Docstoc

Intervention Overview

Document Sample
Intervention Overview Powered By Docstoc
					Pyramid

of Interventions

Introduction to the Pyramid of Interventions Quick Guide
A system of academic and behavioral support for ALL learners
Cincinnati Public Schools is pleased to provide you with our Pyramid of Interventions Quick Guide. This guide has been created in conjunction with Superintendent Rosa Blackwell’s academic priorities as outlined in the district’s new strategic plan, Building Futures. This plan provides the blueprint for developing a districtwide model that addresses the intervention needs of all students. Pyramid of Interventions is the framework through which our district provides integrated academic and behavioral supports to children within a three-tiered model. Specifically, the Pyramid of Interventions framework provides three tiers or levels of support (academic and behavioral) that are designed to support a wide range of learner needs at the schoolwide, targeted and individual levels. This framework is directly aligned with our efforts to improve teaching and learning on behalf of our diverse student population. The Pyramid of Interventions Quick Guide has been designed to serve as a user-friendly reference and resource for a wide audience of educators, parents and community partners in understanding how to best support the educational needs of all learners. Our three-tiered model of instruction and intervention is nationally recognized and is deeply grounded in research and best practices for meeting the needs of all students within a school community. It is our hope that you will find this resource valuable as you work to improve learning outcomes throughout our district. Have a wonderful school year! Markay L. Winston, Ph.D. Director of Student Services

A special acknowledgment is offered to Superintendent Rosa Blackwell for her commitment, support and direction in completing this important work on behalf of Cincinnati’s children.
Additionally, thank you to the following team of professionals who worked tirelessly to complete this tool: • Mireika Kobayashi, CPS’ Bilingual Psychologist • Kathleen Bower, Lead School Psychologist • Dr. Pat Cleveland, Student Services Manager for Nonpublic Schools • Gloria Nelson-Turnbow, Hamilton County Educational Services Center Consultant • Dr. Amy Harris, School Psychologist • Dr. Kami Hill, District School Psychologist • Dr. Amy Murdoch, SERRC Consultant The following groups served in the very important role of reviewing, editing and offering feedback throughout the development of the Quick Guide: • • • • District Instructional Leadership Team Department of Student Services Administrative Team Related Service Personnel and Lead Staff Pyramid of Interventions Steering and Implementation Committees • CPS’ Curriculum Councils • Public Affairs Department

Pyramid of Interventions
Academic Systems
Tier III: Intensive, Individual Interventions (1%-5%)
Individual students Assessment-based High intensity

Behavioral Systems
Tier III: Intensive, Individual Interventions (1%-5%)
Individual students Assessment-based Intense, durable procedures

Tier II: Targeted Group Interventions (5%-10%)
Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response

Tier II: Targeted Group Interventions (5%-10%)
Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response

Tier I: Schoolwide Interventions (80%-90%)
Core instruction All students Preventative, proactive

Tier I: Schoolwide Interventions (80%-90%)
Core instruction All students Preventative, proactive

Pyramid of Interventions: Key points
• • All areas of student performance can be addressed through the Pyramid of Interventions. The representative planning teams implementing the Pyramid of Interventions in school buildings will include, but are not limited to, the following: » » » » » » » » » » » Principal Teachers Parents Teacher leaders Psychologists Intervention specialists Speech/language pathologists Physical therapists Occupational therapists Nurses Gifted and talented teachers » » » » » » » » » » » English-as-a-Second Language personnel Student Services Managers Supplemental Service teachers Audiologists Community partners Juvenile Court representatives Surrogate parents Instructional assistants Bus drivers Custodial staff Cafeteria staff

•

All tiers utilize the Collaborative Strategic Planning Process, explained below.

The Collaborative Strategic Planning Process
Concern Definition
What is the concern?

Evaluate the Plan
Is our plan working?

Analysis of Concern
Why is the concern occurring?

Plan Development & Implementation
What actions will be done to meet the goal and resolve the concern?

Goal Setting
What do we want to see happening and by when?

Foundation for the Pyramid of Interventions
Administrative Leadership Academic & Behavior Supports Across 3 Tiers Explicit Instruction of Academic & Social Skills

Culturally Responsive Practices

Collaborative Strategic Planning

Data-Based Decision Making

Research and Standards-based Practices

Tier Comparisons
Tier 1– Schoolwide
Focus For all students

Tier II– Targeted
For students identified with marked difficulties, and who have not responded to Tier I efforts Programs, strategies and procedures that supplement core instruction Small-group instruction (1:3, 1:4, or 1:5) Minimum of 30 minutes per day 2-3 x per week in small groups in addition to 90 minutes of core instruction Monitoring progress twice a month on target skill to ensure adequate progress and learning (preferably weekly) Personnel determined by the school (e.g., a classroom teacher, a specialized teacher, interventionist, etc.) Appropriate setting designated by the school; may be within or outside the classroom Targeted and representative members with appropriate specialists (e.g. speech and language, nurse, ESL, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted as needed.

Tier III – Intensive
For students identified with severe or significant difficulties and who have not culties, responded to Tier I or Tier II efforts Sustained, intensive research- and standardsbased interventions provided in addition to Tier I and II supports Individualized, small-group instruction (1:1, 1:2, or 1:3) Minimum of 30 minutes per day in small groups or individually in addition to core instruction Monitoring progress twice a week, or at a minimum weekly, on target skill to ensure adequate progress and learning Personnel determined by the school (e.g., a classroom teacher, a specialized teacher, interventionist, etc.) Appropriate setting designated by the school; may be within or outside the classroom Targeted and representative members, parent/guardian, IAT and appropriate specialists (e.g. SLP, nurse, ESL, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted as needed.

Program

Research- and standards-based core instruction Multiple grouping formats to meet student needs 90 minutes per day or more of core instruction Benchmark assessment occurring quarterly throughout the school year General education teacher

Grouping Time

Assessment

Interventionist

Setting

General education classroom

Representative Planning Team Composition

Administrators Teachers Parents Intervention Specialists Community partners Custodial/ Cafeteria staff Gifted & talented teachers Related service personnel Bus drivers ESL personnel Instructional assistants Cultural liaisons/ interpreters Analyze schoolwide data and make building decisions accordingly following the Collaborative Strategic Planning Process at a systemic level. 80%-90% of students will make appropriate progress at this level of support AND achievement gaps among different subgroups should not exist.

Representative Planning Team Activities

Monitor decision-making rules (up to Tier III, down to Tier I); monitor consistent implementation of supplemental instruction; monitor effectiveness of supplemental instruction Only 5%-10% of students will need this level of supplemental instruction to make appropriate progress. If the above percentage does not exist, examine supports and services available in Tier I.

Monitoring implementation of Tier III increased intensity supports and individual student progress

Pyramid Check

Only 1%-5% of students need this level of intense supplemental instruction to make appropriate progress If the above percentage does not exist, examine supports and services available in Tier I and Tier II.

TIER I: Schoolwide Interventions (Core instruction provided to ALL students)
Focus Program Grouping Time Assessment Interventionist Setting Representative Planning Team Composition For all students Research- and standards-based core instruction Multiple-grouping formats to meet student needs 90 minutes per day or more of core instruction Benchmark assessment occurring quarterly throughout the school year General education teacher General education classroom Administrators Intervention Specialists Community partners Custodial & Cafeteria staff Teachers Gifted & talented teachers Related service personnel Bus drivers Parents ESL personnel Instructor Assistants Cultural liaisons/ interpreters Etc.

Representative Planning Team Activities Pyramid Check

Analyze schoolwide data and make building decisions accordingly, following the Collaborative Strategic Planning Process* at a systemic level. 80%-90% of students will make appropriate progress at this level of support AND achievement gaps among different groups should not exist

*See page 4 for the steps of the Collaborative Strategic Planning Process.

TIER I

Schoolwide Interventions

TIER I
Academic Components • A research-based core curriculum that is consistently implemented and monitored • Research-based supplemental academic/social competence programs that address weaknesses in the core or additional needs of students • Universal screening measure(s) throughout the year; analyzed by school-level planning team and classroom teachers • Regular checks of program implementation and reliability of data collection • Culturally Responsive and Inclusive Practices • Appropriate specialists (e.g., SLP, nurse, ESL, school psychologist, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted as needed Universal Screening Data All students are screened at regular times (i.e. at least quarterly) throughout the year using efficient assessment measures that give accurate and clear information about a student’s needs. Building team analyzes data. Particular attention is paid to analyzing any issues regarding disproportionality. Example: DIBELS (K-6), Curriculum-Based Measurements (7 and up) Positive School Culture/ Positive Behavior Supports • Core team to facilitate development and implementation of PBS plan • Three to five overarching expectations • Matrix defining expectations in every setting • Lesson plans for teaching expectations in every setting • A structure for teaching and reteaching lesson plans • Develop an acknowledgment system • System for collecting data (reporting in SASI, who, when) • Ensure the use of Culturally Responsive and Inclusive Practices • Appropriate specialists (e.g., SLP, nurse, ESL, school psychologist, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted as needed Office referral data is recorded and key reports (i.e., the big 5 reports of referrals – per day, per month, by problem behavior, by location, by time, by student) are analyzed graphically. Particular attention is paid to analyzing any issues regarding disproportionality Example: SASI reports of the big 5

TIER I

TIER I
Academic Decision Rules to move children to Tier II • Tier I supports have been correctly implemented and monitored. • Clear decision rules are set for reviewing and confirming universal screening data. Data should identify which children may need support in which skills AND screening data is confirmed with follow-up assessment. • Review child’s behavioral/language data to consider need for behavior or other supports. Example: School is accurately implementing Voyager, the core curriculum for reading. A student scores significantly below benchmark on DIBELS. The teacher would assess at least two more times on a DIBELS assessment to confirm the results. If the results are confirmed, Tier II supports are considered. Positive School Culture/ Positive Behavior Supports • Tier I supports (schoolwide PBS) have been implemented as planned. • Clear decision rules are set for reviewing and confirming universal screening data. • At a minimum, twice as many positive acknowledgments to corrections have been made (part of Tier I). • Review child’s academic data to consider need for academic supports. Example: School is accurately implementing schoolwide PSC, and Ms. Smith is accurately implementing PSC in her classroom. A student starts breaking the classroom rules. The teacher would increase the number of times she gives this child a “caught being good” ticket to increase the expected behaviors. If referrals continue, after a 2-week period, Tier II supports are considered.

TIER I

TIER II: Targeted Group Interventions (Supplemental)
Focus Program Grouping Time Assessment Interventionist Setting Representative Planning Team Composition Targeted Team Activities Pyramid Check For students identified with marked difficulties, and who have not responded to Tier I efforts Programs, strategies and procedures that supplement core instruction Small-group instruction (1:3, 1:4, or 1:5) Minimum of 30 minutes per day 2-3 x per week in small groups in addition to 90 minutes of core instruction Monitoring progress twice a month on target skill to ensure adequate progress and learning (preferably weekly) Personnel determined by the school (e.g., a classroom teacher, a specialized teacher, an interventionist) Appropriate setting designated by the school; may be within or outside the classroom Targeted and representative members with appropriate specialists (e.g. speech and language, nurse, ESL, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted as needed Monitor decision-making rules (up to Tier III, down to Tier I); monitor consistent implementation of supplemental instruction; monitor effectiveness of supplemental instruction Only 5%-10% of students will need this level of supplemental instruction to make appropriate progress. If the above percentage does not exist, examine supports and services available in Tier I.

TIER II

Targeted Interventions

TIER II
Academic Components • Formal, research-based reading interventions in place at all grade levels that address children’s specific area of skill deficits (e.g., A 3rd-grader who is struggling with reading fluency is provided with an intervention, such as repeated readings, to improve her fluency.) • Intervention services consistently given to students who need them • Students provided with intervention support during a time when they will not miss key instructional content as much as possible • Trained instructors provide the intervention services • Regular checks of program implementation and reliability of data collection • Appropriate specialists (e.g., SLP, nurse, ESL, school psychologist, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted as needed Progress Monitoring Data All students receiving Tier II supports are monitored regularly (e.g., biweekly) to determine if their academic or identified skills are improving as a result of the intervention supports. Results are graphed. Example: A 10th-grade student regularly (i.e., on a weekly basis) self-monitors his/her progress on specific skills assessed on the Ohio Graduation Test. Positive School Culture/ Positive Behavior Supports • Tier II interventions implemented. These are developed by the school based on referral data. (e.g., Social skills groups, after-school activities, age-appropriate behavior plan to parent) • Student’s skill needs matched with the intervention service (e.g., 9th-grader who has eight referrals in two months for fighting is taught anger-management skills) • Complete appropriate paperwork (as developed by your school) to access Tier II interventions • Appropriate specialists (e.g., SLP, nurse, ESL, school psychologist, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted

All students receiving Tier II supports are monitored regularly (e.g., biweekly) to determine if their behavioral skills are improving as a result of the intervention supports. Results are graphed. Example: A 6th-grade student with a high referral rate for fighting would graph the number of fights per week (may also graph the pro-social behavior that is replacing the fighting).

TIER II

TIER II
Academic Decision Rules to move to Tier III or back to ONLY Tier I supports. • Tier I and Tier II supports implemented as planned and monitored • Clear decision rules for reviewing and confirming the progress-monitoring data (see example) • Data appropriately graphed to aid in analysis (e.g., goal line, baseline data, enough intervention data for decision making, aim line, peer comparisons, etc.) • All resources at Tier I and Tier II considered and used, if appropriate, without adequate response before moving on to Tier III • Consider increasing the frequency of the intervention before moving on to Tier III Positive School Culture/ Positive Behavior Supports • Tier I and Tier II supports implemented as planned • Tier II interventions implemented as planned for at least 4-6 weeks • Student continued to receive office referrals since starting Tier II intervention • Background information collected • Exception: Student demonstrates behavior that is dangerous to herself/himself or others = automatic move to Tier III. Clear decision rules are set for reviewing and confirming the progress-monitoring data • Data appropriately graphed to aid in analysis (e.g., goal line, baseline data, enough intervention data for decision making, aim line, peer comparisons, etc.) • All resources at Tier I and Tier II considered and used, if appropriate, before moving on to Tier III • Consider increasing the frequency of the intervention before moving on to Tier III

TIER II

TIER III: Intensive, Individualized Interventions
Focus Program Grouping Time Assessment Interventionist Setting Representative Planning Team Composition Representative Planning Team Activities Pyramid Check For students identified with marked difficulties, and who have not responded to Tier I or Tier II efforts Sustained, intensive research- and standards-based interventions provided in addition to Tier I and II supports. Small-group instruction (1:1, 1:2, or 1:3) Minimum of 30 minutes per day in small groups or individually in addition to core instruction Monitoring progress twice a week or at a minimum weekly on target skill to ensure adequate progress and learning Personnel determined by the school (e.g., a classroom teacher, a specialized teacher, an external interventionist) Appropriate setting designated by the school; may be within or outside the classroom Targeted and representative members, parent/guardian, IAT, and appropriate specialists (e.g. SLP, nurse, ESL, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted as needed Monitoring implementation of Tier III increased intensity supports and individual student progress

Only 1%-5% of students need this level of intense supplemental instruction to make appropriate progress. If the above percentage does not exist, examine supports and services available in Tier I and Tier II.

TIER III

Individual Intervention

TIER III
Academic Components • Parent involvement and permission obtained • Collaborative Strategic Planning Process for individual learners used • Intervention plan aligned to the scope and sequence of Tier I and II academic programs • Students’ academic intervention plans include daily practice with key content skills, work with a highly skilled instructor, work in small groups (1:1-1:3) • Research- and standards-based programs or instructional strategies used. • Frequent monitoring of progress continues • Appropriate specialists (e.g. SLP, nurse, ESL, school psychologist, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted Progress Monitoring Data All students receiving Tier III supports are monitored regularly to determine if their academic skills are improving as a result of the intervention supports. Results are graphed. Example: An 8th-grade, ELL student with limited previous education in her native language requires intensive academic support in all content areas. In collaboration with ESL, general education teachers and the school psychologist, Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM) probes for math, reading and writing are given weekly throughout the year to monitor her progress with the goal of catching her up to her peers. Progress is graphed. Positive School Culture/ Positive Behavior Supports • Parent involvement and permission obtained • Collaborative Strategic Planning Process for individual learners used • FBA completed at the meeting by the team • Additional academic data collected • Individual behavior support plan developed, including essential elements such as replacement behavior, rewards and consequences • Frequent monitoring of progress continues • Follow-up meetings scheduled to review progress (typically 3-6 weeks) and to make changes to interventions as needed • Appropriate specialists (e.g. SLP, nurse, ESL, school psychologist, intervention specialist, etc.) consulted All students receiving Tier III supports are monitored regularly to determine if their behavioral skills are improving as a result of the intervention supports. Results are graphed. Example: A 4th-grade, nonverbal student is having difficulties following directions in the cafeteria. The general education teacher and the intervention specialists ask other students to model the use of a checklist with appropriate cafeteria procedures. The adults provide the target student with multiple opportunities to practice and give positive corrective feedback. The number of steps followed is monitored and graphed.

TIER III

TIER III
Academic Decision Rules to revisit Tier III plan or back to Tier II • Tier III supports implemented as planned • Clear decision rules set for reviewing and confirming the progress-monitoring data • Data appropriately graphed to aid in analysis (e.g. goal line, baseline data, enough intervention data for decision making, aim line, peer comparisons, etc.) Positive School Culture/ Positive Behavior Supports • Tier III supports implemented as planned • Tier III interventions implemented as planned for at least 2-3 weeks • Student continued to receive office referrals since starting Tier III intervention • Data appropriately graphed to aid in analysis (e.g. goal line, baseline data, enough intervention data for decision making, aim line, peer comparisons, etc.)

TIER III

Glossary
Accommodations
Changes made in the way materials are presented or in the way students respond to the materials, as well as changes in setting, timing and scheduling, with the expectation that the student will reach the standard set for all students. (Ohio’s Assessment System: Alternate Assessment for Students with Disabilities, Administration Manual). Evaluations (formal/informal) used to determine a student’s needs. The legal process for providing mandated intervention services in conjunction with efforts to identify children with suspected disabilities. Planning and developing procedures to determine who needs help and what type of researched-based support to use (strategies, interventions and assessments). Specific educational practices, instructional strategies, curricula content, and teaming processes that have been established by research to increase the achievement of historically underachieving culturally diverse students. The ability to think, feel and act in ways that acknowledge, respect and build upon ethnic, social, cultural and linguistic diversity. An approach to planning so that one lesson is taught to the entire class while meeting the needs of each child. The teacher weaves the individual goals into the classroom content and strategies. The content and the instructional strategies are the vehicles by which the teacher meets the needs of all the students. A question-driven problem-solving process that identifies factors impacting student behavior. The focus is on finding out what needs the behaviors are meeting for the student and what environmental events are influencing the behaviors.

Assessment Child Find Collaborative Strategic Planning Process Culturally Responsive Practices Cross-Cultural Competence Differentiated Instruction

Functional Behavior Assessment

Glossary

Glossary (cont.)
Inclusive Practices
Intensive Intervention Supports (Tier III)
Practice of educating children with diverse learning needs in general education classrooms with appropriate supports. Identified students who need continued and sustained academic and behavioral support to make progress (1%-5% of students). Supports providing sufficient instruction that is given to students who are at risk for academic or social failure catch up. Any and all ways that instruction is presented to students. PBS/PSC is a broad range of systemic and individualized strategies for achieving important social and learning outcomes while preventing problem behaviors. General education and social competencies for all students. All students receive high quality instruction and behavioral support schoolwide. Identified students who are at risk for not reaching academic and/or behavior standards, (5%-10% of students). A descriptive framework for providing interventions at increasing levels of intensity based on response to interventions. Movement of a student from one setting to another (e. g., preschool to school age, elementary to high school, high school to the work place or to higher education). Universal Design for Learning is the framework through which instructional lessons are planned and designed with embedded learning supports (i.e., scaffolds) that plan for the unique learning needs of diverse students to enable access to curricular content through multiple formats.

Intervention Supports Instructional Method
Positive Behavior Supports (PBS)/Positive School Culture (PSC) Schoolwide (Universal) Intervention/Supports (Tier I) Targeted Intervention Supports (Tier II)

3-Tiered Model Transition

Universal Design For Learning

Commonly Used Acronyms
BIP CRP CWT DIBELS ELL ESL
Behavior Intervention Plan Culturally Responsive Practices Classroom Walk-Through (An effective strategy to guide classroom visits and follow-up reflection) . Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills English Language Learners (Students whose native language or home language is other than English) English as a Second Language (English language instructional support provided to students whose native language or home language is other than English) Free Appropriate Public Education (Special education and related services provided in agreement with an IEP, without charge and meeting state education standards) Functional Behavior Assessment Intervention Assistance Team (Assembled to design a support plan to help teachers, parents and students who are attempting to solve student learning or behavioral concerns and other related issues) Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (P.L. 105-17 IDEA – Ensures all children with disabilities and their families access to a free and appropriate public education) Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (Parts A, B and C, effective 7/1/05)

FAPE

FBA IAT

IDEA IDEIA

Acronyms

Commonly Used Acronyms (cont.)
LEP
Limited English Proficiency (Refers to students whose native or home language is not English, which inhibits participation in a school’s educational program) No Child Left Behind (Federal Operating Standards for Schools) Ohio Integrated Systems Model Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education Positive Behavior Intervention Positive Behavior Management Positive Behavior Support (A broad range of systemic and individualized strategies for achieving important social and learning outcomes in school communities while preventing problem behavior) Positive School Culture Standards/Examine Data/Assessment/Learning Experiences (A framework for developing units and lessons around the identification of desired results for high levels of proficiency and mastery) Standards in Practice (A professional development strategy to align classroom lessons to standards in order to increase the rigor of teachers’ instruction.

NCLB OISM OSEP PBI PBM PBS PSC SEAL

SIP

Questions and Answers on CPS’ Pyramid of Interventions
What is the Pyramid of Interventions?
Pyramid of Interventions is the Cincinnati Public Schools’ theoretical, three-tiered integrated model for addressing the academic and behavioral needs of students within an individual school or district. The CPS Pyramid of Interventions framework is adapted from the nationally recognized threetiered model of intervention, (Ohio’s model is OISM) initially introduced within the Positive Behavior Support literature. The three tiers (universal, targeted and intensive) are designed to provide prevention and intervention supports for all children based on scientifically validated strategies of support. This model is predicated on the theoretical underpinnings of Collaborative Strategic Planning, culturally responsive practices, data-based decision making, inclusive planning teams, empirical basis for practice and treatment integrity.

What are we trying to accomplish?
Superintendent Blackwell directed all schools to develop and implement a three-tiered model of intervention (Pyramid of Interventions) that will be utilized to support a differentiated model of instructional supports for children with diverse and unique learning needs. Each school is expected to adhere to this model as it designs a comprehensive and integrated system of support with the explicit outcome of improving students’ performance. Every principal and school employee should be able to articulate their school’s Pyramid of Interventions for supporting all children.

What would it look like in CPS?
All schools in CPS would follow the districtadopted three-tiered pyramid model. Each building would be required to have a written plan for how it addresses the diverse academic and behavioral needs of all learners within its school environment. These plans are intended to be flexible and based on student needs, as evidenced by academic and behavioral data. Their Pyramid of Interventions plans would be embedded within their school’s OnePlan. Although the overall structure and format of the school’s Pyramid of Interventions will be similar, variations between and among schools will be expected based on the needs of the students.

Questions and Answers

Questions and Answers (cont.)
Why is it necessary, and how will it add value to what we already are doing?
A Pyramid of Interventions model is necessary in districts that are attempting to be inclusive in addressing the needs of 100% of their student population. As well, as we strive to meet the requirements of NCLB, IDEIA and other legislation, this model will serve the district well because of its strong research-based foundation for improving educational outcomes by removing achievement gaps. The value of this type of model is that it requires districts and schools to pay attention to ALL groups of children in the development and implementation of instructional strategies through the creation of strong curriculum and support systems for responding to children who are not responsive to various levels of intervention. In addition, the Pyramid of Interventions strengthens what we already are doing by providing a framework within which all district-sanctioned initiatives should be grounded.

How does it fit with other initiatives in CPS?
The Superintendent’s five-year strategic plan, Building Futures, has prioritized our district’s focus on improving student performance, and the Pyramid of Interventions approach is aligned closely with this plan. As well, this model fits very well with current district initiatives in that the core components of standards-based instruction, examining data, assessment and examining the learning environment (SEAL) all are relevant features embedded within a tiered model. In addition, appropriate application of this model is supportive of teachers collaborating and reflecting on their instructional practices (SIP) while also supporting principals in their efforts to monitor classroom instructional priorities (CWT) while ensuring that high quality and relevant content is delivered (Rigor and Relevance). For example, in many respects, SIP, SEAL, CWT, and Rigor and Relevance strategies and components should all be observed within Tier I of the pyramid in schools and classrooms where implementation is in alignment with the desired protocol. In addition, these initiatives also should have visible evidence throughout the other two tiers as well, depending on how children respond to teacher and school efforts to ensure that all children are provided quality instruction.

References
Key Cincinnati Public Schools Initiatives
For more information regarding CPS’ key initiatives, please refer to the manuals for the following: CWT (Classroom Walk Throughs) Positive School Culture (PSC) Professional Learning Communities (PLC) Rigor and Relevance (in Academic Content) SEAL (Standards, Examine Data, Assessment, Learning Experiences) SIP (Standards in Practice)

Article
Sugai, G., Kame’enui, E., Horner, R. H., & Simmons, D. (2000). Effective instructional and behavioral support systems: A schoolwide approach to discipline and early literacy. University of Oregon, Eugene: Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports and Institute for the Development of Educational Achievement. Academic Intervention Services: Legislative Office of Education Oversight For information, go to: http://www.loeo.state.oh.us/reports/PreEleSecPDF/ Intervention_Web.pdf

Resources
Academic Content Standards For more information, go to: http://www.ode.state.oh.us/ Academic_Content_Standards/ Operating Standards for Ohio’s Schools For more information, go to: http://www.ode.state. oh.us/school_improvement/laws_standards/Operating_ Standards/default.asp Operating Standards for Ohio’s Schools Serving Children with Disabilities For more information, go to: http://www.ode.state. oh.us/exceptional_children/children_with_disabilities/ Operating_Standards/default.asp For more information regarding the Pyramid of Interventions Quickguide or resources: Contact Cincinnati Public Schools’ Department of Student Services at (513) 363-0278.

Legislation
ESEA PL 107-110 – No Child Left Behind For information to help you understand NCLB, go to: http://www.ed.gov/nclb/overview/intro/guide/index. html For information regarding NCLB in Ohio, go to: http:// www.ode.state.oh.us/esea/ IDEIA – Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 For news and information on IDEIA, go to: http://www.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/idea2004. html Senate Bill 1 For information, go to: http://www.ode.state.oh.us/ legislation/PDF/Provisionsof SB1_8.20.01.pdf

References

Cincinnati Public Schools Department of Student Services Markay L. Winston, Ph.D., Director P.O. Box 5381 Cincinnati, OH 45201-5381 Location: 2651 Burnet Avenue, (45219) (513) 363-0278 www.cps-k12.org The Cincinnati Public School District provides equal educational, vocational and employment opportunities for all people without regard to race, gender, ethnicity, color, age, disability, religion, national origin, creed, sexual orientation, or affiliation with a union or professional organization. The district is in compliance with Title VI, Title IX and Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act. For additional information, contact the Title IX Coordinator or Section 504 Student Coordinator at 363-0000. TDD#363-0124. August 2006


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:221
posted:1/6/2010
language:English
pages:24
Description: Intervention overview