Installing Ubuntu 'Feisty Fawn' (7.04) on the ThinkPad T40 by slappypappy129

VIEWS: 136 PAGES: 32

									Installing Ubuntu ‘Feisty Fawn’ (7.04)
on the ThinkPad T40




Victoria JK Lamburn
Ubuntu and Thinkpad




2                     Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                                                      Ubuntu and Thinkpad




Contents
   Introduction...........................................................................................................................................4
   Internet Connection...................................................................................................      ...........................4
      Wireless Network.................................................................................................................       ............4
      Other Options..........................................................................................................................    .........4
   Kick­start the Terminal...................................................................................................       ......................4
                                                                                                                                               ...........5
   Fonts...........................................................................................................................................
      Web Fonts.....................................................................................................................................  ....5
      Talismanic Tahoma.....................................................................................................         .....................6
      Installing Type 1 Postscript Fonts...........................................................................................              .........6
   Setting up your Printer................................................................................................................      ..........7
   Installing Media Codecs (Quicktime/Windows Media)...................................................................                               ....7
   Playing DVDs...........................................................................................................    ............................7
   External Display Setup...................................................................................................        ......................8
      Definitions.................................................................................................................................... ....9
      What we want to accomplish........................................................................................               ...................9
   Configuration for VGA Output.......................................................................................................              ......9
      What to do when the X Server (GUI) Fails to Start...............................................                           .......................10
      Task One: Enhance Performance....................................................................................                  ...............10
      Task Two: Extended Desktop Setup...................................................................                    ...........................12
      Task Three: Detecting an External Display.................................................................                      ..................18
      Bootnote................................................................................................................ .........................21
      My ‘xorg.conf.dual’ file..............................................................................................................         ...22
   Configuration for TV Output..........................................................................................................            ....24
   Take a Break..................................................................................................................................... ...26
   Wine­dows Compatibility........................................................................................................           ...........26
      Easy or Not as Easy?...................................................................................................................        ...27
      Basic Configuration......................................................................................................        .................28
   Speedtouch 330 USB ADSL Modem...........................................................................................                       ......28
   Manage your music library and MP3 player................................................................                       ......................29
      Updating the supplied version of Rhythmbox................................................................                         ...............30
      Using the Rhythmbox player for first time.....................................................................                     ...............30
   Software Recommendations.............................................................................................              ..................30
   Conclusions.................................................................................................................................. .......32




Ver 1.0.1                                                                                                                                                3
Ubuntu and Thinkpad


Introduction
It’s not that difficult just needs a bit of patience and someone who has been there before to guide you 
through the pitfalls. This is not a ‘how to use Ubuntu’ guide. My ThinkPad T40 is a standard model 
the only noteworthy items are that my T40 has:

    ●   Mobility Radeon 7500 32MB (opposed to Radeon 9000 or the T40p)

    ●   Intel ‘Centrino’ 2100B 802.11b wireless card

    ●   XGA Screen (1024x768)

I am not aware of issues with other wireless cards such as the Intel 2200BG card. The only require­
ment is that you have some form of Internet connection preferably over wireless in order to get some 
of the updates and applications that I have included here.


Internet Connection

Wireless Network
You can tell by going up to the top­right hand side of your desktop screen (where the date and time 
are) and clicking on the icon that looks like two computer screens. Make sure you wireless is switched 
on (Fn + F5) and click with the left mouse button on this. If you get a drop down menu listing wire­
less networks—maybe your own—we are good to go. 


Other Options
If you don’t have a wireless card or some form of functioning internet connection then you will need 
to get one unless you are going to use Ubuntu purely as it comes ‘out of the box’. Alternatively you 
could download the updates on another computer and transfer them across. (using a USB memory key 
for example)

If you have a connection to the internet via wireless or not or have downloaded the required files and 
transferred them over, continue reading.


Kick-start the Terminal
A lot of this we are going to do in the Terminal, but it is entirely possible to do this in the Synaptic 
Package Manager. However using the Terminal will familiarise yourself with using some of the 
powerful command line tools a Linux system offers. Secondly, much of the configuration is easier to 
manage if you are already in the Terminal, otherwise you will find manipulating some system files a 
little convoluted (not necessarily tricky) in the Nautilus file manager.

4                                                                                              Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                 Ubuntu and Thinkpad




               Figure 1: The Terminal


Start the Terminal by select the Applications menu (top left of the screen), then Accessories and fi­
nally click Terminal. This will open the command prompt. At the Terminal type followed by enter:
       sudo apt-get update

This will ensure we have an up to date list of packages that we will want to install.


Fonts

Web Fonts
As a web developer myself it is almost essential in my view to install the Microsoft Core Fonts for the 
Web, which includes the Arial, Georgia, Trebuchet MS, Vedana etc. fonts which are used across virtu­
ally the whole world wide web. With your Terminal open and primed for action type pressing enter at 
the end:
       sudo apt-get install msttcorefonts

You will be prompted for your login password so enter that and you will commence downloading the 
web fonts package. When this has done, you can then run a command to update the font cache, which 
stores a list of what fonts are installed. Agreeably Windows tends to do this automatically but some 
applications may require being closed and restarted on that platform so it’s not all a complete farce.
       sudo fc-cache -f -v

Assuming Firefox (or whichever web browser you are using) was closed when you ran the above com­
mand, open up Firefox (Applications menu, Internet menu and Firefox) you should find that rather 
than using the supplied Ubuntu fonts on websites, that the page is laid out using the fonts you would 
almost certainly see if you were browsing on a Windows or Macintosh machine.


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                             5
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

Talismanic Tahoma
Tahoma is by far the most used font on the web—probably anyway. Certainly with Windows 2000 and 
Windows ME Microsoft thought it was good enough to become the default OS font in place of MS 
Sans Serif. However the MS Core Web Fonts package does not include it. As such we have to go else­
where for it.


Installing Type 1 Postscript Fonts
Installing Type 1 Postscript fonts takes a little more effort to get working but with most fonts distrib­
uted as OpenType or TrueType these days you can expect that you won’t have a whole bunch of Type 1 
fonts to install. I only own the one, Bembo which is a font that I use in my self published works. As 
such, I could not afford not to have this font installed as apart from Times, and the Microsoft web 
fonts—Bembo is the font I use most of all.


Type 1 and OpenOffice.org
At first I was a little irked that the word processor that I was getting very used to (and have since used 
full time over Microsoft Word) did not seem to recognise the existence of Bembo that I had set up in 
the previous step. After hunting around on Google, I finally turned up the required document on the 
OpenOffice.org website. You need to run an administration tool called spadmin. (Figure 2)




          Figure 2: Spadmin ­ Printer and font administration tool for OpenOffice.org




6                                                                                                Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                Ubuntu and Thinkpad

Setting up your Printer
Setting up your printer is most likely to be a trivial affair with Ubuntu as it comes supplied with lots 
of printer drivers, both for new and old models from many manufacturers. However if your luck is 
anything like mine, you will find your printer is not listed. In my case because two years ago I 
skimped on buying an expensive printer and got a Canon Pixma iP1500, things take a little more ef­
fort. (Though if I had kept my ultra reliable Canon BJ4200 of seven years at the time, it would have 
worked off the bat, but I sold that as a certain Powerbook G4 I had at the time didn’t have a parallel 
port, a crying shame letting that printer go... C’est la vie!) So after some heavy Googling and search­
ing forums (as per which I have refined in this guide with some of my own trials and tribulations) I 
found the drivers I needed for the iP1500.

The drivers and instructions for the iP1500 and other Canon Bubblejet printers is available from this 
very wonderful website courtesy of the equally wonderful Takushi Miyoshi: 

       http://mambo.kuhp.kyoto­u.ac.jp/~takushi/ 

Drop him an email at t­miyoshi@mfour.med.kyoto­u.ac.jp to say thank you.


Installing Media Codecs (Quicktime/Windows Media)
We are about to install VLC which can play many media types but if you browse the odd website you 
will notice that Quicktime and Windows Media does not play. The trick is to right mouse click on the 
blank video object which will show an option to open the video in Totem. This will immediately re­
port, I don’t have the codec but would you like to install it. You should answer yes you do want to and 
when the results of what codecs to install appears, select all the packages and install them. If you then 
close Firefox to be on the safe side and reopen and browse to the site with the media that would not 
show, you should be greeted with a video that you can now watch.

       Do note that files protected with digital rights management (DRM) are not viewable but 
       for most purposes you will be able to access the majority of videos on the web which are 
       generally corporate promotional material which in non protected formats.


Playing DVDs
There are many packages but my favourite is VLC. I choose VLC because my method for outputting 
my laptop’s display to TV is primarily for DVD playing. As such as I have found that using the excel­
lent Mplayer corrupts the display output unfortunately with my TV output method, and secondly To­
tem (the supplied video/media player with Ubuntu) will not play DVDs either (even with download­
ing the required packages). To get VLC it is a small matter of typing the following in your Terminal:
       sudo apt-get install vlc


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                               7
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

This will play pretty much any media files except encrypted DVDs which is pretty much any com­
mecial DVD you will buy. So we need to install something that can decrypt the video so it can be 
played. In fact if you look in the Ubuntu help files, you will find the information for doing just that.
       sudo /usr/share/doc/libdvdread3/install-css.sh

This will install the required libdvdcss2 decryption package. You should be good to go now with us­
ing VLC as your DVD player. One thing to probably adjust is under the System, Preferences menu 
and the Removable Drives and Media preference panel. Here you can configure VLC to open by de­
fault rather than Totem as I have shown in Figure 3 below.




                       Figure 3: Configuring Ubuntu to use VLC as the  
                       default DVD Video player


You can find VLC in Applications, Sound & Video and VLC. It will play a multitude of files as well 
including DivX, XviD and 3ivX for example.


External Display Setup
By default if you plug in your TV to the Thinkpad via the S­video output you will see nothing, and 
plugging an external monitor when the Thinkpad boots will simply mirror the screen, most likely at 
1024x768 but this does depend on your monitor’s specification. For example my JVC LCD TV when 
connected in a mirrored fashion will only mirror at 800x600 resolution (but with 1024x768 desktop 
space requiring panning with the mouse) but when plugged into pretty much anything else it will cor­
rectly mirror at 1024x768.




8                                                                                             Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                  Ubuntu and Thinkpad

Definitions
    ●   Mirrored Display: This simply copies verbatim what is on the ThinkPad’s internal LCD 
        screen (whether the LCD is switched on or not) and usually to the same resolution 1024x768 
        in the case if my XGA based T40.

    ●   Dual/Extended Display: Instead of copying the display verbatim, this option creates a ‘expan­
        ded’ desktop to the internal LCD screen, essentially giving you two workspaces. This is the 
        method that is explored here.


What we want to accomplish
In an ideal world this is what I wanted to achieve:

    ●   Normal operation of laptop when no external displays plugged in, i.e. no overly wide desktop 
        size when external monitor not plugged in

    ●   Automatically extend desktop onto external display when plugged in when I choose to

    ●   Automatically mirror desktop on external display when plugged in when I choose to

    ●   Output a DVD/video file onto my TV using the Svideo output.

This actually was not a small task for someone who admittedly is not a complete novice but someone 
who couldn’t describe themselves as a professional Linux user. The good news that all of these ob­
jectives have been accomplished.


Configuration for VGA Output
My starting point was that the configuration for the internal display on my T40 was more or less cor­
rect, so this is our starting point and if we do anything wrong we should restore this configuration if 
we hit problems. Suffice to say you should have none because I have sussed out the pitfalls. We also 
know that if we boot with an external display plugged in, we can successfully mirror the display too. 
As such apart from a couple of settings the default configuration will be used when no external 
displays are plugged in or when we want to mirror the desktop on the external display.

In the Terminal, the first step is to back up the default configuration as follows:
        sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf ~/xorg.conf.bak

This command will copy the file xorg.conf and I am saving the backup in our home directory which is 
somewhere easy to locate. (The tilde ~ represents home directory)  Make sure you type a capital X not 
a lower­case x. This is because the file system is case sensitive unlike FAT or NTFS file systems (used 
by Windows). 


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                             9
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

The xorg.conf file is the configuration file for the X Windowing System and if this is not correct you 
may have issues of operating Ubuntu in the graphical environment, as such its essential that we keep a 
working copy in case we need to restore it.


What to do when the X Server (GUI) Fails to Start
If you find that at any step in this section you can’t get the GUI to open, you need to restart your sys­
tem (Ctrl + Alt + Del at the black screen) and log in (your user name and password) when prompted 
and at the command prompt type:
       cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf ~/xorg.conf.broken

       cp ~/xorg.conf.bak /etc/X11/xorg.conf

Then you should be up and running again with the GUI when you reboot. The ‘broken’ xorg.conf file 
will be called xorg.conf.broken where you can troubleshoot your error and then reinstate the file over 
xorg.conf and try again.

When the X Windowing System fails to start read the debug statements it offers to show you and you 
can find out where you went wrong.

I have put these steps here as without knowing how to restore a working X.org configuration for all in­
tents and purposes it will feel like you have ‘killed’ your Ubuntu installation, and let’s face it you don’t 
want to reinstall when there is no need.

If you really mess things up you can enter the following into the Terminal:
       sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-org

That said, I have not tried the above but it should wipe the slate clean again so use with your own cau­
tion if for some reason restoring your backup of xorg.conf does not work.


Task One: Enhance Performance
For safety reasons, the speed of AGP is set at 1x by default, whereas our intrepid ThinkPad T40 (up to 
T42) can run it at AGP 4x. It is safe to change the speed of this having made a backup of your  
xorg.conf file. Firstly we need to confirm that you are running at AGP 1x. At the Terminal type:
       glxinfo

This will about half way down the output (you may need to scroll up) read out something like:
       OpenGL renderer string: Mesa DRI Radeon 20061018 AGP 1x x86/MMX/SSE2 TCL

If this is the case, from your Terminal enter the following:
       sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf


10                                                                                                Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                 Ubuntu and Thinkpad

This will start a Terminal based text editor called nano which is a nice simple system which allows 
you to modify a text file with easy to use short cuts.  When nano is open press Ctrl + W to search for:

       Section “Device”

This should take you to a section that will look like:
       Section "Device"
             Identifier             "ATI Technologies Inc Radeon Mobility M7 LW...”
             Driver                 "ati"
             BusID                  "PCI:1:0:0"
       EndSection

In this section, I have configured my system to use a different driver, tweaked the performance set­
tings and added an explicit mirror tag. Remember, the default xorg.conf file is the one we will use to 
configure the default laptop display and also for mirroring. Therefore, change the section above to the 
following:
       Section "Device"
               Identifier              "ATI Technologies Inc Radeon Mobility M7 LW...”
               Driver                  "radeon"
               BusID                   "PCI:1:0:0"
               Option                  "AGPMode"       "4"
               Option                  "AGPFastWrite" "true"
               Option                  "RenderAccel"   "on"
               Option                  "MonitorLayout" "LVDS, NONE"
       EndSection

The pieces I have changed are highlighted in italics. Please note for the Identifier line not all of it is 
shown due to the physical width of this document, so leave the Identifier  field as it is or you will 
cause yourself some problems with the X Windows System not starting up.

Save the changes using Ctrl + O and then exit nano by pressing Ctrl + X. To check your changes are 
successful you can do so without a reboot by pressing Ctrl + Alt + Backspace (not delete) and log in. 
Open the Terminal and type in glxinfo again and this time you should see that it now reads:

       OpenGL renderer string: Mesa DRI Radeon 20061018 AGP 4x x86/MMX/SSE2 TCL 

There are further options you can configure here but for my purposes this has worked fine. For further 
information on options you can put into this section regarding the  radeon  driver you can read all 
about at the ThinkWiki here:

       http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Additional_options_for_the_radeon_driver

If you don’t get back into the GUI, follow the instructions under What to do when the X Server (GUI)
Fails to Start on page 10.




Ver 1.0.1                                                                                              11
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

Task Two: Extended Desktop Setup
Before we start configuring any files, backup your current xorg.conf file that we modified in task one 
with the following in Terminal:
         sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf ~/xorg.conf.bak

Also in preparation for either mirrored/standard desktop setup and extended display choice, make a 
second copy in the X11 directory as follows:
         sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.default

This one we will use for a mirrored/standard X.org configuration. (hence default) Now it is likely dur­
ing   this   at   first   confusing   process   you   will   need   to   restore   the   copy   of  xorg.conf.bak  (or  
xorg.conf.default if you desire) over the xorg.conf we will now edit since I found I made a few mis­
takes on my first time around that lead to the X Windows System not starting up. If you follow this 
carefully you should however avoid all of these foibles.


Research your external display’s specification
Firstly you need to find out your external display’s resolution support and refresh/sync rates. Without 
these you may not be able to get your external display working to its optimal best or at all. To success­
fully complete this you will need to find out your monitor’s:

     ●   Horizontal sync rate

     ●   Vertical refresh rate

     ●   Screen resolution supporting

In my case I wanted to purely use my widescreen LCD TV at its optimal resolution which I found to 
be 1360x768, with horizontal sync rate of 47.7KHz and vertical refresh rate of 60Hz. You may find 
your monitor has a range e.g. 50­75Hz, which is fine. It will either be a single specific value like mine 
was or a range of values.


Create Configuration for Dual Displays
The method which I have created a dual display using Xinerama. There is an alternative method that 
uses  a  different method  called  MergedFB.  (Merged Frame­buffer) The  difference  mostly rests   in 
graphics  acceleration will appear jumpy  on a  Xinerama  configuration whereas  MergedFB  uses  a 
merged frame­buffer or viewport which accelerates the display across both screens. I found for the 2D 
based computing that I mostly conduct Xinerama was a more than adequate solution. I will probably 
explore  MergedFB  in another guide. Suffice to say, if you see reference to these two systems they 
aren’t quite one and the same and generally you are better going with one option or another. Continue 


12                                                                                                          Ver 1.0.1
                                                                               Ubuntu and Thinkpad

reading if you are happy to go the Xinerama route too.

The part that boggled me with the xorg.conf file was that the various sections actually link one into 
another via certain named tag, which is why I advised you didn’t change it in the Enhance Perform­
ance section.  There are four main sections we configure and one we need to add. These are (explained 
succinctly):

   ●   Device: This configures the graphics chip itself, in my instance this is the Mobility Radeon 
       7500. It does also specify settings about the outputs but in our Xinerama based configuration it 
       is really just the graphics chipset and which screen it will link to.

   ●   Monitor: Does what it says on the tin. Describes monitor based settings such as refresh rates.

   ●   Screen:  Describes the resolutions and colour depths that the monitor can show and which 
       Device the Monitor is attached to.

   ●   ServerLayout: Describes the layout of the Screen(s) for the X Windowing System, and ties all 
       of the sections up.

The section we need to add is one that specifies we want to use Xinerama. I am aware there are prob­
ably tools to do this automatically, but editing this file yourself actually gives a much better insight 
into how this almost magical system works. That’s not to say that Ubuntu could do with a graphical 
based solution, but it proves the level of power you have with Linux versus the ease of initial set up 
with Windows; which let’s face it is a cinch to set up for dual display. So without further ado, in the 
Terminal:
       sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf

Now we’re ready to rock.


Device
This is the first section to get sorted. Because we are running a dual display system we need to set up 
two devices. We don’t have two graphics cards but we do have two outputs which can work independ­
ently. In the case of a laptop that’s the internal LCD port and the external VGA port. To each of these 
is a display: the internal LCD and external monitor. My advice is to move down to the existing Device 
section and remove all of it.

The skeleton to use is:
       Section “Device”
             # Internal LCD

       EndSection

       Section “Device”


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                            13
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

               # External VGA Port

       EndSection

We are going to create two sections, as per the comments above (the lines starting with a #). In the In­
ternal LCD section, enter the following:
       Identifier           "Internal Port"

For the External VGA Port section enter the following:
       Identifier           "External Port"

And for both under the Identifier lines you have just inserted enter:

In the gap between the comment and EndSection enter the following:
       BoardName            "Radeon Mobility M7 LW [Radeon Mobility 7500]"
       VendorName           "ATI Technologies Inc"
       Driver               "radeon"
       BusID                "PCI:1:0:0"
       Option               "AGPMode"       "4"
       Option               "AGPFastWrite" "true"
       Option               "DPMS" "true"
       Option               "DDCMode" "true"
       Option               "Monitor Layout" "LVDS, CRT"

Now at the bottom of the first Device section (before EndSection) enter the following for the Internal 
LCD:
       Screen                  0

And the bottom of the second Device section enter the following for the external VGA port:
       Screen                  1

That’s that section sorted out. If you are unsure how this should look, take a look at the final result on 
page 22 to see how it should all look when put together.


Monitor
Following the Device section are two Monitor definitions one for the internal LCD and one for the 
external LCD. This is where some of the information you researched on page 12 comes in use. As 
with the Device section, erase any existing Monitor section just for clarity’s sake and insert for the in­
ternal LCD:
       Section "Monitor"
               Identifier              "Laptop LCD"
               VendorName              "IBM"
               Option                  "DPMS" "true"
       EndSection


14                                                                                               Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                Ubuntu and Thinkpad

And a second entry for your external display. Bear in mind that you will need to enter the horizonal re­
fresh rate and vertical sync rates for your monitor,  not mine unless you own a JVC LT23D50BK and 
plan to use it at 1360x768! If you monitor supports a range of vertical sync rates e.g. 50 to 75Hz, you 
would enter it as 50.0 – 75.0 (or as 50­75):
       Section "Monitor"
               Identifier             "External LCD" # Keep this the same
               VendorName             "JVC" # Change to your monitor’s make
               HorizSync              47.7 # Change to your monitor’s specification
               VertRefresh            60.0 # Change to your monitor’s specification
               Option                 "DPMS" "true"
       EndSection

Just make sure you leave the Identifier as External LCD. If of course you are plugging into a CRT, 
then you can change this to read External CRT but you would need to change every reference to Ex­
ternal LCD to External CRT. You could even have a reference of “Massive Penguins Eating Pies,” but 
this may not help when it comes to maintenance!


Screen
Ok almost there. I would recommend that you retain your current Screen section for this instance as it 
could be a lot to replace. You do need to make a couple of changes though. So your existing Screen 
section probably looks like:
       Section "Screen"

               Identifier           "Default Screen"
               Device               "ATI Technologies Inc Radeon Mobility M7 LW..."
               Monitor              "Generic Monitor"

This is the current Screen configuration for the Internal LCD. We need to change this to match the 
Identifiers we set up in our new  Device  and  Monitor  sections, which for the internal LCD were
Internal Port and Laptop LCD respectively. So the result should look like:

       Section "Screen"

               Identifier           "Screen0"
               Device               "Internal Port"
               Monitor              "Laptop LCD"

I have also changed the Identifier to Screen0 as it could be that the laptop’s screen is not your default 
screen. The rest should remain as it is.

The second Screen section is for your external display, this is a section you should create from scratch 
in addition to the Screen section we just edited. For example mine is:
       Section "Screen"
               Identifier             "Screen1"
               Device                 "External Port"


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                             15
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

               Monitor         "External LCD"
               DefaultDepth    24
               SubSection "Display"
                       Depth 24
                       Modes "1360x768"
               EndSubSection
       EndSection

This time around the Identifier is Screen1 and I have changed this to connect the External Port
Device and the External LCD Monitor. You should have identified that these cross­reference with 
the previous Device and Monitor sections that we have configured. The SubSection “Display” as­
pect is of interest though as this defines the usuable resolutions on this display. In my case I am set­
ting  up   the  optimal resolution  of my display  only  of  1360x768.  So  if   your monitor could show 
1600x1200 you would enter:
                  SubSection "Display"
                          Depth 24
                          Modes "1600x1200"
                  EndSubSection

Simple as that.


ServerLayout
This is the Window Server Layout, not server as in computer. This defines the layout of the monitors, 
where they actually sit. It also pulls in the input methods for interaction with the window server but 
we are not worried about that. By default this section is as follows:
       Section "ServerLayout"
               Identifier             "Default Layout"
               Screen                 "Default Screen"
               ...

We need to change this so that we have both displays working to expand the desktop, so we change the 
top section identified above to read:
       Section "ServerLayout"

                  Identifier          "Default Layout"
                  Screen 0            "Screen0"
                  Screen 1            "Screen1" RightOf "Screen0"

Now remember we configured the external display to be Screen1 so if in fact physically on your desk 
or in your room the external display sits on the left of your laptop’s screen you should put the follow­
ing:
       Screen     1         "Screen1" Left "Screen0"

Furthermore if the external display is becoming the primary display and your laptop the extended dis­
play you should change this to:

16                                                                                             Ver 1.0.1
                                                                               Ubuntu and Thinkpad

                 Identifier           "Default Layout"
                 Screen 0             "Screen1"
                 Screen 1             "Screen0" RightOf "Screen1"

Or however you may have your screens physically arranged. Now there is only one more section to 
change.


Enabling Xinerama
All you need to add is the following without any changes:
       Section "ServerFlags"

                 Option     "AllowOpenMouseFail"            "true"
                 Option     "Xinerama"      "true"

       EndSection

Save the changes with Ctrl + O. Make sure you have entered everything correctly to save yourself any 
grief, and then exit from nano with Ctrl + X. At the Terminal prompt make a copy of your new X.org 
configuration file with:
       sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.dual

(Remember that you have two known working backups at this stage:  xorg.conf.bak in your home 
folder and xorg.conf.default in /etc/X11) so if you need to restore one of these, refer to page 10.


Testing extended desktop display
You need to reboot with your external monitor plugged in from boot. So attach the display, reboot and 
make sure that output is showing on both screens (mirrored) on bootup. You will either have two res­
ults:

   ●   It works: You will have a flawlessly extended desktop where the mouse drifts over easily 
       enough onto the secondary display. Notice how we never got a choice to mirror the display if 
       we wanted to, and secondly—what would happen without a monitor plugged in? All will be 
       revealed.

   ●   It didn’t work: In which case restore a working X.org configuration file to get back into the 
       GUI as per page 10 in What to do when the X Server (GUI) Fails to Start or use nano from the 
       command prompt you have had to log in to to debug the xorg.conf file that is non functional.

So we are left with two issues here which limit the ‘automatic’ nature of this once you have it running:

   1. If you boot up as things stand with no external display attached, the desktop area is still exten­
      ded which means some applications may disappear onto a piece of desktop you cannot physic­
      ally see. Also your mouse will skid right across onto the second display. What we really want 


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                            17
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

        is the Thinkpad not to extend the display when there is no external display attached.

     2. You have not been able to tell Ubuntu that you wanted to extend or mirror the display, you 
        have had the decision made for you.

So our next thing to accomplish is to make the detection of an external display automatic and then be 
able to make a choice on display method if there is such a display plugged in.

And for heaven’s sakes—if you have been working on this flat out with no break from page one, go 
away from the Thinkpad now and make a cup of coffee or tea, or anything. Take a rest, because there’s 
a  little   way   to go  yet. I   think this summarises  nicely  why the  year of  desktop Linux  is   a  little
way off yet!




                  Figure 4: A picture for a change! nano editing the xorg.conf file



Task Three: Detecting an External Display
This one perplexed me for a while as I actually found the examples given somewhat complicated for 
my knowledge (although technically—possibly—better) and one actually have out the wrong advice 
that got me scratching my head a lot one Friday evening. The secret is installing a package called 
xresprobe  which has a useful little utility called ddcprobe. This utility returns useful information 
about the graphics subsystem, particularly whether there is an external display attached. There is a 
subtle difference in the output so if we search for this difference that only occurs when an external 
device is plugged into the VGA socket, we can then safely assume there is an external display, if not 
we can automatically use our standard configuration.



18                                                                                                   Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                   Ubuntu and Thinkpad

To recap we have created three xorg.conf files:

    ●   xorg.conf.default: This is the single screen/mirrored dual display configuration file

    ●   xorg.conf.dual: This is the extended desktop dual display configuration file

    ●   xorg.conf.bak: The same as xorg.conf.default but a backup held outside of the /etc/X11/ dir­
        ectory in case something goes really wrong.

To break down what we need to do to make this work we need to:

    1. Install xresprobe

    2. Create a script to detect the existence of an external monitor

    3. Run the script before the X Window Server starts when we boot the computer

Steps 1 and 3 actually turn out to be the easiest and step 2 is easy because I provide you the script so 
there should be no reason for the grumbling at the back of the class, I’ve done the leg work for you!


Installing xresprobe
Very simple, from the Terminal enter:
        sudo apt-get install xresprobe

Step one complete.


The detection script
Enter in the Terminal:
        sudo nano /etc/init.d/xorg.conf_switcher

I chose this location as it is where some initialisation scripts are ran but I hit a brick wall with how it’s 
done manually until I found there was a graphical configuration option as explained in step three. 
Anyway /etc/init.d/ is as good a place as any. In nano enter:
        #!/bin/bash
        # determine whether an external display is attached or not dudes

        externalMonitor=`sudo ddcprobe | grep --count '^edid: $'`

        echo -e " * Determining if an external monitor is present...\t"

        if [[ "$externalMonitor" == "0" ]]
                then
                # Monitor Plugged in

                  echo -e " * Detected external display.\n"


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                                 19
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

                  echo -e -n "Do you want to extend [y] or mirror [n] onto the                     
                  external monitor? "

                  read ExtMirQuestion

                  if [[ "$ExtMirQuestion" == "y" ]]
                          then
                          # Use extended desktop display

                             cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf.dual /etc/X11/xorg.conf
                  else
                             # Mirror the desktop

                             cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf.default /etc/X11/xorg.conf
                  fi
       else
                  # Monitor not plugged in

                  cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf.default /etc/X11/xorg.conf
       fi

 Do not press enter here, enter as one line.
You will notice from the above that this is a shell script, a Bash script in fact (Bourne­Again Shell) 
which runs ddcprobe to see if there is an external monitor attached. The difference we mentioned in 
ddcprobe’s output is detected with a grep statement. If we detect an external display then we test the 
result we put into the externalMonitor variable and enter a standard if..else statement block. We also 
solve our extend or mirror question by prompting the user with a text based y[es] or n[o] answer to 
whether they wish to extend or mirror on their external display. This is not the prettiest of solutions 
nor the most robust (someone could enter ‘fat pigeon’ as an answer for example) but it works and can 
always be improved on. The flow of this script should be self explanatory but the main point is that if 
the user has no external display plugged in, they won’t be bugged with a start­up question.

You can see how we’re selecting the configuration though, we’re copying our pre­set configuration 
files over into the place of xorg.conf which is what the X server will start up and use. I don’t particu­
larly see this as a kludge (as I hate kludges), as this is a perfectly valid way to work things, sure not as 
clean as Windows but think how extensible and customisable this could be.

Save the changes (Ctrl + O) and exit nano. (Ctrl + X) Now we need to make the script executable 
which we can do with:
       sudo chmod +x /etc/init.d/xorg.conf_switcher


Running xorg.conf_switcher on boot
One last remaining step and this is done with a GUI, how novel! This is shown in Figure 5 below. You 
can access it from the System menu, Preferences and selecting Sessions.



20                                                                                                Ver 1.0.1
                                                                               Ubuntu and Thinkpad




                      Figure 5: Session preference panel with our Xorg Switcher


From the Startup Programs tab click New and enter the following details:

        Name:           Xorg Switcher (or anything you like)
        Command:        /etc/init.d/xorg.conf_switcher

After doing this you should see it listed as it is in Figure 5 above. Now click on the Current Session 
pane and in the list /etc/init.d/xorg.conf_switcher set the order to 12 so that the script is ran before 
the  X Window Server  is started. If it is ran afterwards it will have adopted possibly the wrong  
xorg.conf  configuration file. Click Apply  to save the changes and click Close. Once you reboot, if 
you have an external display plugged in it should be detected and you will be asked whether you wish 
to extend or mirror the current display on the external screen. Depending on your answer, it will do 
exactly what you have asked of it! If you do not have an external screen plugged in Ubuntu should 
boot without interruption and you will see your desktop size is not extended but the size of your 
laptop’s screen, in my case 1024x768.


Bootnote
It’s worth noting that Ubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbon” is aiming to provide a graphical way to configure 
everything that we have discussed here with its inclusion of X.org 7.3. That said though, I think it’s 
been worthwhile configuring this by hand, particularly the monitor detection routines which allow you 
to get just as much functionality as you would with Windows—more or less. 

Either that or this is self preservation at its very best!



Ver 1.0.1                                                                                            21
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

My ‘xorg.conf.dual’ file
As noted this is the section (not the entirety) of xorg.conf.dual that I have edited as described in this 
section so you can see the combined, final result for your reference:
       Section "Device"

                  Identifier          "Internal Port"
                  BoardName           "Radeon Mobility M7 LW [Radeon Mobility 7500]"
                  VendorName          "ATI Technologies Inc"
                  Driver              "radeon"
                  BusID               "PCI:1:0:0"
                  Option              "AGPMode"       "4"
                  Option              "AGPFastWrite" "true"
                  Option              "DPMS" "true"
                  Option              "DDCMode" "true"
                  Option              "Monitor Layout" "LVDS, CRT"
                  Screen              0

       EndSection

       Section "Device"

                  Identifier          "External Port"
                  BoardName           "Radeon Mobility M7 LW [Radeon Mobility 7500]"
                  VendorName          "ATI Technologies Inc"
                  Driver              "radeon"
                  BusID               "PCI:1:0:0"
                  Option              "AGPMode"       "4"
                  Option              "AGPFastWrite" "true"
                  Option              "DPMS" "true"
                  Option              "DDCMode" "true"
                  Option              "Monitor Layout" "LVDS, CRT"
                  Screen              1

       EndSection

       Section "Monitor"

                  Identifier          "Laptop LCD"
                  VendorName          "IBM"
                  Option              "DPMS" "true"

       EndSection

       Section "Monitor"

                  Identifier          "External LCD"
                  VendorName          "JVC"
                  HorizSync           47.7
                  VertRefresh         60.0
                  Option              "DPMS" "true"

       EndSection

       Section "Screen"

                  Identifier          "Screen0"


22                                                                                              Ver 1.0.1
                                                          Ubuntu and Thinkpad

              Device           "Internal Port"
              Monitor          "Laptop LCD"
              DefaultDepth     24

              SubSection "Display"
                      Depth           1
                      Modes           "1024x768"
              EndSubSection

              SubSection "Display"
                      Depth           4
                      Modes           "1024x768"
              EndSubSection

              SubSection "Display"
                      Depth           8
                      Modes           "1024x768"
              EndSubSection

              SubSection "Display"
                      Depth           15
                      Modes           "1024x768"
              EndSubSection

              SubSection "Display"
                      Depth           16
                      Modes           "1024x768"
              EndSubSection

              SubSection "Display"
                      Depth           24
                      Modes           "1024x768"
              EndSubSection

       EndSection



       Section "Screen"

              Identifier       "Screen1"
              Device           "External Port"
              Monitor          "External LCD"
              DefaultDepth     24

              SubSection "Display"
                      Depth 24
                      Modes "1360x768"
              EndSubSection

       EndSection



       Section "ServerFlags"

              Option   "AllowOpenMouseFail"      "true"
              Option   "Xinerama"      "true"



Ver 1.0.1                                                                  23
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

       EndSection



       Section "ServerLayout"

                  Identifier          "Default Layout"
                  Screen 0            "Screen0"
                  Screen 1            "Screen1" RightOf "Screen0"
                  InputDevice         "Generic Keyboard"
                  InputDevice         "Configured Mouse"
                  InputDevice         "stylus"        "SendCoreEvents"
                  InputDevice         "cursor"        "SendCoreEvents"
                  InputDevice         "eraser"        "SendCoreEvents"
                  InputDevice         "Synaptics Touchpad"

       EndSection


Configuration for TV Output
Admittedly my solution for this isn’t as transparent or even if I am honest as good as Windows (be­
cause of the supplied Windows drivers) but it’s functional and pretty much covers me for my only TV 
output needs – playing a DVD. Issues such as giving a presentation are easily possible using the de­
fault mirrored display. That said my method is far from set in stone in terms of what you can output 
via the Thinkpad’s S­video socket.

If you wish to try the final result out as soon as you finish this section, I would suggest that you shut 
down your Thinkpad and plug your TV in via the S­video output and then switch on. This is so that 
Ubuntu correctly detects your TV is plugged in. I have not tried to run the final result having only just 
plugged in my TV, my guess is that if you do it won’t work. Please tell me otherwise!

First of all we require a small application called atitvout that allows us with some work to output to 
the TV. It is worth noting that this now an undeveloped tool. Secondly displaying output on the TV 
and laptop’s LCD screen at the same time has not been possible with my T40’s Mobility Radeon 
7500. Again in the Terminal enter the following:
       sudo apt-get install atitvout

Now that we have installed the tool that will facilitate outputting to the TV, we also need to create a 
script that will kickstart this tool and run our DVD player which is VLC of which we have already 
downloaded in the previous section. So firstly we need to modify a file that controls the monitor’s out­
put to have one that will be compatible with the atitvout tool. At the Terminal type:
       cd /etc/X11

Remember, Linux uses a case sensitive file system. Again at the Terminal type:
       sudo cp xorg.conf.default xorg.conf.tv



24                                                                                              Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                   Ubuntu and Thinkpad

The xorg.conf.tv is the configuration file we will use for television output. Remember, if you have 
not followed the instructions for VGA output the file to copy is called xorg.conf. This is the con­
figuration we will use for the TV output. Enter:
       sudo nano xorg.conf.tv

We need to change our display driver from using the ati driver to a plain old VESA driver. If we don’t 
do this, atitvout will not work. With nano on the Terminal’s screen, press Ctrl + W. This is the short­
cut to find text or find where text is. Enter ati and press enter. This will find a section of text similar 
to:
       Section "Device"
             Identifier             "ATI Technologies Inc Radeon Mobility M7 LW...”
             Driver                 "ati"
             BusID                  "PCI:1:0:0"
             Option                 "AGPMode"       "4"
       EndSection

Change “ati” to read “vesa”. To save the changes press Ctrl + O, and then to quit nano press Ctrl + 
X. Now we are almost there but we need that script to make this all work. So back at your Terminal’s 
command prompt, enter the following:
       cd ~

The tilde (~) character represents your home folder, which analogous to your Windows ‘My Docu­
ments’ folder in some respects. The script we are going to create does not have to be saved in your 
home folder but it is an easy to recall place for such a file, and can be easily moved somewhere else at 
a later date.
       nano tvout.sh

Little point in calling it something obscure! At the editor enter the following:
       #!/bin/bash
       /usr/X11R6/bin/X :1 -xf86config xorg.conf.vesa -depth 24 -auth                     
             /var/gdm/:1.Xauth vt8 &

       xpid=$!
       DISPLAY=:1.0
       export DISPLAY
       sleep 5
       atitvout pal
       atitvout -f t
       vlc /dev/scd0 -f
       atitvout -f lc
       kill $xpid

 Do not press enter here, enter as one line.

Press Ctrl + O to save and Ctrl + X to exit. Next from the Terminal make the file executable with:

Ver 1.0.1                                                                                               25
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

       sudo chmod +x tvout.sh

If you have your television plugged in and ready to go you can now try this by inserting a DVD and in 
the Terminal by entering:
       sudo ./tvout.sh

Hopefully you will see your TV flicker into action, your laptop’s LCD switch off and VLC appear on 
a plain looking screen. Your DVD should play automatically full screen. 

Notably the more astute of you will notice you can configure this script a little, for example if you are 
in North America you will want to change pal to ntsc. Also, if you have more than one DVD drive, 
you will need to adjust the default scd0. Generally speaking if your internal Ultrabay device is DVD 
player capable, then you will not need to change this.

To return back to your Ubuntu/GNOME desktop, simply exit VLC (which is by default Ctrl + X)


Take a Break
You may have noticed a slight pattern to setting things up even on an excellent and Thinkpad friendly 
distribution like Ubuntu—it requires a bit of effort. Certainly there is a sense of achievement involved, 
but also the ultimate goal that is having an operating system that you enjoy using more than Windows. 
If you find at an early stage you preferred Windows, then it might be worth considering whether Linux 
is for you. I personally knew from an early stage that there was something about using Linux that was 
actually very enjoyable but also intangible to describe. I am far from a Microsoft hater, but rather a 
technology enthusiast. As such I don’t just blindly support anything for the sake of religious fervour as 
could be said of many. If Apple, Microsoft, Ubuntu come out with something good I’ll congratulate 
them with merit. That said, I will also be the first one to voice disappointment where appropriate too. 
I’d rather follow good, technology that fits my needs than supporting something just because it comes 
from a certain manufacturer or vendor.


Wine-dows Compatibility
Winedows? Yes, not Windows in this instance. WINE (WINE Is Not an Emulator) is a compatibility 
layer for UNIX­like systems (including Linux) that provides a translation system of sorts for running 
Windows binaries on an operating system that isn’t Windows or from Microsoft. The idea is that 
rather than running a full copy of Windows in a virtual or emulated environment, that the binaries are 
translated ‘on the fly’ to the host operating system’s native tongue. As such an application like Word 
97 which generally only runs on Windows, suddenly becomes very usable on Linux, in this case 
Ubuntu.

Whilst I maintain a copy of Microsoft Office on my Ubuntu installation, I still turn to OpenOffice.org 
more as it serves my needs very well. That said, I do find Word, Excel and Powerpoint to be excellent 

26                                                                                              Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                Ubuntu and Thinkpad

products as well. As a web developer I find maintaining an installation of Internet Explorer 6 is im­
portant in order that I can develop web pages that work with its various quirks.. Finally, a copy of Mi­
crosoft’s Bookshelf (See Figure 6 below) product because as a writer, I have yet to find a better dic­
tionary, quotations and thesaurus package since. Thankfully these three products work excellently on 
WINE.




            Figure 6: OpenOffice.org Writer and Microsoft Bookshelf '99 in Ubuntu


Easy or Not as Easy?
WINE is very easy to set up but there is a second option which adds a very user friendly front end to 
the system from Codeweavers called Crossover Linux. The latter is not that expensive either, retailing 
at $39 for the basic version. This will give you an easy to maintain system with pre­configured set­up 
routines for many popular supported applications such as Microsoft Office 97 and 2000, Adobe Pho­
toshop 6 and 7, Internet Explorer and so forth. Other applications can be run but they are not officially 
supported generally because their compatibility with WINE is unpredictable. Codeweaver’s Crossov­
er Linux  also provides an easy way to maintain  WINE’s  configuration details in a system called 
bottles (as in wine...) These bottles are essentially different versions of Windows with their own set­
tings as some applications will work better with a Windows 98 alike environment whereas others will 
prefer a Windows 2000 alike set­up.

Because not everyone will want to spend $39, we will look at setting up WINE the so­called not as 
easy way, because really, it’s still easy. To install wine, from the Terminal:


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                             27
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

        sudo apt-get install wine

I’m afraid that’s about as difficult as installations get! 


Basic Configuration
The effort actually comes from configuring WINE itself which is outside of the scope of this docu­
ment but I’ll get you started at least. In your System, Preferences menu you will see two items relat­
ing to WINE, one is the configuration which I suggest you open up to get a feel for what options are 
available. I currently keep my system as Windows 98 as its the most compatible option for the soft­
ware that I use.

Something else you may want to configure is the registry WINE maintains. The only change I make is 
to set the Font Smoothing on, as by default there is no anti aliasing at all and this can in fact be useful 
in a word processor where some semblance of decent typography may be a bonus.

        If you find the Windows software you want to run is unreliable using WINE, try down­
        loading the demo of Crossover which may include a predefined set­up script for your ap­
        plication. Failing that and you have  to run the Windows software in question, consider 
        maintaining a dual boot system or a virtualised Windows system using VMware or simil­
        ar. I personally have WINE and VMware set up.

If you are interested in investigating Codeweaver’s excellent Crossover Linux WINE solution, be sure 
to check them out on their website where you can get a free thirty day trial: 

        http://www.codeweavers.com/

I have to say since I last trialled Debian on a ThinkPad T23 in 2003/04, WINE has come along a great 
deal and now is a reliable solution for some useful software. More than anything I am happy to have 
Microsoft’s Bookshelf running!


Speedtouch 330 USB ADSL Modem
This is actually a bit of redundant information now on my part as I have switched to using a wireless 
ADSL modem router. My reasoning for finally ditching my USB modem was purely because under 
Ubuntu my Intel 2100B wireless card which has a notorious reputation under Windows actually finally 
performed like a decent wireless card at last. If you happen to have the Speedtouch 330 modem (the 
most common type of free USB modem UK ISPs provide if you are going with a broadband connec­
tion) then you can get an easy to use manager that takes out all the configuration issues, Appropriately 
it is called usbadslmodemmanager but to get it you need to go to the creator’s homepage.

I generally keep a copy of this drive so that I can put it on a ‘restore’ CD of sorts if I am without an 


28                                                                                                Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                Ubuntu and Thinkpad

Internet connection when my computer goes down and I need the drivers and software to get up and 
running again. That said, thankfully Ubuntu comes with the decent office suite software that often I 
will need in such an emergency situation which isn’t present as yet on a default Windows install. (Ex­
cept for WordPad)


Manage your music library and MP3 player
I love music, I love working with music and I hate working in an office where I cannot listen to music, 
so it’s important that I have something to listen to (as a DJ in years past...) I own a Sony Ericsson 
w810i ‘Walkman’ mobile phone which doubles up as an MP3 player. This part of the guide should 
also work for other MP3 players such as Apple’s iPod, but not owning such a device I cannot anticip­
ate any of the differences that may exist.

My music player of choice is Rhythmbox which comes supplied with Ubuntu but a slightly newer 
version is now available that has enough changes to make it a worthwhile upgrade. The other bonus is 
that while iTunes from Apple is a great piece of software, it won’t run under WINE and iTunes has 
become a bit of a dog lately and it would appear that my T40 can run it OK, but it only seems slick in 
its 7.3 release on my brother’s dual processor Windows box—which to me seems a little overkill for 
what is a music player and manager. As such Rhythmbox which is not nearly as feature laden is still 
an excellent way to manage your computer and portable music device’s music library. In fact for my 
w810i at least, it is better managing it on Ubuntu than when I had a Mac using iTunes and some 
AppleScripts.

To start with for the w810i, I had to make a small modification of where MP3s to date have been 
stored, which is namely the memory stick’s MP3 directory. It seems the w810i can read from any loca­
tion but to keep things reasonably tidy I decided that I wanted for the music I add to it from this point 
on also to appear in the MP3 directory. To do this I needed to edit a file, so in Terminal as ever I 
entered:
       cd /usr/share/hal/fdi/information/10freedesktop

And then to edit the required file:
       sudo nano 10-usb-music-players.fdi

This file is a standard XML file so it is human readable and some of you may already be familiar with 
XML files. If not, XML is similar to the language of web pages (HTML) except it is much more struc­
tured and strict in every instance. I searched for an instance of w810 in the file (Ctrl + W) :
       <!-- Sony Ericsson W810i) -->
       <match key="@storage.physical_device:usb.product_id" int="0xe042">
       ...

I added the following at the bottom of the <match> tag:


Ver 1.0.1                                                                                             29
Ubuntu and Thinkpad

     <append key="portable_audio_player.audio_folders" type="strlist">MP3/</append>

Save the file (Ctrl + O), exit (Ctrl + X) and then we are ready to use Rhythmbox.


Updating the supplied version of Rhythmbox
If I have understood this correctly, the latest version will be included with Ubuntu 7.10 (Ghastly Goat I 
think... Joke!) so this step will become unnecessary over time. For instructions how to update the sup­
plied version head over to:

         http://amoore2600.wordpress.com/2007/07/23/rhythmbox­0111­major­improvments/

It is a lot better than the supplied version with Ubuntu 7.04. I will flesh this section out more in the 
next update to this guide.


Using the Rhythmbox player for first time
If you have a MP3 player (including iPod) try plugging it in. You should find that Rhythmbox opens 
up automatically ready to manage your music collection. Using the software is very simple, you will 
see it the music player’s icon on the left hand side of the window as you would in iTunes. The main 
difference if you are used to ‘automatic’ synchronisation under iTunes is that now you have to drag 
and drop tracks from your library to the MP3 player manually to copy the tracks over, and also delete 
them off manually too.

One final word of caution that may not apply to you but I found that when I went to eject my w810i it 
took a long time and the system warned me it was writing to the device. First couple of times I gave 
up waiting but did think that the transfer of eight/nine minute long MP3 tracks had been remarkably 
quick for the w810i’s USB 1.1 interface. The upshot is that it would appear that the new data is only 
written when it comes to the device being removed. I am not sure if this is just the standard way Linux 
does these things as I haven’t noticed it with my USB pen drive (also 2GB), though that is a USB 2.0 
compatible device.


Software Recommendations
The one thing you will definitely find from using a Linux based system is just how much ‘free’ soft­
ware there is, and second to that how good some of it is. Whilst there are deficiencies in some applica­
tions compared to the mainstream alternatives, for the average user the Linux alternatives are nothing 
short of excellent and will in most cases fulfil what you need. Here are a few of my recommendations 
that are available to you.

     ●   OpenOffice.org (OOo): That’s right it comes with Ubuntu and I really do recommend using 
         it. It does have a couple of small issues importing some of the Microsoft documents I have 
         thrown at it but no show stoppers with regards to Word, Excel and Powerpoint documents. I 

30                                                                                              Ver 1.0.1
                                                                                 Ubuntu and Thinkpad

       have been able to work on my Office 2003 based PC at work and take the documents over to 
       my T40 and edit within OOo without any issues of translation. Better still, OOo is not just ad­
       equate but an excellent office suite that is getting better all the time. Apart from one or two 
       slightly quirky feature implementations (such as comments/notes which are being resolved in 
       Writer soon) and some of the esoteric functionality in Microsoft Office, OOo is a very power­
       ful office suite. This document was written using it, and I have started laying out some books 
       with it too.

       Likewise the spreadsheet (Calc) and presentation package (Impress) are also excellent if in 
       the latter case very thin on templates to get you started with. Particularly as a writer, I have 
       found Writer to be a much better tool than Microsoft Word for long documents. It is different 
       from Microsoft Office in some areas but I find it just as good.

   ●   GIMP: Again comes with Ubuntu. An excellent bitmap graphics/photo editing package that 
       has similarities to Adobe Photoshop. It is very good although as a long­term user of Photoshop 
       (since 1995) I find myself going back to it quite often, although it is clear that with some effort 
       I would be able to use GIMP  for my needs permanently. If you do need Photoshop, install 
       WINE which works well with versions 6 and 7.

   ●   Inkscape: A vector drawing package similar to the idea of Adobe Illustrator. Easy to use and 
       gets excellent results. Again for free you cannot go wrong and I find it more intuitive to use 
       than Illustrator (although I am familiar with the latter.)

   ●   Scribus:  (Figure 7  below)  Admittedly I have not explored this one fully yet but it so far it 
       looks like an excellent desktop publishing programme in the vein of Quark/InDesign/Page­
       Maker. So far easy to use and good typography. I would suggest installing the Qt3 configura­
       tion program too with:
              sudo apt-get install         qt3-qtconfig

       This will enable you to configure Scribus (and other Qt3 based applications) to fit in better 
       with your Ubuntu environment. 

              Note: If you are using Kubuntu you do not need to install Qt3­config as KDE comes  
              with this configuration tool built in.

   ●   F­Spot Photo Manager: Again something that comes with your default install of Ubuntu but 
       worth flagging up as a decent photo/picture cataloguing application that you can use to organ­
       ise your photo collection with a small set of editing tools to tweak pictures and so forth. Sup­
       ports tagging as well to associate with your photos. You can also set up a slideshow facility 
       and export pictures to a web based gallery if you wish to show your snaps on a webpage.



Ver 1.0.1                                                                                              31
Ubuntu and Thinkpad




            Figure 7: Scribus ­ Open Source DTP on Ubuntu



Conclusions
There is little doubt in my mind that I prefer Linux over Mac OS X and Windows for my day to day 
home computing, and if I could use it at work I would. That said, there is a learning curve with in­
stalling an operating system such as Linux/Ubuntu.

What Ubuntu does well is that it gets pretty much everything working on a Thinkpad T40. It is there­
fore the things that it doesn’t automatically set up that become the trickier things to configure such as 
the dual screen set­up and TV output, These things are easier on Windows and work better if you want 
an easy way to tweak settings which you change on a regular basis. If however, like me you only use 
the TV out to play a DVD and your dual screen setup remains static for most of the time (i.e. you don’t 
have different monitors you use on a regular basis) then the solutions presented here work very well 
indeed. Aside from the hardware set­up are the benefits of using an operating system you prefer.

It is undeniable that many people are happy with Windows, just as there are users of Macs who are 
happy and likewise Linux and other operating system users. The point is that the consumer deserves 
choice and whatever that might be, Ubuntu provides a Linux distribution that removes many of the 
headaches that are usually associated with Linux set­up.




32                                                                                              Ver 1.0.1

								
To top