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					Door Prize Drawings Today!
at the conclusion of this session
1. Fill out the drawing slip below. 2. Gently tear this entire sheet from the handout. 3. We will be collecting these sheets as this session concludes.

Anticipation Guide for Differentiation Presentation
Directions: Complete the pre-test column by writing True or False for each statement. After the presentation, we will revisit this activity to see if any opinions have changed.

Pre-test
True/False

Statement

Post-test
True/False

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

There is only one right way to differentiate. You have to differentiate all the time to be effective. Differentiation is not an all-purpose problem solver. Differentiation includes whole-group instruction. Differentiation doesn t really work when you have high-stakes testing for the students. Differentiation is best for students who are in special education. Differentiation means the same thing as individualization. When you differentiate, you encourage mastery for all students. Differentiation leads to unbalanced workloads.

10. You have to group students and stick with those same groups to be successful. 11. Above-grade-level students should be used as tutors for below-grade-level students. 12. Differentiation is not fair to the students. 13. Assessment is more difficult when you differentiate.
Conclusion Question: Which statement did you find most difficult to evaluate? Why? __________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________

What is Differentiation?
“Differentiation is simply a teacher attending to the learning needs of a particular student or small groups of students, rather than teaching a class as though all individuals in it were basically alike.”
—Carol Ann Tomlinson (2000)

What is Differentiation?

Fair is not everyone getting the same thing. Fair is everyone getting what they need.
—Anonymous

Understanding Differentiation

Differentiate through:
• Content (what is taught) • Process (how it is taught) • Product (what they produce)

Differentiate because: • Readiness • Learning styles • Interests

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Differentiating by Content

Differentiating by Content

Level the Text
1. Shorten sentences (Make compound sentences shorter) 2. Define vocabulary (grade level content words) Give these words context and then define either in text or off to the side of the text 3. Try not to use pronouns (antecedents for pronouns are hard for ELLs)—use the names instead 4. Give context to names (ELLs may not remember that Lincoln is a person, so say President Lincoln or Mr. Lincoln)

Differentiating by Content

The Pledge of Allegiance
1. Circle the words your students won t know. 2. Rewrite the first paragraph—level it down. 3. Have students rewrite it in their own words.

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Differentiating by Content

Differentiating by Content

Differentiating by Content

Leveling Graphic Organizers
• Change what is expected • Change the number of items needed to be listed • Change the resources • Change the look of the organizer

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How Do They Compare?

Directions: Read the reader’s theater script that describes Benjamin Banneker and Thomas Jefferson. Compare them in the Venn diagram with at least five notes in each section.

Think–Pair–Share

Differentiating by Process
Tiering/Leveling Questions • Start with whole class question • Below grade level—Narrow the scope of the question • English language learners—Add context to the language of the question • Above grade level—Increase the complexity of the question

Differentiating by Process
Tiering/Leveling Questions
• Why did the northwestern Indian tribes carve detailed totem poles? (topic) • Why did the tribes carve totem poles? (narrowed) • Why did the Indian tribes carve totem poles? (added context) • For what reasons was it important to be chosen to carve the lowest portion of the totem pole? (opened it up)

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Tiering/Leveling Questions
Directions: Write your own questions and tier them for the different levels of students.

On-Grade-Level Questions:
• What holidays does our country celebrate? • Why did Americans set up three branches of government? • Why did people immigrate to the United States? • What did European explorers learn from their journeys? • Your idea…
Below grade level: _______________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

English language learners: ________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

Above grade level: _______________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

http://www.tcmpub.com

Introduction

Strategies for Using the Leveled Texts (cont.)
Gifted Education Students
By Wendy Conklin

Open-Ended Questions and Activities
Teachers need to be aware of activities that provide a ceiling that is too low for gifted students. When given activities like this, gifted students become bored. We know these students can do more, but how much more? Offering open-ended questions and activities will give high-ability students the opportunities to perform at or above their ability levels. For example, ask students to evaluate major events described in the texts, such as: “Do you think the colonists did the right thing by having the Boston Tea Party?” or “Did the king of Great Britain have the right to tax the colonists?” These questions require students to form opinions, think deeply about the issues, and form pro and con statements in their minds. To questions like this, there really is not one right answer. The generic, open-ended question stems listed below can be adapted to any topic. There is one leveled comprehension question for each text in this book. The question stems below can be used to develop further comprehension questions for the leveled texts. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • In what ways did . . . How might you have done this differently . . . What if . . . What are some possible explanations for . . . How does this affect . . . Explain several reasons why . . . What problems does this create . . . Describe the ways . . . What is the best . . . What is the worst . . . What is the likelihood . . . Predict the outcome . . . Form a hypothesis . . . What are three ways to classify . . . Support your reason . . . Compare this to modern times . . . Make a plan for . . . Propose a solution . . . What is an alternative to . . .

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Differentiating by Process
Tiering/Leveling Questions
In what ways did . . . How might you have done this differently . . . What if . . . How does this affect . . . Explain several reasons why . . . What problems does this create . . . Describe the ways . . . What is the best . . . What is the worst . . . What are some possible explanations for . . . What is the likelihood . . . Predict the outcome . . . Form a hypothesis . . . What are ways to classify . . . Support your reason . . . Make a plan for . . . Propose a solution . . . What is an alternative to . . .

Three Story Intellect

Differentiating by Product
Tiered Assignments

above

Objective

on

below

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Table one

List the different shapes that you see in this picture.

Is this picture new or old? What makes you say that?

Table one

What might happen next in this picture? What makes you think that?

What don’t you see in this picture that you think you should see?

Table one

What objects could be placed into this picture that would belong?

Do you think this is an important picture to study? Why or why not?

Table one

__________________ __________________ __________________ __________________

__________________ __________________ __________________ __________________

Differentiating by Product
Tiered Assignments
• Begin by thinking about the enduring understandings.
– What do you want students to learn during the activity? – All students should work toward the same objective.

In what ways have historical figures influenced life today?

Differentiating by Product
Tiered Assignments
• Create the activity you want your on-grade-level students to complete.
– When you tier your first assignments, start small. Don t tier an entire unit, tier just one day or one assignment.

Write a one-page letter from an inventor that we read about in class.
• Use the books we read as a resource. • Describe what he or she did. • How did this person change life in America? Tell three ways.

Differentiating by Product
Tiered Assignments
• Revise the activity for your English language learners.
Draw a Venn diagram. Compare an inventor from your country with an inventor from America. Some ideas to include are:
• What great things they did • Ways they changed life for others

Then, write at least three sentences about the inventors.

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Differentiating by Product
Tiered Assignments
• Revise the activity for your above-grade-level students. Choose one inventor. Write a one-page story that tells how life would be different today without an invention from the past.
• Use at least two resources (book, Internet) as you write your story. • How would life be different if he or she did not live? • Include at least three examples telling how the inventor made life better.

Differentiating by Product
Tiered Assignments
• Revise the activity for your below-grade-level students. Write at least four sentences about an inventor we read about in class.
• Use the book we read to help you. • Tell at least two details about his or her life as an inventor. • Include two ways that the inventor changed life today.

Differentiating by Product
Menu of Options

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Choices—State History Name _____________________________________________________

Student Reproducibles

State History Menu of Options
Directions: Project ideas are listed below with the total possible points. (You may offer an alternative project or alterations to those listed below to your teacher. If accepted, it will be assigned points.) You must complete enough projects to earn between 50–70 points. If you try to earn 50, the highest grade you can receive is a C. If you try to earn 70 points, the highest grade you can receive is an A. Full credit will only be given for outstanding work. Fewer points will be assigned for incomplete or inadequate projects. Neatness counts. Projects are due: _________________________________

Project Choices
Worth 50 points each Ñ Make a time line showing at least 20 major events in your state’s history. Choose one of these events and write a five-page children’s book about it. You can illustrate it with personal drawings, clip art, or primary source pictures and documents. Ñ Your company specializes in tours of your state. Design a double-sided brochure that shows your tour schedule for the 10 most important historical sites in your state. Ñ Write a play about an important time in your state history. Enlist others to help you perform it for the class. (Points are given to the playwright only.) Ñ Using clay or dough, create a statue of a famous person from your state. Then, write a paragraph description for a plaque that will be placed in front of the statue. This plaque should tell why this person deserves honor from people in your state today. Worth 30 points each Ñ Pick an important historical building in your state. Draw a detailed, colored-pencil drawing of it. Then, write a one-paragraph detailed description of it. Ñ Write a song with three stanzas that would teach others about your state. You can use any type of music (rap, country, rock, etc.) and if you add some instruments, you will receive 10 points extra. Ñ Dress up like an important person from your state’s history. Then, prepare a speech to be given to the class that tells about yourself. Why are you so important? What did you do for the state? Your speech should be two to three minutes long. Ñ Using salt dough, make a map of your state that includes the topographical details like rivers and mountains. Place historical flag markers on toothpicks detailing the 10 most important places in your state.
158 #50639 (ixxxx)—Applying Differentiation Strategies © Shell Education

Choices—State History

Student Reproducibles (cont.)

State History Menu of Options
Project Choices (cont.)
Worth 30 points each (cont.)

Ñ Create an original game about your state history. You can use cards, a game board, or a quiz show atmosphere for this game. Make sure you include instructions on how to play the game as well as the objective of the game. Worth 20 points each Ñ You are a cartoonist for the local newspaper. Choose a time in your state’s history and create a cartoon about it for the newspaper. Ñ Using a large sheet of paper, make a state banner that could hang in the capitol building that tells others the top five most important things about your state. Ñ Imagine you are a party planner in charge of your state’s birthday celebration this year. How should it be celebrated in a way that reflects your state’s history? Make a list of the food, events, and entertainment for this celebration. Ñ Make a mobile with important symbols from your state. Ñ Create a 10-question true or false booklet about your state’s history. It should have one page per question. Make sure you include an answer key at the back of the book. Ñ Create a poster that illustrates your state’s economy today. Then, create a poster that shows your state’s economy 100 years ago. Worth 10 points each Ñ If you could add any design or item to your state flag, what would it be? Draw it and explain why this addition reflects your state’s history. Ñ Write a postcard from an important place in your state. Decorate one side to look like a picture of the location. On the other side, write a note to a friend telling them about the importance of that place in your state’s history. Ñ Make a picture dictionary on index cards that includes your state bird, state flower, state capital, state tree, and other interesting facts about your state. Ñ Find a recipe that originated long ago in your state. Write out the recipe card with instructions on how to make the food. For 15 extra points, work with an adult to make the food. Ñ Find three websites on your state and write a description of each website.

© Shell Education

#50639 (ixxxx)—Applying Differentiation Strategies

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This product grid categorizes different products under separate headings according to research from Howard Gardner’s multiple-intelligences theory. Many are listed in more than one column and would look different according to which approach is taken. These groupings appeal to student interests and strengths. This increases their involvement and the quality of the final product and makes it easier to determine that students have completed tasks that are measurable and demonstrable.

© Shell Education
Bodily/Kinesthetic Calligraphy Charades Collage Costumes Dance Demonstration Diorama Etching Experiment Film Flip book Food Hidden picture Mosaic Mural Musical Musical instruments Needlework Painting Pantomime Papier mache Plaster of Paris model Play Poem Press conference Puppet Puppet show Radio program Role play Transparencies TV program Rhythmic/ Musical Audio-video tape Choral reading Fairy tale Film Instrumental Jukebox Musical Poem Rap song Riddle Role playing Song Sound Interpersonal Advertisement Animated movie Bulletin board Chart Choral reading Comic strip Debate Demonstration Editorial essay Fairy tale Film game Interview Journal Lesson Mazes Museum exhibit Pamphlet Petition Play Press conference Role playing TV program Write a new law Intrapersonal Bulletin board Chart Collection Comic strip Diary Editorial essay Fairy tale Family tree Journal Learning center Poem Riddle maze collage Time line Naturalist Artifact collecting Diorama Field study Field trip Fossil collecting Insect collecting Leaf collecting Original song Photo essay Rock collection Scientific drawing Spelunking trip Time line

Multiple Intelligences Product Grid
(cont.)

Multiple Intelligences Overview

Verbal/Linguistic Advertisement Annotated bibliography Bulletin board Code Comic strip Debate Demonstration Diary Editorial essay Fairy tale Family tree Fiction story Interview Jingle Joke book Journal Lesson Letter Letter to the editor Newspaper story Nonfiction Oral defense Oral report Pamphlet Petition Play Poem Press conference Radio program Riddle Science fiction story Skit Slogan Soliloquy Story telling TV program Write a new law

Logical/Mathematical Advertisement Annotated bibliography Chart Code Collage Collection Computer program Crossword puzzle Database Debate Demonstration Detailed illustration Edibles Experiment Fact tile Family tree Game Graph Hidden picture Labeled diagram Large scale drawing Lesson Map with legend Mazes Mobile Model Petition Play Prototype Puzzle Recipe Riddle Survey Time line Transparencies Venn diagram Working hypothesis Write a new law

#50018 (i2182)—Applying Differentiation Strategies

Visual/Spatial Animated movie Art gallery Bulletin board Bumper sticker Cartoon Chart Clay sculpture Collage Costumes Demonstration Diorama Display Etching Film Filmstrip Flipbook Game Graph Hidden picture Illustrated story Maze Mobile Model Mosaic Mural Painting Papier mache Photo essay Picture story for children Pictures Play Political cartoon Pop-up book Prototype Rebus story Slide show Story cube Transparencies Travel brochure TV program Web home page

133

Reprinted by permission from Dr. T. Roger Taylor, Curriculum Design Online, http://www.rogertaylor.com/. Copyright © 2002 by Dr. T. Roger Taylor.

Choices

Student Reproducibles

Menu of Options
Directions: Project ideas are listed below with the total possible points. (You may offer an alternative project or alterations to those listed below to your teacher. If accepted, it will be assigned points.) You must complete enough projects to earn _______ points. Full credit will only be given for outstanding work. Fewer points will be assigned for incomplete or inadequate projects. Neatness counts. Projects are due: _________________________________

Project Choices
Worth 50 points each
________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

Worth 30 points each
________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

Worth 20 points each
_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

Worth 10 points each
________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

Extra credit ideas
________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

Differentiating by Product
Create Your Own Menu of Options
• Choose a topic you teach. • Use the product chart as you choose items to add to your menu. • Pick the total points students have to earn for each grade.
– Easier products are worth 10–20 points. – Time-consuming products are worth 30–50 points.

Differentiate a Lesson
1) Level the text 2) Level the graphic organizers 3) Level the questions (Blooms, Kaplan, etc.) 4) Change the amount that students are asked to do (numbers, grouping students) 5) Level the activity (make more complex , simple or easy to understand ) 6) Create a menu of options ,

Applying Thank You! Differentiation Wendy Conklin Strategies

wconklin@tcmpub.com

http://www.shelleducation.com

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