HOW TO WRITE PROJECT PROPOSALS by fxs21421

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									 THINGS YOU SHOULD
KNOW ABOUT PROJECT
     PROPOSALS
Seminar-Workshop in Planning and Packaging Winning
                  Project Proposals
         Oct. 27-28, 2007, Camiguin Islands
     Sponsored by Phil. Assoc. of Water Districts
GENERAL TYPES OF PROPOSAL
   FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH (returns
    expected in 25 years, outcome uncertain)
   APPLIED RESEARCH (returns expected
    in 15 years, outcome predictable)
   DEVELOPMENT (returns expected in 5
    years, outcome expected)
   PRACTICAL (returns expected on project
    completion)
     PROPOSAL COVERAGE
   Applied Research, Development Projects
    and Practical Implementations are usually
    funded as a contract with delivery
    obligations
   Public grants or contracts are reglemented
    in form and purpose – usually requiring
    prescribed forms (15-100 pages)
   Private grants are usually satisfied with
    shorter letter proposal
       NOW, THE PRACTICAL
        PROJECT PROPOSAL
   An offer to work conveyed in
-   Active and persuasive verbs
-   Descriptive manner of what’s to be done
-   Specific terms
-   Present tense for general description
-   Simple future tense for future activities
      PURPOSE OF PROJECT
          PROPOSAL

   To persuade the reader to do something
   To seek for sponsor to provide funds
   To write the document to a sponsor
   To seek public sector/private
    participation
KEY IDEAS IN PROPOSAL
   Persuasive writing
   Fulfilling a need
   Logically organized
   Cost-efficient
     TWO GENERAL TYPES


   UNSOLICITED (in response to a need)
   SOLICITED (in response to request-
    for-proposal (RFPs)
PERSUASIVE TECHNIQUE

   Addressing a certain need
    (beneficial/pathos)
   Credibility of the proponent (trust/ethos)
   Logic of the message (logos)
PROPOSAL IS FEASIBILITY!

   Seeks to solve a problem
   Seeks to investigate a subject/idea
   Seeks to sell a product/service
    SKILLS IN WRITING PROJECT
             PROPOSAL
   Exploring (collect background, define
    problem and assess needs/financial factor)
   Planning (analyzing audience, locus-focus,
    budget/personnel and time sked)
   Drafting (graphics/design/layout)
   Evaluating (know the success criteria/result
    oriented)
   Revising (add/modify and assess
    information to meet criteria)
CORE OF PROJECT PROPOSAL
   Identification of problem
   Explanation on “plan of attack” to solve it
   Justification on why you should do it and
    why problem should be solved
   Must have a unique selling proposition
    (USP)
        SOME QUESTIONS?
   What is the problem?
   What do I propose as a solution?
   How do I propose to achieve the solution?
   What are my capabilities/capacities?
   How much will it cost?
      SOME EXTERNAL FUND
           SOURCES

   National grants (DOST, LWUA, DENR)
   Foreign grants (JICA, ASEAN, IRDC)
   Industry foundations (NGOs, SMC, IRC)
   Academic grants (colleges and universities)
HOW TO APPLY FOR FUNDING
        FOR RFPs

   Write for application forms and
    guidelines.
   Call a past grantee for tips.
   Contact program officer in the
    announcement.
            RFPs FORMAT
   Introduction (state problem and prove
    your credibility)
   Problem Statement and Need (focus of
    project in relation to problem, importance
    and solution it offers)
   Objectives
   Methods
   Evaluation
   Budget
   Abstract
EMPHASIS ON PROPOSAL
   Problem Statement (58%) – importance
    and manageabiliy of arresting problem
   Approach (75%) – suited methods
   Investigator (55%) – sufficient experience
    and good track record
   Others (16%) – realistic resource
    assessment
        GRANT REFERENCES
   Annual Register of Grant Support (listing of grant
    programs)
   Foundation Directory (listing of more than 43,000
    foundations in US granting 8B$ annually from 2.5
    M US corporations)
   Foundation grant index – a compendium of grants
   Grantsmanship Center News – published 8x/year
    (located in 1015 West Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles
    California
      VARIATIONS IN PROJECT
            PROPOSAL
   Proposal to solve a problem (e.g.
    poor links/alliance among water districts
    leading to establishment of Water District
    Network)
-   Identify and define the problem
-   Explain a workable solution with clear
    benefits
-   Establish the connection between problem
    and solution
-   Provide a plan for implementation
     VARIATIONS IN PROJECT
           PROPOSAL
   Proposal to investigate a
    subject/idea (e.g. potential site for
    water district as veritable source of clean
    water for communities)
-   Identify and define the subject
-   Justify the importance benefits of the
    inquiry
-   Establish the limits of the inquiry
-   Provide a plan of action for pursuing the
    inquiry
    VARIATIONS IN PROJECT
          PROPOSAL
   Proposal to sell a service or
    product (e.g. the use of filtration
    treatment equipment for water district)
-   Identify and define the need
-   Explain a service/product that meets the
    need
-   Establish connection between need and
    product/service
-   Provide a plan to deliver the
    product/service
     ELEMENTS OF PROJECT
          PROPOSAL
   Project title
   Goals/objectives of project
   Description of project activities
   Description of expected project results
   Project implementation plan
   Beginning of operation
      ELEMENTS OF PROJECT
           PROPOSAL

   Resource allocation
   Project personnel
   Detailed project budget (line-item budget)
   Other technical means (e.g. vehicles)
   Division of financial sources (own and
    counterparts, external sources)
          DO’s and DON’Ts
   DO’s
-   Add interesting technology component
-   Know how to fit into past and current
    projects
-   Involve a team
-   Proofread the document for
    errors/grammar
           DO’s and DON’Ts
   DON’Ts
-   Say little is known or done
-   Think you know everything
-   Confuse objectives with actions
-   Define objectives you don’t wish to achieve
-   Use abbreviations
-   Focus on the “cutting edge” (negative
    complexities)
-   Request funding for basic operations

								
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