Future Directions in Science Journalism

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					The Science Journalism Research Group presents

Future Directions in Science Journalism

November 9 & 10, 2007 Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia Wedgewood Hotel, Downtown Vancouver

Welcome from Stephen Ward
Welcome to this timely conference, “Future Directions in Science Journalism,” a project of the UBC School of Journalism’s science journalism initiative. Given the impact of new media and science on a global world, schools of journalism should lead in the education of critical and informed science journalists and researchers. Science journalism is a new and developing specialty at our graduate school. It aims to improve the understanding of science through research, teaching, and public discussion. The initiative includes research conducted by media scholars at our school, in Belgium, and in France. I invite you to learn more about our school, its international faculty, and its excellent graduate students. Become involved with our science journalism initiative and assist us in this worthy project of improving the public communication of science. Enjoy the conference and please participate in the conference blog at www.sciencejournalism.net. Warm regards, Stephen J. A. Ward, PhD Director and Associate Professor of Journalism Ethics School of Journalism, UBC

About Us
GE3LS Research into Communicating Controversial Science The science journalism initiative at the UBC School of Journalism seeks to improve science journalism through research, education, and public discussion. At the heart of the initiative is GE3LS research into communicating controversial science, especially genomics. The project is part of a larger brain disorder study, the Pleiades Promoter Project, funded by Genome British Columbia. Our research will study the strengths and weaknesses of science reporting on genomics through content analysis, interviews, normative analysis, and the testing of new communication models. The project has established science journalism as a speciality at the School of Journalism. The speciality includes a science journalism course, scholarships and internships, publications, a Web site, public events, the annual appointment of a scientist in residence and the Canadian Science Journalism Awards. Recently, researchers in Belgium and France have joined the project to provide international comparisons of data.

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Welcome from Elizabeth Simpson
Stephen Ward and I met at a Peter Wall Institute interdisciplinary program much like this one. At that time I told Stephen I thought writing books was passé; he later won the Harold Adams Innis Prize for the book he was writing. In turn, he told me that the direction of my science was highly controversial; I later won a $10.2 million award to pursue that direction. Who could have guessed that from such inauspicious beginnings would grow the Science Journalism Research Group at the UBC School of Journalism (SOJ)? This team has only been together for 17 months and already they have awarded four science journalism scholarships, developed a science journalism course, established four national science journalism prizes, and done extensive research interviews with science journalists and editors across Canada. During a recent review of the encompassing Genome Canada Pleiades Promoter Project (www.pleiades.org) the SOJ project “New models and Novel Strategies for Improved Genomic Communication” was singled out: “The GE3LS project has made tremendous progress towards its original goal of developing new journalism to communicate science to the general public.” Congratulations on attending this workshop – perhaps here you will find your interdisciplinary soul mate with whom to carve out “Future Directions in Science Journalism.” Elizabeth M. Simpson, PhD Senior Scientist, Centre for Molecular Medicine & Therapeutics Associate Professor, Department of Medical Genetics, CFRI, UBC

I am really pleased to be participating in this conference both as a scientist and a journalist. I have long supported the creation of a science journalism program in the school which, I am happy to say, is now into its second year. UBC is an excellent location for such a program due to the many excellent researchers spread throughout the faculties, schools and teaching hospitals and the interest that many have in the communication of science. Hopefully, the science journalism program will grow and develop over the next few years. This conference and the awards to be presented to top science journalists will help make this possible. I look forward to our discussions. Sincerely, Sid Katz, C.M., PhD Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Executive Director, UBC Community Affairs Scientist in Residence, UBC School of Journalism

Welcome from Sid Katz

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Biographies
Ira Basen has been with CBC Radio since 1984. He was senior producer at Sunday Morning and Quirks and Quarks. He has been involved in the creation of three network programs; The Inside Track (1985), This Morning (1997) and Workology (2001), as well as several special series, including Spin Cycles, a six-part look at PR and the media, that was broadcast on CBC Radio One in January/February 2007. He has also written for Saturday Night, The Globe and Mail, The Walrus, and cbc.ca. He has won several awards, including the Canadian Science Writers Association Award, the Canadian Nurses Association Award, and the New York Radio Festival Award. He has developed several training programs for CBC journalists, and has taught at the University of Toronto and Ryerson. In the fall of 2007, he will be teaching a course on “Critical Perspectives on Public Relations” at the University of Western Ontario, and a course in radio production at Ryerson University. He is the co-author of the Canadian edition of The Book of Lists (Knopf Canada, 2005).

Richard Black covers environmental issues for BBC News, primarily for the Web site but also for national and international radio. Most of his career was spent in BBC World Service reporting on scientific and environmental affairs, and presenting programmes with a similar brief. He was co-founder of the pioneering environment/ development programme One Planet, and has reported from major international events such as the UNFCCC meeting in Nairobi in 2006, the UN World Summit in New York in 2005, and the UNAIDS summit in Barcelona in 2002. He has contributed to the BBC’s journalist training programmes directed at former Soviet bloc nations, and travelled extensively in the developing world.

Dr. Tammy Boyce is the Research Councils UK Research Fellow in Risk, Science, Health and Communication at the Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, Cardiff University, Wales. Her research interests include media coverage of health and science issues and the relationships between sources, public relations, journalists and the public. Her book Health, Risk and News: the MMR Vaccine and the Media was published by Peter Lang in 2007. She is currently involved in a number of projects including an examination of UK media coverage of science and technology and media coverage, production and audience reception of disfigurement, understanding the impact of user-generated content on news and the role of expertise in journalism.

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Biographies
As MSNBC.com's science editor, Alan Boyle runs a virtual curiosity shop of the physical sciences and space exploration, plus paleontology, archaeology and other “ologies” that strike his fancy. Since joining MSNBC.com in 1996, Boyle has won awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Association of Science Writers, the Pirelli Relativity Challenge and the CMU Cybersecurity Journalism Awards program. He is a contributor to A Field Guide for Science Writers, the president of the Northwest Science Writers Association, the blogger behind Cosmic Log, and an occasional talking head on the MSNBC cable channel. During his 29 years of daily journalism in Cincinnati, Spokane and Seattle, he’s survived a hurricane, a volcanic eruption, a total solar eclipse and an earthquake. He has faith he'll survive the Internet as well. Anne Casselman works as a freelance science writer in Vancouver. She completed an undergraduate degree in zoology from the University of Toronto, and went on to get a masters degree in science communication at Imperial College, London, before interning at Discover magazine in New York in 2005. Since then she has written for them regularly and has picked up other outlets here and there, which include National Geographic News, Seed magazine and Scientific American online.

Alan Cassels is a drug policy researcher with an interest in how clinical research and experience on pharmaceuticals gets translated for policy makers, prescribers and consumers. He led a team of Canadian researchers to carry out the first ever study of Canadian newspaper coverage of new prescription drugs (published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal in April 2003) and has frequently reported on consumer drug issues for magazines, newspapers, and the CBC Radio program Ideas. He is co-author, with Australian journalist Ray Moynihan, of Selling Sickness: How the World’s Biggest Pharmaceutical Companies are Turning us All into Patients (Greystone Books, 2005) about the role of the ethical drug industry in helping to underwrite the creation and marketing of illness. His new book, The ABC’s of Disease Mongering (Emdash Book Publishing) is to be launched in the fall of 2007. Cassels has lectured in journalism schools in Canada, the US and Australia on the essentials of pharmaceutical reporting and was the founder of Media Doctor Canada (www.mediadoctor.ca) a Web-based service dedicated to improving the quality of Canadian medical reporting.

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Biographies
Beth Haddon is a broadcast executive, now working as a communications consultant and adjunct professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of British Columbia, where she also coordinates the school’s internship program. She has held a range of senior positions in broadcasting and journalism in Canada including head of current affairs and features programming at CBC Radio, senior producer and Ottawa bureau chief for CBC Television’s The Journal, senior editor at The Globe and Mail and managing director of Programming at TVOntario. Her career spans all aspects of journalism and editorial management as well as management roles in corporate affairs and strategic planning. Beth has taught journalism at Ryerson University, worked in Africa with Canadian University Service Overseas and served on a variety of not for profit boards. François Heinderyckx is professor of media sociology and political communication at Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) where he is chair of the Master Degree in information and communication. He is also president of the European Communication Research and Education Association (ECREA). Alfred Hermida is an Assistant Professor at the UBC School of Journalism, and a founding member of the award-winning BBCNews.com Web site. He joined the faculty of the Graduate School of Journalism at UBC in the summer of 2006 to develop new courses in multiplatform journalism and in science journalism. He was a daily news editor for BBCNews.com for four years, during which time the site became widely recognized as an online news pioneer and one of the best news sites worldwide. Later, as technology editor for the Web site, he wrote extensively about trends in new media. Prof. Hermida joined the Web site after working in BBC radio and television national outlets, and after spending four years as a BBC foreign correspondent in the Middle East. He worked as a journalist for the BBC for a total of 16 years. His work has also appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Times of London and The Guardian, and he has contributed to NPR and CBC. His research interests include the impact of digital communications technology on journalism and new multiplatform models of journalism education. Prof. Hermida is a frequent commentator in the media on leading Internet trends, such as the rise of social media and the role of citizen journalism, and writes on developments in digital journalism at Reportr.net. He is currently working on a book about the history of the BBCNews.com.

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Biographies
Dr. Sid Katz, a noted UBC science educator, journalist, and professor of pharmacology, has long supported the development of the School of Journalism and is the school’s first scientist in residence for the academic year 2007–2008. Prof. Katz will teach and assist students with their research and thesis projects and advise the Science Journalism Research Group as it carries out a four-year investigation into the public communication of controversial science. Dr. Katz is Executive Director, Community Affairs of the University of British Columbia and Managing Director of the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts. He is also a Professor of pharmacology and toxicology in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at UBC. Sid has had a parallel career in science journalism having contributed over 400 items on CBC Radio regional and national programs, including Morningside and As it Happens on science and health issues and was the national health science correspondent on the CTV National News. He served for a number of years as vice-president of the Canadian Science Writers Association and on many science writing awards juries. Prof. Katz has won many awards for his science education activities, including the Order of Canada in 2003. Jaymie Matthews is an astro-paparazzo who unveils the hidden lifestyles of stars by eavesdropping on “the music of the spheres.” His version of an interstellar iPod is Canada’s first space telescope, MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars), which detects vibrations in the light of ringing stars too subtle to be seen even by the largest telescopes on Earth. Dr. Matthews is the mission scientist, leading the Canadian Space Agency’s MOST project, and an astrophysics professor at the University of British Columbia. He is trying to write a biography of our Sun – past and future – by studying its neighbours in our galactic city, the Milky Way. His research sounds more like astromedicine than astrophysics: performing “ultrasound” on stellar embryos, checking on the hyperactivity of a pre-teen sun, and taking the pulses of stars in their twilight years. Dr. Matthews and his team are also using MOST to forecast the weather on planets beyond the Solar System, and they have begun the search for Terra Nova – alien Earths around other stars. Dr. Matthews was awarded a 1999 Killam Prize for teaching excellence in the UBC Faculty of Science, as well as the 2002 Teaching Prize of the Canadian Association of Physicists. In 2006, he became an Officer of the Order of Canada. But he has yet to live down being quoted in Discover magazine as saying "Exploding Star Contains Atoms from Elvis Presley's Brain – Scientists Confirm the King of Rock & Roll Lived in Another Galaxy 160,000 Years Ago!”

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Biographies
Alanna Mitchell was a journalist at The Globe and Mail for 14 years, where her areas of expertise were earth sciences, the environment, social statistics and behavioural trends. Before that, she was a business journalist at The Financial Post. She is the author of Dancing at the Dead Sea: Tracking the World’s Environmental Hotspots, which was published in 2004 in Canada and subsequently in the U.S., the U.K., Australia and New Zealand. It was named one of the five best nonfiction books in Canada in 2004 by Quill & Quire, the publishing industry’s trade magazine, and has enjoyed international critical acclaim. In 2000, the IUCN and the Reuters Foundation named Mitchell the best environmental reporter in the world for her report on the vanishing forests of Madagascar. That led to a term of study at Green College, Oxford University in 2003 where she studied with Norman Myers. She is currently finishing up her next book on the global ocean to be published internationally in the fall of 2008. She is also an associate at the International Institute for Sustainable Development on media issues. David Secko is an assistant professor in the Department of Journalism at Concordia University, where he studies journalism’s role in democratic governance and develops new models of scientific communication. He obtained his Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology in 2004 and Masters of Journalism degree in 2006 at the University of British Columbia. David is also a freelance science writer whose work has appeared in The Scientist, the Canadian Medical Association Journal, The Tyee and The Science Creative Quarterly.

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Biographies
Dr. Elizabeth M. Simpson is senior scientist and associate professor at the Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics and in the Department of Medical Genetics at the University of British Columbia. She is also an associate of the Department of Psychiatry and holds a Canada Research Chair in Genetics and Behaviour. Her expertise is in human genetics, mouse genetics and genomics as well as mouse models of human brain disorders. The overall goal of Dr. Simpson’s research program is to use genetically engineered mouse models to understand and improve treatment for human brain and behaviour disorders. Her approach is to study the genetics, behaviour, neurogenesis, and genome-wide transcription in mouse models of brain disorders. The expectation is that a clearer understanding of abnormal behaviour and brain pathologies in humans will lead to new and improved therapeutic strategies for these devastating conditions. Her research has attracted significant mainstream media attention including Discovery Channel Canada, Quirks and Quarks, The Globe and Mail, the Vancouver Sun, and many more.
Stephen Ward is director and associate professor of journalism ethics at the graduate School of Journalism, University of British Columbia. His expertise includes the history of journalism ethics, news objectivity, and global journalism ethics, all areas in which he is an internationally recognized expert. His The Invention of Journalism Ethics: The Path to Objectivity and Beyond, was published in 2005 by McGill-Queen’s University Press and won the 2005–2006 Harold Adams Innis Prize from the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences for the best English-language scholarly book in the social sciences. Other writings on journalism ethics have appeared in the Journal of Mass Media Ethics, the Harvard International Journal of Press and Politics, and Journalism Studies. He is the principal investigator of a four-year GE LS (pronounced “gels” and short for genomics-related ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and societal issues) project to improve science journalism by exploring new models for science journalism and new strategies for genomic communication. The study is part of a larger brain disorder study, the Pleiades Promoter Project, funded by Genome Canada. Prof. Ward is associate editor of the Journal of Mass Media Ethics, a media ethics columnist for Media magazine, and director of two Web sites: www.sciencejournalism.net, a comprehensive Web site on science journalism and news, and www.journalismethics.ca, Journalism Ethics for the Global Citizen, Canada’s only Web site for the analysis and promotion of journalism ethics.

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Schedule of Events
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 2:00 P.M. Guided tour of TRIUMF for conference participants, www.triumf.info TRIUMF, 4004 WESBROOK MALL, UBC SOUTH CAMPUS Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics 7:30 P.M. Reception & keynote address by Alfred Hermida WEDGEWOOD HOTEL, 845 HORNBY STREET, DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 PETER WALL INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDIES 8:30 A.M. Guests arrive, breakfast served (included in fee) 9:15 A.M. Welcoming remarks 9:30 A.M. Session 1: Hype, Spin and Conflicts of Interest in Science Journalism Moderator Beth Haddon, UBC Graduate School of Journalism Panellists Ira Basen, CBC Radio Tammy Boyce, Cardiff School of Journalism Alan Cassels, Media Doctor Canada, University of Victoria Alanna Mitchell, reporter and author How much is science hyped in the press, who is responsible for it and why does it happen? How can science reporters recognize hype, avoid manipulation and look for conflicts of interest in the stories they write? How does the commercialization of science relate to science journalism? What conflicts do science journalists themselves have? 11:00 A.M. Coffee refills

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Schedule of Events
11:15 A.M. Session 2: Talking to the Media Moderator David Secko, Department of Journalism, Concordia University Presenters Jaymie M. Matthews, Department of Physics and Astronomy, UBC Elizabeth M. Simpson, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, UBC During this session of the conference, two prominent UBC scientists will present recent research in a press-conference-like setting. After the presentations, the audience can ask questions about the science, but this will also be an opportunity to create a dialogue between scientists, journalists and media experts in the same room about what was included in the press release, how the questions were answered, what else the journalists might have wanted from the scientists, what the scientists thought of the journalists' questions, etc. 12:15 P.M. Lunch served (included in fee) 1:15 P.M. Post-lunch wake-up exercise! Test your knowledge of recent science news! 1:30 P.M. Session 3: Going Online for Science Moderator Stephen Ward, UBC Graduate School of Journalism Panellists Francois Heinderyckx, Department of Information and Communication Science, Université Libre de Bruxelles Anne Casselman, inklingmagazine.com Richard Black, BBCNews.com Studies show that more and more people are going online when they look for health and science news. Where are they looking? How is that changing? And what do these new audiences want? 3:00 P.M. Coffee break (included in fee)

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Schedule of Events
3:30 P.M. Session 4: A Science Journalism Toolkit Moderators Alan Boyle, MSNBC.com Alfred Hermida, UBC School of Journalism Using the information collected in the previous sessions, how can science reporters actually apply this knowledge to the stories they write online? Alfred Hermida and Alan Boyle will assemble their thoughts from the day and lead a group discussion. 5:00 P.M. Concluding remarks 5:30 P.M. Post-conference reception or free time (cash bar) Guests to move downstairs to Sage Lounge 6:15 P.M. Dinner and awards ceremony (dinner and wine included in fee, cash bar) Guests to move downstairs to Sage Restaurant, East Dining Room Master of ceremonies: Sid Katz Four-course meal, drinks and the first annual Canadian Science Journalism Awards Ceremony! Please have a look at the opposite page for more information about the awards and Page 16 for the evening’s menu.

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Please help reduce waste by returning your name-tag holder before you leave. Thank you!

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Awards
The Science Journalism Research Group at the UBC Graduate School of Journalism is pleased to announce the three winners of our first annual competition for excellence in Canadian science reporting. Three $3000 prizes were awarded in these categories: print, broadcast and Internet science journalism. We received many excellent works of science journalism from a large number and wide variety of outlets. A panel of independent judges narrowed down the entries to these three winners: The Genome BC Society and Ethics Prize for Print Science Journalism Forgotten Lake Allan Casey Canadian Geographic The CMMT Prize for Broadcast Science Journalism Gunther's Thin Slices Carol McGrath, Brian Marleau, Kelly McKeown Daily Planet Prize for Internet Science Journalism Blowing Big Smoke at Asthma Stephen Strauss cbc.ca The Barry Lando Prize for Best Science Journalism Overall To be announced at the conference on Saturday, November 10, 2007 Congratulations to the winners! We look forward to another exciting competition next year.

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Delegates
Amadi, Mahmood UBC Bartz, Linda Genome British Columbia Basen, Ira CBC Radio Black, Richard BBC News Boyce, Tammy Cardiff School of Journalism Boyle, Alan msnbc.com Brockett, Beth Forest Sciences, UBC Casey, Allan Freelance journalist, Canadian Geographic Magazine Casselman, Anne inklingmagazine.com, Freelance Cassels, Alan Media Doctor Canada/University of Victoria Clark, Nina Health Care and Epidemiology, UBC Corriveau, Britt Faculty of Forestry, UBC Cornwall, Claudia Reader's Digest Corry, John UBC College for Interdisciplinary Studies D'Arcy, Trevor UBC School of Journalism Fernandez, Ariadna UBC School of Nursing Fong, Anna UBC School of Journalism Fox, Joanne AMBL, Michael Smith Laboratories Go, Jayson UBC School of Journalism Gram, Karen Vancouver Sun Griffith, Megan NSERC-Pacific Haddon, Beth UBC School of Journalism Hanley, Gillian Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, UBC Harland, Kyle UBC School of Journalism Heinderyckx, François Department of Communication & Information Sciences, Free University of Brussels Helm, Jeffrey Science Journalist Herminda, Alfred UBC School of Journalism Ho Sui, Shannon Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, UBC Hughes, Merrilee UBC School of Nursing / UBC Faculty of Medicine Hurrell, Christie Centre for Health and Environment Research, UBC Isabella, Jude YES Mag Jacquet, Jennifer UBC Fisheries Centre Jandciu, Eric UBC School of Journalism Johnson, Lisa CBC News Vancouver Katz, Sid Scientist in Residence, UBC School of Journalism Keilholz, Doerthe UBC School of Journalism Kohm, Jennifer Child & Family Research Institute

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Delegates
Korell, Darryl UBC School of Journalism Leong, Vivian Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, UBC Lovett, Belinda UBC School of Journalism Marovich, Beatrice Vancouver School of Theology Matthews, Jaymie Physics and Astronomy, UBC McCartney, Natasha School of Occupational Health, UBC Mitchell, Alanna Independent writer and journalist Mohun, Bruce Knowledge Network Ng, David AMBL, Michael Smith Laboratories Olejarczyk, Anna UBC School of Journalism Provençal, Johanne Simon Fraser University Ramsay, Euan Ramsay Scientific Consulting Ripplinger, Sarah UBC School of Journalism Rose Schiffman, Celia EarthScope Content Specialist, E&O, UNAVCO Savory, Eve Science reporter, CBC Secko, David Concordia University Semeniuk, David NowPublic Technologies Shell, Barry Research Communications Manager, Applied Sciences, SFU Simpson, Elizabeth Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, UBC Smith, Della Quay Life Sciences Inc. Strauss, Stephen Columnist, cbc.ca Strivelli, Rachel UBC Swanson, Magdalena Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, UBC Tozy, Dunia Journalism, BCIT Uppal, Jaskiran Child & Family Research Institute Varner, Anne-Marie Daily Planet Ward, Stephen UBC School of Journalism Wasserman, Wyeth Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, UBC Webster, Glenys School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, UBC White, Julia Genome British Columbia Wright, Jim Faculty of Medicine, UBC Yoo, Cynthia UBC School of Journalism

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Saturday, November 10 Breakfast Menu
Selection of fresh pastries, fresh fruit arrangement, juices, coffee, tea

Lunch Menu
Gourmet sandwich platter (incl. vegetarian options), soft drinks, coffee, tea

Dinner Menu
Soup Fall squash soup Appetizer Brie in puff pastry and raspberry coulis Entrée Baked herb-infused salmon, champagne butter reduction, steamed new potatoes and seasonal vegetables Vegetarian Beet risotto with fennel confit, pine nuts, parmesan & asiago cheese Dessert Poached pear with marscapone, coffee, tea Courses will be adapted for those who made special requests at registration Please make your special meal tag visible to your server One bottle of white and one bottle of red wine will be served at each table Cash bar will be open

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Maps & Directions

Sheraton Wall Hotel 1088 Burrard Street Wedgewood Hotel 845 Hornby Street Granville Island Hotel 1253 Johnston Street

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Maps & Directions

DIRECTIONS TO UBC CAMPUS By public transit The following bus routes will get you to UBC: #4, 9, 17, 25, 41, 43, 44, 49, 84, 99, 258 and 480. Please visit the Translink Web site (www.translink.bc.ca) for schedule information. Keep in mind that some routes operate only during peak periods. Note especially that the #44 Express from downtown Vancouver operates on weekdays only. Also note that diesel buses and trolley buses stop at different bus loops on campus. Depending on your route, the trip will take between 30 and 40 minutes from downtown Vancouver. By car To reach UBC by car, drive westbound along Northwest Marine Drive, 4th Avenue, 10th Avenue, 16th Avenue, or 41st Avenue. Please visit UBC Parking (www.parking.ubc.ca) for information about parking on campus and rates. The closest parking garage to the conference location is the Rose Garden Parkade. For more detailed driving directions check the UBC Trek Web site at http://trek.ubc.ca/programs/other/drive.html. From downtown Vancouver, it is about a 20minute drive to UBC.

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Maps & Directions

The Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies is located within the University Centre at 6331 Crescent Road, as indicated on the map on the opposite page. This is right next to the Rose Garden Parkade and The School of Journalism is just across the road. NOTE Vehicle access to TRIUMF is from the south (SW Marine Dr. and Wesbrook Mall); access from the north (16th Ave and Wesbrook Mall) is blocked by road construction. Check out a map at: http://www.triumf.info/public/contact/location.php. It is still possible to walk through this intersection. Parking is available at TRIUMF.

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Sponsors
Research and conference funders: Genome British Columbia, UBC School of Journalism

Awards funders: Barry Lando, Genome British Columbia, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, UBC School of Journalism

barrylando.com

Additional support: Canadian Geographic, CBC Television’s This Hour Has 22 Minutes

Science Journalism Research Group UBC School of Journalism 6388 Crescent Road Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z2, Canada Tel: 604-822-8747 Fax: 604-822-6707 Email: info@sciencejournalism.net Web: www.sciencejournalism.net

Bonny’s Taxi: 604-451-1111 Black and White Cab: 604-731-1111 Translink: www.translink.bc.ca, 604-953-3333 Peter Wall Institute: 604-822-4782 Sheraton Wall Centre: 604-331-1000 Wedgewood Hotel: 604-689-77777 Granville Island Hotel: 604-683-7373 Emergency cell number: 778-991-6376