Little Rascals (Ilford) Ltd

Document Sample
Little Rascals (Ilford) Ltd Powered By Docstoc
					Inspection report for early years provision


Unique Reference Number                   EY337339
Inspection date                           05 November 2007
Inspector                                 Susan Marriott



Type of inspection                        Childcare
Type of care                              Childminding




This inspection was carried out under the provisions of Part XA of the Children Act 1989, as inserted by the Care
                                              Standards Act 2000
ABOUT THIS INSPECTION
The purpose of this inspection is to assure government, parents and the public of the quality
of childcare and, if applicable, of nursery education. The inspection was carried out under Part
XA Children Act 1989 as introduced by the Care Standards Act 2000 and, where nursery education
is provided, under Schedule 26 of the School Standards and Framework Act 1998.
This report details the main strengths and any areas for improvement identified during the
inspection. The judgements included in the report are made in relation to the outcomes for
children set out in the Children Act 2004; the National Standards for under 8s day care and
childminding; and, where nursery education is provided, the Curriculum guidance for the
foundation stage.
The report includes information on any complaints about the childcare provision which Ofsted
has received since the last inspection or registration or 1 April 2004 whichever is the later.
The key inspection judgements and what they mean

Outstanding: this aspect of the provision is of exceptionally high quality
Good: this aspect of the provision is strong
Satisfactory: this aspect of the provision is sound
Inadequate: this aspect of the provision is not good enough

For more information about early years inspections, please see the booklet Are you ready for
your inspection? which is available from Ofsted's website: www.ofsted.gov.uk.

THE QUALITY AND STANDARDS OF THE CARE

On the basis of the evidence collected on this inspection:

The quality and standards of the care are satisfactory. The registered person meets the National
Standards for under 8s day care and childminding.

WHAT SORT OF SETTING IS IT?
The childminder was registered in 2006. She works with a co-childminder and up to three
assistants in the co-minders home in the village of Dodford, Northamptonshire. The whole of
the ground floor is used for childminding and a downstairs cloakroom is available. There is a
fully enclosed garden available for outside play. The childminder is registered to care for a
maximum of six children under eight years at any one time and is currently sharing the care of
14 children under five on a flexible, part-time basis.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PROVISION
Helping children to be healthy
The provision is satisfactory.
Children are cared for in a clean home where the childminder follows satisfactory hygiene rules
in order to prevent the spread of infection. For example, young children learn to wash their
hands before eating food and after they have visited the toilet. Disposable paper roll is used
to cover the changing mat and open windows ensure there is good ventilation. Children stay
healthy because the childminder controls infection by excluding children who become sick or
unwell. Appropriate documentation is available to record accidents and the childminder is very


This inspection was carried out under the provisions of Part XA of the Children Act 1989, as inserted by the Care
                                              Standards Act 2000
clear about her responsibilities regarding the administration of any medication. The childminder
holds an appropriate first aid certificate and maintains an adequately stocked first aid kit. This
secures children's welfare in the case of a serious accident.

Children's needs for sleep and active play are effectively met. They use apparatus in the garden
such as the basketball net, slide, swing and see-saw and they manoeuvre sit and ride toys and
tricycles. Children enjoy dancing; moving and stretching their bodies as they dance and move
to music. This promotes the development and improvement of children’s physical skills and
agility.

Children benefit from a healthy diet because the childminder has an appropriate knowledge of
nutrition and encourages children to eat a varied diet. The co-childminder generally plans,
prepares and cooks meals for the children. Meal times are relaxed, social occasions where
children and adults sit together around the table to enjoy their food, each others company and
develop good table manners. Babies benefit from freshly pureed meals which helps with weaning.
Children do not become thirsty because they have constant access to regular drinks throughout
the day.

Protecting children from harm or neglect and helping them stay safe
The provision is satisfactory.
Children are cared for within a friendly, safe and secure environment. The childminder makes
efficient use of the space available in her co-minder's home to provide sufficient play activities
and opportunities for children. This is enhanced by displays of the children's creative artwork
for Halloween adorning the entrance hall. Children independently select activities from a suitable
range of resources, efficiently stored in boxes stacked in the playroom. Toys and equipment
are in a proper state of repair and are age- appropriate.

Children are cared for in a safe and secure environment. The childminder is aware of potential
hazards and identifies risks inside the co-childminder's home and garden. She has an informal
fire evacuation plan and appropriate domestic safety measures are in place. Children are
well-supervised, and are within sight and hearing of the childminder at all times. Sleeping
children are regularly checked to ensure their safety. Fire safety equipment is in place, and the
childminder helps children begin to learn about what to do in an emergency by practising the
fire escape plan. The childminder gives appropriate priority to helping children understand how
to keep themselves safe. For example, children are reminded not to run in the kitchen, lest they
fall and hurt themselves on the hard floor.

The childminder has relevant literature to which she can refer to help her safeguard children's
welfare. Children are safe with the childminder, who has an appropriate understanding of child
protection in line with the Local Safeguarding Children Board procedures.

Helping children achieve well and enjoy what they do
The provision is satisfactory.
Children are settled, happy and content to play because the childminder prioritises the needs
of the children. Children independently choose from a suitable selection of resources from the
designated playroom, building on their natural curiosity as learners. The childminder's interaction
is warm, caring and appropriate as she encourages them to play purposefully with each other.
The childminder reads stories and plays games with the children. She takes them outside into
the well-equipped garden to play on the wide range of toys.


This inspection was carried out under the provisions of Part XA of the Children Act 1989, as inserted by the Care
                                              Standards Act 2000
Children benefit from a balanced range of activities included in the weekly routine and the
childminder is now working on ways to further develop the quality of play and learning. For
example, children have frequent opportunities to participate in cooking activities which they
clearly enjoy. Children of all ages are included in the group. The babies sit in high chairs pulled
up to the kitchen island unit where the activity is taking place. Children put the paper cases
into the cake tin and the childminder encourages them to count as they do so. Children are
copiously praised for their efforts and this visibly boosts their self-esteem and confidence.
However, opportunities for developing children's learning are not effectively exploited because
the childminder has not considered the impact of using a packet mix on this occasion. For
instance, the children do not weigh or measure the ingredients or have the chance to learn the
vocabulary associated with the various ingredients. This reduces the learning value of the
activity. One bowl is passed around the group and the children all take turns to stir the mixture.
This means that the children are not always actively involved for the whole duration of the
activity. The childminder spoons the mixture into the paper cases and the children watch
expectantly as their cakes go into the oven.

They socialise and interact with others at the childminding house. The childminder talks to the
children about what they are doing and the children receive lots of affection and cuddles.
Children make independent choices in their play and are able to choose from a suitable variety
of toys and equipment, which are all stored within easy reach. The childminder is able to divide
her time and attention between the children, ensuring that she is able to accommodate their
individual needs and preferences. Children are developing their communication skills, suitably
supported by the childminder who responds to the children by repeating familiar words. Children
learn to stack the colourful beakers, complete puzzles and manipulate the dough. This promotes
children's fine manipulative skills and hand-to-eye coordination effectively. Children enjoy
creative art activities which reflect the current theme or topic. For example, for Halloween and
Bonfire Night, the children have made spiders from pipe cleaners and fireworks from cardboard
tubes. The childminder assembles scrapbooks of the children's work for parents and carers to
take away with them and these provide evidence of the wide range of craft techniques and art
activities offered to the children.

Helping children make a positive contribution
The provision is satisfactory.
Children are clearly valued and respected as individuals. Children are confident in their
relationship with the childminder, they are valued, cuddled and comforted. This increases their
sense of well-being and promotes their emotional development. Consistent daily routines help
young children feel secure and settled. For example, sleep and feeding routines are respected.
Children have access to an adequate range of books and toys which promote an awareness of
the wider world. Although the childminder has no experience of providing care for minded
children with learning difficulties or disabilities she is aware of children's developmental stages.
Consequently, she feels able to approach parents if she is concerned about children's progress
and obtain appropriate support to ensure that they can make progress.

The childminder is kindly but firm, caring and consistent and this ensures that children behave
well because they know what is expected of them. Children are learning to play harmoniously
and they behave generally well in response to the childminder's clear boundaries for acceptable
behaviour and consistent expectations. The childminder is developing relationships with parents
and carers to ensure that children's welfare and development is promoted effectively. The main
responsibility for sharing information with parents generally lies with the co-childminder.
Nevertheless, the childminder is developing her understanding of the need to work closely with


This inspection was carried out under the provisions of Part XA of the Children Act 1989, as inserted by the Care
                                              Standards Act 2000
parents. She is confident to approach parents when necessary, ensuring that daily discussion
about the service provided keeps parents suitably informed about their child's activities. Children
have written lovely testimonials about their childminder and she has many letters of compliment
and thanks. The childminder has a clear verbal complaints procedure and the required parental
permissions are in place to secure children's welfare.

Organisation
The organisation is satisfactory.
Children are comfortable and at home in the childminder's care and the childminder is beginning
to develop confidence in her childcare practice. She has recently established her business and
operates in partnership with her co-minder and assistants to provide a service in line with the
National Standards. Therefore, children's welfare and education is effectively supported. The
childminder has recently completed her introductory course to enhance her knowledge and
understanding of the underpinning principles of childcare. The childminder is using professionally
produced documentation to support her business. She is beginning to consider ways in which
records, policies and procedures can be further enhanced to consolidate her practice and to
ensure the continuing welfare, care and learning of children. She uses her warm personality
and her life experience to actively promote positive outcomes for children. The childminder is
able to enrich children's care, learning and play through her constant interaction and interest.
All of the children receive individual attention at some time during the day and benefit from
social interaction with children of varying ages and backgrounds. Children confidently choose
activities and the childminder encourages them to extend their experiences. Overall, the needs
of all children are met.

Improvements since the last inspection
At the last inspection, the childminder was set one action. She was required to ensure that a
current first aid certificate is maintained. The childminder completed an appropriate course
within one month. The action taken has substantially improved the standard of care because
children's welfare is protected in a medical emergency.

Complaints since the last inspection
Since the last inspection, there have been no complaints made to Ofsted that required the
provider or Ofsted to take any action in order to meet the National Standards.

The provider is required to keep a record of complaints made by parents, which they can see
on request. The complaints record may contain complaints other than those made to Ofsted.




This inspection was carried out under the provisions of Part XA of the Children Act 1989, as inserted by the Care
                                              Standards Act 2000
THE QUALITY AND STANDARDS OF THE CARE

On the basis of the evidence collected on this inspection:

The quality and standards of the care are satisfactory. The registered person meets the National
Standards for under 8s day care and childminding.


WHAT MUST BE DONE TO SECURE FUTURE IMPROVEMENT?
The quality and standards of the care
To improve the quality and standards of care further the registered person should take account
of the following recommendation(s):
   • continue to develop the quality of activities and play opportunities to develop children's
     language and mathematical thinking, their imagination and social relationships
   • consider ways in which records, policies and procedures can be further enhanced through
     reflective practice to ensure the continuing welfare, care and learning of children.


Any complaints about the inspection or the report should be made following the procedures
set out in the leaflet Complaints about Ofsted Early Years: concerns or complaints about Ofsted's
role in regulating and inspecting childcare and early education (HMI ref no 2599) which is available
from Ofsted's website: www.ofsted.gov.uk




This inspection was carried out under the provisions of Part XA of the Children Act 1989, as inserted by the Care
                                              Standards Act 2000