Swimmers Log Book by mercy2beans122

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									                  Swimmers Log Book



                         Why use this Log Book ?



Over an extended period of time Bill Sweetenham, National Youth Coach of the Australian
Institute has enjoyed the opportunity to coach and work with over 300 National Championship
winners. All of whom he encouraged to keep a detailed and up to date training log. Each athlete
is different in some way. He says that there can be no question that it has been much easier and a
more successful partnership where the swimmer kept a training log.

Without exception each swimmer who took the time to do this has valued the log and its contents
even after their career as a swimmer reached its conclusion. These logs certainly were a great
value to him as a coach and the swimmer as an individual memory of great occasions that would
have been long forgotten if it were not for their individual training log.

Great workouts or training sets recorded by 4 stars with lesser sets recorded and noted with fewer
stars. Smiling, sad or bland faces recording the athlete’s feelings on a daily or workout basis. A
ranking of 1 to 10 on perceived effort. These are a few ways of an athlete easily and effectively
recording and communicating with themselves and the coach. Short term goals, pre race warm
ups, heart rates, school exams, etc are but a few of the details which need to be included in your
log.

Effective and practiced self-management skills are paramount for today’s successful athlete in
their pursuit of a perfect competition performance.

I encourage all athletes and parents to assist in this log book exercise.
                      How to use this book
Write in the following information:
Day column – write in the date
Morning HR – take your pulse as soon as you wake up for 10 seconds and multiply it by six
Sleep – How many hours sleep you had
Weight – weigh yourself each morning
AM,PM WEEK and YEAR Kms – how many Kms you swam in this time
Mood – on a scale of 1-5 (5 bring excellent, 1 being terrible), rate how you felt when you woke up

                                                      •




     1 (Yuk)           2 (Poor)         3 (Average)       4 (Good)             5 ( Great)

           Morning                                                                     A.M.
            HR       Your morning workout             Your afternoon workout           Kms


      S     Sleep                                                                      P.M.
      A                                                                                Kms
      T
      U
      R    Weight                                                                     WEEK
      D                                                                                Kms
      A
      Y
            Mood                                                                       YEAR
                                                                                        Kms




Week’s Highlights – Record any highlights during the week
Swimmer’s Comments – Your comments on how you felt in your workouts
Coach’s Comments – Get your coach to write a comment and sign this at the end of the week


Abbreviations
free            Freestyle                        PB             Personal best
breast          Breaststroke                     hrs            Hours
back            Backstroke                       sec            Seconds
fly             Butterfly                        min            Minutes
IM              Medley                           m              Metres
DPS             Distance per Stroke              HR             Heart Rate
SC              Stroke Count                     BPM            Beats Below Maximum
DS              Dive Start                       %              Percent
    Morning A.M.   P.M.   A.M.
     HR                   Kms


M    Sleep
O
N
D
A   Weight                P.M.
Y                         Kms


     Mood




    Morning A.M.   P.M.   A.M.
     HR                   Kms

T
U    Sleep
E
S
D
A   Weight                P.M.
Y                         Kms


     Mood




    Morning A.M.   P.M.   A.M.
     HR                   Kms
W
E
D    Sleep
N
E
S
D   Weight                P.M.
A                         Kms
Y

     Mood
    Morning A.M.   P.M.   A.M.
     HR                   Kms

T
H    Sleep
U
R
S
D   Weight                P.M.
A                         Kms
Y

     Mood




    Morning A.M.   P.M.   A.M.
     HR                   Kms


     Sleep
F
R
I
D   Weight                P.M.
A                         Kms
Y

     Mood




    Morning A.M.   P.M.   A.M.
     HR                   Kms
S
A
T    Sleep                P.M.
U                         Kms
R
D
A   Weight                WEEK
Y                         Kms


     Mood                 YEAR
                           Kms
Week’s Highlights __________________________________



_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________


Swimmer’s Comments _______________________________



_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

Coach’s Comments _________________________________



_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________
                           ESSENTIALS
                     [by Wayne Goldsmith, ASI Sport Science Co-ordinator]




       Remember that DESTINY IS NOT A MATTER OF CHANCE … IT’S A MATTER OF
CHOICE. What are the essentials, the key elements of fast swimming, that you can develop over
the next four years?

E – Eat Well. By the age of 15 you have probably heard 100 lectures and talks about nutrition.
It is surprising then that the most popular foods sold at swim meets are pies, chips, hot dogs,
sausage rolls, chocolate bars and soft drinks. You are the only person who decides what goes in
your mouth. Good nutrition and a healthy balanced diet with a variety of nutritious foods is an
essential for swimming success.

Something you can do to help your swimming diet is to educate mum, dad, or whoever buys the
food at your house on the basics of healthy eating. No matter how many times age group
swimmers have heard the good food – good health message, in most cases it is not the swimmer
who selects, buys or cooks the food. One thing the nutritionists tell us is that there is a “window”
of around 10-30 minutes immediately after exercise (training or racing) where your body is in a
really receptive state to replenish muscle energy stores. During this time, you have a great
opportunity to help your body recover from the work it has just done and help it prepare for the
work it has to do at the next training session. Foods like fruit, fruit snack packs and sports drinks
can help put the energy back when you really need it and your body really wants it.

S – Sleep Well.       Your ability to swim fast and achieve your goals will largely be based on
your body’s ability to recover. Effective recovery has many benefits. Effective recovery
techniques increase the rate at which your body recovers from training stresses. This has two
main benefits:
1. You can train harder (quality)
2. You can do more training (quantity)

Training stimulates your body to grow and improve. Everyone gets a little tired and fatigued from
training. Being tired is NOT a BAD THING. Being tired after training is all part of the process of
improving and achieving your best. But being over tired, and carrying tiredness from one session
to the next can cause real problems. Recovery is the process of monitoring fatigue and doing
things to overcome it.

Sleep is a key recovery technique. Everyone needs sleep; some swimmers need more than others
do. Get to know how much sleep you need to make your feel rested and recovered.

A simple way to monitor your sleep (hours of sleep is hard to measure as you often can’t
remember when you fell asleep) is to rate your sleep out of five. A sleep rating of “one” means
you tossed and turned all night and woke up feeling like you fought with Mike Tyson. A “five”
sleep means you woke up feeling like you could take on the world; rested, recovered and restored.
S – Stroke well.         Swimming is based around the development of great technique and the
perfection of aquatic skills.
To be the best swimmer in the WORLD, first you must be the best swimmer in your LANE. When
your coach writes up a training set, YOU have a choice to make. You can do the minimum effort
the coach asks, make the time, swim the distance etc. But, every swimmer in your lane is doing
the same thing. What will make the difference, make you better? The difference is YOUR choice
to do great technique every lap, to always streamline off the walls, to never breathe on the first
stroke in fly and free, to never breathe inside the flags, to always finish on the wall using two
hands in fly and breast and so on. Good technique and racing well is your choice. Work on your
stroke at every possible opportunity.

E – Enjoy your swimming.                Swimming is about doing your best, having fun and making
lots of friends. If you ask the best swimmers around Australia what they like about swimming the
answer usually has something to do with having fun or spending time with friends and teammates.
Swimming can be a tough sport. Over your career there are lots of ups and sometimes a few
downs. For those times when you don’t win every race, or don’t win a medal every time you
swim, those times when you think about giving up, it’s your friends and the fun you have at
training, club activities and at meets that keeps you working hard.

N- Never give up (or obstacles are what you see when you take your eyes off your goals)
The great Australian philosopher Arnold Schwarzzenegger once said, “Success comes from
having the discipline to keep in close contact with your goals”. Everyone has days when it all
seems too hard; when training seems tough, the coach grumpy and swimming isn’t as much fun as
it used to be. The difference between great swimmers or great people in any field of endeavor for
that matter, and most other people, is the determination and commitment to get through the tough
times and keep chasing the dream. When the tough times come, thing about your goal. Keep it
close to you. One way to keep the dream alive is to write down your goals and dreams and put
them on a large sheet of paper on your wall (or on your roof if you can get away with it) so that it
is the first thing you see every day. Remember, tough times fade away: tough people never do.

T – Take your time.           Statistics tell us that the average age of Olympic gold medallists is
around the early to mid 20’s. That means the age grouper who is successful at 13 needs to stay on
top for around another ten years to realise his/her full potential. A long-term plan for success is
better than a short-term plan. Take time to develop a range of skills and techniques that will
ensure long-term success. Never compromise on the development of attributes that will prove
successful in the long term for short-term gains. The short cut you take this season usually catches
up with you next season in the form of less than great performances.

I – Intelligent swimmers develop a balanced lifestyle.                        Whilst it is tempting to
spend all your time living, breathing and dreaming swimming, long-term success depends on
having a balance lifestyle. When you train, train hard; try to train better than anyone else ever has
or ever will. But then, REST HARD. When you are not training find something else to stimulate
you mentally and physically. Recovery experts from the Australian Institute of Sport tell us that
real recovery means having a real balance in your life and doing more to rest than just sleeping.
The best form or recovery is to have other things to concentrate on away from training. Music,
study, going out with friends and family, doing other sports for fun and fitness, reading, and so on
all help your mind and body achieve a balance between work and play.

A – Avoid gimmicks (ie fast fixes, fad diets and amazing promises from a can or a bottle).
Unfortunately there are no short cuts to success. It has been said that the secret to success is hard
– that’s why it remains a secret to so many! Australian Swimming is lucky in that it has some
brilliant scientific and coaching minds working with them around Australia. If there were a short
cut to gold medals they would have found it!
If someone is promising an easy road to success, something that means you will have to train less
but you will swim faster, BE CAUTIOUS. Most things in life that look too good to be true,
usually are.

L – Learn from your mistakes.                Making a mistake in training and racing isn’t dumb.
Making the same mistake twice (or several times) is. If you are serious about being successful, it
is a great idea to keep a training diary or swimming logbook. A training diary can help you in a
million ways: If you do a great swim, and you haven’t recorded your training and other
information, how will you know how to repeat it next time for another great performance?
If you do a poor swim, how will you know what to avoid so that it doesn’t happen again?
It gives you a chance to record all the things that can influence your swimming: how you feel,
what you weigh, how your body is adapting to training, your training and racing goals, your
personal bests and many other things.
It is a great way to communicate with your coach.
Most importantly, it teaches you how to listen to your own body.
If you do a brilliant swim at a meet, but haven’t written down what you had for breakfast, what
you did to warm up, how much sleep you got the night before, what your race tactics were and so
on, you will forget it by the next meet.

S – Set your sights high.           Dream the dream and believe that you can be successful; that
you can do anything. Many swimmers faced with the daunting prospect of having to improve
many seconds to get to the top often give up, believing the distance between them and their goal is
just too great.
What if your dream was to swim 20 seconds faster than you can right now and break the world
record and to win the Olympic final. If the next Olympics was just four years away and if you
train 7 sessions a week, 50 weeks a year for the next 4 years, that’s 1400 training sessions that you
can swim between now and then. In other words you have 1400 sessions to improve 20 seconds.
And what is 20 seconds divided by 1400 sessions ???
It’s about the distance between these two lines …. I I.
All you have to do is concentrate on improving this much I I every session.
If you concentrate on improving one thing every session, today your turns, tomorrow your
streamlining, the next day your finishes, the next day your kick etc etc and improve this much I
I every time you train, you can do anything!
              My Swimming Goals
Short-term _____________________________________________________________________




How I will achieve these __________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________




Medium term ___________________________________________________________________



_______________________________________________________________________________


How I will achieve these __________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________




Long-term _____________________________________________________________________




How I will achieve these __________________________________________________________
                 Personal Best Times




       Free   Breast     Back       Fly   IM

 50
100

200
400
800
1500




                       Goal Times




       Free   Breast      Back      Fly   IM

 50
100
200
400
800
1500
         P.B. Or Not P.B. – That is The Question
                                       By Wayne Goldsmith




P.B.’s – Personal Bests. The best ever times that a swimmer has swum, are an important part of
swimming. They are an indication of the best performance of a swimmer and are often used to
determine the appropriate training speeds for a swimmer. They can be part of the process of
achieving qualifying standards for metropolitan, state and national championships and are a useful
measuring stick to track the progress and improvement of a swimmer over time.

However, too much focus on the importance of doing a personal best … rather an on the aspects
of the swimming performance that lead to the personal best … can be counter productive.

National Team Sports Psychologist, Clark Perry, says
“Swimmers should concentrate on the PROCESS of doing a personal best, rather than the actual
OUTCOME – i.e. doing the time. Parents, swimmers and coaches need to focus on the
CONTROLLABLE aspects of the performance – like the number strokes per minute – streamlining
off starts and turns – kicking rhythm, etc. … rather than on WINNING or doing a P.B.”

The goal of competing in a race may be to win – come first. However, in most cases WINNING
is something over which swimmers have little or no control. They have no control over the talent
of the other swimmers in the race. They have no control over how much swimming training the
other swimmers in the race have done. They have no control over the commitment or dedication
of the other swimmers. The only thing they have some control over – in terms of the race
outcome – is their own performance. Therefore, it makes sense to focus on those things over
which the swimmer has control to achieve the best possible result.

Swimmers will often worry about the outcome of a race and stress about winning or losing. By
giving swimmers control over their performance and reinforcing the importance of concentrating
on the skills and techniques they have learned in training – the “freak-out” experienced by many
swimmers prior to a swim meet can be reduced. Of course the time to be working on swimming
skills and techniques is at training. Getting to the meet and worrying about how to get that P.B. IS
TOO LATE. The skills and techniques that will make the P.B. a reality are the things you practice
as part of your daily training routine.

In training – MAKE IT HAPPEN. In racing – on the day of the meet – LET IT HAPPEN! If you
concentrate on doing the little things right in training all the time, you can make the P.B. happen.
If you just roll through training, not concentrating on great turns, great dives, great technique but
then try to turn it all around on race day … it’s too late! Make your success happen in training,
then on race day, let the skills and techniques you have developed in training help you achieve
your goal.
Success means
• Leaving nothing to chance
• Not relying on luck
• Taking control over your performance by working on doing the little things right in training
   every day

Nothing can absolutely guarantee success. But you can increase the likelihood of success by
MAKING things happen through your own hard work, commitment and dedication.

The Big Question is … how do you control the controllable on race day?

1. Focus on the elements of the race competition that are important to success. For example –
   focus on the number of strokes per lap, the number of strokes per minute, your speed for each
   lap (splits), your pacing strategy … and so on.
2. Focus on the elements of swimming technique and race skill. For example – think about
   exploding off the blocks in your dive … about keeping your strokes long and strong and
   smooth … about streamlining and kicking powerfully out of each turn … your breathing
   pattern … when to take your first breath after a turn … when to take your last breath before the
   finish … attacking the final 10 metres. Etc.
3. Focus on doing the little things right before the competition. Eat a light, sensible breakfast of
   fruit, cereal, toast and juice. Get to the pool early and make sure of marshalling procedures,
   warm up facilities and swim down areas. If a backstroker, make sure you know where the
   flags are and how many strokes you need to take from the flags to the wall. Get a good feel
   for the starting blocks and practice some starts. Do a great warm up, have a great stretching
   session and drink a little sports drink or some water and eat a piece of fruit to keep energy
   stores topped up. Take some time to sit with your coach and talk about elements of the race
   that you will need to focus on. Keep warm (this means wearing something on your feet as
   well !!!).

For the “control the controllable” approach to work, the swimmer, coach and family must all be
aiming for the same thing. It is vital that all three communicate and understand that success is a
team effort.

Concentrating on the process of swimming well rather than on the outcome of winning or doing a
P.B. is a great way to achieve your swimming goals without experiencing the highs and lows of
aiming to win every race. Winning and doing P.B.'s are a fantastic HIGH, but if these are your
only aims and you DON’T win or do a P.B. the lows can be rally painful.

As one swimmer put it … “If I concentrate on doing my job right, I know the clock will do the
same.”



                                              -oOo-
       Record of Swim Times



Date     Event         Time   Comments
                   Weekly Activity Planner


                 Date            to


           MON   TUES   WED     THUR     FRI   SAT   SUN


  5:00

  6:00

  7:00

  8:00

  9:00

 10:00

 11:00

 12:00

 13:00

 14:00

 15:00

 16:00

 17:00

 18:00

 19:00

 20:00

 21:00

 22:00

 Notes/

Comments
                   Check how you feel

Date: __________




Physically

Psychologically

Emotionally




Date: __________




Physically


Psychologically


Emotionally




Date: __________




Physically


Psychologically


Emotionally
                   Check how you feel

Date: __________



Physically

Psychologically

Emotionally




Date: __________
Physically

Psychologically

Emotionally




Date: __________
Physically

Psychologically

Emotionally


Date: __________
Physically

Psychologically

Emotionally


Date: __________
Physically

Psychologically

Emotionally

								
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