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Township of Brock Business Retention & Expansion Project - Final Report

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Township of Brock Business Retention & Expansion Project - Final Report

Table of Contents
Message from Mayor Larry O’Connor, Mayor of the Township of Brock........................................................................2 Message from Peter Prust, Chair, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee...................................................3 Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................................................4 1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................6 1.1 1.2 2 Overview of TheTownship of Brock.............................................................................................................6 Introduction to Business Retention & Expansion ........................................................................................6

Methodology...........................................................................................................................................................7 2.1 2.2 2.3 Project Organization and Management.......................................................................................................8 Survey Sample............................................................................................................................................8 Interpreting the Data .................................................................................................................................11

3

Action Plans .........................................................................................................................................................12 3.1 3.2 3.2.1 3.2.2 3.2.3 3.2.4 3.2.5 3.2.6 3.2.7 Task Force Meeting ..................................................................................................................................12 Moving Forward ........................................................................................................................................13 Clarify Economic Development Structure and Policies.........................................................................14 Joint Marketing/Promotions for Retail/Service Businesses ..................................................................15 Enhance Municipal Relationships to Encourage New/Enhanced Business Development....................17 Improve Small Business Owner’s Access to Essential Programs ........................................................19 Building a Stable Workforce .................................................................................................................20 Enhance Utilization of Information Technology ....................................................................................21 Summary of Actions .............................................................................................................................22

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Results .................................................................................................................................................................25 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.10 Business Climate ......................................................................................................................................25 Current & Future Plans .............................................................................................................................27 Local Community Issues ...........................................................................................................................32 Business Planning.....................................................................................................................................35 Workforce Needs ......................................................................................................................................37 Utilities ......................................................................................................................................................46 Markets & Marketing .................................................................................................................................49 Retail/Service ............................................................................................................................................52 Manufacturing ...........................................................................................................................................53 Agriculture.................................................................................................................................................58

Appendix A – Business Retention & Expansion Project Participants ...........................................................................62 Appendix B – Task Force Input ....................................................................................................................................64 Appendix C – Case Study in Joint Marketing and Promotions .....................................................................................68

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Township of Brock Business Retention & Expansion Project - Final Report

Message from Mayor Larry O’Connor, Mayor of the Township of Brock

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Township of Brock Business Retention & Expansion Project - Final Report

Message from Peter Prust, Chair, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee
November 2008 On behalf of the Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee, I want to thank all of the participants in the Brock Business Retention and Expansion (BR+E) project including: • • the Volunteer Leadership Team the Sponsors - The Township of Brock, South Lake Community Futures Development Corporation, The Regional Municipality of Durham, the Province of Ontario the Task Force the Volunteer Visitors and especially the business owners and operators who willingly participated in the survey

• • •

It took many people working together to bring this project to fruition and it has been fantastic to watch and be a part of the process. The Brock Business Retention and Expansion project has been undertaken to objectively understand our business community and what specifically we can do to help it flourish in the context of the total community. A thriving business community is key to providing jobs; jobs which enable us to live here and hopefully, through growth, allow our children the option of working without having to move far away. Let’s use the momentum of this project to continue building the partnerships between the municipality, the business community and the residents of Brock Township. Please read the report, reflect on its contents and communicate your thoughts to your friends and to our leaders - members of council, business owners and operators. Thank you. Peter Prust, Chair, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee

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Township of Brock Business Retention & Expansion Project - Final Report

Executive Summary
The Township of Brock initiated a Business Retention and Expansion (BR+E) project to foster the stability and growth of local business through a community based initiative. The project started in May of 2008 and involved 58 businesses in all sectors of the economy. The report that follows provides an in-depth analysis on the dynamics of the local business climate through the collection and interpretation of the survey results. Also in this report is an action plan which encourages the engagement of the community, government and business organizations to work in partnership for future development of the local economy of the Township of Brock. An overarching theme is that the Township and its partners must invest time and resources to effectively coordinate efforts in the area of economic development, and the Township must assume the lead role showing commitment to the process and to growing the area. Six action areas were identified by the Task Force – • Develop a clear economic development structure and policies • Coordinate joint marketing initiatives • Enhance municipal relationships • Improve Access and Communications • Enable a stable and skilled workforce • Enhance the area information technology system The first action sets the stage for all of the other actions. It stresses the need for dedicated resources to build a strong team who will lead the Township towards a coordinated approach to local economic health and growth. Participating in joint marketing efforts will increase the visibility and market potential of the Township of Brock businesses. Local businesses identified that individual efforts do not realize the strength of collaborative efforts. Businesses also felt that there were deficiencies in consumer services within the Township. It is therefore very important to identify these service gaps and develop a plan to attract new services to meet the future vision of the Township. Businesses felt strongly that it is critical for municipal officials to work with businesses towards planned growth by regular contact and ongoing BR+E type processes to identify issues and streamline the development process. Communications was also identified as a key area of concern with business owners feeling that more information should be readily available to inform them of new and essential programs that can assist their businesses. Many business owners felt a shortage of skilled labour was a very important issue to address. Through training and information this concern can be greatly alleviated – again this is an area for a collaborative approach with all partners. Finally the area of enhanced information technology must be addressed to meet the changing technology and the changing markets and communication needs of the businesses. In general, Township of Brock businesses have expansion plans, are experiencing an increase in dollar sales and are positive for further growth in the future. They appreciate the quality of life and support of

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local residents as the area’s greatest strengths while expressing concern over some municipal services, labour shortages and the overall cost of doing business. Overall the business community of the Township of Brock is growing and has a positive attitude despite some obvious areas for improvement. Business owners have a ‘can-do’ attitude and are very willing and enthused to work with the municipality to develop the area to its full potential.

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Township of Brock Business Retention & Expansion Project - Final Report

1 Introduction
1.1 Overview of The Township of Brock
The Township of Brock is the most northerly township of the Regional Municipality of Durham. It is situated on the southeast shore of Lake Simcoe, approximately 1.5 hours northeast of the City of Toronto. The municipality covers a vast array of landscapes, which include small urban areas, hamlets and countryside. Brock’s local economic composition includes a range of primary, commercial and industrial businesses that are located throughout the rural areas and in the three main urban centres of Beaverton, Cannington and Sunderland.

1.2 Introduction to Business Retention & Expansion
A Business Retention and Expansion (BR+E) program is more than a site visit program where business owners discuss matters that may be inhibiting growth or causing decline of their business. BR+E is a community-based, volunteer-driven economic development tool to encourage the growth and stability of local businesses. In Ontario, the BR+E program was first formalized as an economic development resource tool by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) to promote investment in local business. OMAFRA encourages communities to partner with multiple business interest groups and offers a comprehensive interview and data gathering/analyzing process, which helps to determine the viability of the local economy. Thorough analysis of the data allows for the extraction of important issues that can result in strategic actions. When implemented, these actions will improve the local business climate. This will help retain existing businesses or help others to expand. The Township of Brock’s BR+E project began in the spring of 2008 with the assistance of the Township Council and several stakeholder groups. A total of 58 businesses participated. The project is consistent with the OMAFRA program and involved direct communication with the business community. The end result is the identification of some challenges and opportunities which are categorized in an action plan to encourage future growth and progress of businesses within Brock’s local boundaries. The Township of Brock’s objectives in completing a BR+E project were to: Provide community support for local business Identify and address, where possible, immediate individual business concerns Develop a strong working relationship between economic development partners Increase the competitiveness of local establishments Establish and implement a strategic action plan for economic development Increase business development and job creation Increase community capacity for economic development

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2 Methodology
After strategic direction and approval from Township Council and the Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee, the project was placed into the hands of project coordinator, Christine Dukelow of TGP Consulting. Operational direction was provided by the BR+E Leadership Team who were supported by a team of Volunteer Visitors. Several Volunteer Visitor Training Sessions were led by Judy Coward, Economic Development Consultant with OMAFRA. Additional project support was provided by Susan Creighton from Township of Brock, Marlene Werry, Rural Economic Development Officer with the Region of Durham’s Economic Development and Tourism Department and Peter Budreo, General Manager of South Lake Community Futures Development Corporation (CFDC). The Volunteers visited businesses and facilitated interviews, which were returned to the municipal office and entered into the BR+E database. Individual letters of introduction were sent to all participating business. The data was then analyzed by the consulting firm of Millier Dickinson Blais Inc. and presented to a Task Force of community and business leaders. The Task Force identified areas where the Town and other local groups could take on initiatives to improve the business environment.

Figure 1 – Project Organizational Chart

Strategic Direction

Operational Direction

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2.1 Project Organization and Management
Township of Brock’s BR+E project is a partnership between the Province of Ontario, Township of Brock, the Region of Durham and the South Lake CFDC.

South Lake

2.2 Survey Sample
Business Retention and Expansion (BR+E) projects offer an opportunity to either survey a cross-section of community businesses or to focus on a specific sector(s). The Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee recommended a modified approach that would provide a cross-section profile of the key sectors contributing to the Brock economy, namely agriculture, manufacturing, aggregates and retail/service including tourism. In addition, the committee requested that the growing communications and marketing sector also receive a special focus. The total business listing was based on the Region of Durham business directory. The list was reviewed for accuracy and missing businesses added prior to the selection of those to be surveyed. From the total number of businesses representing the target sectors (295) 80 businesses were randomly selected for the survey with the goal of including 75 businesses. The survey sample was adjusted slightly to ensure representation from all three business areas of the township as well as 100 % of the aggregate and communications/marketing businesses. The survey was to take place during the months of July and August, a challenging time for volunteers and businesses especially managing vacation schedules. The final survey includes 58 businesses or 20% of the target sectors. A total of 58 businesses participated in the program, which represented 72% of all businesses contacted. The following figure illustrates the number of responses by sector.

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Figure 2

Of the 58 reporting businesses, 60% were corporations, 22% were sole proprietors, 10% were partnerships, 3% were non-profit organizations, 2% were branch plants, and 2% were cooperative. A significant number of businesses (90%) reported their company headquarters was in the Township of Brock, while 7% were elsewhere in Ontario, 2% were outside of Ontario and 2% were outside of Canada. The BR + E process included 58 participants from a number of different business types. The majority (43%) identified themselves as part of the retail/business service sector. The second largest business sector identified was from the tourism sector (19%), followed by the manufacturing sector (17%) and lastly, the agriculture/farm industry (16%).

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Figure 3

Approximately, 83% of respondents indicated the owner is a resident in the Township. Only 7% of the respondents indicated that there business is part of a franchise. 90% of businesses identified the Brock Township location as the headquarters. The business respondents for the survey are split quite evenly throughout the three communities of Brock Township.

Figure 4
Business Location
Beaverton Cannington Sunderland 37% (22 businesses) 28% (16 businesses) 35% (20 businesses)

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Figure 5

Age of Business in Brock Township
Over 35 years 26 to 35 years 11 to 25 years 4 to 10 years 1 to 3 years Less than 1 year 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

Nearly 38% of the respondents have been in operation over 35 years. Two-thirds (67%) of businesses were established at least 10 years ago, possibly indicating a low level of new business start up initiatives.

2.3 Interpreting the Data
It is a significant accomplishment to complete a first time BR+E project, especially for a community without full-time resources dedicated to economic development. Many volunteers and township staff took on more work in order to develop the project plan, complete funding applications and manage the process. While the data is important and can be used to help draw out ideas about the nature of doing business in Brock Township, the reader must be cognizant of the fact that the findings cannot be considered statistically significant. In other words, based on this limited sample we cannot be sure the answers offered herein are representative of how the business community as a whole would respond. Having said this, there is no question that the survey adds a base of information that creates tremendous value while developing action plans. One of the recommendations is that Brock Township continues with future BR+E work. Done systematically over time, the knowledge base gets deeper which ultimately makes for better decisions.

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3 Action Plans
3.1 Task Force Meeting
On October 8, 2008 the BR+E Leadership Team and more than 20 other business and community leaders met to review the survey findings and develop action plans aimed at resolving the evident challenges and opportunities. The 3.5 hour workshop was an opportunity for the consulting team to present some of the most pertinent survey findings and engage the audience in brainstorming discussions. A full list of Task Force members can be found in the Appendix A of this document. Many of the issues and ideas that were identified during that meeting are incorporated into an action plan that follows. The action plan is a list of activities and responsibilities that will aid the Economic Development Committee in prioritizing the large range of initiatives that were identified throughout the project.

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3.2 Moving Forward
There are a number of activities identified in the following tables; however, the completion of these initiatives faces a major barrier: an unclear picture of who is responsible for what and who can take the lead role in implementation. An implementation committee should undertake designating the appropriate lead on each action. There are a number of organizations that should participate in the solution: Beaverton and District Chamber of Commerce (BCC), Sunderland Business Association (SBA), Cannington Business Association (CBA) and South Lake CFDC are a few. It is notable that the organizations in this list that has a dedicated staffing commitment and is well funded (South Lake CFDC) is the one that received the highest marks from business owners for its contributions to the community. Although the data does not break down levels of satisfaction specific to the BCC, SBA and CBA, their collective scores were quite low, indicating a review of their service delivery is necessary. Despite the efforts of the Township’s volunteer Economic Development Liaison Committee and their ability to spearhead the BR+E project, the Township is significantly under-represented when it comes to implementing/co-ordinating economic development activities. At this moment in time, it appears that there is an opportunity for the Township to take a leadership role in the creation of a more significant entity – one that is based on a partnership between government and business – with its only goal as moving the local economy ahead. The Township and its partners need to be willing to invest time and money to make this happen as local governments can build partnerships with a purpose of enhancing the business environment. The Township must assume the lead role in the action process in order to show its commitment to facilitating community growth and prosperity. There is a long list of supporting goals that are required to make these outcomes possible and they will be discussed in the implementation tables that follow.

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  3.2.1 Clarify Economic Development Structure and Policies 
Goal
•
• Dedicate financial and human resources towards a coordinated approach to local economic development.

Actions 1
Formalize the Economic Development Liaison Committee as a Committee of Council
Township champion the cause by dedicating $30,000 in the 2009 budget to move this initiative forward – funding used at the discretion of Economic Development Committee and to assist leveraging other cash and in-kind contributions Community business partners work together to develop a new cooperative initiative dedicated to economic development priorities including business attraction/retention and small business start-up. The managing Board of Directors will include representatives from TB, CBA, BCC and SBA Develop a funding model that includes cash and in-kind contributions from TB, CBA, BCC and SBA and other partners. Begin with a small organization consisting of a full-time staff person and limited marketing dollars. Limiting these funds will encourage the identification of partnerships, which should be the first priority. The cooperative initiative will develop annual business plans that will be presented separately to TB, CBA, BCC and SBA for approval. • •

Lead Role 2 , Timing & Required Resources
A joint initiative of TB, CBA, BCC and SBA. Q1 2009: meetings with organizations to agree on priorities and objectives; commitment from each organization including signed memorandum of understanding Q2 2009: organizational preparation; development of sustainable multi-year business plan; identify possible external funding sources Q3 2009: 15 month funding secured 3 A budget of $70-100,000 would provide funds to hire an intern and staff supervision, leading to a full-time staff person in addition to a small budget to leverage funds. Q3 2009: Hiring process Q4 2009: Organizational start-up; draft and presentation of 2010 Marketing Action Plan to partners 2010: Implementation of Marketing Action Plan 2011 onwards: annual Action Plan completed with financial allocation

• • •

• • • • •

• • • •

TB = Township of Brock; CBA = Cannington Business Association; BCC = Beaverton Chamber of Commerce; SBA = Sunderland Business Association; SLCFDC = South Lake Community Futures Development Corporation; RMD = Regional Municipality of Durham
2

1

Ibid Look towards the South Lake CFDC and its access to the Eastern Ontario Development Program or OMAFRA’s Rural Economic Development Program for financial assistance.

3

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  3.2.2 Joint Marketing/Promotions for Retail/Service Businesses 
Shopping malls and effective Downtown Business Associations have shown that there is incredible value in joint marketing and promotions. The basic premise is that, as a partnership, there is an ability to leverage each individual business’ small marketing budget and ideas to be showcased in advertising that is beyond the financial capability of individual business. Additionally, you are presenting to potential shoppers an abundance of spending opportunities, which will increase their likelihood of visiting in addition to attracting out of town shoppers. The survey returns show the efforts of the three urban areas’ individual efforts are not fulfilling the needs of the business community. More joint marketing and promotions initiatives are needed. While it is inherently more challenging to group into a Township-wide effort, there could be tremendous payback. An example of a case study in joint marketing and promotions amongst four communities in Hastings County is explained in Appendix C.

Goal
• • • Develop a Brock Township wide commitment to joint marketing and promotions for retail and service businesses • • •

Actions
Complete Objective 3.2.1 as this initiative must proceed with the full cooperation of all three business associations/chambers and the Township Allocate a dedicated budget to this initiative Establish a sub-committee of interested retailers and service providers from the three urban communities Develop a proposal to OMAFRA’s Rural Economic Development Downtown Revitalization Program Generate necessary data for a marketing and promotions plan by completing trade area analysis and business/residential surveys Complete marketing/promotional strategy and logo/slogan development (the marketing strategy includes a description of who the target market is (e.g. by age, by location, by sex) and the most effective ways of reaching them with the promotional message (e.g. road signage, newspaper, radio, website, podcasting) Ensure area identity is maintained on online services i.e. Google Earth, Wikipedia, GPS systems Implement initiatives that will enhance the shopping experience i.e. beautification, capital investment Implement initiatives that will enhance the shopping experience i.e. civic enhancement, facade improvements – individual partner initiatives Identify the focus for the downtown areas

Lead Role, Timing & Required Resources

• • • • • •

• • • •

Completed after Objective 3.2.1 Q4 2009: application to OMAFRA’s Rural Economic Development Program geared to Downtown Revitalization Q1-Q2 2010: undertake trade area analysis and business/residential surveys to better understand opportunities Q3-Q4 2010: complete marketing/promotional strategy and logo/slogan development Q4 2010: Roll-out new program in time for 2010 Christmas season A 2010 budget of $40,000 (included in main project budget) would provide enough leveraged funding for an OMAFRA application

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Develop a recruitment strategy to attract new commercial investment to the community

• •

•

Complete a business mix assessment and gap analysis to determine the types of businesses that are desired in the community Develop investment profiles, financial pro forma statements and community profiles for each of the targeted business types (due to the restrictions on water availability and sewage treatment there has been, initially, an emphasis on light users) A longer-term objective beginning once the joint marketing and promotions initiatives are underway – prospective business investors will be enticed by this type of initiative.

• • • • • • •

RMD could play a lead role in this initiative Q1 2010: complete an investment readiness assessment to identify the capacity of the community to respond to incoming investment interests Q1-Q2 2010: complete a business mix assessment and gap analysis to determine the desired types of businesses Q2-Q3 2010: work upon improving the shortcomings identified in the investment readiness assessment Q3 2010: Develop a budget and resources plan 2011: begin proactive recruitment A budget of $30,000 in 2010 is required and $20,000 in 2011

 

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3.2.3 Enhance Municipal Relationships to Encourage New/Enhanced Business Development 
Public consultation is encouraged in all aspects of strategic planning including the creation of future Official Plans. This survey and the Task Force discussions underline the importance of the business community becoming involved in discussing the types of desired developments. One of the primary emphases of the BR+E project is for the community to begin to look and recognize that businesses are one of the Township’s most important customers. The Township is not only in existence to serve the general public, but the business community as well. Township staff were very keen on following-up on business concerns where they existed. This has helped to establish a rapport that may never have existed before. The communication channels are now open and this is an excellent opportunity to continue the dialogue and expand it to other sectors

Goal

Actions
• • Urban areas of Beaverton, Cannington and Sunderland are designated as Community Improvement Project Areas To encourage heritage-conforming construction and renovation, streetscape improvements and the infill of vacant lots in residential and commercial areas of the downtown core. TB should ensure designation of its downtown areas as Community Improvement Plans (CIP). Section 28 of the Planning Act provides CIPs with an exemption to the traditional restriction on financial subsidies. Loan, grant and development charge assistance programs can be leveraged to provide owners and tenants with financial assistance • • • •

Lead Role, Timing & Required Resources
This is a role for Brock Township Q1-Q3 2009: Staff compiles positive and negative consequences of these policies. Public consultation. Q3 2009: Council direction Q1-Q3 2009: Staff compiles positive and negative consequences of these policies. Public consultation Q3 2009: Council direction There will only be minimal financial costs to developing the CIP unless outside consultants are utilized. The real costs are in the foregoing of revenue that would have otherwise been received through building permits, development charges, impost fees, etc. These will be calculated through the staff/consultant review.

Promote and enhance the bylaws and policies that ensure the community goals of heritage restoration and economic growth are pursued.

• •

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• • Conduct an annual BR+E type evaluations with key business owners in key sectors. •

• • • • •

Examine ways of streamlining the development approvals process for agriculture, commercial and industrial property.

• • •

• •

Because the three downtowns are the location of most commercial tax assessment in Brock, tie in these improvements closely to ongoing BR+E initiatives. Other sectors such as the home-based business and agriculture sectors providing wider range of data On an annual basis carry out a BR+E project. Suggest aiming these at specific sectors or geographic areas of the community in order to increase statistical confidence in the results. It is most beneficial to continue partnerships as the information that is gathered is helpful to many. The Township and its partners need to do “a report card” on a regular basis that determines the business community’s satisfaction with their location Maintain the personal relationship that was created between Township and business Track trends over the years Select the questions that are most relevant and develop into a 20-30 minute survey Ensure that the Township has good written step-by-step manuals for businesses to follow when they are planning new construction, zoning changes, etc. Ensure the Township has a check-off list that guides business through the planning process Every effort should be made towards continuous improvement – always striving to reduce the process time During the Official Plan update examine the potential for using Development Permit System – new legislation enacted by the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing that drastically reduces Zoning and other by-law modifications Provide support systems for complying to accessibility and fire/safety issues Ensure customer service training for township staff

• • •

• •

OMAFRA’s Main Street Program has been a real trigger in assisting Madoc, Marmora, Stirling and Tweed to mobilize initiative. Eastern Ontario Development Program New coordinated initiative as identified in 4.2.1 to take the lead with ongoing support from partners involved in this project as well as CBA, BCC, SBA, Greater Toronto Area Agriculture Action Committee, Training Board, College, etc. The choice of partners will depend on the sector and/or geographic area covered. BR+E projects completed annually Allocate $15,000 per year for outsourcing of coordination and administrative costs with analysis to be done in house.

•

• •

Q1 2010 – TB should contact all businesses who have been through the process over the last two years to identify their chief concerns and implement changes that will have a direct effect Q2 2010 – TB can create the step-by-step manual and check-off guide Ongoing – the new coordinated body can act as a “friction reducer” between business and the Town. Those who need more “hand holding” or do not understand terminology are examples of business people who would benefit from this service.

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3.2.4 Improve Small Business Owner’s Access to Essential Programs 
During the Task Force retreat the survey results stimulated a lot of discussion around the access that small business owners have when it comes to accessing essential/important programs. Through both the survey and the discussion, it seems the programs are available, but business owners are not aware of them. There is a significant lack of communication through the existing channels or the business owners have not felt the information flow to be relevant enough to consistently pay attention. Due to the distances that Brock is from the main small business offices (Durham Small Business Centre is in Whitby and South Lake CFDC is in Keswick) there was discussion around the establishment of a Brock (or North Durham) Business Centre. We do not recommend this approach to solve a communications issue. The financial price is significant and the capabilities for better communication are available – in addition, the economic development service developed through Objective 3.2.1 will go a long ways towards creating a local information broker. Although 58% and 56% of businesses said they have Business Plans and Marketing Plans, respectively, in place, there is concern about the quality of these plans and whether or not these plans are written. To the extent that research shows that businesses who are guided by a business plan are much more likely to be successful, there needs to be an emphasis on getting as many businesses as possible involved in writing business plans.

Goal
Increase the communication to business owners regarding business, marketing and succession planning, exporting, availability of funding programs and other opportunities.

Actions
• •

Lead Role, Timing & Required Resources
This is a relatively easy step that can be taken even before the new coordinated initiative as identified in Section 4.2.1 is established. In an early indication of cooperation, partners should contribute $5000 to hire a communications consultant who will be responsible for developing four quarterly newsletters in 2009. Partnership of TB, SLCFDC, RMD, CBA, BCC, SBA, Government of Ontario and Government of Canada

•

Establish one communications vehicle for all small business groups.

• • Staff of the new coordinated initiative should know the proper referrals and, ideally, personal relationships with small business program offerings as well as sector experts and country experts that are available from Ontario Government for those businesses that are looking to begin exporting. Set up a rotation of local business visitations in order to strengthen relationships and identify sector issues

Provide an information brokerage service •

• •

New coordinated initiative. No extra financial consideration. There is a time commitment to training and understanding small business initiatives and proper referrals.

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3.2.5 Building a Stable Workforce 
The shortage of certain skill sets was identified as a challenge for most small business operators. Exacerbating the challenge, is a realization by some that this is not just a Brock issue, but it is impacting communities across the country. Although the Township and its partners can offer limited direct services in this respect, it is an area where ongoing communications and information providing can have an impact on the types of services that labour force management and training organizations provide.

Goal
• Ongoing identification of labour force challenges and communication to agencies who are responsible for solutions •

Actions
Provide the findings of this BR+E project to relevant organizations for them to build their annual plans around. Carry out sector-focused BR+E initiatives that will more specifically pinpoint labour force challenges and inform the proper organizations or, better yet, involve them in the project. Look for specific ways to deliver small business employee training courses around computer software, customer service, sales/marketing and interpersonal communication. Examine specific ways and partners to deliver long distance training via the internet.

Lead Role, Timing & Required Resources

•

• •

•

Without a local mechanism for action in place, it is best for TB to provide the results herein to the organizations involved in labour force development such as Training Board, Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, Kawartha Manufacturers Association. Future BR+E initiatives will occur with the support of the new coordinated local economic development resource so follow-through will be more effective.

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3.2.6 Enhance Utilization of Information Technology  
The survey results indicate having access to suitable high speed telecommunications services is an important factor of future competitiveness for 83% of the business community. The survey evidence also shows that current service may not be of a suitable standard in many parts of the community. At one time, telecommunications was looked upon as “the great equalizer” that would allow businesses in rural communities to operate with all the advantages of an urban and rural setting – this is not exactly how it has turned out. Anecdotal evidence tells us that Brock Township is attracting and will continue to attract small business operators, telecommuters and active retirees who want to live in this rural setting but are concerned about the capacity of information technology.

Goal
Ongoing identification of information technology and telecommunication challenges and supporting agencies who are active in taking solutions • • •

Actions
Provide the findings of this BR+E project to relevant organizations for them to build their business case for enhanced services. Assist in completing more specific telecommunications and information technology needs surveys if necessary to develop the business case. Following installation of infrastructure, ensure adequate resources to train users and assume ownership of the technology •

Lead Role, Timing & Required Resources
Without a local mechanism for action in place, it is best for TB to provide the results herein to the organizations involved in telecommunications improvements such as SLCFDC. Future BR+E initiatives will occur with the support of the new coordinated local economic development resource so follow-through will be more effective.

•

     

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3.2.7 Summary of Actions 
Goal
3.2.1 Dedicated Resources towards a coordinated approach to economic development

Actions
• • • • • Formalize Economic Development Committee Develop a funding model and dedicate financial resources Establish community committee and strategic priorities Contract a staff person Develop annual business plans Allocate budget to initiative Establish sub-committee of stake holders Develop a proposal to OMAFRA Complete market research with market/promo strategy Complete gap analysis of business community Develop profiles to target new businesses

Lead
TB, CBA, BCC, SBA

Timing
2009 – 2011 onwards

Resources
$30,000 initial start up funding $70,000 – 100,000 for staff and marketing budget

3.2.2

Joint Marketing initiatives

• • • •

TB, CBA, BCC, SBA

Q4 2009 – Q4– 2010

Sufficient funds to leverage OMAFRA funding

Recruitment Strategy to attract new commercial investment

• •

TB, CBA, BCC, SBA, RMD

Q1 2010 – 2011 onwards

Budget to support strategy

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3.2.3

Promote & Enhance Bylaws of economic growth & heritage restoration Annual BR+E

• •

Modify areas as Community Improvement Project Areas Encourage heritage-conforming construction

TB

Q1-Q3 2009

Minimal

• •

Conduct annually with downtown businesses Conduct with specific business sectors Create an efficient process to enhance the development process and eliminate red tape Support compliance with fire/safety/ accessibility codes Customer service training Establish a process for clear and accurate communication Develop quarterly newsletters Regular business visitations Disseminate accurate and relevant business assistance information Pinpoint specific sector labour shortages Develop training delivery plan

TB

Q1 2010 onwards

Funding sources

Streamline Development Process

• • •

TB

Q1 2010 ongoing

Minimal

3.2.4

Enhance Communications

• • •

TB, SLCFDC, RMD, CBA, BCC, SBA,

Q1 2009

Information Service 3.2.5 Labour Force recognition

•

TB

Q1 2009 ongoing Q1 2009 ongoing

None

• •

TB Training institutions

None

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3.2.6

Information Technology

• •

Identify and monitor business information technology needs Support enhanced infrastructure

TB

Q1 2009 ongoing

None

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4 Results
4.1 Business Climate
A review of the Township of Brock’s business climate was undertaken by asking respondents of the survey to comment on the local business conditions and their overall experiences operating in the community. The overall perceptions of the community for conducting business, by owners and managers of local businesses were positive.

Figure 6

General Impression of the Community as a Place to do Business
Excellent Cannington Good Fair Poor 0% 20% 40% 60% Sunderland Beaverton

Comments
Less red tape in approval process Need to develop industrial and commercial land areas Need a stable major employer i.e.: manufacturing Businesses need to feel appreciated Buy local/Canadian a good program Businesses need to work together for common goals We need to be more proactive

Occurrences
3 3 3 3 3 2 2

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Business incentives should be available for facade improvements Need affordable public transit Amalgamate BIAs of three townships Improve highways/roads Property/business taxes too high Eliminate development fees/lot levies Brock Chamber of Commerce needs to work together and take a lead role in economic development Need to enhance skills in fire/police departments Need more retail space Need to increase population base Need to attract more businesses Develop more housing areas Lack of communications with Ministry of Natural Resources Need increased contact with local and provincial leadership Need more business networking Improve medical facilities Need to work cooperatively Promote TB in relation to greater area Repair town hall Needs an active business association Need more local amenities i.e.: child care, recreation facilities Improve infrastructure Post secondary education Energies subsidies Increase skill level in employees Improve highway signage

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1` 1 1` 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

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4.2 Current & Future Plans
The section of the survey entitled, “Future Plans” focused on questions regarding major business decisions within each organization over the next three years. A positive response was provided by respondents in terms of anticipating expansion plans in the future. Approximately 87% of surveyed businesses note that they will stay the same size or are planning to expand their operations within the next three years. About 5 businesses indicated they will be downsizing, 1 noted that they will be closing and 3 indicated they will be relocating their business (fortunately all three relocations are expected to take place within Brock Township). In addition, all three firms stated their current facilities are inadequate for expansion and they could use help in finding a new location. Approximately 31% or (18) of the respondents indicated that they will purchase new equipment for their operations in the next three years.

Figure 7
During the past 3 years, has the number of employees in this business increased, decreased or stayed the same?

Increased, 33% Remain the same, 49% Decreased, 18%

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Figure 8
During the next 3 years, do you think the number of employees in this business will increase, decrease or remain the same?

Don't know, 4%

Increase, 42% Remain the same, 47%

Decrease, 7%

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Figure 9

Impediments to Growth
Water access Availability of w ater moorings Water/sew er fees Availability of natural gas Inadequate w aterw ay identification Trucking & distribution Availability of unskilled labour Availability of financing Availability of training opportunities Business insurance Information technology capacity Other (Specify): Availability of space for rent or lease Road & highw ay system Public transit Availability of variety of different sized parcels of land Security/policing & fire service Resistance from local business Serviced land Development charges Approval processes Water/sew age capacity Health & medical services Business taxes Availability of properly zoned and designated land Lack of proactive new business recruitment Availability of skilled labour 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6

Note: More than one response can be selected for this question. Note: Percentages are based on the number of companies and may not total 100%. Note: 56 companies responded to this question in the BrockTownship2008 project.

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It is anticipated that the expansion of firms in Township of Brock will lead to several changes. These changes are exemplified in figure 10 (below). All firms surveyed anticipate that business expansion will lead to an increase in workforce, additional investment in equipment and process improvements.

Figure 10

Business Expansion Results
Importing goods or services to Canada An increase in export of goods or services Other (Specify): An increase in floor space An increase in demand for skills training Additional services for customers Additional product line(s) Process improvements Additional investment in equipment and technology An increase in work force 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%

Note: More than one response can be selected for this question. Note: Percentages are based on the number of companies and may not total 100%. Note: 19 companies responded to this question in the BrockTownship2008 project.

When asked questions regarding sales trends and market share, nearly half of businesses surveyed indicated an increase in total dollar sales over the last three years and also expected next year to also experience higher sales. Most businesses felt that competition in their market area is increasing and 81% of businesses surveyed felt that they were maintaining or increasing their market share. These results are shown in figures 11 – 14 below.

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Figure 11
Total Dollar Sales Trend for the Last Three Years
46% 23% 16% 20% 0% Increased Decreased Uneven sales pattern Same/no significant change 14%

% of Responses

60% 40%

Total Dollar Sales Pattern

Figure 12
Expectations of Total Dollar Sales as Compared to Last Year
55% 60%

% of Responses

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Higher Lower Same Not sure 7% 20% 18%

Total Dollar Sales Expectations

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Figure 13
Competition in Local Market
57% 60%

% of Responses

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Increasing Decreasing 9%

33%

Staying the same

Figure 14
Market Share
60% 38%
% of Responses

43%

40% 19% 20%

0% Increasing Decreasing Staying the same

4.3 Local Community Issues
Included in the survey were 15 community-specific questions that touch on a broad array of issues. Topics included the level of assistance local business associations and/or economic development offices to the local business sector, factors affecting doing business in the Township of Brock and the presence of an economic development within the local community. Figure 15 shows this breakdown. Over 50 of the businesses surveyed were very or somewhat satisfied with fire prevention (89%). In particular respondents were pleased with garbage removal (88%), snow removal (76%) and public utilities (74%). Dissatisfaction levels were high among all respondents with reference to public transit (75%), policing services (63%) and street repairs (58%).

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Figure 15

Level of Satisfaction with Public Services
Public transit Garbage removal Snow removal Street repairs Public utilities Fire prevention and services Policing Health department/health … Planning, engineering, … 0% 37% 51% 45% 50% 42% 74% 89% 63% 49% 55% 100% 25% 88% 76% 58% 26% 11% 75% 13% 24%
Very & Somewhat Satisfied

Very & Somewhat Dis-Satisfied

When asked what type of assistance from business associations and/or economic development offices would help their business grow, most indicated joint advertising and marketing, marketing and workforce skills development.

Figure 16
How can local business associations and/or economic development offices assist your business?

Other E-marketing Website development Productivity improvement workshops Opportunities for shared use of buildings, … Workforce planning, employee training and attraction Attraction of related supply & services businesses Joint advertising and marketing Export development programs and services Business networking sessions Trade shows Access to capital seminars Marketing seminars 0%

4% 45% 45% 47% 45% 55% 55% 66% 21% 57% 55% 36% 57% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%

% of Respondents

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Figure 17
What factors contribute to a positive business climate in your area? Businesses rated quality of life and support from local residents as the number one factor in a positive business climate in Brock Township, followed by good utilities and water and sewer capacity.

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4.4 Business Planning
Figure 18
Nearly one third of businesses would like to invest more into their business.

Are you investing as much in capital as you would like?

32% 68%
Yes No

Figure 19
How far in advance do you plan your financial performance? Over half of businesses surveyed plan monthly or yearly, but 17% do not plan at all. Again, 17% do not compare their financial plan against actual performances.

5 Years 4 Years 3 Years 2 Years Yearly Quarterly Monthly Weekly Daily Not At All 0% 5% 2% 0% 0%

6%

4%

31% 7% 26%

7% 17% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35%

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Figure 20
How often do you review your financial plan against your actual performance?

5 Years 4 Years 3 Years 2 Years Yearly Quarterly Monthly Weekly Daily Not At All 0%

0% 0% 0% 0% 15% 6% 55% 0% 8% 17% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%

Figure 21
Succession/Business/Marketing Plans in Use

Plan
Succession Plan Business Plan Marketing Plan

Yes
45% 58% 56%

No
55% 42% 44%

Many of the responding business indicated that they do not have a succession, business or marketing plan. When asked to indicate the importance of particular factors to ensure business success over the next three years, 77% of the respondents indicated that business planning will be either very or somewhat important to ensure the business remains successful.

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Figure 22 Business Planning
Very important Somewhat important Not at all important

Percent
50% 27% 12%

4.5 Workforce Needs
When asked to indicate the importance of particular factors to ensure business success over the next three years the respondents had some strong opinions regarding availability of labour and the ability to increase worker productivity. Of the 20 businesses that will be expanding, six have noted that attracting labour is a barrier to the expansion process.

Figure 23 - Factors of Business Success

Availability of Labour
Very important Somewhat important Not at all important Not applicable

Percent
48% 30% 7% 15%

Improving Worker Productivity
Very important Somewhat important Not at all important Not Applicable

Percent
56% 13% 6% 26%

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Figure 24
Workforce Needs

Quality of Workforce
Excellent Good Fair Poor

Percent
11% 25% 34% 30%

There is an unmet demand for both skilled and unskilled labour in Brock Township. Those surveyed rate the availability of workers very poorly. 44% of the companies indicate that they cannot recruit sufficiently qualified employees to their business. These companies identified specific workforce improvement needs. The top five are as follows: 1. Computer software 2. Customer service 3. Sales and marketing 4. Working with others 5. Oral communication

Figure 25 Employee Location
Within Municipality Outside Municipality but within County Outside County/area

Percent
82% 10%

8%

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Figure 26
Anticipation of Labour force increases or decreases over the next three years

Don't know, 4%

Increase, 42% Remain the same, 47%

Decrease, 7%

Figure 27
Employee count for increase or decrease for the next three years. Increase Decrease 98 10

Figure 28
How do you rate the availability, quality and stability of workers in this area for your business needs?

Availability
Excellent Good Fair Poor 11% 25% 34% 30%

Quality
12% 42% 24% 22%

Stability
20% 36% 24% 20%

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Figure 29
Recruitment issues

Figure 30
Does this business have difficulty retaining employees?

Yes, 25%

No, 75%

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Figure 31
Reasons for Recruitment Difficulties

Seasonal

58%

Competition

17%

Wages

42%

0%

10%

20%

30% % of Respondents

40%

50%

60%

Figure 32
Would you like information on employee retention strategies?

No, 40% Yes, 60%

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Figure 33
Employee Type Unskilled labour Sales Skilled trades Apprenticeship Computer technology/ programming Environmental Clerical Electronic engineering Product development Industry specialist Manufacturing technology Market development Business administration Employee Count 52 14 11 7 4

3 3 2 2 1 1 0 -8

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Figure 34
Do your employees training meet your business needs?

Outside of the area

86% 57% 80% 80% 71% 75% 0% 20% Yes 40% No 60% 80% 43%

14%

Training Location

University Customized training In-house Distance Education Local Community College

20% 20% 29% 25% 100%

Figure 35
Barriers to Achieving Employees Training Needs

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Figure 36
Projected employee needs over the next three years
Business Administration Market development Manufacturing technology Industry specialists Product development Electronic engineering Clerical Environmental technology/management

Computer technology/programming Other Apprenticeship Skilled trades Sales Unskilled labour -20 -10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60

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Figure 37

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4.6 Utilities
Figure 38
Businesses rated energy as a very important factor in their competitiveness. Nearly half of the businesses expressed concerns with their energy, specifically regarding the cost. Telecommunications was also rated as a very important competitive factor. Factors of Business Competitiveness for the Next Three Years: Energy

Not at all important, 5%

Not applicable, 5%

Somewhat important, 14%

Very important, 75%

Figure 39
Concerns with respect to energy supply, management or efficiency?

No, 52%

Yes, 48%

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Figure 40
Specific concerns with respect to energy supply, management or efficiency?

90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Inconsistent supply/periodic brownouts Unusually highenergy consumption Loss of productivity 19% 19% 38%

81%

Cost of energy

% of Respondents

Figure 41
Would your business benefit from engineering or technical support with respect to energy conservation and efficiency?

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Figure 42
Factors of Business Competitiveness for the Next Three Years: Water/Sewer Availability.

Not applicable, 35%

Very important, 36%

Not at all important, 15%

Somewhat important, 15%

Figure 43
Factors of Business Competitiveness for the Next Three Years: Availability of Telecommunication Services.

Not at all important, 2%

Not applicable, 15%

Somewhat important, 27%

Very important, 56%

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4.7 Markets & Marketing
Township of Brock businesses are very keen to engage in collaborative marketing. Over 60% indicated an interest in joint marketing and collaboration through networking and information sharing. Businesses feel that their competition is based in another community and is not significantly affected by tourism or visitors to the area. Local issues of greatest concern included public safety, vandalism, shop lifting and accessibility. There was overwhelming support for community events that take place in the downtown area.

Figure 444

Percentage of Businesses Interested in Collaborative Activities
Joint product purchasing 18% Joint marketing

14%

8%

Collaboration/networking/i nformation sharing Other (Specify): 29% 31% None

Figure 45
Forms of Competition

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Figure 46
Forms of Competition

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% In the downtown In the community 20% 16% 80% 84%

12%

No 88% Yes

In another community

Figure 47
Participation in and/or support for community events and festivals that take place in the downtown/commercial district?

Yes No

94% 6%

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Figure 48
Local Market Issues

Vagrancy, panhandling Parking enforcement Loitering Storefront appearance / window displays / signage Location of parking spaces No issues Availability of parking spaces Number of parking spaces Accessibility Shop lifting Vandalism, graffiti and litter Public safety services (lighting, police presence) 0% 5%

7% 13% 17% 17% 17% 20% 20% 20% 20% 23% 27% 40% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%

% of Respondents that Identified Issues

Figure 49
If the number of tourists/visitors to Brock Township were to decline by the following amount would your business be able to survive?

81-100%

61-80% Maybe No 21-40% Yes

0-20%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

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Figure 50
Do the following facilities have an impact on your business?

80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0% Arena Historic Town Hall Library 2% 2% 0% 46% 54% 65% 65%

71%

Positive 33% 31% Negative 29% No Impact

Museum

4.8 Retail/Service
This section of the survey asked respondents to evaluate the local retail business climate and their overall experiences operating in the community. Respondents stated the top three ways to improve the local retail business environment were: a) Repair or remove "eyesore" buildings b) More hotels/accommodations c) More niche market specialty shops

When asked to comment on the type of marketing tools used in the promotion of local retailers, 61% state that the local highway signage/tourism directional signs require improvement. A further 50% want improvement on local roadside advertising and none of those surveyed recognized roadside advertising or local highway signage as excellent. When asked to identify the top services or programs that would be of use to these retailers, five answers were most often noted:

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Figure 51
Response Business directories, brochures, maps Cooperative advertising/joint marketing Networking events Retail and special event coordination Analysis and reporting on the downtown market/economy % that Stated 'Yes' 96% 83% 78% 78% 73%

The local property tax structure was deemed as the most important operational cost as 80% of local retailers indicated this is a serious concern to the success of their business.

Figure 52
25

Frequency of Responses

20 15 10 5 0 Business & Property tax structure Insurance Cost of utilities Rent and lease costs

Concerning Operational Costs

4.9 Manufacturing
Most manufacturing businesses interviewed are maintaining their current size and product type. Primary products were in the maturing phase while secondary products were positioned in the growth stage of its life cycle. Businesses cited lack of prototype development as well as a lack of available expertise as barriers to their research and development. In order to improve their process, most businesses are focussed on process improvements and energy efficiency. A full 80% of businesses indicated that export development will be very/somewhat important to their businesses over the next three years. An opportunity to partner is evident as 57% of businesses would consider cooperating with another business to bring an underutilized plant to capacity.

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Figure 53
Current and Projected Plan for Local Plant

Downsize Maintain current size, but diversify products Expand the size of plant and diversify products Maintain the current size and type of… 0 Projected Current 0 0

1 1

2

3 4 2 4 # of Respondents 6 8 8

Figure 54
Do you compete for business against sister plants within your corporate organization?

Yes, 11%

No, 89%

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Figure 55
Where is your primary product in its life cycle?
4 4

# of Respondents

3 2 2 2

1 0 0 Emerging Growing Maturing Declining

Figure 56
Where is your secondary product in its life cycle?

3 3 2 2 1 1 0 0 Emerging Growing Maturing Declining

# of Respondents

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Figure 57
Are any of the following factors barriers to your business undertaking research and development?

Proto type development

13%

88%

Expertise

25%

75% Yes

Human Resources

38%

63%

No

Financing

50%

50%

0%

50%

100%

150%

Figure 58
Is your business focused on implementing any of the following process improvements?

Vendor/supplier network for continuous product improvement Administrative support toward ISO Certification Health & safety activities Waste product recovery Energy efficiency Six sigma & quality Productivity improvement (lean mfg.) 0% 20% 13% 22%

67% 78% 56% 44% 78% 88% 60% 40% 60%

33%

44% 56% 22% Yes No

40% 80% 100% 120%

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Figure 59
If your plant and/or equipment is/are underutilized, are you interested in cooperating with another business to bring the plant or equipment to full capacity?

No, 43% Yes, 57%

Figure 60
Looking forward to the next 3 years, how important will the development of export markets be in ensuring that your business remains competitive?

Not at all Important

10%

Not very Important

10%

Somewhat Important 20%

60%

Very Important 0% 10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

% of Respondents

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4.10 Agriculture
Agricultural businesses are most adversely affected by lack of public awareness of the industry and overall cost of doing business including commodity prices. It was felt that local government could assist by providing better infrastructure and streamlining local development processes. 78% of businesses indicated that their financial position has improved in the past three years and 50% plan to expand the scale of their businesses and diversify in the next three years. Barriers to expansion included uncertain markets, low commodity prices and access to financing.

Figure 61

Factors affecting Farm Businesses
Availability of labour Technological changes International competition Public concern/awareness of industry Securing financing for expansion Securing financing for operations Overall cost of doing business Land use issues Commodity prices 0% 20%
44% 67% 22% 44% 33% 67% 56% 0%11%0% 22% 33% 22% 56% 11% 78% 33% 22% 11% 33% 22% 22% 11% 0% 22%

11%0%11% 33% 0% 22% 0%

Very critical Somewhat critical Not very critical

0%11% 0%

11%

22% 0% 0%

Not at all critical Not applicable

33%

40%

60%

80%

100%

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Figure 62
Local Government Assistance with Agri-Business
80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%
Streamlining of local Review of taxes and fees Infrastructure Database of available regulatory and permitting maintenance and local farm labour processes (e.g. building improvement (roads, permits, zoning changes, telecommunications, etc.) energy supply, services, etc.) Other (Specify):

Figure 63

Farm Operation's Financial Situation Changed over the Past 3 Years
Deteriorated 11%

Stayed the same 11%

Improved 78%

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Figure 64

Plans for the Next 3 Years: Farm Operations
60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Expand the scale of the existing business (increase acreage and/or livestock numbers) Diversify (new crops/livestock) on existing acreage Diversify (new crops/livestock) on increased acreage

Figure 65

Barriers to Expansion: Farm Operations
Other (Specify): Securing necessary farm services (Specify): Access to processing services Custom operators Deadstock disposal facilities Low commodity prices Uncertain markets Access to capital Land costs Land rental rates Access to land (leased or purchase) 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50%

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Figure 66

Product Marketing
Other (Specify): Farmer's market Direct to processor To local retailers (including… At the farm-gate Direct to regulated marketing… 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%

Figure 67

Expansion & Diversification: Value-Added Processing

No 33%

Yes 67%

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Appendix A – Business Retention & Expansion Project Participants
Volunteer Visitors
Bernice Andrews Heather Benjamin Alison Bennie Peter Budreo Terry Clayton Paul Clayton Susan Creighton Doug Crichton Ben Deith Cheryl Dillon Loretta Fernandes-Heaslip Russell Fisher Rosalie Fontaine Ted Foster Elsa Georgas Rev. Barney Grace Wayne Hider Lynne Holtrust Liisa Ikavalko Denise Marsh Brian McGregor Mike McInerney Lianne Megarry Chelsea Neill Liane Prust Peter Prust Monika Rogers Terry Sellers Barbara Smith Jean Soulodre Audrey Teefy Scott Turner Marlene Werry Barbara Westerbaan Denise Wilson Joan Yerema Jay Yerema-Weafer

Leadership Team Members Debbie Brammer Paul Clayton Susan Creighton Russell Fisher Terry Sellers Rein Westerbaan Doug White Jay Yerema-Weafer

Key Resources Peter Budreo, South Lake Community Futures Development Corporation Judy Coward, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food & Rural Affairs Susan Creighton, Township of Brock Marlene Werry, Regional Municipality of Durham

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Task Force Participants Peter Budreo, South Lake Community Futures Development Corporation Terry Clayton, Clayton Communications Paul Clayton, CBM St. Mary’s Cement Judy Coward, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Susan Creighton, Township of Brock Gail Dennis, Sutton Group Heritage Realty, Beaverton and District Chamber of Commerce David Ellins, President, Cedarhurst Golf Club, Russell Fisher, Fisher’s Independent Grocer Ted Foster, President, Cannington and Area Historical Society, Brock Community Health Centre Shannon Inglis, Brock Community Employment Resource Centre (CERC) Rick Lea, Durham Region Local Training Board Tena Lush, Atocrates Inc. Heather Macmillan, Durham Region Local Training Board Denise Marsh, Denise Marsh Income Tax Services, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee Larry O'Connor, Mayor, Township of Brock, Brock Community Health Centre Steve Pauls, The Haven Bed and Breakfast Inn, Beaverton and District Chamber of Commerce Sylvia Pauls, The Haven Bed and Breakfast Inn, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee George Pilgrim, Pilgrim’s Home Hardware, Sunderland Business Association Peter Prust, Pefferlaw Peat Products, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee Terry Sellers, Jingles, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee Barbara Smith, Silver Connections Peter Terry, Braids & Laces, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee Bill Vieveen, Vieveen’s Nursery Marlene Werry, Durham Region Economic Development Rein Westerbaan, Azar Farms, Durham Agricultural Advisory Committee Doug White, Cedarhurst Golf Club Jay Yerema-Weafer, The Magic Door Gallery, Brock Economic Development Liaison Committee

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Appendix B – Task Force Input
The following is the input generated during the Task Force Workshop on October 8, 2008.

Warm-up Exercise 1. Looking ahead 10 years what would Brock Township be like if you had the power to make it any way you wanted? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Main street beautification. Unique business opportunities Youth retention, a place where children will stay Put the communities on the map Cohesiveness within the Township. Working together among the communities to set Brock Township apart Security for local business and community members 1 good local job per household Good manufacturing opportunities – long-term opportunities instead of short-term Manufacturing base provides income that allow people to spend in the community Council should not take small businesses in the local communities for granted Bigger residential base Well planned urban communities Need infrastructure support – No sewage treatment or water in Cannington or Sunderland Better transit options to the community Weekly events to attract people to the community – a major event of some variety One event each season, or four memorable events each year Each family has opportunity to access computer and internet A green community – close proximity to Lake Simcoe. The community should draw on the fact that community are leaders in environmental programs (specific to Lake Simcoe). Investigate green energy opportunities Fair trade community Senior housing, to transition between owing their own homes and finally into nursing homes/facilities Strategic or innovative transportation approach. How will an aging population be able to travel through the Township as they may no longer be able to drive their own vehicle No urgent care centre, all people must go to a hospital Facilities for young population should be made available to all no matter what income level they are in. 100% graduation rate from high school Focus on culture and the arts. Provide people opportunities with things to do in their spare time and attract more visitors No accommodation for visitors (hotels/motels) Don’t let Lake Simcoe be destroyed

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Township of Brock Business Retention & Expansion Project - Final Report

Baseline and Future Plans sections 2. What does this data tell you about the future of the Brock Township economy? • • • • • • • • • • • 88 net new jobs, what does this represent? Not growing fast enough Looks positive, there is a positive perspective 88 net new jobs without doing anything, the BR+E process will have a positive effect on these total new jobs Cautious time right now. Wait and see perspective hold status quo due to current economic times Age of businesses, very mature business age for Brock Township. Underlying indicator that local community supports local business Aging business can be a future issue, how do we replace the business owners that may be returning Dearth of entrepreneurial activity, no new businesses in local community Transportation not identified as an issue is surprising No one noting that water/sewer is an issue for attracting a large business or to allow for existing businesses to grow is an issue North/South transportation issues throughout the Region

Local Community Issues 3. What findings worry you the most? • • • • • • • • • • • Very limited business leadership in the community, Chamber of Commerce and BIA’s are evident of this x 3 Limited land & space for growth x 4 Region has targeted Brock Township as an area for tourism, but lack of zoned land and current tourism choice Lack of skilled labour – issue for attracting or expansion of local businesses x 2 Inherit fear of change Public transportation Transportation corridors and routes Policing issues and 911 support Street repairs, access lanes and transportation issues Mill rate is higher here than other location Brock township votes in one Region, but then municipal affairs occur at another level

4. What findings please you the most? • • • • • • • • Great place to live/quality of life x 3 Good business support from local community Positive outlook on local business x 2 Community futures and positive response towards the organization Satisfaction with positive outlook by local business community x 2 Positive job growth – net 88 jobs Good fire department Very good local business referrals

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5. What are the highest priority needs that should be addressed? How? • • • • • • Zoning & employment land issues Transportation corridors Broadband in rural areas, telecommunications infrastructure Agricultural development Public process to determine which type of growth is unacceptable to the local citizens and businesses Innovative perspective on planning on the ‘green belt’ what is possible and is being implemented in other communities globally

Business Planning, Workforce Development and Utilities/Telecommunications 6. Does the data point to any opportunities that should be capitalized upon? How? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Business plans, provide local businesses some very short-form ways to create business plans Long distance training should be offered locally to retain youth. This can create local opportunities for entrepreneurs that will create new local green businesses Manufacturing sector – Alberta/Saskatchewan manufacturing opportunities – ship products interprovincially Green energy – develop green energy options in the community Recycling businesses Flexible transportation services. Issue of growing and aging population that is very spread out. Use small vehicles or local school bus system Make school facilities available during summer and after school hours to increase recreational facilities for local youth populations Specific needs analysis for employment and business training needs. Training board could support this Offering targeted training for local business Provide energy audits and training assistance Durham College will be offering training with regards to energy audits, possibly Brock Township Keep track of high school grad’s to offer them opportunities to return to the community in the future Joint or shared training mechanism that will defray the costs for each individual business Put training programs in place that will attract the type of labourers that are needed for each industry sector (e.g. IT) Alternative energy or leading edge green opportunities to set the community apart Training on how to write a business plan (already offered at CFDC) Someway to market local services (specifically CFDC) to the local business community. Create a database for these services. Possibility of using the town’s website to provide one point of access for all these business services. Or email blast to local business about opportunities More capacity needed for local business association. Local Chambers and BIA’s don’t have fulltime staff to provide this support North Durham Business Development Centre – one place where all these ideas can come together. A home for local business associations. Could be a training facility to help out with local training needs and employee up-skilling, business plans, marketing information, mentorship program, incubator possibility Utilization of heritage buildings, could be a satellite facility in each local community for a business development centre

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Markets/Marketing and Retail/Business Services 7. What become your top three priorities when you see this data? • • • • • • • • • • • Get Region to focus on the fact that tourism may not be an important industry sector to focus on But for local tourism businesses it is very important to focus on tourism opportunities. The local tourism product is very undeveloped No public access to local waterfront. Opportunity to provide local boating on the Lake. Cruise opportunities to increase local tourism choice Beaches in Beaverton are poorly maintained and closed very often Signage or lack thereof. Beaverton, can’t find waterfront access. Sunderland and Cannington difficult to find downtown core The opportunity for tourism is here, how should Brock Township take advantage of the opportunity provided by the Region Accommodations – feasibility study of hotel/motel in the Township. Find appropriate business to do study Co-Op for tourism products\businesses that could be run by local community members. Sunderland arts, Beaverton Lake opportunities, Cannington accommodations and restaurants Possibility of agri-tourism opportunities across the Township Collaboration across the Township regarding economic development and tourism opportunities Signage – not enough and poorly designed

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Appendix C – Case Study in Joint Marketing and Promotions
Main Street Revitalization Initiative In February, 2005 the Municipalities of Marmora & Lake, Centre Hastings (Madoc), Tweed and StirlingRawdon partnered to form the Main Street Revitalization Initiative. With assistance from the Rural Development Division of OMAFRA, a management committee in each town was formed consisting of elected members of Council, business owners, service club reps and anyone else interested in the redevelopment of their downtown/central business district. To assist the municipalities and the work of the committees, in June, 2005 a sub-contractor was hired. The costs of this Coordinator’s employment (a multi-year initiative) are, and have been, shared between the four municipalities. Since the hiring of the Coordinator, the initiative has, for each of the four downtowns, completed a market analysis and streetscape conceptual design plan. This year, OMAFRA provided funding through the Rural Economic Development Program to complete branding, commercial recruitment and landscape architecture designs. Local committees are very active and in every case the local municipality is also building the momentum by making investments in their downtown areas (e.g. Marmora event signage, Madoc murals, Stirling decorative wall, Tweed heritage street signs). Last year, the group completed commercial recruitment and branding strategies. The branding strategy has recently won a marketing award from the Economic Developers Association of Canada for the country’s most effective composition. You can see from the logo provided that the individual identity of each community is not lost within the concept of working together. In fact, the overall branding guidelines allow for each community to use an individual logo (as shown below the main logo). This is useful for such things as shopping bags which have the full logo on one side and then the individual downtown logo on the other side.

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