Memo Debriefing TO Nick Pirro Onondaga County Executive SUBJECT Implement a Syringe Exchange Program in Onondaga County What’s Wrong TO Nick Pirro Onondaga County Executive FROM Ryan Gerec

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Memo Debriefing TO Nick Pirro Onondaga County Executive SUBJECT Implement a Syringe Exchange Program in Onondaga County What’s Wrong TO Nick Pirro Onondaga County Executive FROM Ryan Gerec Powered By Docstoc
					Memo Debriefing
  TO: Nick Pirro, Onondaga County
  Executive

  SUBJECT: Implement a Syringe
  Exchange Program in Onondaga County
What’s Wrong?
  TO: Nick Pirro, Onondaga County
  Executive
  FROM: Ryan Gerecht, EMT-D
  SUBJECT: Implement a Syringe
  Exchange Program in Onondaga County
PROBLEM:
Dear Nick,
    The Oneida County Health Assessment published
in 1998 reports that the total number of AIDS cases
among residents of Oneida County has consistently
increased. The Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention report that there is no cure for the
disease resulting in a 100% mortality rate.
What’s Wrong?
 Dear Nick,
        The Oneida County Health Assessment published
   in 1998 reports that the total number of AIDS cases
   among residents of Oneida County has consistently
   increased from 108 in 1990 to 755 in 1997. Nearly
   40% of these cases are a result of intravenous drug
   users sharing contaminated syringes which results in
   the transmission of HIV. The Centers for Disease
   Control and Prevention report that there is no cure
   for the disease resulting in a 100% mortality rate.
PROPOSED POLICY:
   Since 1992, free and anonymous
syringe exchange programs (SEPs) have
been legal in the state of New York. Since
that time seven New York cities or
boroughs have established at least one
SEP, each with great success.
What’s Wrong?
  Since 1992, free and anonymous syringe exchange
  programs (SEPs) have been legal in the state of New
  York. Since that time seven New York cities or
  boroughs have established at least one SEP, each
  with great success. I propose that the Onondaga
  County Health Department establish a SEP that
  would provide sterile syringe and other necessary
  sterile injection accessories, in accordance with the
  already established New York State Department of
  Health guidelines governing SEPs.
BENCHMARKS:
    National researchers at both the CDC and the
University of California have shown SEPs to reduce
HIV infection rates by nearly 50%. Similar results
have been reported for New York State. Based on
these statistics and the fact that HIV has a long
incubation period, benchmarks should be set at 5
and 10 years from the date of the SEP opening.
Assuming implementation in 2005, the percentage
of HIV infections from intravenous drug use should
decrease to 28% in 2013 and 14% in 2017. This
7% annual infection rate is consistent with data
I’ve found.
What’s Wrong?
  National researchers at both the CDC and the
  University of California have shown SEPs to reduce
  HIV infection rates by nearly 50%. Similar results
  have been reported for New York State. Based on
  these statistics and the fact that HIV has a long
  incubation period, benchmarks should be set at 5,
  10, and 15 years from the date of the SEP opening.
  Assuming implementation in 2005, the percentage of
  HIV infections from intravenous drug use should
  decrease to 28% in 2012, 14% in 2017, and 7% in
  2022. This 7% annual infection rate is consistent
  with data reported by the director of AIDS Rochester,
  Steven Price. Providing clean needles will reduce the
  spread of HIV.
POLITICAL FEASIBILITY:
      According to the Centers for Disease Control and
 Prevention the cost per HIV infection prevented by SEPs is
 between $4,000 and $12,000, considerably less than the
 estimated $190,000 spent in treating a single person
 infected with HIV. Upon approval by the AIDS Institute and
 the NYS Health Commissioner, state and federal funds cover
 most of the costs. Nonetheless, the financial pressure on
 the county budget would create substantial political support
 for the policy.
                         Sincerely,
                                 Ryan Gerecht, EMT-D
What’s Wrong?
 According to the Centers for Disease Control and
   Prevention the cost per HIV infection prevented by
   SEPs is between $4,000 and $12,000, considerably
   less than the estimated $190,000 spent in treating a
   single person infected with HIV. Upon approval by
   the AIDS Institute and the NYS Health Commissioner,
   state and federal funds cover most of the costs.
   Nonetheless, the financial pressure on the county
   budget would create substantial political support for
   the policy. The policy is likely to be implemented
   because legislators would see this as a way to save
   money over the long run.
                           Sincerely,
                                   Ryan Gerecht, EMT-D
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