Fragments A fragment is a part of something. In by mercy2beans120

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									                                        Fragments

A fragment is a part of something. In writing, a fragment is a group of words which
does not express a complete idea, only part of an idea. Obviously then, a fragment is not
a sentence because, by the traditional definition, a sentence is a group of words which
expresses a complete idea.

When we talk, we use many fragments. When we do any type of creative writing, we can
use fragments. However, academic writing in the university setting usually differs from
talking and creative writing. In fact, fragments, which come in a variety of types, may
stigmatize the writer. Fragments can be used carefully to emphasize points, to create tone,
to mimic speech, or to demonstrate flair, but be sure you know your instructor's/your
reader's level of tolerance in regard to fragments. If you cannot identify the
reader/audience, analyze the context in which you are writing and the purpose for which
you are writing.

In most cases, writing in the university calls for complete ideas expressed in complete sentences.

Examine the following items for completeness. Write "S" beside the groups of words
which convey to you a sense of completion. Write "F" if you find only a fragment.

1. Attending a Mules football game in the fall is fun.
2. After the national anthem has been played.
3. Cheering them after each touchdown.
4. The jackets of the coaches, the uniforms of the band members, and the costumes of
the Mulekickers adding bright colors to the dull brown and greens of the playing field
when the players haven't yet appeared.
5. Sometimes the broadcaster, the athletic trainers, and the concessions salespeople, too.
6. I spend most of my time looking around at the crowd in the stadium.
7. Figuring out the strategy of the game is difficult for me.
8. Careful to carry the ball so it cannot fall to the turf.
9. The enthusiastic cheers of the fans float up the hill toward Selmo Park.
10. Running onto Vernon Kennedy field.
11. Echoes of the Army ROTC cannon in our ears.
12. While we waited for the kickoff.
13. For example, cheerleaders memorizing the new choreography specifically for this season.
14. Finally we have scored.
15. Two of the best routines remaining the actions which mimic the shark in the old
movie Jaws and the cockroach on its back, unable to turn over.


On this page, you should have found eleven fragments and four complete sentences.
                                   The Writing Center
                                        Humphreys 116
                                 University of Central Missouri
                                           Fragments
                           Fragments--Answers and Explanation

16. Suddenly the other team stole the ball!
17. To be a calm moment for the band.
18. The games having added to the excitement of college days, even when the Mules lose.
19. At least I think so.
20. Then I wondered about some of the players of past seasons who had graduated.
21. Not many teams a real live mule as mascot.


You should have discovered eight complete items among the twenty-one above.
The complete items are: 1, 6, 7, 9, 14, 16, 19, 20.


The incomplete items are as follows:

2. A dependent clause (Attending is).

3. A descriptive phrase.

4. A long descriptive phrase followed by a dependent clause (players have appeared).

5. This one could go in a number of directions.

8. If "be" were added at the very beginning, this would be a sentence (or independent
clause) with "you understood" as the subject.

10. A descriptive phrase.

11. This one could go in a number of directions.

12. A dependent clause (we waited).

13. Could go in multiple directions.

15. A long descriptive phrase with an internal dependent clause (which mimic).

17. Could go in multiple directions.

18. A long descriptive phrase followed by a dependent clause (even when Mules lose).

21. What is missing may be a verb: Not many teams have a real live mule as mascot.

                                  The Writing Center
                                       Humphreys 116
                              University of Central Missouri
                      Fragments, continued – Answers and Explanation

								
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