The Promise of Wave Power OSU Ocean Wave Energy Extraction Research and Plans Lead Professors Annette von Jouanne Ph D P E Alan Wallace Ph D School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scie

Document Sample
The Promise of Wave Power OSU Ocean Wave Energy Extraction Research and Plans Lead Professors Annette von Jouanne Ph D P E Alan Wallace Ph D School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Scie Powered By Docstoc
					The Promise of Wave Power
OSU Ocean Wave Energy Extraction Research and Plans Lead Professors: Annette von Jouanne, Ph.D., P.E., Alan Wallace, Ph.D. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Oregon State University
Current Graduate Students: Emmanuel Agamloh, Dave Eveland, Javier Moncada, Ken Rhinefrank Current Undergraduates: Andrew Metzcus, Elisha Juve Mike Langliers, Jason Haberkorn, Tan Ho, Tim Smith, Adrian Aditya, Dan Wittmer, Mike Slevcove Former Undergraduates: Joe Prudell, Kelly Kimble, Jess Aills, Eric Schmidt, Palvin Chan, Brian Sweeney

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Port Liaison Project (PLP) Partnership
OSU is working with Oregon Sea Grant and the PLP to initially: -Identify optimum Wave Park sites -Provide technical expertise on buoy tethers, bottom anchors, mooring, maintenance of equipment etc.

Commercial fishing industry cooperators include: Nick Furman- Dir. OR Dungeness Crab Comm. (Coos Bay) Rick Lilienthal- Coos Bay Fisherman Scott Hartzell- Winchester Bay Fisherman Alan Pazar- Florence Fisherman Bob Eder- Newport Fisherman Terry Thompson- Newport Fisherman (retired)

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

TOPICS
Why Ocean Wave Energy? History of Wave Energy Research at OSU OSU Strategic Facilities to Advance Wave Energy OSU Research and Development in Wave Energy US Ocean Wave Energy Research & Demonstration Center

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Why Ocean Wave Energy ?

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Introduction
New forms of Energy will be required !
•It is estimated that if 0.2% of the ocean’s untapped energy could be harnessed, it could provide power sufficient for the entire world. The wave energy harvested from about 10 square miles of ocean off the Oregon coast could produce enough electricity to power the entire state. Compared to Other Renewables: Higher energy density, availability (80 – 90%) and predictability •OSU is an Excellent Location to conduct ocean wave energy extraction research: •Motor Systems Resource Facility (MSRF) •O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Lab •Wave energy potentials of the Oregon coast.

3.6m

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

50m

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

History of Wave Energy at OSU
-2000, First Wave Energy Proposals in Development -2001 - 2002, First Wave Energy Proposals Submitted -2003, First Awards, National Science Foundation ($270k, 3yr.), Oregon Sea Grant ($20k) -2004, Oregon Sea Grant ($20k), Grainger ($15k), NSF REU ($6k) -2005, Oregon Sea Grant ($20k), Columbia Power Technologies ($40k, plus hiring of ½ time student), Pacificorp ($5k), NCIIA ($11k), USDOE STTR, ($50k), NSF REU ($6k) (Nearly $0.5M Total) Results: Three Hardware prototypes designed, analyzed, developed and tested, 4th in analysis, 5th in conceptual phase, Supported 4 Grad Students and 2 UG Sr. Design Teams

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU Strategic Facilities to Advance Wave Energy

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU Facilities

Motor Systems Resource Facility (MSRF)

O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Lab (HWRL)

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU – Key Location for Ocean Wave Energy Research
• 750 KVA Adjustable Power Supply •Variable Voltage input(0-600Vac), 600A •3-phase adjustable (while loaded) for balanced and unbalanced testing • Highest Power University Lab in the Nation •Enables Multi-Scale energy research • Four Quadrant Dynamometer •Programmable torque/speed •Dynamic Vector Controls 0-4000 rpm • Bidirectional Grid Interface •Regeneration back to the utility grid • Flexible, 300 hp, Motor/Generator test-bed • 120KVA programmable source •Transient VLrms=680V •Steady State VLrms= 530V •Frequency range: 45Hz to 2KHz

Motor Systems Resource Facility (MSRF)

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU – Key Location for Ocean Wave Energy Research

O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Lab (HWRL)
• Dimensions:342ft long,12ft wide, 15ft deep • Wave period range: 0.5 to 10 seconds • Max. Wave: 1.6 m (5.2 ft) @ 3.5 sec

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU Research and Development in Wave Energy

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Power from Ocean Waves Available Resource off Oregon Coast

NDBC Data Buoys

CDIP (SCRIPPS) Data Buoys

• Wave Energy Resource Assessment Study carried out for Oregon Coast
(See Oregon Sea Grant Report “Conversion of Wave Characteristics to Actual Electric Energy/Power Potentials”, January 2004)

• Long term average data over 10 years analyzed • Report confirmed that Oregon has some of the richest ocean wave energy extraction sites in the world
Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Power from Ocean Waves Available Resource off Oregon Coast
Average Seasonal Wave Power
120

Seasonal variation – Good match for the NW load demand

100
Av. Power, kW/m

80 60 40 20 0 J F M A M J J
m onths

A

S

O

N

D

Data buoys are 2-200mi off shore, with waves traveling 15-20mph, gives 10+ hours forecast time for buoy generators located 2 mi out

(wave data From National Data Buoy Center, Power estimated from 5 buoys off the Oregon coast over past 10 years)

Power from a wave is

P

 = the density of sea water = 1025 kg/m3 g = acceleration due to gravity = 9.8 m/s/s T = period of wave (s) (averages 8s in the winter to 6s in the summer) H = wave height (m) (averages 3.5m in the winter to 1.5m in the summer)
Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

g 2TH 2 32

W/m of crest length (distance along an individual crest )

OSU’s Planned Devices and Goals
Devices Must be Survivable, Reliable, and Maintainable with efficient and high quality power take-off systems

Direct Drive Buoy
(Current Technology Focus)

• Simplify and Advance existing buoy technologies • Avoid additional stages such as hydraulic and pneumatic based units, Instead use:
–Direct drive roller, ball, helical magnetic screw concepts –Linear PM generator systems

• Pursue optimum topologies
Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU’s Novel Direct Drive Buoy Approaches

Permanent Magnet Linear Generator

Contactless Force Permanent Magnet Transmission Rack and Pinion Drive (eliminates “working seals”)

(patents purchased by Columbia Power Technologies)
Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Linear Generator Buoy with Demo/Test Stand

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU’s Contactless Force Transmission Buoy

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU’s Contactless Force Transmission Prototype

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU’s Permanent Magnet Rack and Pinion Drive
• System installed on sea floor • Sealed Unit

• Buoy drives Generator via a line to the surface
•Translator returned by either spring or gravity

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU’s Permanent Magnet Rack and Pinion Drive
• Dual PM Rotors • Translator and gear box, each separately sealed units • No moving seals (flux passes through water in magnetic gap) PM translator moves relative to gear box and provides an equivalent 5.75:1 transmission ratio. • Reduced component wear

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Fluid Structure Interaction

Preliminary 3D Results
T=2.5s, Hs=0.1m Generated by Piston wave-maker

Buoy heaving in waves (Initially neutrally buoyant)

Buoy heaving in waves

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

OSU’s Wave Energy Goals and Ongoing Efforts
Establish US Ocean Wave Energy Research, Dev. & Demonstration Center R&D Headquarters at Oregon State University Electromechanical R&D and optimization including modeling, PTO etc., at Motor Systems Resource Facility (MSRF) Wave Testing at O. H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory Wave Park for Development, Demonstration and Power Generation off Reedsport, OR

Enable streamlined research to pursue optimum topologies (e.g. as occurred with wind turbine R&D), Collaborating with European Center (EMEC) Aid industry and government in comparing competing technologies Accelerate scaling devices to larger, and smaller applications (ship and personal craft power, self powering of monitoring/sensor buoys etc.)
Pursuing a Wide-Range of Funding Opportunities Developing Roadmap to enable Ocean Testing and Demonstration Organizational Model: DOE/NREL Center headquartered in Oregon/OSU

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Wave Energy RD&D Facility Development Roadmap In Process OSU is pursuing Wave Energy Technology Developments Outreach, OSU Wave Energy DVD, Multiple Presentations OSU is pursuing the establishment of a Wave Energy Demonstration Site (Currently with PLP, future: Oregon Economic and Community Dev. – Glenn Montgomery, Army Core of Engineers – Teena Monical, Waylon Bowers) Working on Wave Energy Permitting Handbook with Oregon Dept. of Land Conservation and Development (Greg McMurray and Charles von Reis) Utility Interconnection Issues (FERC etc.) – Currently Central Lincoln PUD (Tony Schacher and Kay Moxness), have offered to look into this for general installations
Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Wave Energy RD&D Facility Development Roadmap Proposed Future Activities Defining and Planning an Environmental Monitoring Component for the Demonstration Site as well as a Control Site (Hatfield Marine Science Center – Jon Luke) Obtaining Approval to Use of Effluent Pipe/Site Development (Oregon Economic and Community Dev. Glenn Montgomery) Upon Initial Startup funding of $5M, Permitting to use Effluent Pipe, Ocean Usage, and Interconnection to the grid Future funding would be directed toward advancing OSU’s direct drive technologies and furthering the overall project development, with scheduled reporting
Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Oregon State University, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science