Tips for Optimal Health, Weight loss, and Wellness for by sparkunder22

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									   Tips for Optimal Health,
Weight loss, and Wellness for
          Women



    Rebecca MS, RD, LD
    Registered Dietitian
      Expert Nutrition
Today’s Topics

 Diet
 Disease
 Stress
 Fitness
     Disease Risk –
Reducing What We Can and
 Modifying What We Can’t
Disease Risk –
Non-Modifiable Risk Factors
 Genetics
 Gender
 Age
Disease Risk –
Modifiable Risk Factors

Lifestyle changes may impact:
  Obesity
  Hypertension
  Hyperlipidemia
  Impaired glucose tolerance and
  diabetes
  Stress management
  Smoking
Optimal Nutrition
What’s the best diet for optimal
health?
 A truly balanced diet
 that includes:
   some carbohydrate
   moderate protein
   low amounts of fat
 Beware: not all
 foods labeled low-
 carb are low-calorie.
Other Strategies for Weight
Maintenance & Optimum Health
    More fruit and veggies: 5 cups a day =
    good goal
    More foods as they occur in nature, e.g.
    whole grains & legumes (good sources of
    magnesium)
    Less animal fat and no trans fat
    Less added sugar and salt
    Snack healthfully
    Control portions and calories
    (mypyramid.gov)
Foods with Emphasis
 Soy foods
 Green tea/Black tea
 Plant sterols
 Omega Fatty Acids
 Antioxidants
 Nuts
 Fatty Fish
 Flax Seed
 Calcium
Cholesterol/Heart Disease
Cholesterol Reduction
 Flax seed
 Plant sterols
 Fiber
 Omega Fatty acids
 Exercise
 Limit saturated fat
 Avoid trans fat
Weight Control
Weight Reduction
 Calories in vs. calories out
 Portion control
 Meal plan
 Food journal
 Hydration
 Exercise
Other Strategies for Weight Loss
 Be aware of hunger and satiety
    Eat when hungry
    Stop eating when almost full
 Don’t eat for emotional reasons, comfort, or stress
    Look elsewhere for comfort
 Identify triggers and find substitute behaviors
    Use logs
    Keep lists
Foods to Limit
 Limit saturated fat
 Avoid trans fat (hydrogenated oils)
 Limit sugars
 Drink alcohol in moderation
 Choose low cholesterol foods
Stress
Stress
Negatively Influences:
  Heart disease
  Blood pressure
  GI system
  Sleep
  Asthma
  Migraines
  Allergies
  Stress & Your Waistline

How can stress affect your weight?
  Weight Gain
  Sometimes Weight Loss (e.g. too busy or sad to
  eat)
Hormonal responses to stress
  e.g. Cortisol, serotonin, adrenaline, and others
Behavioral responses to stress
  Eating for comfort, boredom, avoidance, loneliness,
  anxiety, anger, depression, frustration, or low self-
  esteem
  Why Do We Turn to Food During
  Times of Stress?
Emotional eating
  Certain foods can suppress or soothe negative
  emotions
Some foods have addictive qualities     (e.g. chocolate)
  Temporarily elevates mood and satisfaction
  Reward reinforces preference for foods associated with
  feeling
  Foods can distract us from worry or stress as we focus
  on pleasant taste
Stopping the Cycle
 Learn to recognize true hunger
 Identify triggers
 Look elsewhere for comfort
 Make healthy choices - ⇑ fruits & veggies
   Find healthier comfort food substitutions
   Choose healthy options that are similar in taste
   or texture to foods you typically use or desire in
   times of stress
Finding Stress Relief

 Adequate sleep and rest
    7 to 9 hours/night
    Dark room
 Meditation or prayer
 Self-massage
    Especially head, neck and shoulders
 Relaxation exercises
    Deep breathing (in through nose; out through mouth)
    Progressive relaxation (tighten and release muscles)
    Guided imagery
Fitness
Fitness – Benefits

People who exercise regularly are less likely
to develop:
      • Heart disease
      • High blood pressure
      • High cholesterol levels
      • Diabetes
      • Certain forms of cancer
      • Osteoporosis
Improving Fitness – Benefits
People who exercise regularly are more likely to:
  Maintain a healthy body weight.
  Control pain and joint swelling that accompanies
  arthritis.
  Maintain lean muscle (generally lost with increasing
  age).
  Have more self-esteem and self-confidence.
  Continue to perform activities of daily living
   as they grow older.
  Experience overall feelings of well-being
  and good health.
Summary of Fitness Benefits
 Promotes health promotion
 Reduces disease risk
 Allows better management of illness
 Adds more life to your years
 Mind-body connection
   Improves mental acuity, body
   awareness, stress management
Components of Fitness
 Cardio-respiratory fitness
    Aerobic exercise involves moving large muscle
    groups for sustained periods of time
    Improves cardio-respiratory endurance
 Strength
    Improves muscular strength and endurance
 Flexibility
    Maintains range of motion around a joint
 Body composition
   Ratio of lean body mass to fat
     Getting Started –
Safety Considerations Before
  Considering an Exercise
         Program
When Should You Speak with
Your Doctor?
 If you have two or more of the following
 coronary artery disease risk factors:
    Age (women aged 55 or older, men aged 45 or
    older)
    Family history of heart attack, stroke or sudden
    death
    Tobacco use
    High blood pressure
    High cholesterol
    Diabetes
    Physical inactivity
Getting Started
 Most common obstacles to exercising:
   Lack of time to exercise
   Lack of sufficient results/unreasonable
   expectations
What Types of Movement
Work Best for You
 Consider your fitness goals:
   Weight management
   Health and well-being
   Stress management
   Recreation
   Competition
Components of a Fitness
Regimen
 Warm-up
 Cardiovascular training
 Resistance training
 Flexibility
 Cool-down
Cardiovascular Training
 3-6 sessions/week
 10- to 60-minute sessions (excluding warm-up time)
 Intensity: for most healthy individuals –
 50-80% of maximal heart rate
 Measurement:
    Pulse: on wrist (count for 10 seconds and multiply
    by six)
    Heart rate monitor
    Perceived exertion –
    Goal: three (moderate) to five (strong)
 ACSM recommend 3-5 times/week
 for 20-60 minutes
Resistance Training
 Two to six days/week, depending on format of
 resistance training
    Full body vs. opposing muscle groups
 Include exercises for every major muscle group:
    Arms, chest, back, stomach, buttocks, hips and
    legs
 Always target core muscles:
    Stomach, back, buttocks, legs
 ACSM recommends a minimum of 2-3/week;
 1 set of 8-12 reps; 8-10 exercises
  Examples: Calisthenics, free weights, Pilates, machines
Flexibility
  Stretching:
     Hold each stretch for up to 30 seconds.
     Move through your stretching routine in a slow,
     sustained manner. (Avoid bouncing.)
  American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
  recommends at least two to three days/week of
  stretching, regardless of any other activity.


Examples: Yoga, Tai Chi, Pilates
American College of Sports
Medicine
 Benefits seen with as little as 30
 minutes/day most days of the week –
 whether in one, 30-minute session, two,
 15-minute sessions or three, 10-minute
 sessions.
Incorporating Fitness
into a Busy Schedule
 Choose times when exercise seems possible.
    Mornings, lunchtime, afternoons or evenings
    Shorter sessions several times a day or longer
    sessions several days a week
 Set boundaries at work and home and stick
 to them.
 Find a partner for accountability and support.
    Trainer, coach, friend, significant other
 Be flexible.
Strategies to Stay Committed
 Change your perspective on exercise.
    Find opportunities for movement at different times
    and in different ways.
 Start small, then decide if progression is wanted or
 needed.
 Try new and different activities.
 Set goals for your experiences.
 Get your brain on board.
    Decide whether you need to zone out or
    tune in during movement.
          Remember . . .
 The worst thing that you can do
to improve your health and fitness
      is to do nothing at all!
      Questions?
    Rebecca Mohning, MS, RD, LD
          Expert Nutrition
        Phone: 571-437-5249
               Email:
rebecca.mohning@expertnutrition.net
      www.expertnutrition.net

								
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