE CANOPY
The project site is a 3.59-acre site with a single family home and several associated
buildings and a pool surrounded by trees. Along each of the project site’s borders trees
provide a visual buffer between the project site and the surrounding house, shopping
center, and Illinois Avenue and Sherry Drive. In some areas the trees are more densely
grouped than others, such as along sections of the site’s southern border. The project
proposes to remove 84 of 136 trees (62%). On-site landscaping associated with the
project and mitigation consisting of compensatory oak tree plantings will mitigate the
impact to a level of less than significant.



Sycamore Village EIR                       13-1             06-CZB-PWP-UPP-SPP-AHS-0792
                                        13 - SUMMARY OF IMPACTS AND THEIR DISPOSITION




EFFECTS FOUND NOT TO BE SIGNIFICANT

LAND USE
The proposed project meets the minimum density requirements of LU-14, for transit
supportive uses. It would also help to provide a buffer of higher density housing
between existing commercial and business uses along Greenback Lane and the less
dense single family homes to the south.

The project meets Zoning Code standards for minimum parking requirements.
Nonetheless, there is some potential for overflow parking from the project to occur in the
surrounding neighborhood resulting in a minor nuisance impact.

Impacts related to land use are considered less than significant.

PUBLIC SERVICES
The additional development of this site is expected to increase the demands on public
services to some degree, but not beyond current or planned service capacity. Impacts
are expected to be less than significant.

DRAINAGE AND HYDROLOGY
The project site is located outside the 100-year floodplain and will not expose on-site
residents to flood hazards. Preliminary grading and drainage plans for the project have
been reviewed by County DWR staff, who determined that they were sufficient to
manage any increase in peak flows related to the development.

TRAFFIC IMPACTS
The Cumulative (2025) average daily traffic volume (ADT) for Illinois Avenue is
projected to be 6,600 vehicles per day with a level of service (LOS) E without the
project. Sacramento County thresholds of significance state that a project is considered
to have a significant effect if it would result in a roadway operating at an acceptable
LOS to deteriorate to an unacceptable LOS. The acceptable LOS threshold for urban
areas is E. Illinois Avenue would operate at an acceptable LOS in the cumulative year.
Illinois Avenue is classified as a residential collector with frontage (houses facing the
road) and according to the County of Sacramento Traffic Impact Analysis Guidelines,
the capacity of this type of road is 8,000 vehicles per day. Adding in the 71 daily trips
associated with the proposed project would not cause the roadway to deteriorate to a
level below an acceptable LOS. The cumulative LOS with the project traffic included




Sycamore Village EIR                       13-2            06-CZB-PWP-UPP-SPP-AHS-0792
                                        13 - SUMMARY OF IMPACTS AND THEIR DISPOSITION


would remain E. The project is not expected to result in a significant traffic impact and
does not require mitigation. Traffic impacts are expected to be less than significant.

LAND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS RELATING TO NOISE

TRAFFIC NOISE
Traffic noise levels from Illinois Avenue measured at the closest outdoor patio/porch
area and closest residential building façade is 65 decibels. The noise level at the
nearest common area is 61 decibels. . Using standard construction techniques and
materials as previously discussed, interior noise levels for the closest residence is 40
decibels.

Traffic noise levels from Greenback Lane and measured at the closest outdoor
patio/porch area, closest outdoor common area, and closest residential building façade
are 58 decibels.

Exterior and interior noise levels are within General Plan standards (policy NO-7);
therefore, noise impacts are considered less than significant.


NUISANCE NOISE
Noise from cars on the project site may be increased above what is currently generated
by the project site, but this level of noise is typical for an urban environment and would
not exceed County noise standards. These noises however will be muffled by the
proposed garages and three walled carports that will separate the driveway from the
neighboring residences. While nuisance noise may increase as a result of the proposed
project, these impacts are not considered environmentally significant.

AIR QUALITY
Project construction would result in the temporary generation of NOx and PM10
emissions. However, the project is less than 5 acres in size; therefore, according to the
SMAQMD screening guidelines for particulate matter, no mitigation is required for PM10
emissions. In addition, Urbemis modeling results showed that the project would
produce only 21.36 pounds per day of NOx emissions, which is below the current
threshold of 85 pounds per day for construction-related NOx emissions.

AESTHETIC RESOURCES
Changes in Viewshed

Given the generally urbanized environment in which the project is proposed, the project
would not substantially alter the visual character or quality of the site or vicinity.

Light Intrusion into Existing Residences


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                                          13 - SUMMARY OF IMPACTS AND THEIR DISPOSITION


At the southwest corner of the site, there is a potential for direct-on headlights to affect
adjacent residences. This would constitute a nuisance impact.

Impacts to aesthetic resources are considered less than significant.



IRREVERSIBLE ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES

Construction of the project will require irretrievable commitments of a variety of limited
natural resources, including aggregates, petrochemicals and metals.



GROWTH INDUCING IMPACTS

The CEQA Guidelines identify several ways in which a project could have growth-
inducing impacts. In addition to the characteristics described above, projects that
remove obstacles to population growth and projects that encourage and facilitate other
activities that are beyond those proposed as part of the project and that could affect the
environment are considered growth-inducing (CEQA Guidelines Section 15126.2[d]).
Potential inducements to population growth include the availability of adequate water
supplies, the availability of sewage treatment facilities, the availability of developable
land and local government growth policies contained in general plans and zoning
ordinances.

Growth inducement may not be considered necessarily detrimental, beneficial, or of
significance under CEQA. Induced growth is considered a significant impact only if it
directly or indirectly affects the ability of agencies to provide needed public services or if
it can be demonstrated that the potential growth, in some other way, significantly affects
the environment, e.g., that it requires constructing facilities that would adversely affect
the environment.

This project is in an area designated in the Orangevale Community Plan for residential
uses. Therefore, the projects will not induce growth by setting a precedent in the area
for conversion of agricultural-residential lands to residential lands. The project does
increase the planned density of housing in the community plan, which could, in turn,
inspire some of the neighboring property owners to develop at densities higher than the
community plan designations. This project is still proposing densities that are consistent
with General Plan designations and is not expected to induce nearby developments to
develop at densities higher than those planned for in the General Plan. This project is
not expected to result in significant growth inducing impacts.




Sycamore Village EIR                         13-4             06-CZB-PWP-UPP-SPP-AHS-0792