India_fa07_prog_hdbk by peirongw

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									Sustainability in Practice at Auroville
September 13 – December 19, 2007

STUDENT HANDBOOK

Name

PRE-PROGRAM CHECKLIST .................................................................................................................................................................... 1 CONTACT INFORMATION......................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Mail............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 2 Telephone .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 2 Email ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Weblog....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 TRAVEL INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................................................................ 3 AIRFARE....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 TRAVEL RELATED INSURANCE ........................................................................................................................................................... 3 POST-PROGRAM ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 4 PASSPORT.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 INDIA VISA .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 6 Application Options.................................................................................................................................................................................. 6 Visa Application Instructions................................................................................................................................................................... 7 PACKING ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 FINANCIAL INFORMATION.................................................................................................................................................................... 12 COST BREAKDOWN................................................................................................................................................................................ 12 FINANCIAL AID........................................................................................................................................................................................ 12 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ................................................................................................................................................................... 14 HEALTH.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 ILLNESS AS A GUIDE ............................................................................................................................................................................. 15 MEDICAL INSURANCE........................................................................................................................................................................... 15 INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE CARD (ISEC) ............................................................................................................... 16 IMMUNIZATIONS .................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AND NATURAL HEALING.................................................................................................................. 20 SPECIAL MEDICAL CONDITIONS AND MEDICATIONS ............................................................................................................... 21 HEALTH RESOURCES............................................................................................................................................................................. 23 SAFETY ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24 HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDLINES.................................................................................................................................................... 24 Guidelines for Program Sponsors ......................................................................................................................................................... 24 Responsibilities of Participants ............................................................................................................................................................. 25 Recommendations to Parents/Guardians/Families.............................................................................................................................. 26 STUDENT SAFETY POLICIES ............................................................................................................................................................... 27 POLICY FOR STUDENT INDEPENDENT TRAVEL WITHIN PROGRAM..................................................................................... 30 A SENSE OF PLACE .................................................................................................................................................................................... 31 STUDENTS AS AMBASSADORS .......................................................................................................................................................... 32 SOUTH INDIA............................................................................................................................................................................................ 32 INTRODUCTION TO TAMIL .................................................................................................................................................................. 35 AUROVILLE............................................................................................................................................................................................... 36 HAMPI ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40 CULTURE SHOCK ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 44 REVERSE CULTURE SHOCK .......................................................................................................................................................................... 46 MAKING THE STUDY ABROAD EXPERIENCE COUNT AT HOME .................................................................................................................. 47

PRE-PROGRAM CHECKLIST
The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step… or two… or fifty! We realize that a lot of work is involved in preparing for the program and want to make the process as simple as possible. To this end, we have compiled the following Pre-Program Checklist to aid in your preparations. Not all of it will apply to all of you. If you have any questions, please call or email Gregg Orifici or Daniel Greenberg at the Living Routes’ office. And remember, every item you check off brings you one step closer to the journey of a lifetime.
 Application File Completed  Application Form  Signed Agreement Form  Autobiographical Essay  Reference Letter - Parent  Reference Letter - Teacher/Advisor  Current Academic Transcript  Completed Forms sent to Office  Medical Information Form - Physician’s  Medical Information Form - Student’s  Authorization for Medical Treatment  Enrollment and Program Fee Agreement  Agreement and Release Form  UMass Transcript Invoice Form  Working with Own School (if enrolled)  Talk with Advisor about Plans  Confirm that Credits will Transfer  Check in with Study Abroad Office  Talk with Financial Aid Office (if needed)  Talk with Registrar about Time Away  Check into registering for next semester  Create Independent Study (if needed)  Program Finances  $50 Application Fee  $1000 Deposit (due 2 wks from acceptance)  Work with Home Inst. if receiving F.A.  Send a Cons. Agr. Letter to L.R.  Send an updated Award Letter to L.R.  Arrange transfer of F.A. to UMass  Apply for LR Financial Aid (if needed)  Application Form  Letter of Explanation  Financial Aid Award Letter  Most Recent Tax Return  Remainder of Tuition (Due by July 15)  Academic  Read Student Handbook  Complete pre-semester readings and assignments (to be mailed in July)  Travel  Get Passport (leave a copy with home contact)  Apply for Tourist Visa  Get Immunizations  Purchase International Student Exchange Card  Confirm or purchase insurance plan  Purchase Airline Ticket  Practice packing  Set up free email account (if desired)  Fall Programs: register to vote in U.S. elections and get an absentee ballot (if desired)  Purchase Traveler’s Checks  Leave contact info with friends & family  If staying on, write essay about plans and obtain written permission (if under 21)  Remember to bring a natural object from home (see Packing list for more information)  Fill out and send UMass Transcript Request Form  Meet group in Frankfurt, Germany on Sept. 12 in time to catch Lufthansa Flight 758 at 10:25 am.  Post-program  Receive UMass-Amherst Transcript (approximately six weeks post-program)  Transfer Credit to Home Institution (if needed)  Offer student presentation  Join and Participate in Alumni Network

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CONTACT INFORMATION
Mail
Mail is very important to program participants. There are many options for how to mail letters and packages to students. Costs range from a 1oz airmail for 80¢ (typically 10-14 days for delivery) to Global Express Guarantees, which starts at $34 and is guaranteed to be delivered within 3-5 days. We have had good luck with Global Priority Mail, which costs between $5 and $9 and usually arrives within 4-7 days. We do not recommend economy (surface) post, which can take up to 4 months for delivery. A good resource for comparing options is the USPS International Calculator at http://ircalc.usps.gov/. Your address in Auroville will be: College Guest House <Student Name> Auroville 605 101 Tamil Nadu India

Telephone
Telephone calls, although not always cheap or convenient, are another way to remain in touch with loved ones. Remember that India is 10.5 hours ahead of Eastern Standard Time (9.5 during Daylight Savings Time from the second Sunday in March through the first Sunday in November). In India, one usually cannot use a calling card but must pay cash instead (approx. $2/minute). It is best to plan calls ahead via email so that parents/friends from the USA can call students at an agreed upon time. You may want to suggest that parents/friends check their calling plans and/or purchase an international pre-paid calling card, as calls to India can be expensive. VoIP services such as Skype (www.Skype.com) are also becoming more available.

Email
Email is usually the best way for students to remain in contact with friends and family. There is an Internet Café at Auroville for students’ use. We recommend that students set up a “gmail” type account if they do not already have one.

Weblog
A weblog (a.k.a. “blog”) is an online journal that students and faculty will create together. It is a wonderful way for students to share thoughts, news and photos with the wider world and for parents and friends to keep up-to-date on program activities. We will email you the URL once it becomes set up and you should also be able to access it through our web site. . Please note that, while we encourage all students and faculty to blog, we also will be offering a Weblog Scholarship of $250 for 1-2 students who want to make a commitment of regular and detailed posting (words and pics) of their learning adventure. We will send out info on the Listserv about this opportunity.

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TRAVEL INFORMATION
AIRFARE Airfare is not included in the cost of the program. Students are free to use their own travel agent or purchase tickets over the internet. A travel agency we trust and frequently use is: Travel Loft 266 N. Pleasant Street Amherst, MA 01002 413-256-6481 or 888-THE-LOFT travloft@verizon.net Contact: Michelle In order to facilitate arrival logistics, we require all students to meet together in the Frankfurt, Germany airport by 9:00 am on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 in time to travel together on Lufthansa Flight 758, leaving Frankfurt at 10:25 am and arriving in Chennai at 11:45 pm that evening. The program officially begins on September 13 and ends on December 19. We expect many students will leave on Lufthansa Flight 759, which leaves Chennai at 1:50 am on Thursday, December 20 and arrives in Frankfurt 7:15 am. Students have the option of staying in India or laying over in Frankfurt on the return and may choose other flights. We strongly recommend students choose Lufthansa as their carrier from the U.S. to Frankfurt as they will be more supportive in the off chance a flight is delayed. Please also be aware that penalties typically apply to any changes after a ticket is issued and that they are nonrefundable once travel has begun. The cost of airfare to Chennai will depend on a number of factors (including the rising price of oil), but currently, a roundtrip ticket from Boston to Chennai through the Travel Loft is $1,689 for a six-month ticket and $1,889 for a twelve-month ticket. These prices allow one FREE stop in each direction if you want to do additional traveling. TRAVEL RELATED INSURANCE Trip interruption insurance: You may want to inquire about insurance that protects your investment in the event of withdrawal before departure. The Travel Loft offers trip cancellation insurance for airfare, but it is only for illness or death. You can also inquire locally, through our travel agency, through an insurance agent or your college business office, or by calling CSA at 1800-348-9505 (the cost generally is 5% of the amount covered). You may also want to check with your credit card company whether they offer insurance for the purchase of airplane tickets in case your tickets get lost or stolen, or your flight is cancelled. Tuition Insurance: You may also want to consider purchasing tuition insurance. Once you have signed your Agreement and Release Form (sent to you in your acceptance packet) and paid your tuition in full (due no later than July 15, 2007) your tuition is not refundable. However, in the event that for some reason you are not able to participate on this program at the last minute, you have some way of insuring your investment. Most universities have a tuition insurance policy through Dewar or another carrier. Please check with your university’s billing department to see if this is an option.

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POST-PROGRAM As the program ends in India, it is common for students to travel on afterwards. While this is a wonderful opportunity, it can also be a delicate issue of balancing competing needs where the program is concerned. The bottom line is that we want each of you to ... Stay focused. The program is "full-on" and it will be important for students to not get distracted by planning and preparing for post-program travels. Have a "complete" experience. This includes preparation, engagement, and, most importantly, reflection (which will likely happen for years after the program). "Follow your Bliss" (as Joseph Campbell would say). This is a journey of a lifetime and we would like to create the space for you to continue on after the program ends if you feel so called. Share what you've learned. You are part of a growing network of social change activists working toward a more sustainable future. It is crucial that we find ways to support each other to become catalysts for positive change and share our developing wisdom and skills. So, given these desires, we ask all students to create and offer a public presentation within six months after the end of the program – to provide an opportunity to further synthesize your learnings and articulate them to a wider audience. This may include producing videos, audio tapes, or other materials; setting up systems for collecting, copying, digitizing, and sharing photos; synthesizing experiences; writing up short stories; creating outlines; practicing with each other; etc. In addition, we ask that students staying on (1) write a short essay outlining plans and (2) obtain written permission from parents (if under 21).

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PASSPORT Your passport is your most crucial travel document. You will need it to enter India (and the USA upon return), and for occasional hotels in India. You can obtain passport applications at your local post office, or at any of the major passport agencies around the country. You can also download the forms, and find additional information at the State Department’s web site: http://www.travel.state.gov Think about how you will carry it (money belt, neck wallet, travel organizer, fanny pack). If you leave it in your daypack, be sure you have it within eyesight or that a group member is keeping watch over it. Make a photocopy of the main page with passport number and vital information and leave it with your home contact person.  IMPORTANT NOTE: If you do not already have a passport valid through at least June 2008, this should be your first order of business, as processing can take as long as ten weeks. Contact your local post office for the forms and requirements.

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INDIA VISA You will need a Visa for entry into India. The visa is actually a stamp in your passport, so it is crucial that you send along a valid passport when applying for your India Visa.

Application Options
You can apply for your Tourist Visa in one of two ways: 1) Through Travel Loft. Contact Michelle (phone: 413-256-6481 or 888-THE-LOFT; email: travloft@aol.com) who can arrange everything for you, including mailing your passport to the proper Indian Consulate. The all-inclusive fee is $224.00 if you choose to use this service. or 2) Do it yourself, directly through the Indian Consulates, which are divided according to five regions of the USA. This should cost around $85 plus postage (which varies by consulate. We recommend either registered or overnight mail) If you decide to go this route, please review the list below to find the appropriate consulate that serves your region. • Consulate General of India, New York. 3 East, 64th St. New York, New York 10021. Tel: 212-774-0600; fax; 212-861-3788; URL: http://www.indiacgny.org/visa1.html which covers Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Vermont, and the Virgin Islands Embassy of India, Washington DC: 2107 Massachusetts Ave., Washington DC 20008; 202-939-7000 Fax: 202-265-7532; URL: http://www.indianembassy.org/consular/index.htm which covers: Delaware, Washington D.C., Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, The Bahamas Consulate General of India, Chicago: 455 N. Cityfront Plaza Drive, Suite 850 Chicago, IL - 60611, Tel. 312-595-0405, Fax: 312-595-0416 and 312-595-0418, URL: http://chicago.indianconsulate.com/geninf1202.htm which covers: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Missouri Consulate General of India, San Francisco: 540 Arguello Boulevard, San Francisco, CA – 94118. Tel. 415-668-0662, Fax: 415-668-9764, URL: http://www.indianconsulate-sf.org/ which covers: Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, Colorado, Montana, Idaho, California Consulate General of India, Houston: Suite 600, 6th floor, 3 Post Oak Central, 1990 Post Oak Boulevard, Houston, Texas - 77056, Tel. 713-626-2148, Fax: 713-626-2450, URL: http://www.cgihouston.org/newvisa.html which covers: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Texas

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We encourage that participants purchase a one-year Indian Tourist Visa for $85 as opposed to a six-month Visa for $60 (we feel that our collective peace of mind will be well worth the extra $25). As soon as possible, fill out the appropriate Visa Application Form (to be found on the Indian Consulate Website) and send it along with your passport by registered mail to the Consulate or Embassy that covers your state of residency (make and keep a copy of your passport before sending it). In addition, you need to include two passport size photographs (affixed in the proper place), and a money order, bank draft, or certified check (no personal checks accepted) in the name of "Consulate General of India" (or "Embassy of India" if your are working through the D.C. office) for $85 plus the fee for return mail (check the web site of your Consulate for rates). It is often helpful to include a note stating that you have included money for a particular type of return service. Applications generally take five days to process.

Visa Application Instructions
(taken from the Consulate General of India: New York City web site)

Instructions: 1. Passports valid for a minimum of six months beyond date of intended departure from India should accompany visa applications. 2. Paste one photo and staple the other one on the form at specified place. 3. Applicants holding other than United States passports should submit proof of long term-stay (at least three years) / permanent residence (copy of green card) in the United States to expedite issuance of visa. For applicants who do not normally stay in U.S., references have to be made to their country of residence for which an additional $20 fee is applicable and will involve five to seven days processing time after receipt in the Consulate. Please refrain from making inquiries about the status of application during this time. You will be applying for a TOURIST VISA, valid for six-month or one-year stay. Instructions below are taken from the New York form and are for questions requiring specific information. They may be slightly different on forms from other regions. The rest is common sense. Line # 24. Type of Visa required: √ Tourist 25. Period of Visa: √ One Year 29. Purpose of Journey: Tourism 30. Are you traveling on behalf of a company? Yes No √ 32. Expected date of departure from USA: September 11, 2007 33. Expected date of arrival in India: September 12, 2007 34. Port of arrival in India: Chennai 36. Name and address of two references (India & USA): (a) In India: Bindu Mohanty Auroville 605 101 Tamil Nadu

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PACKING Students and faculty have developed the following list of recommended items over the course of many programs. Please take them seriously as you think through your own needs, others’ needs, packing space, and how you like to live & dress. India will be hot (80° to 100°) no matter what time of year. Try a few packing "dry runs" and aim for less and light, as sending items back to the States is very expensive and not guaranteed for delivery. Consider the packing process a practice in non-attachment. The less you bring, the lighter your bag, which will also leave room to bring new items back. Most items listed below (clothing, school supplies, washing etc) can be found in Auroville and in Pondicherry, and are much cheaper there than in the U.S. Many of the clothes you bring with you, though they need to be neat and modest, will get very dirty from travel and service projects, and can be ruined by insects, mildew, etc. It will be important to bring both work/travel clothes and at least one or two nice summer outfits. White clothes tend to be more difficult to keep clean. There will be many times you will want to look nice and should be considerate of different cultural expectations. Also note that in a tropical climate many things can gather mildew and mold, especially in the Fall Monsoon Season. Please avoid bringing natural items (made out of wood, silk, leather, or wool), which will be hard to protect. You may also not want to bring your favorite, irreplaceable or most expensive things or luggage. Bring extra plastic bags to help protect some items when not in use/storage. Dressing respectfully in another culture can be extremely difficult, especially when values and norms are so different. The intricacy of doing this in India is compounded by the complexity of living in Auroville, an international community within the context of traditional Tamil culture. As a program, we aim for a high level of respect for traditional Indian culture and require a certain level of conservativeness in dress, especially when traveling outside of Auroville. For women, this means covering shoulders through the use of a scarf or shawl (can be obtained in Auroville) or by wearing a top with sleeves, not wearing shorts (except while doing farm work or yoga) and not wearing tight shirts, pants or skirts. Men are asked to wear shirts at all times (other than during physical labor), and although shorts are fairly accepted for travelers, in India only younger boys tend to wear shorts. You will find that Aurovillians and visitors will dress in a variety of ways which can be confusing given our program’s practices, however it is useful to remember that although foreigners may choose to wear different clothing than is worn traditionally, they may be perceived as being disrespectful and their choices are likely to adversely affect their interactions with local Tamil culture. Our students find that they enjoy experimenting with wearing saris and salwar kameez for the women and lungis for the men, and notice the respect and appreciation they get for honoring local traditions. On the flip side, women wearing tighter clothing can lead to unwanted attention from Indian men who are also struggling to navigate between their own cultural norms, changing cultural patterns in India and the portrayal of Western culture through television and movies. Navigating how to dress respectfully in Auroville and India provides amazing opportunities to learn about ourselves, our own culture, and the cultures of the land through which we will be traveling. Unfortunately, most of the current style of tighter and low-slung pants and short and tighter t-shirts for women don’t fit these guidelines, so we recommend that you leave them at home. Luckily, there are many opportunities for you to buy clothing in Auroville and Pondicherry and to experiment with having clothing tailored using some of the beautiful fabrics available. Students usually find that many of their clothes from home are too heavy for the climate and they tend to wear the clothes they acquire in Auroville or elsewhere in India. Keep in mind however that although there are opportunities to buy clothes early in your visit, it may take a while to find what works for you. Bring enough clothes to wear for the first few weeks or so.

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A NOTE ON LUGGAGE If you will be traveling before or after the program, a large backpack is highly recommended, however it is not needed once you get to Auroville. During the semester, we will be mostly based in Auroville, so it is up to you to decide how to transport the bulk of your personal items to and from India (we recommend a duffel bag, but a large backpack or suitcase can also work). We will be taking several shorter trips from Auroville, during which time most of your luggage can remain safely stored in Auroville. For these shorter travel periods we highly recommend bringing a small backpack to allow for easy travel on trains as well as hiking across rough terrain. If you do decide to travel to India with a large backpack, we recommend using one with an internal frame. Two-compartment panel loading is most practical. If you don't have a pack with a zipper flap to cover the harness, we suggest you purchase an inexpensive duffel inside which your pack can travel as plane baggage. We often use Outdoor Products Basic Duffel 18" x 42" (item number: 60865) from Campmor (1-800-2267667). You will also need a daypack or carry-on bag for travel items like your toothbrush, journal, etc. All luggage must be able to be securely locked. If necessary, sew tabs onto your backpack so you can put some kind of small padlock on it. Make sure your name and address is on all of your luggage.

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Packing List
Notebooks and school supplies
 Unlined journal for artwork, notes and reflections (please purchase early as you will be asked to respond to several reflection questions prior to Orientation)  Private diary if you wish, in addition to journal – there are also inexpensive, bound, beautiful journals for purchase in Auroville.  Miscellaneous: glue stick, ruler, pens (ball points like “Bic” don’t do well in heat), colored pencils, paints, whatever you need. Office and school supplies are also available in India.  Personal address book

For outdoors/travelling
 Bathing suit A one-piece is recommended for women, rather than a bikini.  Sunglasses  Sun hat or head covering  Insect repellent (with max. 32% DEET) Doesn’t have to contain DEET, but that is strongest recommended. Badger is a good brand.  Potent sunscreen (like Bullfrog SPF 30). High SPF type is not readily available in India.  Ear plugs for sleeping & train travel  Light bed spread/cotton sleep sack for trains etc  Combination padlock for hotel doors, etc.  Pocket knife (DO NOT pack in carry-on luggage)  Head lamp for biking at night (essential) Auroville is very dark at night and you will need a headlamp for biking and walking around. Batteries last much longer in LED headlamps, but be certain you bring one with a strong light.

Miscellaneous Important Items
 PASSPORT with VISA & other documents (student ID, insurance info, traveler’s checks, credit card). Carry on body while traveling.  2 extra passport photos  Personal health records: immunization records, blood type, allergic reactions to drugs & medical insurance.  Money belt for cash and passport  Small combo locks for luggage  Small sewing kit  Water-resistant wristwatch (with alarm!)  Glasses and a copy of prescription (if needed)  Natural object from home*

Toiletries/medical
 Toilet articles: biodegradable soap, shampoo, toothbrush, toothpaste, comb/brush, razor blades, deodorant, nail clipper, etc. (available in Auroville)  Sealable plastic freezer bags for pens, liquids, & wet things while traveling as well as to protect and store things  1 or 2 bath towels, washcloth, and handkerchiefs or camp towel  Antibacterial soap (especially for traveling. You may also want to bring bottles of hand sanitizer)  Malaria tablets (these can be bought in India, as well as other alternatives such as neem tablets)  Prescription drugs and copies of prescriptions  Simple medical kit: (a small tube of antibiotic ointment, pain reliever like Tylenol, Dramamine if you get motion sickness, rehydration salts, bandaids, tweezers, etc. Pepto Bismal (liquid variety) is useful for diarrhea and other digestive system upsets). Faculty will carry a larger medical kit.  Tampons are available in India, unless you prefer a special kind

Electronic Technologies (In contexts such as
India and Auroville where there is a wide continuum of material “haves” and “have nots”, expensive technological items such as laptops, digital cameras and iPods become targets for theft. If you choose to bring such items, please insure them, be discreet in their use, and secure them well. Ask your insurance company or travel agent for details.)

 Personal Laptop (There is a computer lab in
Auroville and we accept hand written papers. If you are considering bringing a laptop, talk with faculty or staff to assess your need versus risk.)  Camera (Digital allows easy upload to weblogs and doesn’t use toxic chemicals to develop photos)

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Clothing (many also purchase clothes in India)
 2-3 pairs of extra light loose cotton pants (drawstring are good. Capri, or calf length style suggested for women)  2 skirts for women (something you can bike in)  Nice summer dress or outfit  Sarong or light scarf for women (to cover shoulders)  Long-sleeved cotton shirts  Light fleece sweater for rainy days and traveling  3-4 extra light weight short-sleeved cotton shirts or T-shirts (loose fitting)  Pair of shorts (longer length is preferable)  Comfortable clothes for yoga in Auroville  1-2 pairs of socks; 5-7 pairs of underwear (and bras)  Cheap poncho  Solid hiking shoes/sandals (e.g. Teva or Chaco) are essential. A second pair of flip-flops for everyday use is also recommended. Crocs (www.crocs.com) may also be useful during the rainy season. Hiking boots are not necessary. * Natural object from home: During orientation, we will begin creating our own community through various group-building activities and sharing personal stories. As part of that process, we ask you to bring an object from your natural environment that holds some meaning to you, connects you to your place and can be carried to India.

Optional (not required, but worth considering)
 Means for water purification You will always have access to clean water during the program. If you will be traveling afterwards or just want to be extra safe, we suggest 2 bottles (enough for 100 quarts) of Potable Aqua iodine tablets (PA Plus removes iodine taste), grapefruit seed extracts liquid, Travelers End, or Nutribiotic. You might also want to bring something to flavor Iodized water such as herbal tea or Emergen-C.  Pictures that connect you to home (nice to share with each other & new friends)  Multi-vitamins  Grapefruit seed extract and acidophillus (see natural healing section)  Pillow and pillowcase  Crazy Creek or BackJack foldable chair. (cushions are available, but some students enjoy the extra support)  Mosquito netting If you like sleeping under the stars, we suggest you buy a free standing mosquito net. A model we recommend is the Repel Tropic Screen II Mosquito Net. You can buy if for around $60 at http://store.wildernessessentials.com/349.html  Duffel Bag (see above)  1-2 Mix-tapes or CDs with your favorite music  Small Travel Umbrella  Binoculars  Travel clothesline, rope, travel hangers or clothespins to hang up clothes in rooms.  Mesh bags, small stuff sacks or small plastic baskets to organize and protect toiletries or other miscellaneous items in your room.  Gifts - We are collecting useful items for the night schools around Auroville. Suggestions include schoolbooks or children’s books with simple English, watercolor paints, crayons, art supplies, etc). Children often ask for pencils and pens.  Special things to share: harmonica, songbook, hacky sack, frisbee, etc. Walkman (please use with discretion when in community and keep in mind that extras like walkmans and cameras invite theft).  Fun stuff: (games, jokes, songs, poetry, and anything else that celebrates the Earth, yourself, and each other.

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION
COST BREAKDOWN
The cost for the program is $12,500, which includes room and board, course fees, library books, non-air transportation, and tuition (which include program costs and administration). Additional student expenses: (approximate) Application fee ............................................................................................... $50 Books and supplies.......................................................................................... 200 Medical preparations....................................................................................... 400 India Visa ........................................................................................................... 85 Passport and photos........................................................................................... 85 Spending money* .......................................................................................... ~500 International Student Exchange Card............................................................... 25 Airfare (e.g., 12-month RT flight Boston – India) ...................................~1,889 Total of additional expenses ............................................................... $3,234
* Spending money will vary significantly from student to student. One student may spend as little as $50 while another spends over $1,000. We suggest students bring approximately $500 for gifts, clothing, snacks, postage, paper, toiletries etc. Consider bringing an extra $200 in case of emergency. Traveler's checks are the only safe way to carry money. American Express seems to be most widely accepted in India. Make sure that you record check numbers as soon as you get the checks in case of loss or theft. They are not so different from cash and require care. Some people also choose to use a credit card for many of their purchases. A credit card may be useful on occasion, but they are not usable everywhere and often apply surcharges for exchanging currency.

FINANCIAL AID
If you are planning on receiving financial aid to help pay for your Living Routes semester, you’ll need to check with the study abroad or financial aid office at your school (known in financial aid terminology as your “home institution”) to see what their policies are for managing your financial aid while you are abroad. If your school will continue to administer your financial aid package, there are several steps you will need to take to get everything set up properly.
1) Get a “Consortium Agreement” letter from your financial aid office and send it to Living Routes. We will fill in the program costs, including estimates for airplane tickets and program preparation, and send the form on to UMass-Amherst for them to sign as the “host institution.” UMass will then send the form back to your financial aid office so they can revise their calculations of financial need and prepare a proper award for attending our program. 2) Next, get a copy of your financial aid award determination from your school and send it to us. We will forward it to UMass for their records. They will defer the deadline for that portion of your tuition payment until after the start of the semester in order to allow your school to process and release your financial aid award. 3) Finally, arrange for transfer of your F.A. to UMass. The procedure varies depending on the policies of your school and the kinds of financial aid you receive. In some cases, your school will be able to send the money directly to UMass on your behalf. In other cases they will only send the payment to your permanent address. If it is the latter, someone will have to deposit the check and then forward the money to UMass. This may require a joint bank account or power of attorney for them to do this for you. Again, your study abroad or financial aid office may have forms and systems set up to make this step easy.

If your school will not administer your financial aid, your options are limited. UMass will not do this for you unless you permanently transfer to UMass. Please contact us if you have any questions and for the latest information on your choices and possible sources for financial aid.

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The following was adapted from the USC Center For Global Education’s Safety Abroad Handbook (http://www.usc.edu/dept/education/globaled/studentsabroad/safetyhandbook.html) “In most cases, a student’s financial aid package should cover most, if not all, of the costs of certain study abroad programs. Most students that can afford to study on a U.S. campus, can afford to study abroad, with appropriate planning. It is important to take into account all program costs to ensure that you have sufficient funds for a healthy and safe experience abroad. If you don’t have financial aid, there are also many scholarships and fellowships available; you just have to know where to look for them. Grants and loans are yet another way to help cut costs. Loans and Financial Aid: If you receive financial aid, study abroad may be partially or fully covered by the terms of your financial aid package. Inquire about the terms of your financial aid package at your school’s F.A. office. You may also be eligible for a student loan, or an additional loan, if you receive federal work-study as part of your financial aid packet. Before asking for a bank loan, ask a financial aid adviser on your campus. Scholarships, Fellowships and Grants: With advance planning, you may be able to obtain scholarship or loan money from your home university or even from the institution abroad where you will study. There are many academic awards and fellowships available for students with an interest in study abroad or other international experiences. To find scholarship and fellowship opportunities, visit your school’s financial aid office, search online, or consider purchasing one of the many books available on the subject. Many academic departments also offer student research grants for research study completed abroad; most often, the fields of anthropology, geology, and medicine offer research grants. Spending and Saving: Frugal spending is key both before you go, and while you are abroad. Make a budget for yourself and stick to it. Before you go, you may want to budget your spending by giving up that morning cup of coffee you buy on your way to work/class. Instead, you could make your own coffee at home, and bring your lunch with you rather than buying it every day. You may have to eat out less and give up going out as frequently. You could take the bus instead of paying to fill up your car, and you might even start clipping coupons. Work: Even though it may be hard to juggle a full load of classes and a job, working is a great way to raise money for study abroad. Although working on-campus doesn’t usually get you the highest salary possible, campus jobs do help your cash flow. With a campus job, you may spend less on gasoline since you most likely won’t have to commute. Since your goal is to earn fast cash, you don’t necessarily need to look for a job oriented around your future career. While career-oriented jobs can be terrific learning and networking opportunities, noncareer jobs may have more flexible hours allowing you to work between classes. Raising Extra Money: Get creative. If you are really struggling to make ends meet, you might want to get family, friends and neighbors involved. Outside of work, you could do odd jobs like wash neighbors’ cars, mow neighbors’ lawns, or walk neighbors’ dogs. You may consider holding a garage sale and asking relatives to donate items to sell. You could ask younger siblings to hold a bake sale for you, or ask them to donate their babysitting money to your cause. Free Money: Try making appeals to your local community, religious and academic organizations. These groups may set aside funding, or take up special collections, for students. Also, if you or your family happen to belong to any community or religious organizations, those groups may be more apt to sponsor you because they know you; these groups often see you as a representative or role model and may even ask you to speak at their meetings when you return from studying abroad. If your study abroad involves volunteer work or charitable activities, some organizations may also be more willing to support your efforts.”

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ADDITIONAL RESOURCES You may also want to search the following web sites for additional financial aid opportunities: Free Scholarship Searches www.istc.umn.edu/html/misc_schol.html www.collegeboard.org www.collegenet.com www.collegelink.com www.fastweb.com www.srnexpress.com www.winscholarships.com Useful Financial Aid Sites www.finaid.org www.mapping-your-future.org/paying www.petersons.com/resources www.ed.gov www.collegeispossible.com/paying/faq.htm

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HEALTH
The Sustainability in Practice in Auroville program and Living Routes has a strong record of safe and healthy students and faculty. However, traveling to foreign countries, especially those with many food and waterborne diseases can often cause illness for travelers. There is a good medical center in Auroville, as well as a reputable hospital in Pondicherry (closest city, 20 minutes away). There are also large numbers of alternative practitioners nearby for holistic health care. ILLNESS AS A GUIDE It is likely that participants in the program will experience illness at some point in the semester. The combination of travel, a new bacterial environment, unfamiliar foods and living conditions, as well as the overall pace and intensity of the program can overwhelm the senses and the immune system of even generally healthy individuals. With this in mind, we feel that it is important for students entering the program to have an understanding of the body-mind connection and how this may affect your experience in India. The immune system is inextricably linked to and responds to your emotions and your state of mind as well as to your external environment. As you are likely to experience a variety of emotional and mental states during the next few months, it is also likely that your susceptibility to illness will fluctuate. This may mean, for example, that the nausea or diarrhea you are experiencing is caused by an exposure to bacteria, AND that your body is telling you to pay closer attention not just to what you are eating, but also to what you may or may not be “digesting” emotionally. The faculty will focus on preventative measures to ensure student health. At the same time, we believe that illness or dis-ease can be a useful teacher, can force us to slow down and pay attention to our bodies and our environment, and can engender compassion for our selves and for each other during our time together. We will ask each student entering the program to reflect on where and how you hold stress or emotion in your body, and what support you may need when you are feeling ill so that we can collectively create an environment of well-being and compassion within the community. If you are willing to allow physical ailments (both your own and that of others) to guide you to greater selfawareness, then you may also be able to see them as a part of the experience of India rather than detracting from it. MEDICAL INSURANCE The University of Massachusetts - Amherst and Living Routes require that all students must carry medical insurance as a condition of registration. Prior to enrollment, students must demonstrate that they have adequate medical insurance coverage. Students will be responsible and are fully liable for the cost of any medical treatment they require, including transportation to health care facilities. Make sure you know if and how your family policies cover you overseas and bring any necessary report forms. Some questions to ask include:
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• What is and is not covered by your insurance plan? For example, high-risk sports injuries, dental care, and optical care are sometimes not covered by basic medical insurance. • If certain, pre-existing conditions are excluded, what is their exact definition of “pre-existing”? • What are the financial limits of coverage? • Does your insurance plan cover independent travel? • Does it include all countries? • Are evacuation and repatriation included? • What are the policy’s start and end dates? • Does your insurance policy provider have a 24-hour assistance phone number/hotline • Would you have to pay first for treatment and then be reimbursed by the insurance company? International Student Exchange Card (ISEC)
Living Routes requires that students also carry basic health-accident-evacuation coverage that comes with the International Student Exchange ID Card, which is an internationally recognized identification and discount card available to students of any age, faculty/teacher members, and youths between the ages of 12 and 26 years.. The ISE Card costs $25, which is a good bargain for what the card offers (up to $2,000 in medical expenses and up to $5,000 in evacuation fees). Please purchase your card online by clicking on the “www.isecard.com/” link from the “Resources” page on the Living Routes website (http://www.livingroutes.org/resources.htm) or by pasting the following URL in your browser: http://www.kqzyfj.com/click-1971888-5414945.

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IMMUNIZATIONS Travel to India exposes you to health risks, which are not normally encountered in temperate and more developed countries. Regulations and recommendations for healthy travel change and there is often not a clear consensus among medical practitioners. Living Routes has several years of successful experience in advising and monitoring our participants' health. We have access to very good medical services in Auroville. Students will receive a thorough introduction to health and hygiene during orientation. We expect program participants to obtain the required immunizations listed below. You may consult us for additional health questions, but ultimately each of you must use your own judgment, in consultation with your family doctor, as to what you actually do. It is essential (and good sustainability training) to educate yourself. You may want to consult some of the sources that follow, but please be cautious about travel clinics or physicians who recommend more than we do. (You may also notice that availability and high costs for some of these immunizations are heavily controlled by US pharmaceutical companies and travel clinics, try accessing your university clinic first.) Some good source books for traveling • Lonely Planet Healthy Travel: Asia and India, from Lonely Planet Publications, 150 Linden Street, Oakland, CA 94607. ISBN 1-86450-051-4 • International Travel Health Guide by Stuart Rose, from Travel Medicine, Inc., 351 Pleasant St., Suite 312, Northampton, MA 01060. 1-800-TRAVMED or travel@travmed.com. • Health Information for International Travel, from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954; 1-202-512-1800. You or your physician may check with the CDC International Travelers Hotline 404-332-4559 or the US Public Health Service 716-754-4883. The CDC recommends and Living Routes requires that participants have current immunizations against hepatitis A, measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), tetanus and diphtheria, and polio as well as take prophylactics against typhoid. It is up to each student to decide whether or not to take prophylactics against malaria. The following is more detailed information: HEPATITIS A is a viral infection of the liver passed by ingesting contaminated food and water, and through direct person to person contact. Symptoms include fatigue, fever, loss of appetite, nausea, dark urine, jaundice, and vomiting. RISK: According to the CDC, non-immune travelers are at high risk for Hepatitis A, especially if visiting rural areas and the backcountry. PREVENTION: The virus is inactivated by boiling or cooking to 85 degrees centigrade for one minute, therefore eating thoroughly cooked foods and treated water serve as precautions. Havrix, the Hepatitis A vaccine currently licensed for use in the US, or immune globulin (IG), is recommended for protection against Hepatitis A. REQUIREMENTS: For travelers over 18 years of age, Hepatitis A vaccine should be given in a two-dose series with the second dose administered 6-12 months after the first. For those aged 2-18 years, a three-dose series is recommended. Travelers can be considered to be protected four weeks after receiving the initial vaccine dose.

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MMR: You should have had two doses since age 14 months unless you were born before 1957, in which case you are considered naturally immune. CDC recommends and Living Routes requires a second dose for all travelers born after 1956 unless you are sure that you had two doses of vaccine after 1980. TETANUS: Living Routes requires a booster within the past 5 years unless your doctor feels okay with 10 years. If your tetanus immunization is due to expire soon, discuss early revaccination with your physician. POLIO: Living Routes requires an “IPV (inactivated polio vaccine) enhanced” booster shot before departure (instead of OPV which has reported side effects for adults) TYPHOID FEVER is a bacterial infection transmitted through contaminated food and/or water or directly between people. Symptoms include fever, headaches, tiredness, loss of appetite, and constipation more often than diarrhea. Typhoid fever can be effectively treated with antibiotics. RISK: Typhoid fever is highly endemic in India. PREVENTION: Careful preparation of food, and treatment of water, lowers the risk of infection. Currently available vaccines have been shown to protect 70-90% of the recipients. Two current vaccines provide equivalent protection against typhoid fever. REQUIREMENTS: The live oral vaccine, Vivotef (Ty21A), should be taken. It lasts for five years. Avoid the older injectable vaccine due to high incidence of side effects. A new one-dose shot (Typhim Vi) may soon replace the Vivotef. It is very important to follow the directions for taking the oral vaccine. Don't take it if on antibiotics or on the same day as a dose of Lariam. MALARIA is a serious parasitic infection transmitted to humans by infective mosquitoes. They bite mostly at night from dusk to dawn. Symptoms range from fever and flu-like symptoms, to chills, general achiness, and tiredness. If left untreated, malaria can cause anemia, kidney failure, coma, and death. Preventative measures can be taken, and malaria can be effectively treated in its early stages. Delaying treatment can have serious consequences. RISK: While the incidence of malaria has increased recently in Tamil Nadu, the most intense malaria transmission in India occurs elsewhere in the eastern and northeastern states. This is also where Chloroquine-resistant malaria has primarily been reported. PREVENTION: There are moderate numbers of mosquitoes in Auroville and Mitraniketan. Protect yourself from mosquito bites by using an effective repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants in the evening, and sleeping in a mosquito-free area at night. Nets and/or ceiling fans are provided in the rooms where we sleep. We suggest some of the low-DEET, "activated" repellents such as Ultrathon or DEET-PLUS. These are available through local stores or Travel Medicine at 800-872-8633. Do not use DEET in higher than 32% concentration. We like the natural repellents but they don't last as long and are not as effective in malaria regions. RECOMMENDATIONS: Living Routes suggests chloroquine plus proguanil for prevention in South India (International Travel Health Guide also recommends this). Lariam (mefloquine) is recommended by CDC for all India, but it is very expensive (14 weeks for $112) and can have very unpleasant side effects. Two new drugs under consideration for malaria prevention are primaquine and azithromycin. For more information, contact the CDC's Malaria Hotline (404-332-4555).
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TRAVELER'S DIARRHEA (TD) is the most common illness on our India programs and is characterized by cramps, weakness, and frequent watery or loose stools. It is self-limiting (goes away by itself). However, if the diarrhea does not resolve within a few days, or if it is accompanied by fever and chills, it is probably more than TD and Living Routes staff should be informed. Stool tests may be advisable and medicines for treatment are readily available at Auroville and throughout India. RECOMMENDATIONS: During orientation, we will explain the importance of diligent hand washing, careful food preparation and purchasing, personal and kitchen hygiene, and water purification. These are important preventative measures and we expect you to follow them closely. We will also give you a handout on the treatment of traveler's diarrhea. Please bring an 8-oz. bottle of Pepto-Bismol (not the tablets) as a safe and effective initial treatment. You may also bring Loperamide (Imodium) as a back up, if you wish. Don’t bring Lomotil or antibiotics unless you have a special reason and have informed Living Routes staff. Antibiotics are available in India and should be used under the direction of a physician with Living Routes staff supervision. RABIES is a viral infection that affects the central nervous system. Rabies is contracted through contact with body fluids of an infected animal, generally via a bite. If the post-exposure treatment is started immediately, full recovery from an exposure is generally the outcome, but if the disease develops, it is almost always fatal. RISK: According to the CDC, there is a risk of rabies in India, particularly in rural areas, or in areas where large numbers of dogs are found. (Auroville has many dogs) PREVENTION: Do not handle any animals! When wounds are thoroughly cleaned, the risk of rabies infection is reduced. Exposed individuals should receive prompt medical attention. RECOMMENDATIONS: The CDC recommends a pre-exposure vaccination for travelers visiting areas where rabies is known to exist. There is always some risk, but this is a question that we leave to your own discretion. CHOLERA is an acute intestinal infection caused by a bacterium. Infection is acquired by ingesting contaminated water or food. Symptoms include an abrupt onset of voluminous watery diarrhea, dehydration, vomiting, and muscle cramps. RISK: The risk of infection to the US. traveler is very low, especially for those that are staying in relatively sanitary accommodations. Travelers should consider the vaccine if they have any problems with their stomach, such as anti-acid therapy or ulcers. PREVENTION: Careful preparation of food, and treatment of water, lowers the risk of infection. Thoroughly cooked food, peeled fruit and boiled, treated, or bottled water are advised precautions. RECOMMENDATIONS: The available vaccine is only 50% effective in reducing the illness and is not recommended routinely for travelers or for program participants. Upon Your Return... Some tropical diseases you could be exposed to in India might not surface until well after your return (rarely, although sometimes years later). If you experience any problems when you return to the USA, you may get a check-up and stool test from your physician or a tropical medicine expert.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AND NATURAL HEALING There are several options for natural health and healing at Auroville. In addition to the above preventative tips and requirements, many students in the past have chosen to address healthcare from a more holistic perspective. Students often seek out massage therapists, Ayurvedic doctors (traditional Indian medicine), and the homeopathic clinic for health and healing. In Auroville, you can find natural remedies for malaria prevention, traveler’s diarrhea, mites and scabies, vomiting, etc. Ayurvedic medicine and other local remedies are also easily available and can assist you in treating many of the ailments that you may come across during your time in India. Please be advised that we are not doctors, and cannot be held responsible for any side effects or the potential of it ineffectively treating your symptoms. We do, however, want to offer a few alternatives. Below are some additional resources and ideas that may assist you in approaching a healthy semester… naturally. Most of these remedies are not available in Auroville, and should be brought with you if you so choose.

Helpful Things to Have for Intestinal Health:
Grapefruit Seed Extract- a natural antibiotic that can be purchased in most health/whole food stores. It helps get rid of parasites, fungi, bacteria, candida, strep throat, etc.; it can be used over a long period of time with no known side effects or toxicity. For m ore info, check out: http://www.nutriteam.com Acidophilus- needed to maintain a healthy balance of intestinal flora; be sure to buy the kind that doesn’t need to be refrigerated Oil of Oregano- kills bacteria and parasites; may be harder to find Ginger- for help with nausea and motion sickness (in tincture or capsule form) Arsenicum- a homeopathic* remedy which can be useful for diarrhea, especially when it is accompanied by nausea and/or extreme thirst Nux Vomica- a homeopathic remedy which can help with nausea and traveler’s constipation Goldenseal- (in tincture or pill) a very effective herbal remedy which, if taken a week before and during travel to a foreign country, can help prevent traveler’s diarrhea. The active Ingredient- berberine- is known to kill a broad spectrum of bacteria, stimulate the immune system, and counteract diarrhea from parasites

Immaculate Immune Boosters:
Vitamin C- the well-known anti-oxidant helps boost the immune system which is especially helpful before travel to prevent jet lag; one particular brand of vitamin C, Ester-C, is more easy on the digestive tract Echinacea- an herbal support to maintain healthy immune function
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Oscillococcinum- a homeopathic flu remedy which works best when taken at the onset of symptoms such as fever, soreness, aches and pains, etc.

Topical Treats!:
Arnica- a homeopathic remedy which can be used after injury, shock, trauma, swelling, bruising, sprain, or overexertion; it comes in pellets and in a topical ointment Aloe Vera Gel- helpful for sunburn, skin irritations, insect bites Tea Tree Oil- very effective, strong essential oil which can be applied topically to take away fungus, skin conditions, and skin irritations Eucalyptus Oil- a very volatile essential oil which can be applied to the skin to help repel insects Calendula Ointment- a homeopathic ointment made from calendula flowers which can be applied topically as a healing, antiseptic salve for cuts, burns, and skin rashes

Miscellaneous:
Emergen-C- comes in little packets and can be added to water for taste and to help with dehydration and weak immune systems Rhus tox- a homeopathic remedy which helps with poison oak/ivy Resource: Traveler’s Natural Medicine Kit by Pamela Hirsch, Healing Arts Press *Homeopathic remedies come in a variety of potencies—the recommended potency is 30C for selfcare—and they can be purchased over the counter at health/whole foods stores. They are best when taken at least 20 minutes before and after the consumption of food and drink and most remedies come with recommended dosages and directions. SPECIAL MEDICAL CONDITIONS AND MEDICATIONS While we pride ourselves on running healthy and safe programs, we advise you not to expect U.S. style health care in India. It is important to consider whether existing medical conditions can be adequately accommodated. If you have allergies or special conditions that might lead to sudden illness (such as asthma, diabetes, bee sting or penicillin allergies, etc.), you must inform the faculty of your possible reactions. You should also discuss these with the rest of your class during the orientation period so that other people will know how to react in case you need assistance. Critical medications must be with you at all times and should be reported on your Living Routes Medical Form. Let each faculty member know where you carry or store these medications, how to administer them, and the dosage. We also recommend that you consider wearing a medical alert bracelet describing any special conditions.
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Bring any personal medications that you might need because they might be difficult to obtain in India. Make sure any prescription is noted on the Living Routes Medical Form. Bring enough medication along to last the entire program and pack it in your carry-on luggage (in their original bottles with proper labels for customs) in a way that it will not be damaged by wetness or impact. You should also know the generic name of any medication you are using in case it is sold under a different name abroad. Bring written prescriptions from your doctor for customs and in case of loss. In addition, The Center for Disease Control for Travelers to the Indian Subcontinent makes the following recommendations:
“Food and waterborne diseases are the number one cause of illness in travelers. Travelers’ diarrhea can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or parasites, which are found throughout the region and can contaminate food or water. Infections may cause diarrhea and vomiting (E. coli, Salmonella, cholera, and parasites), fever (typhoid fever and toxoplasmosis), or liver damage (hepatitis). Make sure your food and drinking water are safe. (See below.) To Stay Healthy, Do: • • Wash hands often with soap and water. Drink only bottled or boiled water, or carbonated (bubbly) drinks in cans or bottles. Avoid tap water, fountain drinks, and ice cubes. If this is not possible, make water safer by BOTH filtering through an “absolute 1-micron or less” filter AND adding iodine tablets to the filtered water. “Absolute 1-micron filters” are found in camping/outdoor supply stores. Eat only thoroughly cooked food or fruits and vegetables you have peeled yourself. Remember: boil it, cook it, peel it, or forget it. If you are going to visit areas where there is risk for malaria, take your malaria prevention medication before, during, and after travel, as directed. (See your doctor for a prescription.) Protect yourself from insects by remaining in well-screened areas, using repellents (applied sparingly at 4hour intervals) and permethrin-impregnated mosquito nets, and wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants from dusk through dawn. To prevent fungal and parasitic infections, keep feet clean and dry, and do not go barefoot. Always use latex condoms to reduce the risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.

• • •

• •

To Avoid Getting Sick: • • • • • • Don’t eat food purchased from street vendors. Don’t drink beverages with ice. Don’t eat dairy products unless you know they have been pasteurized. Don’t share needles with anyone. Don’t handle animals (especially monkeys, dogs, and cats), to avoid bites and serious diseases (including rabies and plague) Don’t swim in fresh water. Salt water is usually safer.

For more information, please visit the CDC website at http://www.cdc.gov/travel/indianrg.htm

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HEALTH RESOURCES U.S. Passport Services CDC Travel Health Information (voice) (fax) CDC Malaria Hotline for Physicians 900-225-5674 888-232-3228 888-232-3299 770-488-7788

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/travel/index.htm WHO International Travel & Vaccination requirements http://jupiter.who.ch/yellow/welcome.html Medical Information for Americans Travelling Abroad http://travel.state.gov/medical.html Shoreland’s Travel Health Online http://www.tripprep.com Department of State http://www.state.gov/index.html State Department Passport Information http://www.travel.state.gov/passport_services.html State Department Travel Warnings http://travel.state.gov/trav.warnings.html Bureau of Consular Affairs http://travel.state.gov/index2.html US Embassies & Consulates http://travel.state.gov/links.html Assistance for Canadians Overseas http://dfait-maeci.gc.ca/english/CONSULAR/web.htm Health Canada http://www.hwc.ca/hpb/lcdc Global Weather http://www.weather.yahoo.com

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SAFETY
Living Routes has had an excellent safety record in all the programs that we have conducted. We intend to continue this record and believe it is primarily due to the students and faculty acting responsibly toward themselves and each other and being aware of their collective health and safety. Below you will find an outline of some safety policies that we have developed as a guideline for your behavior and for decisions about safety systems. Please read through this and make sure that you are clear about the parameters. The Living Routes’ faculty are the principle persons responsible for risk management issues, health and safety. They will always have the final say, if a situation is ever questionable. Where specific guidelines are absent, Living Routes advises both students and faculty to be prudent and conservative in their assessment of appropriate behavior. The following was adapted from NAFSA’s web site: http://www.secussa.nafsa.org/safetyabroad/safetyabroad.gif

HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDLINES
“Because the health and safety of study abroad participants are primary concerns, these guidelines have been developed to provide useful practical guidance to institutions, participants, and parents/guardians/families. The guidelines are intended to be aspirational in nature. Although no set of guidelines can guarantee the health and safety needs of each individual involved in a study abroad program, these guidelines address issues that merit attention and thoughtful judgment. Although they address general considerations, they cannot possibly account for all the inevitable variations in actual cases that arise. Therefore, as specific situations arise, those involved must also rely upon their collective experience and judgment while considering the unique circumstances of each situation.

Guidelines for Program Sponsors
To the extent reasonably possible, all program sponsors should endeavor to implement these guidelines as applicable. At the same time, it must be noted that the structure of study abroad programs varies widely and that study abroad is usually a cooperative venture that can involve multiple sponsors. The term "sponsors" refers to all the entities that together develop, offer, and administer study abroad programs. Sponsors include sending institutions, host institutions, program administrators, and placement organizations. The role of an organization in a study abroad program varies considerably from case to case, and it is not possible to specify a division of efforts that will be applicable to all cases. All entities should apply the guidelines in ways consistent with their respective roles. Program sponsors should: • Conduct periodic assessments of health and safety conditions for the program, and develop and maintain emergency preparedness processes and a crisis response plan. • Provide health and safety information for prospective participants so that they and their parents/guardians/families can make informed decisions concerning preparation, participation and behavior while on the program. • Provide orientation to participants prior to the program and as needed on site, which includes information on safety, health, legal, environmental, political, cultural, and religious conditions in the host country, dealing with health and safety issues, potential health and safety risks, and appropriate emergency response measures. • Consider health and safety issues in evaluating the appropriateness of an individual's participation in a study abroad program.

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• Either provide appropriate health and travel accident (emergency evacuation, repatriation) insurance to participants, or provide information about how to obtain appropriate coverage. Require participants to show evidence of appropriate coverage. • Conduct appropriate inquiry regarding the potential health and safety risks of the local environment of the program, including program-sponsored accommodation, events, excursions and other activities, on an ongoing basis and provide information and assistance to participants and their parents / guardians / families as needed. • Conduct appropriate inquiry regarding available medical and professional services, provide information for participants and their parents /guardians / families, and help participants obtain the services they may need. • Provide appropriate and ongoing health and safety training for program directors and staff, including guidelines with respect to intervention and referral, and working within the limitations of their own competencies. • Communicate applicable codes of conduct and the consequences of noncompliance to participants. Take appropriate action when aware that participants are in violation. • Obtain current and reliable information concerning heath and safety risks, and provide that information to program administrators and participants. • In cases of serious health problems, injury, or other significant health and safety circumstances, maintain good communication among all program sponsors and others who need to know. • Provide information for participants and their parents / guardians / families regarding when and where the sponsor's responsibility ends, and the range of aspects of participants' overseas experiences that are beyond the sponsor's control. In particular, program sponsors generally:

-- Cannot guarantee or assure the safety of participants or eliminate all risks from the study abroad environments. -- Cannot monitor or control all of the daily personal decisions, choices, and activities of individual participants. -- Cannot prevent participants from engaging in illegal, dangerous or unwise activities. -- Cannot assure that U.S. standards of due process apply in overseas legal proceedings or provide or pay for legal representation for participants. -- Cannot assume responsibility for the actions of persons not employed or otherwise engaged by the program sponsor, for events that are not part of the program, or that are beyond the control of the sponsor and its subcontractors, or for situations that may arise due to the failure of a participant to disclose pertinent information. -- Cannot assure that home-country cultural values and norms will apply in the host country.

Responsibilities of Participants
In Study Abroad, as in other settings, participants can have a major impact on their own health and safety abroad through the decisions they make before and during the program and by their day-to-day choices and behaviors. Participants should: • Read and carefully consider all materials issued by the sponsor that relate to safety, health, legal, environmental, political, cultural, and religious conditions in host countries. • Consider their health and other personal circumstances when applying for or accepting a place in a program. • Make available to the sponsor accurate and complete physical and mental health information and any other personal data that is necessary in planning for a safe and healthy study abroad experience. • Assume responsibility for all the elements necessary for their personal preparation for the program and participate fully in orientations. • Obtain and maintain appropriate insurance coverage and abide by any conditions imposed by the carriers. • Inform parents/guardians/families, and any others who may need to know, about their participation in the study abroad program, provide them with emergency contact information, and keep them informed on an ongoing basis.

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• Understand and comply with the terms of participation, codes of conduct, and emergency procedures of the program, and obey host-country laws. • Be aware of local conditions and customs that may present health or safety risks when making daily choices and decisions. Promptly express any health or safety concerns to the program staff or other appropriate individuals. • Behave in a manner that is respectful of the rights and well-being of others, and encourage others to behave in a similar manner. • Accept responsibility for their own decisions and actions. • Become familiar with the procedures for obtaining emergency health and law enforcement services in the host country. • Follow the program policies for keeping program staff informed of their whereabouts and well-being.

Recommendations to Parents/Guardians/Families.
• In Study Abroad as in other settings, parents, guardians, and families can play an important role in the health and safety of participants by helping them make decisions and by influencing their behavior overseas. • When appropriate, parents/guardians/families should: • Obtain and carefully evaluate health and safety information related to the program, as provided by the sponsor and other sources. • Be involved in the decision of the participant to enroll in a particular program. • Engage the participant in a thorough discussion of safety and behavior issues, insurance needs, and emergency procedures related to living abroad. • Be responsive to requests from the program sponsor for information regarding the participant. • Keep in touch with the participant. • Be aware that some information may most appropriately be provided by the participant rather than the program.”

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STUDENT SAFETY POLICIES

Bicycling
Bicycles are our primary form of transportation in and around Auroville. The bicycles available to us are one-speeders. If you don’t feel confident on a bicycle we strongly recommend that you practice before arriving as some paths are quite sandy. There will also be time to practice in Auroville, but the more confident you are, the better. Bicycle use is strictly limited to Auroville roads. The only exception is crossing the main highway to Repos Beach. All other trips on non-Aurovillian roads need to be approved by faculty. You must have a headlight on your bike if you ride at night. Therefore, it is important to bring your own headlamp from the US, in the event that the light on your bike does not work properly or gets broken. It is dangerous to drive on Aurovillian roads at nights without a headlight on your bike. All bikes should be checked for working headlights before leaving on a ride that will last after dark. Have the light fixed immediately.

Urban Activities
When in large cities (Frankfurt, Chennai, Bangalore, and Pondicherry) you will use a buddy system. i.e. traveling with at least one other person. Each situation should be discussed, especially if it means being out after dark and arriving home after dark.

Swimming
When there is no lifeguard present at a swimming area, then it is essential that a member of the group is out of the water and watching swimmers at all times. Two members if the site is isolated. Faculty must be involved in approving the site and parameters of a swimming situation. Safety precautions for Auroville beaches will be explained while there, as conditions change frequently. Living Routes participants will follow the swimming guidelines of partner organizations should they be more conservative. Diving is strongly discouraged. Diving can only occur when the area has been thoroughly checked out by entering the water, and all swimmers and a faculty person have discussed the decision to dive. There is to be no night swimming. Swimming without a faculty member present is possible when the site is a known one, but discussion with a faculty member must precede it. Everyone needs to develop and understand a swimming safety system.

Boating
Students will not go boating unless it is a planned activity approved by faculty. When traveling overseas it is difficult if not impossible to find life jackets or other safety items. Assess the situation carefully, know your group’s swimming ability and make a decision together. When life jackets are available, they will be worn at all times when in the boat.
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Mopeds/Motorcycles
Students will not ride on mopeds or motorcycles at any time during the program. This is the standard of practice (Peace Corps) and is not negotiable. Violation of this policy is grounds for dismissal from the program.

Other Vehicles
Students may not ride in any car in India that is not approved by faculty first. Hired public transportation (taxis, buses, vans) is the only form of approved transportation. In India, travel by night beyond Pondicherry is strongly discouraged. Use reputable drivers and check for intoxication. When in the United States, students may drive their own car or be driven by a relative, parent, sibling, or friend only after having signed off the program. There will be full understanding that Living Routes will not be held liable in any way and that they are not insured by Living Routes but by the owner of the vehicle. This should be clear with the owner of the vehicle before the car is used.

Climbing
Rock climbing, cliff climbing, and/or tree climbing is not allowed without a professional rock climber to teach the skill. Faculty reserves the right to interrupt a situation that they feel is potentially dangerous.

In the Backcountry
A Hiking System must be established before any students and faculty enters the Backcountry. This means a group safety system in which each participant understands his/her responsibility to the group. A faculty (or otherwise Living Routes approved person) will accompany the group on all backpacks and day hikes.

Power Tools
Use of power tools by students is at the discretion and judgment of the faculty. Students may not use chain saws, weed cutters, or tools with whirling blades.

Hitch-hiking
No student may hitch hike during the program.

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Sexual Harassment Policy
Living Routes, in keeping with college and university procedure, has an official sexual harassment policy. For your information we have described the policy below, and outlined the attending grievance procedure. “Sexual advances, expression or implied, for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct to a sexual nature constitute as sexual harassment when: 4) Submission to such conduct is made wither explicitly or implicitly a term of condition of an individual’s education; 5) Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as a basis of academic decisions affecting that individual; 6) Such conduct had the purpose or effect of interfering with an individual’s academic or work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational environment, or affects such an individual’s freedoms within such educational environment. Grievance procedure: If you think you or someone else is being sexually harassed, seek help. Any student wishing to file a grievance related to the above policy should talk to an appropriate faculty member or the Executive Director. Faculty are directed to notify the Director immediately upon receiving such a complaint. The Director has been designated by the Board to answer questions and respond to concerns relating to sexual harassment. There have been rising reports of Aurovillian visitors being harassed by local villagers. Auroville is aware of this issue and is doing what it can to prevent future occurrences. We suggest that all students, especially females, stay with at least one other group member at all times during the first weeks of orientation to Auroville. This allows an appropriate amount of time to become accustomed to the area, and which places are safer to walk than others are. Faculty, appropriate Auroville liaisons and the Director of Programs should be notified immediately if such an incident occurs.

Unforeseen Events
Your faculty is empowered by the Board of Living Routes to be aware of any situations that are potentially unsafe. They will, if needed, provide guidance for safety protocols in unforeseen events that could arise. Your cooperation in following these protocols is expected.

Removal from the Program
The faculty, in consultation with the Director, reserves the right to ask a student to leave the program if they are in any way jeopardizing their own safety, the safety of the group, or the safety of other people. Safety is defined as both physical and emotional safety.

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POLICY FOR STUDENT INDEPENDENT TRAVEL WITHIN PROGRAM In the event that a student wishes to temporarily leave the community for a day trip or overnight stay outside the boundaries of Auroville, or wish to stay overnight within the boundaries of Auroville, the following guidelines apply: • The students are responsible for bringing their plans to the faculty first for consultation and approval, and then to the community at least two days prior to absence. The student must have full support of the community by consensus before leaving. • Outside of Auroville, the student must be accompanied by Living Routes faculty or a faculty approved mentor. • Within Auroville, the student must be accompanied by at least one other Living Routes student. In the case of female students, the student must be accompanied by a male student, or male faculty, unless otherwise approved by faculty. • The student’s absence must not disrupt any academic or community scheduled responsibility. • Upon approval, there must be a clear written agreement signed by both faculty and the students including: - Approved mode of transportation, departure times and arrival times. The arrival time at destination and the return to the community must be before sunset, unless otherwise agreed upon. - An agreed upon system for communication and contact between the students and faculty, including an emergency contact phone number to reach the student. The student must also bring the emergency contact card with them. • Students must review and agree to adhere to the Student Safety and Liability policies as detailed in the Student Handbook.

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A SENSE OF PLACE
In the following pages, you will find information about the places you will be visiting, in the order in which you’ll be visiting them. Most of the information about Auroville and Fireflies comes directly from the ecovillages’ websites or promotional materials. If you have additional questions, please do not hesitate to call Living Routes at 1-888-515-7333.

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STUDENTS AS AMBASSADORS As you travel to and within India, please keep in mind that you represent more than just yourself. Your behavior, either positive or negative, will also reflect on Living Routes, the program, the University of Massachusetts - Amherst, your home institution, and your home country. Living Routes tries to foster cultural awareness and sensitivity among its students. We encourage you to be polite, mature, enthusiastic, open-minded, and dressed with sensitivity to your host country. We have a close relationship with our host communities, ecovillages, and organizations, and the program’s success relies on the maintenance of a positive affinity with a wide range of individuals and organizations. Irresponsible and inconsiderate students undermine the intent of all Living Routes programs and jeopardize the unique educational opportunities it provides. At the same time, positive impressions will open many doors for yourself, your faculty and peers, and the program as a whole. SOUTH INDIA Your adventures on the program will take place in South India; beginning with your arrival in Auroville in the state of Tamil Nadu, and later on to Hampi in the state of Karnataka. Lonely Planet guide says that India has such a wide range of climatic factors that it's impossible to pin down the best time to visit weather-wise with any certainty. Broadly speaking October to March tend to be the most pleasant months over much of the country. In the far south, the monsoonal weather pattern tends to make January to September more pleasant, while Sikkim and the areas of north-eastern India tend to be more palatable between March and August, and Kashmir and the mountainous regions of Himachal Pradesh are at their most accessible between May and September. The deserts of Rajasthan and the north-western Indian Himalayan region are at their best during the monsoon. Because you will be primarily visiting South India, it is best to assume that it will be hot with late Spring and summer months being even significantly hotter. The later part of the Fall semester will also bring rain, so prepare to get wet. Your packing list offers a range of suggestions for the climate. It is best to pack for hot, humid weather, bringing both nice, casual and neat work clothes. The following material was taken from: http://www.tourindia.com/htm/homepage.htm. Please refer to this website, guide books and suggested reading material for additional information. This is only meant to wet your palette.
“South India, surrounded by three oceans, is a region of overwhelming grandeur and pristine beauty. Separated from north India by the Vindhya mountain range, the south Indian peninsula is doubly insulated by the Arabian Sea and Eastern Ghats on the east and the Bay of Bengal and Western Ghats on the west. As a result, this triangular volcanic land that was once part of the geologically primeval Gondwanaland, remained culturally undisturbed for millennia, evolving an aura of poised tranquillity. The dominant features of south India are the tropical climate less harsh than the northern States, lush green tropical vegetation in the coastal areas and the architecture, culture, languages and lifestyle which had remained essentially Dravidian at the core in spite of repeated exposures to alien influences. Since the southern culture evolved millennia before the modern State borders did, there is a racial, cultural and linguistic homogeneity here that makes visitors perceive the four major southern States together simply as 'south India', albeit mistakenly.
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In spite of the seeming similarity, each State has different scenery, festivals, architecture and subtle cultural variations to offer, each State in its own right a fascinating tourist destination. Pondicherry and Lakshadweep are again utterly different from the four traditional States of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Kerala. The leitmotif of southern culture is its tapestry of magnificent temple architecture going back to the 6th century, the unaltered traditions of food, religion and lifestyle, handicrafts, heritage of sandalwood, silk, rosewood and brass, and of course the grandeur of classical dance and music. This is a land of temples, a land of the devout, the profusion of jasmine and 'kanakambaram' flowers and the soft beat of distant drums as yet another festival starts... Tamil Nadu Tamil Nadu, the heart of the Dravidian culture and tradition, has for time immemorial, been a pioneer of peace and knowledge, and the visual legacy of the culture of the state, is among the most satisfying spectacles in India. Sharing boundaries with the states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, and Kerala, Tamil Nadu has an unbroken coastline, edging the Bay of Bengal. Densely forested uplands which abound in wildlife, intensively cultivated farmlands interspersed with rocky wastes, mountain chains of the Western Ghats, which give way to fertile coastal plains and plateaus form the geographical features of Tamil Nadu. Tamilians learn to appreciate culture, from a very young age, and have a deep interest in music, dance and literature. Classical dancing in the form of Bharatnatyam, has its origin in the temples of the SouthEast, and continues to be followed with a lot of fervor and dedication in Tamil Nadu. Karnatic music is another art form, which has flourished over the ages, producing artists of great repute. Festivals are a daily feature in this region. The places of tourist interest in the state are Chennai, the beautiful capital city; Mamallapuram, the beach resort; Kanchipuram, the land of 1000 temples; Madurai, famous for the Meenakshi temple; Rameswaram, Tiruchirapalli and Thanjavur, the temple trio; the charming hill resorts of Yercaud, Ootacamund and Kodaikanal and Kanyakumari, the southern tip of India, renowned for its sunrise and sunset. Karnataka Situated in the southern part of India, the province of Karnataka spreads over the Deccan Plateau. At 300B.C., it had formed the southern tip of Mauryan empire. Its boundaries enlarged or receded swaying to the drum beats of history & today it accounts for a sixteenth area of India & has a population of about 45 million. Its language is Kannada & its people are known as kannadigas. The three distinct regions are a narrow coastal area along Arabian Sea; high hills, the Western Ghats; & sprawling plains towards the east. The name of the land Karnataka has come from 'Kari-nadu' meaning the land of black soil say the scholars, & some others hold that 'Karunadu' also means beautiful country; either way the land is celebrated as beautiful throughout its ancient literature. The water-soaked western strip across the Arabian sea is humid & warm in summer, water-soaked in monsoon, profuse with coconut grooves & paddy fields crossed by strips of silvery streams & sparkling stretches of sand. The hilly uplands of Malnad, is one of the wettest regions of the world, and is where the bamboo flourishes wild & areca, teak, rosewood & matti are grown. It is also the home of the stately gaur & langur trees, as well as wild elephant, deer and tiger. East of the Ghats is strikingly bare. This elevated stretch is supposed to be the oldest land on the earth where ancient rocks of earth are seen jutting in & out odd shapes. Rivers like Cauvrey, Sharavathi & Ghataprabha pass through upgraded valleys and result in water-falls and occasional rapids. The torrential fall of these rivers have been harnessed to generate hydro-electric power in an area where black coal is scarce.
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The Capital is Bangalore, and today has become an Industrial Metropolis. It is also called India's science city. Sophisticated industries in the public sector employ thousands and thousands of workers. It is also called the Electronics city because most of the country's basic electronic industries are based here. It is the fastest growing city in Asia. Aircraft-building, telecommunication, aeronautics, machine manufacture, etc., have taken giant strides here. Bangalore was known for its salubrious climate, which is now being debated because of the accelerated progress of modern industry. It was called an air-conditioned city and a pensioner's paradise, but with these industrial advances, it is to be seen how long it could retain these epithets.”

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INTRODUCTION TO TAMIL Here are a few words and phrases that students have found useful in the past. Capital letters are where the emphasis of the word is placed. vaNakkam Rempa CantooSam mannikkaNum varren pootum aamaa ___ enke irukkraaru EvaLavu keekkre? ille Onka peer-enna? Om/Em/Avam/Ava peer-enna? Em-peeru ___ Amerikkaavlerntu Vantrukkren oNNu reNTu muuNu naalu anci aaru eeRu eTTu ompatu pattu Hello; how do you do? Pleased to meet you (much pleasure) Please excuse us Goodbye Enough Yes Where is ___? How much will you charge? No What is your name? (your named what?) What is your/my/his/her name? My name is ___ I am from America (from America I have come) One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine Ten

Nann vaattyaar-veele taam paakkren I am in the teaching profession

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AUROVILLE
(The following information was taken from the Auroville website at www.auroville.org)

INTRODUCTION
Auroville draws its inspiration from the vision and work of the great Indian seer and mystic, Sri Aurobindo. Mira Alfonsa (also known as the Mother), Sri Aurobindo’s spiritual collaborator founded it, in 1968. According to the evolutionary philosophy of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother, “Man is a transitional being.” “Humanity is not the last rung of the terrestrial creation. Evolution continues and man will be surpassed..” The task of giving a concrete form to Sri Aurobindo’s vision was entrusted to The Mother. The creation of a new world, a new humanity, a new society expressing and embodying the new consciousness is the work she has undertaken. By the very nature of things, it is a collective ideal that calls for a collective effort so that it may be realized in the terms of an integral human perfection.

AIMS AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES
One of the main aims of the Auroville experiment is to undergo an inner change within oneself, and to make Auroville into a model where material and spiritual solutions to the difficulties of humanity can be constructively researched. To facilitate this The Mother has given a set of practical guiding principles: Inner Discovery No circulation of money At the Service of Truth No rules or laws are being framed Beauty Research and Experiments Unending Education Collaboration Human Unity True Collective Life Freedom Self Supporting Township No Private ownership True living Work as Service, not a way to earn one's living

AUROVILLE: PLANS FOR A CITY
The Mother suggested that Auroville would contain 50,000 people. The city is envisaged as having a galaxy shaped inner city area surrounded by a Green Belt, the whole being 2.5 kilometers in diameter. At the center of the city stands the Matrimandir and its surrounding gardens, extending out to the inner ring road of the township. The plan for the gardens involves two main areas, the park-like Outer Gardens and the more formal Inner Gardens. The latter will consist of 12 sub gardens in sections radiating out from the Matrimandir containing plants symbolizing different states of consciousness. Within the central gardens area there is a large Banyan tree, which serves as geographical center for the town, and an amphitheater with the lotus-shaped urn containing the soil from the inauguration ceremony.

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The inner city area is to be divided into four zones, the Cultural, Industrial, International and Residential Zones. These zones represent four essential aspects of society: education/culture, work/productivity, nationhood/citizenship and living habitat/residential. According to the galaxy model, starting from the Matrimandir the four main zones fan out approximately following the spiral layout of the township. • In the Residential Zone, Auroville will manifest its group soul in a diversity of architectural forms and a constant search for the most perfect integration of buildings with nature. • The activities of the Cultural Zone will focus on education, following the guidelines given by The Mother, and on seeking out new forms of cultural expression. Within the zone will be schools, academies for music, fine arts and drama, an auditorium, libraries and a stadium for sports. • The International Zone will include the national pavilions of different countries and will also house the headquarters of various international organizations. • To support Auroville, the Industrial Zone will have small industries/workshops and training centers for different skills. The aim is for all such places is to be non-polluting and in harmony with the surrounding environment. Adjacent to the city proper, there will be a strategically linked ring/zone of public services (post office, bank, etc.). Situated half way between the center and the outer limits of the city, the main avenue (Crown Road) will connect all these facilities. The city will be surrounded by a Green Belt of forests and farms with the following purpose: 1) to house farms and dairies to produce food for the township; 2) to act as a living interface with the "outside world", while also acting as a protective barrier against urban encroachment from outside areas; 3) to provide a practical base for research in environmental and rural regeneration; 4) to create a healthy micro-climate in the bioregion, and act as the 'lungs' of the city; 5) to provide suitable protected habitat for a rich diversity of wildlife. For the villages in the area (population ca. 35,000) special attention will be given to their development in collaboration with the residents. The three villages in the immediate proximity of the city area are specially considered to be integrally involved with Auroville, and it has always been recognized that the township cannot come up independently of them. The same applies in a broader sense to other villages in the bioregion. I wonder whether Wim would write something entitled Auroville and Interaction with Tamil villages to
prepare students for their reactions that Aurovillians don’t care about the villagers?? Identifying some of the initiatives taken by Auroville eg Village Action, cultural centre etc.

GREEN INDUSTRY IN AUROVILLE
A sound conceptual and philosophical base is needed for the development of industries. A conscious industry with a vision takes into account the indigenous people, the environment and the natural region around it. The development of a strong vision for industrial development, based on the philosophy and goals of the community is required. The vision should address the 'way of life' the community may adopt and the participation by the residents. For example, Auroville believes in Karmayoga, in which work is not just a means for livelihood but a means of expressing oneself. To be creative and conscious towards beauty, self-participation or joy of doing work by one's own hands is an Aurovilian's 'way of life'.

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In addition to the Galaxy Plan and it’s subsequent green industries, there are several other aspects of Auroville that are guiding it’s ecological responsibilities and areas which constitute it as an ecovillage:

AUROVILLE'S CENTRE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
CSR was founded in 1984, with an original focus on ferro-cement technologies: roofing channels, water tanks, doors, biogas tanks and other products. Though the products are difficult to transport, CSR has since 1993 been shipping yearly an average of seven biogas plants to the Andaman Islands. Its ferro-cement products are sold in Tamil Nadu and have been exhibited in New Delhi and used in model houses built in Orissa and Gujurat. Next to the sale of products, the sharing of acquired expertise and skills has become part of CSR's activities. The aim is to promote integral choices for a sustainable future by providing education to professionals, voluntary organizations and students through awareness programs, workshops, training courses and seminars in environmental and sustainable technologies. These trainings are executed in collaboration with more than 22 partner organizations in India and abroad.

TOWARDS PASSIVE SOLAR ARCHITECTURE: EXPERIMENTS IN AUROVILLE
Over three decades, countless trials and experiments have taken place with the aim of integrating appropriate technology into the design of buildings and communities. This endeavor is exemplified in three buildings. Eco-house In the mid seventies a residential building was constructed called 'Eco-house'. It was one of the very first attempts in India to build a climatically appropriate house which integrated solar cooking and water heating with rooftop rainfall harvesting and a multifeed biogas plant. A roof mounted wind generator was also contemplated but not installed. The experiment was too far ahead of its time to succeed, as the technologies had not matured then. However, it provided the first data on costs and technology integration. One clear conclusion was that for ecological and economic sustainability, group housing rather than single housing is necessary. Eco-house Technologies 1) `Rainwater harvesting with underground cistern 2) Roof integrated solar water heater 3) Window mounted retractable solar cooker 4) Multifeed biogas plant, usable as septic tank, if required 5) Three different types of experimental roofs (Hollow concrete tiles, Prefab brick jack arches, Madras terrace roof) 6) Design for Ventura ventilation via inner courtyard The Auroville Visitors Centre The second experiment was a public building. 'The Auroville Visitors Centre' was designed and built in 1989. The building comprises exhibition and conference space, with a boutique and cafeteria situated at one of the major entrance roads to Auroville and serves as an entry point for the numerous daily
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visitors. The building demonstrated the use of 'sustainable technologies', including low energy building materials and on site waste water recycling. Visitors Centre Technologies 1) Compressed earth blocks 2) Ferrocement roof channels and building elements 3) Solar chimneys 4) Wind pump 5) Water solar PV pump 6) Wind generators 7) Decentralized waste water system (Dewats) Solar Kitchen The third and most recent integration attempt is demonstrated in the 'Solar Kitchen', a community kitchen for preparing 2000 meals a day. The concept began to be implemented in 1994. Since solar energy is abundant in southern India, using steam as the heat transfer medium for preparing the meals was the obvious choice. The innovative decision to integrate in the building a fixed spherical solar bowl concentrator of 15 meter diameter determined, to a large extent, the design and technology applications used within the building itself. Solar Kitchen Technologies 1) Compressed earth blocks 2) 10 meter long ferrocement roof channels 3) Decentralized waste water system (Dewats) consisting of Imhoff tank, baffled reactor and polishing pond 4) Solar bowl concentrator of 15 meter diameter 5) Scheffler community cooker concentrator

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HAMPI Hampi is located in the state of Karnataka, 200 kms North West of the capital Bangalore. In 1986, UNESCO declared Hampi a World Heritage Site. Hampi is a major ruin complex of a human settlement that emerged in 1325 near the banks of the Thungabhadra River. This settlement was known as Vijayanagar and was the mighty and splendid capital of the South Indian Vijayanagar Empire. For 300 years, till 1650, it ruled the whole of South India and prevented Muslims invasions from the North. Vijayanagar was known at that time as a jewel of a city. It was famous for its riches and its spiritual tolerance. It finally crumbled under a Muslim invasion in 1650. Today, the ruins of this South Asian Empire cover an area of about 60 sq km while the main complex of ruins near the southern bank of the Thungabhadra River is called Hampi. Hampi has become a busy pilgrimage and tourist place for Indians and a favorite visiting place for foreign tourists and back packers. Although the ruins of Hampi are impressive and full of historical significance, the bioregion surrounding Hampi is even more astonishing and full of natural beauty and rich in geological, ecological and cultural significance. The larger bioregion has two main natural markers: the Thungabhadra river and the Yamini Hills. The Thungabhadra River carries water from the Western Ghats eastwards into the Deccan Plateau, one of the oldest plateaus of Mother Earth. The Deccan Plateau is estimated to be about four billion years old. It was born during one of the first times the liquid state of pre-Cambrian earth solidified and became hard rock. Stretching over hundreds of kms as one solid, mostly flat rock, in one place, where it meets the Thungabhadra River, it becomes condensed and has created a series of seven mountain ranges of granite stone, known as the Yamini Hills. The oldest known human settlements in the Yamini Hills are Neolithic settlements, pre-historic Stone Age colonies. Signs of Neolithic settlements with cave paintings have been found and until now have barely been noticed or researched. More recently, for those of us that have a soft touch for heartbreaking animal stories, the Yamini Hills bioregion was the inspiration for Rudyard Kipling’s “Jungle Book”. The historical significance of the Yamini Hills bioregion is also significant in Indian Mythology. Known as the ‘playground of the gods’, the bioregion where the Yamani Hills and the Thungabhadra River meet was anciently known as Kishkinda. Kishkinda is a place that is the stage for the unfolding of several of the events in the Ramayana, one of India’s most ancient epics (the equivalent of the Iliad in European culture). The Ramayana tells the story of king Ram, a human incarnation of Vishnu, and his search for his beloved wife Sita, who has been captured in Sri Lanka by the demon Ravana. It was in Kishkinda that Hanuman, the monkey god of devotion and the wind, was born and met Lord Ram and helped him liberate Sita. It was also in Kishkinda that Lord Ram received the message that his Beloved Sita was alive and residing in Sri Lanka. The locations of these events are scattered over 60 sq km and are worshipped as sacred pilgrim sites by the local population and by Hindus from all over India. Further, since time immemorial the Yamani Hills Region has been a place where rishis and saints have practiced meditation and contemplation in caves along the Thungabhadra River and in the Yamini Hills.

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Location During the Hampi stay, you will be staying at the Ecodaya Island Sanctuary, which is located a few kilometers upstream from the Hampi ruins, where the Thungabhadra River splits into two arms, cutting through a granite hill range to form an Island. The Island Sanctuary-- about 3 km long and 1 km wide-is a pristine river wilderness, which features natural granite sculptures of stunning beauty and complexity, which have been formed over millennia as the river meanders its way under extreme pressure through the rocks. The waterways surrounding the island include a number of river-fed large swimming holes, waterfalls, astonishing rock formations and river caves. There is also seasonally a number of pure rain fed water holes suitable for bathing. This wilderness of hills, waterways and pools together form a stunning and inspiring natural environment. Educational Setting In the fall of 2001, through a passionate effort, a few Aurovilians became the stewards of 5 acres of cultivable land in a low valley on the eastern downstream tip of the Island, which also included a secluded and protected upper valley of about 1 acre in size. As stewards of the land, the vision was to protect and enhance the biodiversity of the place; to cultivate organically the land in the lower valley and to transform the upper valley into a retreat zone where solitude and silence can be easily maintained while retreatants would practice in the natural caves which would be simply modified using mainly natural and locally available materials. This part of the Island is called the Open Island Center. For the last three years, the Open Island Center has provided a supportive environment for people who wish to engage in an ancient practice of seeking self-knowledge and transformation through intimate personal contact with nature. At present the Center provides support for personal retreat and contemplation in 16 caves. Food (mostly grown from the land), water (filtered from the river) and support (logistic and personal) are provided to retreatants and the Center operates on a donation basis. During your time in Hampi, you will be given the opportunity to participate in a very ancient ritual that we are calling a sacred solo. This is based on a time-honored tradition of seeking self-knowledge and transformation through intimate personal contact with nature. Sacred Solo For centuries, spiritual seekers in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions have gone to caves and mountaintops and other remote places to practice meditation, yoga, and other spiritual disciplines toward realization of the Self. Christian mystics, hermits, and monks have used fasting, silence, and self-discipline in nature retreats in order to find their deepest connection with God. Celtic and Germanic traditions include shamanistic journeys and quests to sacred places in nature in order to contact spirit guides for one’s life journey. And, of course, indigenous peoples around the world have used drumming, chanting, and dancing, purification rites, vision fasts, and other rituals in order to make contact with the spirit world and to seek a vision to provide direction and meaning to life. India’s 5,000-year spiritual history, which has given rise to many sages and enlightened beings, seems to draw out this desire for self-knowledge. Within the context of the experience of India, students also seek to incorporate contemplation, and the program sees the Sacred Solo experience as an opportunity to engage in a process of deep self-inquiry and self-reflection where students may deepen their own understanding of their place in the cosmos, cultivate compassion and wisdom, and integrate the reality of their experience in India into their being. In attending to the inner landscape, one is able to gain a greater “sense of place” within the spiritual
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realm, thereby opening to the process of soul restoration in a world that often does not honor the requirements of a personal sustainability practice. Other Activities during your time in Hampi Beside the Sacred Solo, there will also have the opportunity for site visits in the Hampi Bioregion and engage in a service learning project.

Site visits
• Ecodaya Island Sanctuary: All human activities on the Ecodaya Island Sanctuary are in resonance with the intention to practice and experiment with a sustainable integral way of living. During exploratory trips, students will be exposed to the diversity of features of this special landscape including visiting caves that have intact Neolithic paintings. The master plan for developing the island sanctuary project will be explained as one moves throughout the landscape including the plans for harmonious integration of human habitats within the existing rocky hills to reduce the ecological footprint, plans for sustainable farming and water management. Hampi Ruins: exploring the ruins of the Vijayanagar empire which are scattered over an area of approx 60 sq km. For 300 years, the Vijayanagar empire ruled the whole of South India and prevented Muslims invasions from the North. It was known at that time as a jewel of a city famous for its riches and its spiritual tolerance. It finally crumbled under a Muslim invasion in 1650. Today it recognized by UNESCO as a world heritage site and efforts are underway to prevent deterioration of these fascinating relics and restore parts to their impressive original grandeur. Hampi is a busy pilgrimage and place for Indians and a favorite visiting place for foreign tourists and back packers. This site visit will also include a walk up Matanga Hill – a vantage point from which the vast majority of ruins can be perceived as a whole. Hanuman’s birthplace and Pampa Sarovar. On the road between OIC and Angundi are 2 important Hindu pilgrimage places. One is the mythical birthplace of lord Hanuman, the monkey god famous for his rescue of Sita, beloved of lord Ram from the epic Ramayana. Hanuman is revered as the God most representing the qualities of selfless service and devotion. His birthplace is located atop a mountain which is home to many Saddhus (ascetics who have renounced worldy life in their pursuit of liberation) and, of course, monkeys. A little further on, is another pilgrimage place which has a temple devoted to the Goddess Lakshmi. These 2 places are representative of the spiritual significance of this region. Signal Hill: as a preparation for undertaking deeper exploration into the whole concept of the sanctuary and the biosphere reserve, a walk up Signal Hill provides a vantage point from which to gain a perspective on the complex and convoluted landscape. This is the nearest lookout point adjacent to the island sanctuary and will help students gain perspective. The Devaraya conservation reserve. The Open Island Centre and the Ecodaya Island Sanctuary are embedded in a larger geographically coherent area known as the Yamini Hills. The Devaraya conservation area is a specific area of these hills which is linked to the island via
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•

•

•

•

nature corridors and provide a habitat for endangered species such as leopard and sloth bear. The Devaraya Conservation reserve is approx 7 x 15 km in size. It is intended to purchase and therefore regenerate and conserve these lands which are currently at risk of insensitive development. Students will be exposed to the landscape and explained the conservation strategy and how this relates to a larger bioregional context which faces some specific and unique threats.

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CULTURE SHOCK
The following was adapted from the USC Center For Global Education’s Safety Abroad Handbook (http://www.usc.edu/dept/education/globaled/studentsabroad/safetyhandbook.html)
“Experiencing new cultures, and obtaining a better understanding of your own culture, can result in some of the most positive, life-altering experiences students have while studying abroad. When going abroad, students will experience differences in manners, beliefs, customs, laws, language, art, religion, values, concept of self, family organization, social organization, government, behavior, etc. All of these elements combine to form culture. While the introduction to new and foreign cultures greatly benefits students, it can also be overwhelming. Cultural differences can be so great that a student may need extra time to adjust. This is normal. The new cultural elements a student encounters may be so different that they seem “shocking” in comparison to cultural norms they are used to at home. A student’s reaction of feeling “shocked” by a culture’s attributes can manifest itself in mood swings ranging from anger, to depression, to panic. It can be difficult to explain culture shock, especially if you have never been through it. As Bruce La Brack wrote in his article “The Missing Linkage: The Process of Integrating Orientation and Reentry”: "Just as you can’t really describe the taste of a hot fudge sundae to someone who has never experienced one, it is difficult to actually convey just how disorienting entering another culture can be to a student without any cross-cultural experience." Prepare yourself for some down times; they happen to practically everyone trying to make it in a culture they have never lived in before. Realizing that what you are feeling is natural, and that other students are probably experiencing the same thing, will help you to avoid discouragement. Culture shock has its ups and downs, good days and bad—but you will pull through. Many students studying abroad experience times when they feel depressed. However, the overwhelming majority comes away from their experience abroad even stronger and better adapted for living and working with others. Culture shock and its effects can occur in a number of stages. However, culture shock is not an exact step-by-step process; every student doesn’t experience culture shock the same way or at the same time. When things are going well, a student may feel comfortable, adjusted and relaxed. When negative or stressful situations spring up, a student often lapses back into feeling depressed rather than happy and well-adjusted. Sometimes a “normal” level of stress that a student can easily deal with at home suddenly turns into a high-stress situation abroad because a student is outside of his/her comfort zone. The following 10 steps of cultural adjustment outlined by Steven Rhinesmith show how culture shock can be like a roller coaster ride of emotions:

Rhinesmith’s Ten Stages of Adjustment
1. initial anxiety 2. initial elation 3. initial culture shock 4. superficial adjustment 5. depression-frustration 6. acceptance of host culture 7. return anxiety 8. return elation 9. re-entry shock 10. reintegration

Riding the roller coaster of culture shock, a student actually follows a natural pattern of hitting peaks and valleys. The high points of excitement and interest are succeeded by lower points of depression, disorientation, or frustration. Each student will experience these ups and downs in different degrees of intensity and for different lengths of time. The process is necessary in order to make the transition from one culture to another; it helps a student or traveler to balance out and adjust. Prior to going abroad, students may be excited about new adventures to come. The student arrives and perhaps begins to develop increasing independence as he/she starts to experience a country’s culture. At first, a student’s expectations may be too high. Through close contact with orientation advisors, introduction to housing, and supported group tours, a student may see things almost as a tourist would during the first few weeks abroad.

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A student may be heavily comparing and contrasting his/her home culture with the culture abroad. It is common for students to focus on what they see as weaknesses in foreign cultures. Students tend to point out what a foreign culture lacks; this often leads to feelings of frustration over what is “missing” or what can’t be obtained abroad the same way as at home. Students may be challenged on a regular basis by different ways of living abroad (banking, eating, relationships, etc.). Negative feelings and frustrations may reach a level where you begin to recognize you are going through “culture shock”. As a student gets used to the ways abroad, things that seemed like a “crisis” may now simply be seen as different ways of doing things. Most students gradually adjust their lifestyles to be balanced with a country’s own cultural norms. The cultural traits that once annoyed or bothered a student generally come to be accepted as normal. Students usually begin to understand and appreciate the cultural differences between the U.S. and abroad. However, if significant problems arise, a student may briefly return to the “frustration” stage of culture shock. As a student begins to adapt more and more, he/she may have a new set of friends, may be traveling more, and may even be dreaming in another language. The culture abroad may now become the “normal” way of living. The challenge here is that the better a student becomes integrated to the ways of a country’s culture, the more difficult it may be to re-adapt to the U.S. upon return home. The U.S. just won’t look the same way it did before leaving to study abroad; a student may see home with new eyes and may also be more critical of U.S. cultural traditions once thought to be “normal”. This is called reverse culture shock. Fear of experiencing reverse culture shock should not deter students from trying to integrate as fully as possible while abroad. No matter how integrated a student becomes while abroad, he or she will probably still be “shocked” by differences noted at home after so much time spent abroad

Making Friends
While abroad, try to make friends with locals. These people can help explain cultural practices and customs. Learning about a country’s culture firsthand from the locals may make you more tolerant and lessen your culture shock. They can help you with the language and introduce you to things that tourists and vacationers never experience. They also protect you from the worst blows of culture shock that come from the temptation to only hang around with other Americans. Above all, pay attention to the unique viewpoints you bring with you. Just as a foreign culture will offer new insight to you, so too can you offer new insight to locals you meet. Making friends while abroad can help foster the international camaraderie that overseas living is all about.

Stress
Stress has many definitions. Stress affects everyone differently. The additional/new kinds of stress you may encounter abroad may lead to anxiety/panic disorders, depression, paranoia, eating disorders, and other phobias. Any mental health challenges you have prior to going abroad may become more severe once you experience the effects of culture shock. Even mental fatigue from constant language immersion and time change may cause the symptoms of culture shock to seem overwhelming.

Worldwide Concern
The symptoms of cultural adjustment a student experiences may be more intense due to the events of September 11th and other worldwide threats. Students, parents and administrators may have additional anxiety; they may also take studying abroad and safety abroad more seriously than they did prior to September 11th. Any added feelings of panic or fear related to the international war against terrorism can directly affect how well a student deals with culture shock. Because terrorism is an international phenomenon, terrorist threats in one part of the world--away from where you are studying--may create a chain reaction with consequences for the country in which you are studying. A threat to one country may be taken as a threat to all. It is important to remember not to fear another country’s culture; no culture is wrong or bad—it’s just different from your own. If you let world events turn your culture shock into culture fear, you will not be able to fully adapt or integrate into the culture of the country in which you are studying. Remember, counseling is always a good option; talking to someone can usually help to work through anxiety or fears. Students can also talk to a study abroad staff member about their challenges in cultural adjustment abroad. For some students, the process is relatively simple, others may need counseling to help deal with their mental health challenges and stress abroad.

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REVERSE CULTURE SHOCK
One of the biggest challenges for students who participate in study abroad can be the difficulty in re-adapting to the realities in the U.S (otherwise known as "re-entry"). Many students who studied abroad went through many changes, re-examining their priorities, their values, and what they think of themselves and the U.S. The "return culture shock" may be more difficult than the "culture shock" they felt when abroad. If return culture shock is severe, it is important that students are able to seek help/counseling to help them through this. So what is reverse culture shock? First, let’s examine the process of re-entry. There are usually two elements that characterize a study abroad student’s re-entry: 1. an idealized view of home 2. the expectation of total familiarity (that nothing at home has changed while you have been away) Often students expect to be able to pick up exactly where they left off. A problem arises when reality doesn’t meet these expectations. Home may fall short of what you envisioned, and things may have changed at home: your friends and family have their own lives, and things have happened since you’ve been gone. This is part of why home may feel so foreign.

Feelings You May Experience
The inconsistency between expectations and reality, plus the lack of interest on the part of family and friends (nobody seems to really care about all of your "when I was abroad" stories) may result in: frustration, feelings of alienation, and mutual misunderstandings between study abroad students and their friends and family. Of course, the difficulty of readjustment will vary for different individuals, but, in general, the better integrated you have become to the culture abroad and overseas lifestyle, the harder it is to readjust during re-entry.

Reverse culture shock is usually described in four stages:
1. Disengagement 2. Initial euphoria 3. Irritability and hostility 4. Readjustment and adaptation

Stage 1 begins before you leave the host country. You begin thinking about re-entry and making your preparations for
your return home. You also begin to realize that it’s time to say good-bye to your overseas friends and to the place you've come to call home. The hustle and bustle of finals, good-bye parties, and packing can intensify your feelings of sadness and frustration. You already miss the friends you’ve made, and you are reluctant to leave. Or, you may make your last few days fly by so fast that you don’t have time to reflect on your emotions and experiences.

Stage 2 usually begins shortly before departure, and it is characterized by feelings of excitement and anticipation – even
euphoria – about returning home. This is very similar to the initial feelings of fascination and excitement you may have when you first entered the country where you studied. You may be very happy to see your family and friends again, and they are also happy to see you. The length of this stage varies, and often ends with the realization that most people are not as interested in your experiences abroad as you had hoped. They will politely listen to your stories for a while, but you may find that soon they are ready to move on to the next topic of conversation. This is often one of the transitions to Stage 3 of Reverse Culture Shock, which parallels the Culture Shock you may have experienced when you first entered the country where you studied. In fact, your transition into Stage 3 might occur sooner than it did when you first went overseas. You may experience feelings of frustration, anger, alienation, loneliness, disorientation, and helplessness and not understand exactly why. You might quickly become irritated or critical of others and of American culture. Depression, feeling like a stranger at home, and the longing to go back overseas are also not uncommon reactions. You may also feel less independent than you were abroad. Most people are then able to move onto Stage 4, which is a gradual readjustment to life at home. Things will start to seem a little more normal again, and you will probably fall back into some old routines, but things won’t be exactly the same as how you left them. You have most likely developed new attitudes, beliefs, habits, as well as personal and professional goals, and you will see things differently now. The important thing is to try to incorporate the positive aspects of your international experience with the positive aspects of your life at home.

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MAKING THE STUDY ABROAD EXPERIENCE COUNT AT HOME Post-study Abroad Advisement
After you begin to readjust to being back home, visit your academic advisor. S/he will be able to inform you of whether your study abroad credits will transfer properly. Even if you are not planning on using those credits toward your graduation, the records are still important and may be needed if you decide to go on and pursue a higher level of education. You should also check with your academic advisor to make sure that you are registered for all of the courses that you need for the upcoming semester, and that you have filled out any financial aid or tuition forms that you will need for that year. Sometimes studying abroad will affect you to the point where you may decide to pursue another area of study. This meeting with your academic advisor is a good time to discuss any changes that you might want to make to your class selection or even your current major. Your advisor will be able to discuss your options with you and help you decide what the best academic path for you may be.

Career Development
If you are considering a career with an international component, or looking for a job overseas, we also recommend that you visit your campus Career Center. The Career Center often provides various services for students seeking employment, and this is generally a good place to start looking for international job opportunities. If your career plans require a higher degree of education, you might consider graduate school, either in the U.S. or abroad. Your U.S. university’s academic and career counselors can be helpful in providing you with information about career requirements and a headstart on your job search.

Careers and Resumes
When you start looking for a job or career, think of the professional and personal growth you've undergone while overseas. If you can present these skills on your resume and in your interview(s) well, you can impress almost any employer. IES, Institute for the International Education of Students, has a useful website that will help you learn to "market" your international experience (a link to this site is provided in the "Resources" section). To sum up IES's resume tips: Make sure your international experience gets noticed by formatting your resume to highlight the overseas institutions at which you studied, or with separate categories such as "International Education" or "International Experience". List any languages that you speak, internships, major projects, or field experience you had, in the appropriate categories. Also briefly describe what you did and the skills and attributes you learned while abroad. If possible, try to incorporate into your interview some of the significant learning, communication, problem-solving, etc. experiences you had.

Study Abroad Re-Visited
Some students choose to continue participation in study abroad, either through the same program (Living Routes has 6 other programs in countries around the world) or through a new program or location. If you are unable to go abroad for another whole semester, there are a variety of programs offered during the summer that range from 3 days to 3 months. Talk to your academic advisor about what other programs might benefit you. For more help, refer to our "Choosing a Program" section. Also, if you’re interested in continuing your study abroad experience, there are many ways to fund research or postundergraduate studies. For example, the Department of State Fulbright Program, the National Security Education Program (NSEP), Rotary International, the Rhodes Scholarship Program, the Luce Scholarship Program, and the Marshall Scholarship Program are excellent ways to fund your studies overseas. There are many other scholarships out there, as well as on-line scholarship search engines (some of which you can find in the "Resources" section of this handbook).

Independent Travel
Independent travel is an option for students who feel that they are confident enough to tour on their own. If you decide to travel independently, your student travel office or a travel agent can be helpful. There are numerous travel guidebooks and resources on the Internet. Also, ask friends who have traveled independently to find the best places to go and tips on what to do while you’re there. See our "Resources" section for links to purchasing guidebooks and booking tours.

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Internships Abroad
In this section, we'll help you turn your study abroad experience into a useful resumé-builder, and even the start to a future career. If you long to go back abroad, well help get you there. Some students have such a positive study abroad experience that they decide that they would enjoy a career that would give them an opportunity to live and work overseas. There are several ways to go about this. One way is to investigate the possibility of doing an internship abroad. This can be an excellent way to not only be able to live abroad again, but also to get experience in a field in which you are interested. Many internships are paid; others can count towards college credit.

Careers Abroad
Some students decide to change their field of study to an area such as international relations, which includes a broad background in international policies, politics and history. If changing your major is a little extreme, try taking some international studies classes or focus in on an aspect of your major that could somehow be incorporated into a career overseas. Many international career opportunities lie in the areas of industry, education, government and the non-profit sector. In many cases, you can begin by seeking employment domestically with a company, firm, or group that has international branches. To gain information on career opportunities abroad, talk with a career counselor at your university, and figure out what path will work best for you as an individual.

Volunteering
Volunteering is another great way to go abroad again. There are opportunities available worldwide. In many cases, only short-term commitments are required. However, there are organizations, such as the Peace Corps, that can allow for years of rewarding work abroad. Volunteering can be a good way to defer college loans for a while. Some volunteerships even give you a modest monthly stipend.”

Alumni Network
The Class Listserve that was set up prior to the program will not end after the program, but rather provide an easy way for alumni to continue to stay in touch with each other. Furthermore, students will also be subscribed to an All Geo Listserve with over 100 other alumni who regularly share information, resources, and support with each other.

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