CT for the Nuclear Medicine Technologist

Document Sample
CT for the Nuclear Medicine Technologist Powered By Docstoc
					CT for the Nuclear Medicine 
        Technologist
    Idris Elbakri, PhD, MCCPM
            May 9, 2009
                   Outline
• X‐ray Production
• CT Fundamentals
• CT Scanner Components and Image Display
  – Gantry
  – CT detectors
• Helical CT
• CT Dose
• CT Artifacts
                       CT vs SPECT
                 CT
               SPECT

• Detector signal is sum of 
• radioactivity along ray, 
  Detector signal is sum of 
  attenuation along ray
  minus attenuation
• Signal from all around gives 
  slice image of attenuation
• Signal from all around gives 
• slice image of radioactivity
  Photon attenuation is the 
  image
• Photon attenuation is not 
   desirable
             X‐ray Production
• SPECT and PET
  – emission tomography
  – Photons originate from radionuclides inside object
• Computed Tomography 
  – transmission tomography modality
  – Photons originate outside object
  – So, where do they come from?
                X‐ray Tube
• Vacuum tube with two electrodes
• Generator supplies a voltage between the two 
  electrodes: 80,000 Volts to 140,000 Volts
• Cathode (‐): small filament that boils off 
  electrons when heated with electric current
• Anode (+): Attracts electrons under influence 
  of high voltage
                   Vacuum Tube




                                                        Rotating Anode
                                 kVp
Cathode
                              Electrons


                            Current (mA) 
          (number of electrons  number of x‐rays) 



                                                     X‐rays
           Radiation Spectrum
• Electrons colliding with the target generate 
  two kinds of radiation
• Bremsstrahlung (braking radiation) is a broad 
  spectrum of x‐ray energies emitted due to 
  electron rapid deceleration
• Characteristic radiation is produced by 
  vacancies created in the inner electron shells 
  of the anode material
X‐ray Tube Output Spectrum




                      kVp
                 X‐ray Tube
• 1% of energy is converted to x‐rays. 99% is 
  generated as heat.
• Rotating anode is used to increase heat 
  dissipation
• Anode material (target) an alloy of W 
• CT tubes are cooled using oil, water and/or air
    X‐ray Production Parameters
• Anode material determines characteristic 
  radiation energy
  – Tungsten 58 keV, 59 keV and 67 keV
• KVp determines “beam quality”
  – Higher kVp: higher beam energy, more penetrating, 
    lower noise, more dose, lower tissue contrast
• mA determines “beam quantity”
  – mAs is product of current and rotation time
  – Higher mAs: lower noise, better contrast resolution 
    and higher dose
              X‐ray Filtration
• Partial radiation                           X‐ray tube
  absorbers placed at the            Filter
                                                Collimator
  x‐ray tube output
• Filters absorb very low 
  x‐ray energies and 
  reduce dose 
• Filters shape the beam 
  energy to reduce 
                             Collimator
  artifacts (bow‐tie)
                                                Detector
Filtered Spectrum
      CT Fundamentals


Iin                                   Iout


      Iout < Iin
      Iout = Iin x Transmission
      Iout = Iin x e – μ(x,y)  L


        CT makes an image of μ(x,y)
      o
P(r,90 )


                o
           P(r,0 )
CT Sinogram
{ P(r ,0o ), P(r ,1o ), P(r ,2o ),..., P(r ,360o ) }



                   Filtered Back
                    Projection




                  μ ( x, y )
    Components of a CT Scanner
• Computer workstation for scanner operation
• Computer hardware for data processing and 
  image reconstruction
• Electronics cabinets
• Patient table
• Rotating gantry
www.imaginis.com
                   CT Gantry
• Houses key rotating components
  – Heavy duty X‐ray tube (diagnostic CT)
  – X‐ray generators
  – Heat exchangers
  – Slip rings for continuous motion (cable‐free!)
  – Collimators
  – X‐ray detectors
• Gantry assembly produces rotating fan beam 
  of X‐rays
              X‐ray Detector
• Array of X‐ray sensitive elements
• Ceramic solid state most common
  – High efficiency
  – Low lag
  – Stable response
  – < 1 mm 
• Number of detector rows determines 
  available number of slices
Z‐axis
                          Z‐axis


16 x 1 mm




8 x 2 mm



 4 x 2 mm



4 x 4 mm



            4 x 1.5 mm   16 x 0.75 mm   4 x 1.5 mm
                   Collimation
• Pre‐patient collimation  • Thinner collimation:
  limits x‐ray beam width     – Improves spatial resolution
  to active area of           – Reduces volume averaging
  detector (0.6 – 40 mm)      – Reduces streaking from 
• Post‐patient collimation      high density objects
  reduces scatter             – Increases noise
  contribution to signal      – Increases scan time
                                 – Increases dose
                    Helical CT
• Axial scans acquired using a “translate and 
  shoot” routine
  – Successive slices required tens of seconds –
    minutes
  – Prone to patient motion
• Helical scan:
     • Patient table translated at constant speed during beam 
       rotation
       Advantages of Helical CT
• Lower dose over axial scan of comparable z‐
  axis coverage
• Large volume coverage in less time
• Less patient motion artifacts
        Helical CT Parameters
• Gantry rotation time < 1 sec – 2 sec
• Table translation speed
• Beam collimation
              table movement per rotation
    Pitch  = 
                 beam collimation
• Example: table moves 24 mm per rotation, 
  detector configured to 16 x 1.5 mm (24 mm), 
  pitch = 1
         Helical Pitch = 1.0




Z‐axis




           Table motion equals beam width
         Helical Pitch = 2.0




Z‐axis




             Table motion equals 2 X beam width
              Lower Resolution and lower dose
         Helical Pitch = 0.75




Z‐axis




             Table motion < beam width
             Higher resolution and higher dose
            CT Image Display
• CT images are in units of CT numbers or 
  Hounsfield units (HU)

                      μ − μwater
           HU= 1000 ×
                        μwater
• Water HU  = 0
• Air HU = ‐1000
HU Scale
             Radiation Dose
• Dose determination in CT not straightforward 
  due to beam rotation
• CT has its own dose parameters based on 
  measurements in a 16‐cm diameter “head”
  and 32‐cm diameter “body” acrylic phantoms
  – CTDI
Slice Radiation Profile




                          Radiographics 2002
Computed Tomography Dose Index
• CTDI is the standard dose parameter for CT

                        1 5cm
             CTDI100 =         ∫ D(z) dz
                       N ⋅ T −5cm

• N number of slices
• T slice thickness
• D(z) single axial slice dose profile
                       CTDI Variations

                     1                   2
              CTDIw = (CTDI100 ) center + (CTDI100 ) periphery
                     3                   3


                                         CTDIw
                             CTDIvol   =
                                          pitch




CTDI et al is an index of radiation dose, not an accurate estimate of patient dose
                   Dose Factors
•   Increases with kVp
•   Increases with mAs linearly
                                        All else constant
•   Decreases with pitch
•   Decreases with wider collimation
•   Could increase with any parameter that 
    increase noise:
    – Thin slice thickness or detail reconstruction filter 
             Dose Reduction
• Reduce mAs (and let the readers live with 
  grainier images)
• Increase pitch
• Reduce kVp

Modern diagnostic scanners have adaptive mAs
 modulation
                   Dose Comparison

     Exam            CTDIw    Effective Dose   NM Dose 
     Head            60 mGy       2 mSv
Abdomen ‐ Pelvis     35 mGy       4 mSv
     Chest           30 mGy       7 mSv
                 CT Artifacts
• Artifacts are systematic discrepancies 
  between the CT image and the true 
  attenuation map of the object:
  – Streaking
  – Shading
  – Rings
  – Distortion
• Introduce errors in attenuation correction 
  leading to inaccuracy in activity 
              Beam Hardening
• Patient body acts like an x‐ray filter, altering 
  the energy distribution of the x‐ray beam
   – Lower energy photons are preferentially 
     attenuated
   – Average energy of the beam increases
• This leads to inconsistencies in data
• Artifacts include cupping and streaking
Radiographics 2004
Radiographics 2004
       Beam Hardening Control
• Increase beam energy with filtration and kVp
• Water phantom calibration for soft tissue 
  correction (cupping)
• Special algorithms for bone beam hardening 
  effects
                   Partial Volume




PV  artifacts can be reduced by using thinner reconstructed slices
                                                     Radiographics 2004
              Photon Starvation
• Highly attenuating 
  areas can cause low 
  photon statistics in the 
  detector causing 
  streaking
• Effect can be reduced 
  with tube current 
  modulations and 
  adaptive noise filtering
Photon Starvation




                    Radiographics 2004
               Metal Artifacts
• Presence of metal objects can cause severe 
  streaking
  – Very high material density
  – Beam hardening
  – Partial volume
• Avoidance:
  – Removal of metallic objects
  – Gantry tilt
Radiographics 2004
         Other Artifact Sources 
• Patient motion
• Ring artifacts due to detector sensitivity 
  changes
• Helical artifacts due to data interpolation
                  Summary
• CT produces images of the attenuation 
  coefficient
• Multislice helical CT is current standard of 
  practice in diagnostic CT
• CT dose is high relative to radiography and 
  steps should be taken to reduce it
• CT artifacts affect both diagnostic CT image 
  quality and attenuation correction for ET
             Suggested Readings
• J F Barrett and N Keat, “Artifacts in CT: Recognition and 
  avoidance”. Radiographics 24:1679‐1691, 2004
• M F McNitt‐Gray, “AAPM/RSNA tutorial for residents: 
  topics in CT dose”, Radiographics 22:1541‐1553, 2002
• Computed Tomography: Principles, Design, Artifacts 
  and Recent Advances. Jiang Hsieh, SPIE Press 2003
• Computed Tomography: Fundamentals, System 
  Technology, Image Quality, Applications. Wili Kalender, 
  Publicis MCD  Verlag 2000