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					Telephone/Fax : 2813 7500 e-mail address : membership@royalasiaticsociety.org.hk web address : www.royalasiaticsociety.org.hk

NOVEMBER 2009
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IN THIS ISSUE
FUTURE ACTIVITIES
Thursday 3 December Friday 8 January Friday 29 January Saturday 6 February Lecture Lecture Lecture Local Visit “East River Column: Hong Kong Guerrillas in the Second World War and After” Flight of the One-Legged Admiral: Re-enacting the Christmas Day 1941 Escape from Hong Kong Pandas The China Light and Power Company Archives 2 2 4 4

RECENT ACTIVITES
Saturday 19 September Tuesday 6 October Friday 16 October Friday 6 November Saturday 7 November Local Visit Visit Lecture Lecture Walk The China Light and Power Company Archives Lok Man Bookshop “Hidden in Plain Sight: The Remarkable Impact of the Ancient Story of King Goujian in Twentieth-Century China” The Evolution of Modern Piracy in South China The Urban Transformation of Hong Kong — West of Pottinger Street 5 6 6 7 8

OF GENERAL INTEREST

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BOOKING FORMS

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Future Activities
LECTURE East River Column: Hong Kong Guerrillas in the Second World War and After Helena May • Thursday 3 December
Hong Kong’s story in the Second World War has been predominantly told as a story of the Allied forces and their defeat on Christmas Day 1941. But there is another story: the Chinese guerrilla forces who harassed the Japanese throughout the occupation played a crucial part in the escapes from Hong Kong’s prisoner of war camps and in rescuing Allied airmen. This neglected part of Hong Kong’s war is Chan Suijeung’s topic in this talk and his book East River Column: Hong Kong Guerrillas in the Second World War and After. The guerrilla group usually described as the East River Column gathered momentum in 1937 after China and Japan embarked on full-fledged war. Mr Chan reports on its precursors and the formation of more formal structures that provided the basis for the guerrilla activities in Hong Kong between 1941 and 1945. Just as the guerrilla’s story starts before the Second World War, so it goes on after 1945 and is entwined with the civil war and the establishment of the People’s Republic of China. Due prominence is given to the role of the Chinese guerrillas in Hong Kong during the war, while at the same time setting that struggle into the broader contexts of Guangdong province, the long war between China and Japan, and the victory of the Communists and the early years of their rule in the South. Chan Sui-jeung was born in Hong Kong in a family whose history in Hong Kong goes back some 200 years. He graduated from the University of Hong Kong in 1959. From 1968 to 1994, he was a career Administrative Officer of the Hong Kong Civil Service. From 1980 to 1984, he was District Officer, Sai Kung, New Territories Administration, where he met many of the veterans of the East River Column. For over 20 years, he has been an Honorary Research Fellow of the Centre of Asian Studies at the University of Hong Kong. He is the author of The Jews of Kaifeng: Reflections on Sino-Judaic History and Calendar of Traditional Chinese Festivals and Local Celebrations. His latest book is published by Hong Kong University Press as part of the Royal Asiatic Society’s Hong Kong Studies Series. Speaker: Date/Time: Venue: Cost: Booking: Chan Sui-jeung Thursday, 3 December 2009 6.30pm (cash bar available from 6.00 pm) The Garden Room of The Helena May, 35 Garden Road, Central Members $50, Non-members $70 Please send cheque and booking form on page 13 to Katherine Fenton

*****

Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Future Activities
LECTURE Flight of the One-Legged Admiral: Re-enacting the Christmas Day 1941 Escape from Hong Kong City Hall • Friday 8 January
On December 25, 1941, within hours of Hong Kong's surrender, a group of 68 British and Chinese officers and men made a daring breakout through the encircling Japanese forces. Leaving Aberdeen under heavy gunfire, they sailed by night in five motor torpedo boats to Mirs Bay and landed on the mainland. Guided by Chinese guerrillas and fed by villagers, they walked for four days and nights across rough country frequented by bandits and Japanese patrols to the Chinese Nationalist held town of Huizhou, where they were welcomed as heroes. The escape party included China’s top representative in Hong Kong, the one-legged Admiral Chan Chak, the future Colonial Secretary, David MacDougall and a number of senior British intelligence officers. The main party of almost fifty Royal Navy sailors continued their journey by river, road and rail across China to Burma and India, finally reaching Britain five months later. How this unlikely group came together and how they managed to get away as the rest of Hong Kong prepared to buckle down to long years of occupation are the topics of this talk by Tim Luard, who has been researching the escape for a book. He has also been helping to prepare an exhibition which brings together for the first time written records, photographs and mementoes of this remarkable episode and will be shown for the next two years at the Hong Kong Museum of Coastal Defence.

Photos courtesy of Tim Luard

Tim Luard graduated in Chinese at Edinburgh University in 1973 and spent the next seven years in Hong Kong, living on Cheung Chau and working as a freelance journalist. Highlights of his 23-year career at the BBC included covering the events in Tiananmen Square during a spell as Beijing Correspondent from 1987-89 and making a 6part radio series on the history of Hong Kong to mark the handover. Tim and his wife, Alison – whose father Colin McEwan was a member of the escape party – retraced the escapers’ route on foot to Huizhou last year (see full report in our March 2009 newsletter). This Christmas they will be joined by some seventy other descendants as part of a much bigger event being staged both in the SAR and on the mainland by the Hongkong Escape Re-enactment Organisation (HERO) and its Chinese partners.

Speaker: Date/Time: Venue: Booking:

Mr Tim Luard Friday, 8 January 2010 6.30pm 8th Floor, City Hall High Block, Central This lecture is free and open to the public, with no booking required

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Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Future Activities
LECTURE Pandas Helena May • Friday 29 January
Ms Suzanne Gendron, Executive Director Zoological Operations and Education at Ocean Park will speak to us about Pandas. Ms Gendron will discuss the Pandas as well as the sanctuary in Northern China.

Speaker: Date/Time: Venue: Booking:

Ms Suzanne Gendron Friday, 29 January 2010, 6.30 pm (cash bar available from 6.00 pm) Conference Room of The Helena May, 35 Garden Road, Central Please send cheque and booking form on page 13 to Katherine Fenton

*****
LOCAL VISIT The China Light and Power Company Archives Saturday 6 February
Due to popular demand, we are repeating this visit. Our Home, Our History – The Hong Kong Heritage Project (HKHP) is a non profit undertaking initiated in May 2007 by Sir Michael Kadoorie, whose own family connection to Hong Kong stretches back to 1880 when Sir Elly Kadoorie first arrived in the Far East from Baghdad. The impetus behind the establishment of the HKHP was to preserve Hong Kong’s history through the collection of oral history testimonials and to house these in a public archive facility alongside Kadoorie related documents, before those who had witnessed the seminal changes of the twentieth century in Hong Kong disappeared. The project is the first of its kind in Hong Kong. The Project’s mission is local heritage preservation. Hong Kong’s current lack of archival law makes this task all the more urgent. The Project also aims to promote education, original academic research and enrich Hong Kong’s existing archival collection with written records, which relate to the occupation of Hong Kong and its post-war reconstruction, the Jewish communities of Shanghai and Hong Kong, the history of the Kadoorie Family as well as Hong Kong’s business development through the lens of the China Light & Power and Hongkong Shanghai Hotel companies. CLP has collected over 300 filmed interviews, which include testimonials from Szeto Wah, Lord David Wilson and Elsie Tu. We believe that living history complements, strengthens and provides alternative vantage points to the written records. CLP hopes to raise public awareness and interest in history for its own sake through the website, which you can check out at www.hongkongheritage.org. The archive has recently opened to the public and our oral history interview collection continues apace. Date/Time: Venue: Cost: Booking: Saturday, 6 February 2010 China Light and Power Archives, Mong Kok Members $50 Non-members $70 Please send cheque and booking form on page 14 to M.B. Broom

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Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Recent Activities
LOCAL VISIT The China Light and Power Company Archives Saturday 19 September Reported by Michael Broom
To mark its centenary celebrations in 2001 the China Light and Power (CLP) published a book entitled A Century of Light which chronicled the history of the company and its founders, the Kadoorie family. Conscious of the desire to leave a lasting corporate and family legacy to the people of Hong Kong, Sir Michael Kadoorie has personally supported the funding by CLP of a unique project called Our Home, Our History – The Hong Kong Heritage Project (HKHP). A group of the RASHKB were invited to visit the archive, where we were met by Ms Amelia Allsop, one of the project managers, and archivist Mr Clement Cheung. The first part of the visit consisted of a briefing on document conservation and a demonstration by Mr Gavin Lee, which included removal of rusty staples and transfer of documents to special plastic document files designed by the Public Records Office. We were informed that the archive does have correspondence between the late leader Deng Xiao-ping and Sir Lawrence Kadoorie. A representative exhibition of documents, including ledgers and company minute books was made available for our inspection and we donned white cotton gloves for this purpose. Of particular interest were records recounting the role the Kadoorie family played in Shanghai in the 1930’s assisting Jewish refugees from Europe. While documentary records form the bulk of the archive it does have several items of memorabilia, including Sir Lawrence Kadoorie’s leather briefcase and old office machines such as a manual calculator. In addition to the conservation of paper records, the Project has sought to collect oral histories from a wide range of people in the Hong Kong community. This collection now amounts to over three hundred recorded interviews. The group was shown a film entitled A Tribute to the Factory Girls, comprised of archive film footage from the 1960’s and 70’s showing the industrial areas of Kowloon and the New Territories and interviews with former factory workers. We were joined by the project director Mr Peter Greenwood, who answered questions and led a discussion on the role of the archive. I am grateful to members who wrote their thoughts and impressions of the visit. As several of the members have commented, we were warmly welcomed by Peter Greenwood, Amelia Allsop and Clement Cheung and I would like to extend the RASHKB’s grateful thanks. “The film. In a few instances, people have been interviewed on camera. This includes factory girls employed during Hong Kong’s industrial ‘heyday’. This film has been criticised for giving a one-sided approach nevertheless it does provide an important aspect to the story of Hong Kong’s own ‘industrial revolution’. It is sometimes surprising how well people with little formal education speak, providing the matter they are talking about is close to their hearts.” Dr Dan Waters “It was interesting to see a family/corporate archival project in progress, to glance through the primary sources and wonderful old photos and be introduced to the website. Thanks to Peter Greenwood, Amelia Allsop and Clement Cheung for patiently answering questions. Also impressive that just 4 staff have done such great work in 2 years.” Ms Chai Kim-wah “A tremendous morning. I thought the work they have done in less than two years to get the archive going from scratch is a remarkable achievement. I also like the fact that they don’t do it for scholars only, but for the benefit of the community at large. A very interesting visit.” Prof Alain Le Pichon “China Light and Power have a wonderful archive that is cared for by a professional and friendly team who genuinely make you feel welcome and who obviously care passionately about our collective (that is to say Hong Kong) history. Three cheers to Amelia, Clement and Pete.” Mr Adrian Churn “The visit to the CLP Archive was a great pleasure. The scope of the project goes far beyond its name; it’s not simply a collection of the historical records of a family or companies, but rather a large scale project to preserve some of Hong Kong’s cultural heritage. The archive is managed by a friendly and dedicated group of people who enthusiastically guided us through the process of preserving documents and displayed for us an eclectic collection of books, photos, maps and miscellaneous items covering nearly a century of Hong Kong life. I particularly enjoyed browsing through letters, documents and photos from the 1930s and 40s viewing everything from property purchase and sale notes and correspondence concerning political climates. We were shown some captivating and informative short films, in which the interviewees told their stories abut living a Hong Kong life that no longer exists. I highly recommend this visit to other RAS members and to anyone with an interest in delving further into Hong Kong’s colourful history.” Mr Brian Dietrich
Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009 page 5

Recent Activities
VISIT Lok Man Bookshop Tuesday 6 October Reported by Valery Garrett
A fortunate twelve RAS members were able to enjoy an evening of books and wine at Lorence Johnston's small bookshop at 192A Hollywood Road, Sheung Wan (www.lokmanbooks.com) on Tuesday 6th October. Ensconced in leather armchairs, glasses of wine in hand, and cheese and nibbles in easy reach, members listened to a fascinating talk on rare books. Lorence told us how he moved three years ago from the finance industry to his first love, books. His bookshop now stocks first editions, rare books on China, and out of print books from around the world. Members enjoyed browsing the shelves, heard of the amazing prices some of his books fetched, and afterwards adjourned to dinner at a nearby restaurant.

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LECTURE “Hidden in Plain Sight: The Remarkable Impact of the Ancient Story of King Goujian in Twentieth-Century China” City Hall • Friday 16 October Reported by Don Gasper
Though the story of Guojian, monarch of the Yue Kingdom in the fifth century B.C., is well known to most educated Chinese and it has been worked and reworked countless times in popular culture, it is virtually unknown in the Western literature about China. Paul Cohen, Professor Emeritus of History at Wellesley College, has sought to remedy this in his new book Speaking to History: The Story of King Guojian in Twentieth-Century China (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009) and this was the topic of his lecture. The lecture was illustrated by a number of slides which showed how popular this story was in the late Qing and early Republican period. One of the slides was a picture taken from a primer published in March 1927 that went through numerous subsequent printings. It shows the famous scene where the king, defeated by the neighbouring state of Wu, rests on a brushwood bed looking at a suspended gall bladder to remind him of his humiliation as he plots revenge. Professor Cohen showed us a photograph of the banner that hung over the Whampoa Military Academy that recalled this episode, as well as an advertisement for Golden Dragon cigarettes from May 9, 1925 (the anniversary of the government’s capitulation to Japan’s demands in 1915) that referred to the king as a model for emulation. He noted that what had originally been the story of the personal humiliation of one monarch had been transformed in the late 19th century into a metaphor for China’s national humiliation at the hands of foreign imperialism. A 1934 entry from the diary of Nationalist leader Generalissimo Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek) showed that he strongly identified with Guo Jian. After 1949 when he fled to Taiwan, his regime there saw itself like the small kingdom of Yue faced with the more powerful state of Wu (the mainland). Jiang dreamed of recapturing the mainland. On the mainland too, the story was popular. For example, it was the subject of books written in 1961 by playwright Cao Yu and in 1962 by novelist Mao Dun, who interpreted it as a lesson on the importance of self reliance, following China’s break with the Soviet Union. From the 1990s, according to Prof. Cohen, the story began to be used in a different way, to emphasize patriotism, to teach people to cope with adversity and to criticize corruption. Today, he mentioned, the Guo Jian story is frequently referred to by Chinese experts in security matters and international relations.

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Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Recent Activities
LECTURE The Evolution of Modern Piracy in South China Helena May • Friday 6 November Reported by Colin Davidson
Professor Robert Antony opened his lecture with a general introduction to the study of pirates—as practiced by ‘Piratologists’. A leading authority on the subject, Professor Antony described the methods by which pirates of the South China Coast may be classified. This includes by periods of activity, their activities by modus operandi and the three typologies of piracy: opportunistic, professional, and sanctioned, as with privateers. The period between 1780 and 1810 marks the end of the golden age of Chinese piracy. At the beginning of this period, a number of pirate gangs competed fiercely against each other. However in 1805 seven of the most powerful gangs formed a loose confederation that numbered between 40,000 and 60,000 pirates. This resulted in a form of law and order which enabled the confederation to institutionalize its activities of piracy, ransom, bribery and extortion. Such was the strength of this force that the Imperial Ching navy was unable to defeat their masses. In 1809 Richard Glasspoole, a sailor with the British East India Company was abducted by pirates of the confederation. Upon his release following the payment of a ransom he was able to give a colourful account of the activities of the pirates. The confederation collapsed in 1810, when lead by Zhang Bao and Zheng Yi Sao; the pirates surrendered in return for promises of pardons and rewards. The second major period of Chinese piracy was in the latter half of the nineteen century. Professor Antony described the activities of the American renegade pirate Eli Boggs in the 1850s and the Cantonese pirate A- Pak, who was eventually sanctioned to destroy other pirates. The ‘Namoa’ incident in 1890, which involved a number of Europeans, resulted in the infamous beheading of suspect pirates in Bias Bay in 1891. In the early twentieth century pirate activity was centred around Macau and Coloane, as well as Bias Bay. The queen of Macau pirates, Lai Choi San, was well known in the 1930s, as the film studios turned their attentions to the romance of piracy with movies such as ‘Shanghai Lily’ and ‘Vampires of the China Coast’. The hijacking of steamships made for good storylines. Much of the pirate activity of this period was focused on the taking of hostages and the payment of ransoms for release. Fear of being taken captive was a constant threat for Europeans travelling the many steamer routes of the South China Coast. After the Second World War there were sporadic incidents through the decades, culminating in the much publicized incident in January 2000 when thirteen men were executed for piracy in Shanwei, Guangdong, for their involvement in the attack on the bulk-carrier Cheung Son in the Taiwan Strait. The entire crew was brutally murdered and their bodies thrown overboard. Professor Antony’s lecture was an excellent study of a subject which is much romanticized, but seldom seriously evaluated. His forthcoming book, Elusive Pirates, Pervasive Smugglers will no doubt provide still further interesting insights into this fascinating subject.

*****

Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Recent Activities
WALK The Urban Transformation of Hong Kong — West of Pottinger Street Saturday 7 November Reported by Colin Davidson
This walk was previously scheduled for Saturday 25th April, when due to extreme weather conditions and a black storm rain warning, the event had to be curtailed. The organizers at that time, Hendrik Tieben and Woo Pui Leng of the Department of Architecture, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, very kindly agreed to reschedule the walk later in the year when the weather should be more favourable. The number of members who wanted to join was such that it was decided to divide those attending the event into two groups, one in the morning and the other in the afternoon. These groups were in turn divided into two, with Hendrik and Leng each separately conducting tours of approximately ten people in the morning and the afternoon. This proved to be a very successful arrangement, with each group of a size that was manageable and where participants could hear the full commentary. Introductions to the walks were given at the Conservancy Association Centre for Heritage (CACHe), an interesting government heritage building in Western Street. It was explained that the Department of Architecture, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, had carried out studies into the urban transformation of Sai Ying Pun, which tied in closely with the RAS book A Sense of Place: Hong Kong West of Pottinger Street published earlier this year and the photographic survey of the area carried out by the RAS in 1974. The purpose of the walk was to examine the urban fabric of Sai Ying Pun and some of the remaining historical buildings. For his tour, Hendrik Tieben described in detail, with the aid of a handout, government proposals for the redevelopment of the area. He showed us some very dubious “artists impressions” intended to show how the area would look in the future. Hendrik’s walk took us along Third Street and into Yu Lok Lane, a fascinating alleyway of small historical buildings and surely one of the last remnants of a bygone way of life, more reminiscent of the older parts of Macau. Most of this area is scheduled for redevelopment. We moved to High Street, where a detailed explanation was given of the numerous different types of buildings facing this road and how their size, form and function had changed due to environmental pressures and legislation. At the corner of Eastern Street we viewed the Old Mental Hospital, the Methadone Clinic and one of the earlier LDC projects. The potential impact of the new MTR line on the area was discussed. In Tak Sing Lane we viewed a very rare example of old houses being restored for new use, albeit in rather mysterious circumstances. The tour concluded with a walk along Second Street and First Street. Woo Pui Leng provided the second group with a detailed map of buildings of interest which first took us down Western Street to Queen’s Road West, where we viewed numerous mixed use buildings where appearance and form had been influenced by changing building regulations. Further along the street, we saw some remaining pre and post war housing, before moving up to pass the enormous recently completed URA development between First and Second Street. This tour then proceeded to Tak Sing Lane, Third Street, High Street and Yu Lok Lane, as with the other group. The morning tours ended with a dim sum lunch at a typical local and very large Chinese restaurant nearby. The boisterous atmosphere added to the sense of ‘place’ for all those who attended. It was a fascinating and revealing day for all involved; numerous participants mentioned they were totally unaware of the history and influences behind so many of the buildings around us. It was however also a sad reminder of how our urban heritage is being systematically destroyed by excessive focus on economic gains, resulting in large scale redevelopment, gentrification and the disappearance of the older, more intimate urban fabric. We are extremely grateful to Hendrik and Leng for organizing this trip not once, but twice, and we hope we will have the opportunity to join them again for further visits to other historical parts of Hong Kong.

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Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Of General Interest
OBITUARY Written by Peter Stuckey

Colin Michael Guilford

Photo courtesy of Peter Stuckey

The Society was much saddened to learn of the passing of Michael Guilford on 5th October 2009. Michael had been an active Member and supporter of the Branch for twenty years. He attended and contributed to many of our activities. He was a well known figure in Hong Kong and was a Justice of the Peace for over 20 years, involving visits to prisons. He was much respected and remained approachable, humble and generous. He was born on 3rd April 1929 in Essex, England. After military service with the Royal Engineers he read Mechanical Sciences (Engineering) at Queen’s College, Cambridge from 1949 to 1952. He also completed a post-graduate course on Soils and Foundations at Harvard in 1963. Michael came to Hong Kong in 1952 and worked in Hong Kong with the highly respected consulting engineering firm of Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick. He remained with the Firm throughout his working life from 1952 to 1991 and as a Consultant to the Firm till 1996. He was, for 21 years, a Partner with the Firm. One of his early projects was the Kai Tak Airport (runway) Development. He was Resident Engineer for the Plover Cove Water Scheme, involving Hong Kong’s longest dam, with a 2 kms length, and a 1200 hectare reservoir recovered from the sea – the world’s first such reservoir. He also contributed to the Kai Tak airport tunnel, the Cross Harbour Tunnel, completed in 1972 and to the Kwai Chung Container Terminal development. Michael also had a keen sense of history as exemplified by a paper he wrote on “Civil Engineering in Hong Kong 1841-1941” featuring rare photographs of early civil engineering projects in Hong Kong. (A copy can be downloaded if you Google Michael Guilford, Hong Kong). He was keen on sports and despite some problems with his legs in latter years remained active and inquisitive to see and understand all that our visits had to offer. He celebrated whenever an occasion arose, including big parties to celebrate 50 years in Hong Kong and his 80th birthday. With his family he prepared a report on his life in celebration of his 80th birthday. His family tells us that even in his last week Michael was updating and tuning that report. Ever the thorough Consultant he produced the report accurate, up to date and on time! We extend our sympathy to his loving wife, Pat, and to his four adult children, Amanda, Michelle, Colin and Oliver.

*****

Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Of General Interest
OBITUARY Written by Peter Stuckey

Ronald James Clibborn-Dyer

Photo courtesy of Dr Brian Shaw

Ron Clibborn-Dyer passed away on 7th November 2009 after a full and active life of some 69 years. He was born in the five storey Semaphore Tower at Chatley Heath in Surrey, England on 9th October 1940. At 20 he joined the Northern Rhodesian Police Force and served with them for four years till independence. It was while serving in Lusaka that he met his wife to be, Veronica. They both came to Hong Kong and Ron joined the Royal Hong Kong Police Force in 1965. He served with them in a variety of posts, particularly in the Traffic Branch, till his retirement, as Chief Superintendent, in 1996. It was in that year that Ron found the Wan Jing Temple - the Temple of Peace and Tranquillity. The Temple was remote and at that time, ramshackle, but, in accordance with one of their favourite sayings, “what can be imagined can be achieved”, Ron and Veronica set up home there and transformed it. Since then, they have invited literally thousands of people to enjoy their hospitality at the Temple, to share Ron’s love for nature, his delight with the goats, his knowledge of the plants and his concern for heritage. As a Society we have enjoyed two group visits to this hidden treasure and enjoyed Ron’s talk at a packed meeting in the Helena May when Ron showed us photographs and that amazing video he took of his capture of a python in the grounds of the temple and the regurgitation of a poor little goat. Ron was an RAS icon – he epitomized so much of what we stand for. He knew and loved Asia and loved to share his passion for it. He actively sought out ways to learn more about it and to meet and help its people, and to know and understand more about the nature and culture of the region he had adopted as home. It was on the overseas trips that many of us got to know Ron better and to really appreciate his company and to respect and like him even more. Participants each have their fond memories of Ron - on the Ning Po and Putuo Shan trip, walking the Nakasendo Highway (when he did not hesitate to direct the Japanese traffic, and very effectively too, during a hold up outside our hotel in Kyoto), in Bhutan , Tibet and in Mongolia. His support, often quietly given, was always with good humour. His sense of fun, for example, at the dinners after the RAS lectures will long be cherished. We extend our sympathy and best wishes to Veronica, and to his three adult children, Clifford, Michael and Angela.

*****

Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Of General Interest
REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY Sunday 8 November By Dan Waters
For the third year running the RASHKB took part in the Memorial Service in Statue Square and a wreath was laid at the Cenotaph, jointly by our President, Mr Robert Nield, and Past President, Dr Dan Waters. Messrs Michael Broom, Honorary Activities Co-ordinator, and Tony Lam, Council member, also attended the service. It was a moving occasion for many older participants when they inevitably recalled their own memories of the Second World War. This year, a few children accompanied their parents to the Cenotaph. There were, according to my reckoning, 112 wreaths. The number seems to increase year by year. The service is to commemorate the fallen, both service and civilian, of all nationalities and creeds, who died in the defence of Hong Kong. Prayers were said by clerics of various Faiths.

Photo courtesy of Tony Lam

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INFORMATION ON NEW PUBLICATIONS
The editors of the Journal would like to start a section in the Journal that lists new publications that fall within the area of the Society’s interests. Given the number of new books and also limitations on space, we cannot publish full reviews of every such publication, so we feel it would be a useful service to members to provide at least a listing. We are also very aware that some books are published privately and never come to the attention of the average reader. So the purpose of this message is to ask members to let us know about any new books (or recent ones) they come across. There is no need to report new books that come from the local university presses, but it would be especially valuable to hear about private publications and publications in specialist areas that nonetheless may interest a wider range of readers: a book on the history of architecture in Hong Kong would be an example of the kind of thing that we are thinking of here. Over time we may need to define more precisely the range of books that we will include but, as an initial working definition, we will limit the list to works of non-fiction that address the history of the region or the culture of its peoples. If possible please provide full title, author, publisher, number of pages, number of illustrations and price. If a brief description is available (especially in digital form) that would also be most valuable. Please send information to colinday@hku.hk. Colin Day Associate Editor

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Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Of General Interest
LECTURE BY PROF JAMES WATSON
Prof James Watson, Professor of Anthropology at Harvard University, and a long time member of the RAS will be speaking on Saturday, 12 December. His talk, titled “Poon Choi: Cuisine, Heritage and the Search for Identity in Post 1997 Hong Kong” is scheduled from 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm and will be held in the Lecture Hall of the Hong Kong Museum of History. Prof Watson has been researching Chinese society in the New Territories since the 1970s. All are welcome to attend.

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HERITAGE ALIVE Hong Kong Winning Projects of UNESCO Asia-Pacific Heritage Awards for Culture Heritage Conservation Exhibition
This exhibition aims to provide an overview of the UNESCO Heritage Awards and to introduce the 12 winning projects from Hong Kong. Some building components, measured drawings, documents and models of the winning projects are also displayed. By showcasing the efforts and achievements of the government and local community groups, it is hoped that the public’s awareness in heritage preservation could be aroused and enhanced. The exhibition to be held in Thematic Exhibition Gallery, Hong Kong Heritage Discovery Centre, Kowloon Park, Haiphong Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon will run from 22 November 2009 to 17 February 2010. Additional information can be obtained at website: www.amo.gov.hk.

*****
Boat Field trip Tolo Channel and Double Haven, North East New Territories Saturday 5 December
The Royal Geographical Society – Hong Kong has invited RAS members to join on a Boat Field trip to Tolo Channel and Double Haven, North East New Territories on Saturday, 5 December 2009. The Leaders will be Prof Bernie Owen and Dr Raynor Shaw. Please meet at City Hall, Central: 9.30 am and bring a water bottle, walking shoes and appropriate clothing for being outdoors. The cost is HK$300 for RGS Members and $350 for guests, including land and sea transport on a cruiser and a buffet lunch with drinks. Please mail a note with your cheque payable to Royal Geographical Society – Hong Kong to GPO Box 6681, Hong Kong. PLEASE E-MAIL TO THE RGS OFFICE AT events@rgshk.org.hk BEFORE POSTING. E-mail: events@rgshk.org.hk. Tel: 2583 9700.

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Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Booking Forms
LECTURE East River Column Hong Kong Guerrillas in the Second World War and After Helena May • Thursday 3 December
Please reserve _______ places for members at $50 each and _______ places for guests at $70 each. I enclose my cheque for $ _______ payable to “Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch”. I understand the Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch, and its officials take no responsibility and accept no liability for any accident, injury or loss to myself, other members or my guests named above, that may occur during this activity. Name(s) of Member(s): (please print) .................................................................Membership No.: ............................ Name(s) of Guest(s): .................................................................................................................................................... Telephone: (daytime)............................................................. (evening) ........................................................................ Mobile: ................................................................................. Email: (please print) ...................................................... Please send cheque with this form to: Katherine Fenton, Flat E, 28th Floor, 1 Island Place, 51 Tanner Road, North Point, Hong Kong

LECTURE Pandas Helena May • Friday 29 January
Please reserve _______ places for members at $50 each and _______ places for guests at $70 each. I enclose my cheque for $ _______ payable to “Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch”. I understand the Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch, and its officials take no responsibility and accept no liability for any accident, injury or loss to myself, other members or my guests named above, that may occur during this activity. Name(s) of Member(s): (please print) .................................................................Membership No.: ............................ Name(s) of Guest(s): .................................................................................................................................................... Telephone: (daytime)............................................................. (evening) ........................................................................ Mobile: ................................................................................. Email: (please print) ...................................................... Please send cheque with this form to: Katherine Fenton, Flat E, 28th Floor, 1 Island Place, 51 Tanner Road, North Point, Hong Kong

Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

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Booking Forms
LOCAL VISIT The China Light and Power Company Archives Saturday 6 February
Please reserve _______ places for members at $50 each and _______ places for guests at $70 each. I enclose my cheque for $ _______ payable to “Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch”. I understand the Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch, and its officials take no responsibility and accept no liability for any accident, injury or loss to myself, other members or my guests named above, that may occur during this activity. Name(s) of Member(s): (please print) .................................................................Membership No.: ............................ Name(s) of Guest(s): .................................................................................................................................................... Telephone: (daytime)............................................................. (evening) ........................................................................ Mobile: ................................................................................. Email: (please print) ...................................................... Please send cheque with this form to: M.B. Broom, Apt A16, Tower 1, Caribbean Coast; 2, Kin Tung Street; Tung Chung, Lantau, Hong Kong (Telephone: 2719 4974) Successful applicants will be notified and visit instructions sent.

Royal Asiatic Society · Hong Kong Branch – November 2009

page 14

Publications Order Form
Price
HK$

Qty
….. ….. ….. ….. ….. …..

Order
HK$ ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ……….

Journals
Vols 1-23 Vols 24-28 Vols 29-48 Index to Vols 1-10 Index to Vols 11-20 Set of Journals in print, 1-49, including indexes $100.00 each $150.00 each $200.00 each $ 50.00 each $ 50.00 each $7,150 set

Books
Hong Kong, Going and Gone The Vegetation of Hong Kong – Structure & Change (Symposium) 1970 The New Territories and Its Future (Symposium) 1982 Index to Sessional Papers Aspects of Social Organization in the New Territories (Symposium) 1964 Beyond the Metropolis: Villages in Hong Kong* In the Heart of the Metropolis: Yaumatei and Its People* Beyond the Metropolis + Yaumatei and Its People (two-volume set)* A Sense of Place: Hong Kong West of Pottinger Street $120.00 $100.00 $ 75.00 $100.00 $ 75.00 $320.00 $275.00 $575.00 $300.00 ….. ….. ….. ….. ….. ….. ….. ….. ….. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ……….

P&P
Beyond the Metropolis In the Heart of the Metropolis A Sense of Place: Hong Kong West of Pottinger Street Full set of Journals All other volumes (per volume)

within Hong Kong
$ 40.00 $ 40.00 $ 30.00 $250.00 $ 20.00

Overseas (surface mail)
$125.00 $125.00 $125.00 price available on request $50.00

TOTAL

HK$ ______

Please return this form with payment to Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong Branch, GPO Box 3864, Hong Kong .
Name………………………………………………………………………………… Membership No. ………………. Address……………………………………………………………………………………………………….………….. …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Daytime Tel …………..……...………Fax………………….…..……….Email……………..……..…………………... We accept US$ or GBP cheques at exchange rates of US$1=HK7 / GBP1=HK$10, but please also add US$14.00 / GBP 8.00 to cover the bank charges incurred in clearing your cheque.

ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY HONG KONG STUDIES SERIES
Reluctant Heroes: Rickshaw Pullers in Hong Kong and Canton, 1874-1954 For Gods, Ghosts and Ancestors: the Chinese Tradition of Paper Offerings Hong Kong Internment, 1942-1945: Life in the Japanese Civilian Camp at Stanley The Six-Day War of 1899: Hong Kong in the Age of Imperialism Watching over Hong Kong: Private Policing 1841-1941 The Dragon and the Crown: Hong Kong Memoirs Public Success, Private Sorrow: The Life and Times of Charles Henry Brewitt Taylor Resist to the End: Hong Kong, 1941 – 1945 East River Column: Hong Kong Guerrillas in the Second World War and After $190.00 $150.00 $190.00 $190.00 $190.00 $190.00 $190.00 $190.00 $190.00 _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____

P & P within Hong Kong $20 P & P Overseas (surface mail) $50 Please return this form with cheque payable to The University of Hong Kong. Mail to Hong Kong University Press, 14/F Hing Wai Centre, 7 Tin Wan Praya Road, Aberdeen, Hong Kong.

Contact Details
Council Members and Others
Position President Vice President Vice-President Immediate Past President Past President Hon. Secretary Hon. Treasurer Hon. Librarian Hon. Activities Co-ordinator Hon. Editor Hon. Archivist Member Member Member Member Member Member Name Mr Robert Nield Dr Elizabeth Sinn Mr Peter Stuckey Dr Patrick Hase Dr Dan Waters Mr David McKellar Dr Peter Halliday Miss Julia Chan Mr Michael Broom Dr Peter Cunich Stacy Belcher Gould Mr Tony Lam Dr Gillian Bickley Mrs Valery Garrett Mr William Greaves Prof Mark MacAlpine Prof Alain le Pichon Phone 2540 0722 2859 2461 2548 6724 2658 6529 2858 1858 2843 2493 2694 9858 2819 9286 2719 4974 2859 7049 2859 7953 2219 7188 2259 3456 2849 8164 2890 3824 2605 3810 2803 1943 2658 5400 2576 6472 2103 5996 2606 0213 2855 9343 2719 4958 2858 9755 2517 8647 2219 7133 2688 0546 2849 8556 3691 8185 2601 2333 2803 1983 Fax 2335 5470 2559 5884 E-mail hiflyer@netvigator.com hrahsyy@hkucc.hku.hk peterstuckey@yahoo.com.hk phhase@hkusua.hku.hk benefit@netvigator.com mckellar@graduate.hku.hk peter.halliday@e-liteitservices.com jlychan@hkucc.hku.hk stgeorge_hk@yahoo.co.hk

pacunich@hkusua.hku.hk sbgould@hkucc.hku.hk
tonylam@agcdesign.com.hk proverse@netvigator.com vgarrett@hkucc.hku.hk

wdgreaves@lcsd.gov.hk youngmac@netfront.net
alainlepichonfr@yahoo.fr

Administrator

Mrs Katherine Fenton Ms Patie Ngor

2813 7500 2289 2068

2813 7500 2804 6868

membership@royalasiaticsociety.org.hk patie.ngor@hk.pwc.com

Advertising
In an effort to defray newsletter costs, we are accepting ads that would be of interest to RAS members and related to the objects of the Society. Would you like to advertise a business or a service you can provide, or do you know someone who might be interested? Our rates are very reasonable: Full Page 2/3 Page 1/2 Page 1/3 Page Classified HK$1,150 HK$850 HK$725 HK$450 First 10 words HK$70, each additional word HK$2.50

For booking please contact the Office on 2813 7500 or email info@royalasiaticsociety.org.hk.

Design and production by Polly Yu Production Ltd (Tel: +852 2526 0206 Fax: +852 2526 0378 Email: pollyu@netvigator.com)


				
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