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					NEWARK PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Computer Applications CURRICULUM GUIDE 2008

The Newark Public Schools 2008

Computer Applications

NEWARK PUBLIC SCHOOLS ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS 2008-2009 Mr. Samuel Gonzalez, Chairperson Ms. Shanique L. Davis-Speight, Vice Chairperson Mr. Tharien Arnold Ms. Barbara King Mr. Anthony Machado Ms. Eliana Pintor Ms. Arelis Romero Mr. Felix A. Rouse Mr. Carlos Valentin, Jr.

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NEWARK PUBLIC SCHOOLS ADMINISTRATION 2008-2009
State District Superintendent ................................................................................................................................................Dr. Clifford B. Chaney State District Deputy Superintendent......................................................................................................................................................................... Chief Financial Officer .................................................................................................................................................................... Mr. Ronald Lee School Business Administrator Chief of Staff................................................................................................................................................................................... Ms. Sadia White Assistant Superintendent ................................................................................................................................................. Ms. Joanne C. Bergamotto School Leadership Team I Assistant Superintendent ..................................................................................................................................................................Mr. Roger Leon School Leadership Team II Assistant Superintendent .................................................................................................................................................Dr. Glenda Johnson-Green School Leadership Team III Assistant Superintendent .................................................................................................................................................................. Ms. Lydia Silva School Leadership Team IV Assistant Superintendent ...............................................................................................................................................................Dr. Don Marinaro School Leadership Team V Assistant Superintendent .......................................................................................................................................................... Dr. Gayle W. Griffin Department of Teaching and Learning Assistant Superintendent .................................................................................................................................................................. Dr. Kevin West Department of Special Programs
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Page ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................1 Board Members .................................................................................................................................................................................................................2 Administration ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................3 Table of Contents ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................4 District Mission Statement ................................................................................................................................................................................................5 District Goals and Guiding Principles ..............................................................................................................................................................................6 Curriculum Committee .....................................................................................................................................................................................................8 Course Philosophy ............................................................................................................................................................................................................9 Course Description..........................................................................................................................................................................................................10 Recommended Textbooks ...............................................................................................................................................................................................11 Course Proficiencies .......................................................................................................................................................................................................12 Curriculum Units ............................................................................................................................................................................................................16 Course Pacing .................................................................................................................................................................................................................17 Standards, Goals, and Objectives....................................................................................................................................................................................18 Appendix ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................X

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Mission Statement
The Newark Public Schools recognize that each child is a unique individual possessing talents, abilities, goals, and dreams. We further recognize that each child can only be successful when we acknowledge all aspects of that child‟s life – addressing their needs, enhancing their intellect, developing character, and uplifting their spirit. Finally, we recognize that individuals learn, grow, and achieve differently; and it is therefore critical that as a district, we provide a diversity of programs based on student needs. As a district, we recognize that education does not exist in a vacuum. In recognizing the rich diversity of our student population, we also acknowledge the richness of the diverse environment that surrounds us. The numerous cultural, educational and economic institutions that are part of the greater Newark community play a critical role in the lives of our children. It is equally essential that these institutions become an integral part of our educational program. To this end, the Newark Public Schools is dedicated to providing a quality education, embodying a philosophy of critical and creative thinking and designed to equip each graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to be a productive citizen. Our educational program is informed by high academic standards, high expectations, and equal access to programs that provide and motivate a variety of interests and abilities for every student based on his or her needs. Accountability at every level is an integral part of our approach. As a result of the conscientious, committed, and coordinated efforts of teachers, administrators, parents, and the community, ALL CHILDREN WILL LEARN. DR. CLIFFORD B. CHANEY

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GOALS AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES Reaching for the Brass Ring
GOALS 

Goal 1

IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Provide all students with equal access to opportunities that demonstrate high academic standards, high expectations, instructional rigor and alignment with the NJCCCS, and which embody a philosophy of critical and creative thinking.

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Goal 2

DEVELOP STUDENT MORAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Equip students to be productive citizens by addressing needs, enhancing intellect, developing character, and instilling pride and hope.

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Goal 3

STRUCTURE THE ORGANIZATION TO BE EFFICIENT, EFFECTIVE AND ALIGNED WITH THE DISTRICT MISSION Allocate and align resources on the basis of student needs with high achievement as the ultimate goal. --Schools and district offices will have effective and efficient programs, processes, operations and services to assure that all students and other customers will have access to certificated, highly trained professionals. --Budget and fiscal systems will support the focus on student achievement through timely and accurate processing of documents.

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Goal 4

ENFRANCHISE COMMUNITY / EMPOWER PARENTS Engage community and family in meaningful decision-making and planning for Newark children.

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GOALS AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES Reaching for the Brass Ring
GUIDING PRINCIPLES 

FOCUS ON STUDENTS Every Newark Public Schools employee must be committed to high achievement for all students and assume responsibility for that success. Everyone clearly communicates the vision, focus, and goals of the district. All district policies, procedures and activities are aligned in support of student achievement.



HIGH EXPECTATIONS / STANDARDS DRIVEN All district personnel are constantly analyzing data and feedback to ensure high standards and support to enable all students to be successful. All school communities are constantly monitoring data and feedback to ensure that each student has the necessary personalized support and quality-learning environment to meet high standards and expectations for learning.



CARING AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT The district is committed to safe, clean, aesthetically pleasing educational work environments. Students‟ and employees‟ diverse backgrounds, abilities, interests, and needs are respected. Structures and practices that promote personalization and equity of access are provided.  SHARED DECISION MAKING The district participates openly and honestly in productive, collaborative and reflective communication and systemically solicits feedback from multiple stakeholders. Systemic feedback loops are established to ensure that all stakeholders (including district offices, administrators, teachers, parents and students) are engaged in dialogue for the purpose of shared decision-making.

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Computer Applications CURRICULUM COMMITTEE
Katherine Clark – West Side High School Patricia Palmiere – Technology High School Keith Starks- Barringer High School Christine Van Sant– Malcolm X Shabazz High School

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Newark Public Schools Computer Applications
Course Philosophy Learning is a process of experiencing, doing, reacting, interacting and developing lasting understanding where the learner plays an essential role in his or her own learning experience. An individual‟s learning is, therefore predicated on his or her desire as well as internal and external motivation. It is the expectation that with the guidance, and the facilitation of educators, the learner will persist through rigorous, and challenging situations. Ultimately the individual acquires and shares knowledge and skills via the production of work, communication, and other forms of assessment that indicate that authentic learning has taken place and learning objectives have been met. Though a critical and challenging task it is the ambition of the business teacher to prepare students for an ever changing workplace. As educators it is further acknowledged that students who plan to enter full-time employment when they complete their high school education must be ready to function in an environment using the latest technology. At the same time, students must be prepared to adapt to changes that are likely to be introduced in relation to their responsibilities. In the face of this challenge, business teachers must continue to bear in mind the importance of certain basic skills such as organizing work, communicating effectively, and interacting successfully with others.

All Students will learn:  The relevance of acquiring technology skills necessary to pursue success in higher education as well as the acquisition of gainful employment.  Both the role of the technology in the business world and the role of the employee in the office environment.
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Computer Applications

How to develop marketable skills using the most current procedures and technologies (specifically applications included in the Microsoft Office).

    

The importance of emerging technologies; How to recognize the importance of organization, accuracy, and efficiency as they relate to productivity. How to develop employability skills including teamwork, strong communication skills, (verbal/written), and soft skills. Professional protocol and professional employee/employer relationships. How to identify opportunities for employment and for professional growth in business and technology occupations.

Upon completing this course, students will have acquired marketable skills required for success in today‟s business world. Throughout the program all facets of learning are developed through a series of practical experiences directly relating to workplace readiness and preparation for further education and / or employment in the business world using modern technology. Here, the teacher has unique opportunities to serve youth by imparting knowledge and infusing real-world experiences through hands-on and critical thinking activities.

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Newark Public Schools Computer Applications
Course Description This is a prerequisite course to Office Systems Technology I, II, and III. In this course students will receive a comprehensive overview of the history and the practical and professional use of computers and the Internet and their relevance in today‟s society and workplace. Also student will be introduced to internal and peripheral components of the actual computer (hardware and software). Students will also be introduced to various Microsoft Office Suite Applications including: Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

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Recommended Textbooks/Resources
Nielsen, Joyce and Skintik, Catherine. (2008). Learning Microsoft Office 2007. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0-13363948-3. Shelly, Gary B, Cashman, Thomas J. & Vermaat, Misty E. (2007). Microsoft Office 2007: Introductory Concepts and Techniques, Windows Vista Edition. Course Technology, Cengage Learning. ISBN 13: 978-1-4239-1228-6©2008, ISBN 10: 1-4239-1228-4 Glencoe Consultants: C. Jacqueline Schultz, Ph.D. and Linda Wooldridge, M.B.A. (2009). iCheck™ Series Microsoft® Office 2007 Real World Applications. Woodland Hills, CA Glencoe/McGraw-Hill. ISBN: 978-0-078-78605-1

Teacher Reference Texts Nielsen, Joyce and Skintik, Catherine. (2008). Learning Microsoft Office 2007. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN-13: 978-0-13363948-3.

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Course Proficiencies
Upon completion of the Computer Applications course each student will be able to: Unit I: The History of Computers       Understand the creation of the modern day computer. Understand how WWII played a role in the computer‟s development and the impact that the Space Race had on the development of computers. Understand Boolean logic and the Binary system and the significance of both in the development of computers. Acquire knowledge about the origins of personal computers and technological developments that progressed computing. Understand the origins of computers in businesses during the 1950‟s. Understand concepts related to computers in the future.

Unit II: The History of the Internet                Learn about the history of the Internet and how the Internet has evolved. Learn to use the Internet as a research tool. Identify and use browsers, search engines, and directories to obtain information to solve real world problems. Recognize the ethical and legal implications of plagiarism of copyrighted materials. Students will recognize accuracy and/or bias of information. Gain an understanding of how changes in technology impact the workplace and society. Exhibit legal and ethical behaviors when using information and technology, and discuss consequences of misuse. Understand the purpose of an “Acceptable Use Policy” and consequences of inappropriate use of technology. Understand and practice safe Internet usage. Learn appropriate Internet etiquette – “Netiquette." Describe the potential and implications of contemporary and emerging computer applications for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs. Exhibit legal and ethical behaviors when using information and technology, and discuss consequences of misuse. Use appropriate language when communicating with diverse audiences using computer and information literacy. Select and use specialized databases for advanced research to solve real world problems. Evaluate information sources for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness. Compose, send, and organize e-mail messages with and without attachments.
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Unit III: Introduction to Microsoft Windows Operating System  Utilize organization tools to manage files and folders Unit IV: Introduction to Microsoft Word         Create documents including a resumes, and business letters. Edit documents. Modify and enhance created or existing document text and paragraphs using formatting options. Create and modify table structure using table options for organizing data. Add visual effects using symbols and special characters. Enhance created and existing documents by inserting graphic elements such as photos and other illustrations. Control page appearance and document accuracy using page set up and spell check options. Identify the impact of technology on society.

Unit V: Introduction to Microsoft Excel          Recognize and navigate through various options associated with creating, modifying, and saving electronic workbooks and spreadsheets. Understand and manipulate the Microsoft Excel user interface including toolbars, ribbons, scroll bars, row and column cell coordinates, and help options. Create, add text to, perform basic edits and save basic electronic workbooks. Comprehend how Excel performs calculations (order of operations) by creating formulas using mathematical operators to calculate listed numerical values. Students will be able to create formulas using basic Excel programmed functions including sum, min, max and average to calculate listed numerical data. Modify existing spreadsheets by manipulating data, cells, columns, and rows as well as use the Edit and Tools commands for performing data searches and spell checks. Enhance and modify worksheets creating a professional appearance using Excel formatting options. Student will be able to use default and user defined print options. As well they will analyze and modify large worksheet set up (header/footer) and page breaks to present professional and legible hard copy worksheets. Create graphic representations of reported data using Excel basic charting options to create and modify charts.

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Unit VI: Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint       
Learn the importance of utilizing PowerPoint to deliver effective presentations.

Explore the PowerPoint user interface by navigating a presentation. Create slides by entering text on slides and saving a presentation. Modify and enhance slide text using formatting options. Add graphic elements on slides using Clip Art, pictures and Word Art. Add and modify tables and charts on slides using SmartArt. Prepare slides for actual presentation by adding slide transition, animation effects, creating speaker notes printing and presenting to an audience.

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Curriculum Units
Unit I: The History of Computers Unit II: The History of the Internet Unit III: Introduction to Microsoft Windows Operating System Unit IV: Introduction to Microsoft Word Unit V: Introduction to Microsoft Excel Unit VI: Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint

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Suggested Course Pacing

Full Year Block Schedule Unit I: The History of Computers Unit II: The Internet Unit III: Introduction to Computers and Microsoft Windows Operating System Unit IV: Introduction to Microsoft Word Unit V: Introduction to Microsoft Excel Unit VI: Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint 4 20 6 60 50 40 2 10 3 30 25 20

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Standard 8.2 TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
ALL STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE NATURE AND IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, TECHNOLOGICAL DESIGN, AND THE DESIGNED WORLD AS THEY RELATE TO THE INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY, AND THE ENVIRONMENT. Strand A:: Nature and Impact of Technology/History of Computers Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments
that could illustrate Objectives

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

What is the significance of studying the historical development of the modern computers? How can studying computer history help explain how technological activity has an affect on economic development, political actions and cultural change?

1. (CPI) Students will have an understanding of the many steps it took to create the modern day computer. 2. (CPI)Students will have an understanding of what factors influenced the development of computers and will be introduced to the pioneers. 3. (CPI) Students will be introduced to Boolean logic and the Binary system and have an understanding why they are used in computers. 4. (CPI) Students will learn how the PC originated and how technological developments progressed computing. 5. (CPI) Students will learn that businesses didn‟t use computers like they are used today. 6. (CPI) Students will have an understanding about the future of computers.

Computer History Timeline

“The History of Computers” DVD Video available at Films Media Group. Computer History Museum www.computerhistory.org
Visit for Current Trends

Current Trends in Computer Technology

Vocabulary

Bell Labs IBM Xerox Stanford Research Institute

Assessment Questions Digital Literacy: Digital Lifestyles

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Standard 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy
ALL STUDENTS WILL USE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TO GATHER AND ORGANIZE INFRMATION AND TO SOLVE PROBLEMS. Strand B: Application of Productivity Tools/Internet

Essential Questions

Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments that
could illustrate Objectives

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

How do we appropriately utilize the Internet as a resource tool? What are the consequences to inappropriate use of the Internet? Why do organizations utilize “Acceptable Use Agreements”? How do we practice safe Internet usage? How do we evaluate the accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness of print and non-print electronic information sources? How do we use the Internet for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs?

1. (CPI)Students will learn about the history of the Internet and how the Internet has evolved. 2. (CPI) Students will learn to use the Internet as a research tool. Identify and use browsers, search engines, and directories to obtain information to solve real world problems. 3. (CPI) Students will gain an understanding of how changes in technology impact the workplace and society. 4. (CPI) Students will describe the potential and implications of contemporary and emerging computer applications for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs.

History of the Internet

Computer History Museum www.computerhistory.org

Searching the Internet with Scavenger Hunts

Education World Scavenger Hunts

Acceptable Use Policy

Digital Literacy: Digital Lifestyles

Internet Vocabulary

NTUAFT NJCCCS

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Standard 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy
ALL STUDENTS WILL USE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TO GATHER AND ORGANIZE INFORMATION AND TO SOLVE PROBLEMS.

Strand B: Application of Productivity Tools/Internet Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments
that could illustrate Objectives

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

How do we appropriately utilize the Internet as a resource tool? What are the consequences to inappropriate use of the Internet? Why do organizations utilize “Acceptable Use Agreements”? How do we practice safe Internet usage? How do we evaluate the accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness of print and non-print electronic information sources? How do we use the Internet for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs?

5. (CPI) Students will exhibit legal and ethical behaviors when using information and technology, and discuss consequences of misuse. 6. (CPI) Students will use appropriate language when communicating with diverse audiences using computer and information literacy. 7. (CPI) Students will identify new technologies and other organizational tools to use in personal, home, and/or work environments for information retrieval, entry, and presentation. E-Mail Activity 8. (CPI) Students will evaluate information sources for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness. 9. (CPI) Students will compose, send, and organize e-mail messages with and without attachments. Learn The NET CyberSmart Framework for Technological Literacy: Searching the Internet Evaluating Websites Plagiarism & Copyright use Internet Safety Framework for Technological Literacy - NJCCCS NPS “Acceptable Use Policy” “Netiquette” Teacher Vision NPS CyberSafety E-Board NPS CyberLingo E-Board

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Standard 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy
ALL STUDENTS WILL USE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TO GATHER AND ORGANIZE INFORMATION AND TO SOLVE PROBLEMS.

Strand A: Basic Computer Skills and Tools/Computers & Operating Systems Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments
that could illustrate Objectives

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

What are the different types of computers and their uses? Why is it important to be able to identify the parts of a computer? What are common input and output devices? What are common storage devices?

1.

(NPS) Students will identify the types of computers and their uses. Identify the Parts of a Computer and Common Peripheral Devices Microsoft - Parts of a Computer http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/w indows/en-us/help/b7bf360d-67e74bad-976d-7623e6deb6dd1033.mspx

2. (NPS) Students will identify the parts of a personal computer. 3. (NPS) Students will identify common input and output devices.
4.

(NPS) Students will identify common storage devices. (NPS) Students will identify the difference between hardware and software. (NPS) Students will identify the difference between operating system software, application software and utility programs.

ADITA – How Computers Work http://www.adita.com/literacy.htm

ADITA – How Computers Work. http://www.adita.com/literacy.htm

5.

What is the difference between hardware and software?
6.

Digital Literacy: Digital Lifestyles

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Standard 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy
ALL STUDENTS WILL USE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TO GATHER AND ORGANIZE INFORMATION AND TO SOLVE PROBLEMS.

Strand B Application of Productivity Tools/Managing Files & Folders Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments
that could illustrate Objectives

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

How will managing files and folders increase efficiency and worker productivity?

7. (CPI) Students will utilize organization tools to manage files and folders.

Managing Files and Folders

Microsoft Help XP Microsoft Help Vista Managing Files & Folders www.microsoft.com/atwork/managei nfo/files.mspx

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 History of Computers - Timeline Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

Standard 8.2 Computer and Information Literacy Strand A: Provide various examples of how technological developments have shaped human history. Brief Description: Students will learn about the development of modern day computers by compiling research data in order to produce a historical timeline. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. Example: Visit “Timeline of Computer History” www.computerhistory.org and have students track major historical events that have lead to the development of the modern day computer. Assign time periods to groups as a cooperative learning assignment. Have students hand in a timeline of major developments in a Word document. Also have student‟s present detailed information in a PowerPoint presentation.

Group A Report on Years 39-48, Group B Report on Years 49-58, Group C Report on Years 59-68, etc.

Resources: www.computerhistory.org

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Current Trends in Computer Technology Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

Standard 8.2 Computer and Information Literacy Strand A: Provide various examples of how technological developments have shaped human history. Brief Description: Students will research current trends in computer technology. How to Teach It: 1. 2. Using the Internet, have students search for current trends in computer technology. Have students report their findings back to the class.

Example: Resources:

Have students research “What kinds of technologies are being developed by Bell Labs?”

Bell Labs IBM Xerox Stanford Research Institute

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Computer History Vocabulary (This vocabulary is optional and accompanies the video “The History of Computers”.) Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

Standard 8.2 Computer and Information Literacy Strand A: Provide various examples of how technological developments have shaped human history.

Artificial Intelligence: When a computer can communicate with a human without the human knowing it is a computer. Binary system: A base two counting system that uses only ones and zeros. This works well with computers that have on/off switches. „On‟ can be „one‟ and „off‟ can be „zero,‟ or vice versa. 3. Boolean Logic: A mathematical logic that uses simple questions like AND, OR and NOT to perform calculations. 4. Capacitors: A form of memory that uses electrically charged plates to hold numbers. 5. Computer: Machine that has internal memory for data and programs, a processor, and input and output. 6. Integrated Circuit: A block of silicon with components such as transistors, capacitors and resistors built in. 7. Internet: World Wide computer accessed communications, business, and information system. 8. Magnetic Core Memory: Using magnets as memory. The southern and northern polarity of a magnet can be chosen to equal a one or a zero. 9. Stored Program Computer: The programs are stored in memory right along with the data to be processed. 10. Quantum Computer: A computer that uses laser controlled ions as bits. It can perform length-equations all at once instead of step-by-step.

1. 2.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Computer History Assessment Questions (These assessment questions were taken from the Teacher‟s guide that accompanies the video “The History of Computers”.) Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

Standard 8.2 Computer and Information Literacy Strand A: Provide various examples of how technological developments have shaped human history. Using the Computer History website, students can answer the following questions in order to learn about the history of the modern day computer: Q: What is the binary system? A: A base two system of mathematics using ones and zeros. Q: Who started building computing machines in Germany? A: Konrad Zuse Q: Who was the first person in the United States to build a computing machine? A: John Atanasoff Q: Who created the first microprocessor? A: Tedd Hoff Q: Who created the first Personal Computer? A: H. Edward Roberts Q: Who created magnetic or iron-core memory? A: Jay Forrestor Research based homework assignments: 1. Who were some of the people who made the first PCs useful? 2. Which pioneers contributed what to the development of the computer? 3. What were the initial problems in getting the Personal computer to be useful? 4. Where did Apple computers get their ideas for the revolutionary MAC? 5. Which computer was the first to be a household name, and why? 6. Which early computers represented major steps in the development of modern computers? 7. What is the historic progression in types of memory? 8. How advanced would computers be if the military had not been interested in them? 9. What is the origin of the Internet?

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Internet Vocabulary Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

Standard 8.2 Computer and Information Literacy Strand A: Provide various examples of how technological developments have shaped human history. Internet – A worldwide network of computers. Information Superhighway – nickname for the Internet. Internet address - The user ID utilized by an individual or host computer on the Internet. World Wide Web – A system for finding information on the Internet through the use of linked documents. Internet Service Provider - A company that produces access to the Internet for a fee. Web browser – Software designed for locating and viewing information stored on the Internet. Common browsers include Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator. Search engine is a software program that goes out on the Web, seeks Web sites, and catalogs them – usually by downloading their home pages (Google). Web site – A set of linked Web pages, usually all relating to the same topic. Web page – A document stored on the World Wide Web. Web page title – The text that displays in the title bar when a Web page is viewed in a Web browser. Web server – A computer connected to the Internet used to store Web page documents. servers are the computers that actually run websites. eb An intranet is a private computer network that uses network connectivity to securely share part of an organization's information or operations with its employees. Sometimes the term refers only to the most visible service, the internal website. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intranet HTML Hypertext Markup Language. A file format used for storing Web pages. HTTP Hypertext Transfer Protocol. The communication protocol that allows for Web pages to connect to one another, regardless of what type of operating system is used to display or access files. Blog - A web log, which is a journal or newsletter that is updated frequently and published online. Webquest An inquiry-oriented activity in which most or all of the information used by students is online. By providing links necessary to complete the quest, the student is able to focus on the material rather than spend time looking for it. The five-part WebQuest (Introduction, Task, Process, Evaluation and Conclusion) promotes critical thinking at the levels of analysis, synthesis and evaluation. What is a Webquest? Accessed 07-09-08. (http://www.netnet.org/students/student%20glossary.htm) Downloading is copying files (e-mail, software, documents, etc.) from a remote computer to your own computer. A Copyright is the legal right of ownership of published material. E-mail messages are covered by copyright laws. In most cases, the copyright owner is the writer of the message. Fair Use is the right to use short quotes and excerpts from copyrighted material such as e-mail messages. Freeware is software that can be used for free. No license is required and the software may be copied and distributed legally.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

17. 18. 19. 20.

About the World Wide Web  Anyone with a computer, an Internet connection, and communications software can access the Internet and the World Wide Web.  For a fee, Internet Service Providers (ISP) provide you with an e-mail account, Web browser software, and Internet access.  Some things available via the Internet and the World Wide Web include e-mail communication, product information and support, reference material, shopping, stock quotes, ravel arrangements, real estate information, and games. 21. Hyperlink – Text or graphics linked to a destination file or location. Click the link to jump to the destination. 22. Hyperlink destination – the location displayed when the hyperlink is clicked. Sometimes called the target. 23. Hyperlink source – the document where the hyperlink is inserted. Department of Teaching & Learning ©2008 27

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About Hyperlinks  Hyperlinks can be used to link locations within a single document, to link two documents, or to link a document to a Web page or e-mail address.  A hyperlink destination does not have to be in the same file format as the hyperlink source document. For example, you can link a Word document file to a Web page file or to an Excel file, and so on.  The hyperlink destination can be a file stored on your computer, on your company intranet, or on a Web server as part of a Web site. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. E-mail – a method of sending information from one computer to another across the Internet or Intranet. Attachment – A document attached to an e-mail message and sent in its original file format. Mail service provider – A company that maintains and controls e-mail accounts. E-mail address – the string of characters that identifies the name and location of an e-mail user. Message header – The area at the top of the message window where you enter information about where the message is going and what it is about. Message body – The area in an e-mail message where the message body is typed.

About Email  Internet Protocol is the method of communication which allows information to be exchanged across the Internet and across varying platforms that may be accessing or sending information.  Netiquette (network etiquette). The do‟s and do not‟s of online communication.  You can create documents and other files and use them as attachments to your email messages.  The original document remains stored on your computer, and a copy is transmitted as the attachment.  The attached document is sent in its original format. The message recipient can open the attached document on his or her computer.  To send e-mail messages you must have the following: o A connection to the Internet or to an intranet. o An account with a mail service provider. o The recipients e-mail address. (Vocabulary list taken from Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC).

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Identify Computer Components & Common Peripheral Devices Applies to Standards: 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy Strand A: Basic Computer Skills and Tools Brief Description:

Computer Applications

Students will be able to identify computer parts and common peripheral devices. Students will learn basic computer vocabulary. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. Resources: Teacher will identify computer components and common peripheral devices. Have students review vocabulary. Have students illustrate computer components and common peripheral devices.

Microsoft - Parts of a Computer http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/windows/en-us/help/b7bf360d-67e7-4bad-976d-7623e6deb6dd1033.mspx ADITA – How Computers Work. http://www.adita.com/literacy.htm

Note: If you have a Glencoe book in your classroom visit the online resources for the following articles: Technology Handbook Article 1 Types of Computers & Computer Systems Technology Handbook Article 2 Storage Devices Technology Handbook Article 3 Operating System Software Technology Handbook Article 4 Application Software Technology Handbook Article 5 Utility Programs (www.icheck.glencoe.com; Select iCheck Series: Office 2003, Introductory ©2006.)

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Acceptable Use Policies Applies to Standards: 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy Strand B: Applications of Productivity Tools – Explain the purpose of an Acceptable Use Policy and the consequences of inappropriate use of technology. Brief Description: Utilizing the NPS “Acceptable Use Policy”, students will review the agreement as a class; students will emphasize the consequences of inappropriate use of school computers. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. Distribute NPS “Acceptable Use Policy”. Give students time to read the entire agreement. Have students list the key components of the agreement. Have students identify consequences of misuse.

Resources: NPS “Acceptable Use Policy”

H:\My Documents\ NPS Acceptable Use Policy.pdf
If this document does not open, please see your school technology coordinator for a hard copy.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Searching the Internet with Scavenger Hunts Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Computer and Information Literacy Strand B: Choose appropriate tools and information resources to support research and solve real world problems.

Brief Description: How to Teach It:

Utilizing the Internet, students will search various web sites to locate information.

1. 2. 3. Resources:

Students will utilize the Internet to research information related to a given topic. Give student‟s a list of web addresses where they can locate the information. Have students complete an activity sheet for a participation grade.

Education World Scavenger Hunts

Black History Scavenger Hunt

H:\My Documents\ Black History Scavenger Hunt.pdf

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Framework for Technological Literacy Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

Standard 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy Strand B: Exhibit legal and ethical behaviors when using information and technology, and discuss consequences of misuse. Brief Description: Students will research and identify facts related to plagiarism and copyright infringement and the basic guidelines of the fair use policy (e.g., purpose, nature, amount, and effect). Students will learn to evaluate websites for credibility. Students will become familiar with and develop a basic understanding of Internet Safety. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. Resources: Framework for Technological Literacy - NJCCCS Students will utilize the Internet to research information related to a given topic. Give student‟s a list of web addresses where they can locate the information. Have students complete an activity sheet for a participation grade.

Framework for Technological Literacy

CyberSecurity Tips

H:\My Documents\ Internet Safety Lesson Plan.doc

H:\My Documents\ Cybersecurity Tips.pdf

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Email Activity Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

Standard 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy Strand B: Compose, send and organize e-mail messages with and without attachments. Brief Description: Students will compose, send, and organize e-mail messages with and without attachments. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. Example: When attaching documents, have students attach a document with a recent classwork assignment. This can also be used for student homework assignments. Resources: www.yahoo.com www.google.com Have students create a personal email account. Have students compose and send email messages with and without attachments to your email address. Discuss e-mail étiquette “Netiquette”.

.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Managing Files and Folders Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Computer and Information Literacy Strand A: Discuss and/or demonstrate the capability of emerging technologies and software in the creation of documents or files. Brief Description: In this activity, the teacher will focus on how Windows displays files and folders and helps us to organize and manage information. Teacher should review terminology, parts of a folder, viewing files in a folder, finding/searching files, copying and moving files, creating and deleting files and opening an existing file (see Windows/Help and Support). Students should also understand how to apply strategies on managing files more efficiently. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Resources: Offline Support: Windows Help and Support – provides a comprehensive overview of managing files/folders. Windows>Windows Basics>Working With Files and Folders Online Support: Windows Vista: http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/windows/en-us “Files & Folders Link” Windows XP Service Pack 3: http://support.microsoft.com Microsoft at Work: 7 Tips to Manage Your Files Better: www.microsoft.com/atwork/manageinfo/files.mspx About.com: 6 Ways to Keep Your Documents Organized in Word by James Marshall http://wordprocessing.about.com/od/wordprocessingsoftware/a/6organize.htm UNC Digital Library Services http://www.unc.edu/projects/diglib/help/manageassets.htm Teacher will discuss the importance of developing an efficient system to manage folders and files. Teacher will discuss how windows organizes files and folders, common folders (documents, pictures, music, videos, downloads), and the parts of a folder. Teacher will discuss terminology: folder, subfolder, folder icon, download, personal folder, common files, adding tags or other properties, removable media, drag and drop Teacher will discuss tips/strategies in developing an efficient filing system (see resources). Teacher will demonstrate the following skills: accessing windows explorer; searching for files and folders; setting document properties to improve file searches; creating shortcuts and working with files/folders, copying/moving/deleting files, opening an existing file (see Windows Help and Support). Teacher will provide students with a scenario and students will develop an efficient filing system for upcoming coursework for the school year.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Framework_for_Technological_Literacy

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Be a responsible cyber citizen.
If you use the Internet, you're a citizen of a global community—a cyber citizen. Just like being a citizen of your local community, being a cyber citizen has responsibilities. Use the Internet to share knowledge that makes people's lives better. Keep safe, use good manners and respect the laws.

Top ten Cyber security tips
For Teens, their teachers and families
Use anti-virus software.
A computer virus is a program that can invade your computer and damage or destroy information. Anti-virus software is designed to protect you and your computer against known viruses. But with new viruses emerging daily, anti-virus programs need to be updated regularly. Check with the web site of your anti-virus software company to see some sample descriptions of viruses and to get regular updates for your software. Stop viruses in their tracks!

CyberSmart!

Visit www.cybersmartcurriculum.org for free curriculum co-published with McGraw-Hill Education that teaches the skills necessary for safe, responsible and effective computer and Internet use.

®

Do not open email from unknown sources.
Delete email from unknown sources. Watch out for files attached to e-mails, particularly those with an "exe" extension—even if people you know sent them to you. Some files transport and distribute viruses and other programs that can permanently destroy files and damage computers and Web sites. Do not forward e-mail if you are not completely sure that any attached files are safe.

Disconnect from the Internet when not in use.
The Internet is a two-way road. You get information and also send information. Turning off the Internet makes sure that someone else on the Internet can’t enter your computer and cause harm. Disconnecting your computer from the Internet when you are not online lessens the chance that someone will be able to access your computer.

Use hard-to-guess passwords and keep them private.
Do not write passwords down on small pieces of paper taped to your computer. You would be surprised how many people are sloppy about keeping their passwords private. Passwords that are easy to-guess are a bad choice. In other words, if your name is "Dan" do not make your password "Dan." Change your passwords regularly and don’t give your passwords to anyone! Tell your family that combinations of letters, numbers and symbols are harder to crack than just words.

Back-up your computer regularly.
Help your family back up all household computers onto external media such as CD’s or diskettes.

Regularly download security protection update “patches”.
Security flaws are regularly found in operating systems and application software. Companies that make software release quick fixes called "patches" that you should install to correct the latest software flaw. It is a good idea to check for security updates on the publisher's Web site for all the software you own.

Help your family to check computer security on a regular basis.

Evaluate computer security at least twice a year. To help remember, do it when you change the clocks for daylight-savings time! Check for all of the items listed previously.

Do not share access to your computers with strangers. Learn about file sharing risks.
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Your computer operating system may allow other computers on a network, including the Internet, to access the hard-drive of your computer in order to "share files". This ability to share files can be used to infect your computer with a virus or look at the files on your computer if you do not pay close attention. Check your operating system and other program help files to learn how to disable file sharing. Do not share access to your computer with strangers!

Protect computers with firewalls.
Install firewalls for your family-it is not difficult. A firewall helps prevent hackers from breaking into your computer or the computers that belong to your family. Firewalls help prevent thieves from stealing and using private information including your phone number and credit card numbers, which may be stored on a family computer. Visit www.staysafeonline.info for cyberspace security information. The National Cyber Security Alliance is a government/ industry partnership to help keep computers and cyberspace safe.
© 2002 The National Cyber Security Alliance and The CyberSmart! School Program. Duplication permitted for school and home use only.

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BLACK HISTORY SCAVENGER HUNT DIRECTIONS: Read each clue below. Each clue tells about a famous black American on the list at the bottom of the page. Use the list to connect to a short biography of each person. On the line next to each clue, write the name of the person to whom the clue refers. 1. _____________________ In 1870, this person was the first black to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. 2. _____________________ This person, the child of former slaves, invented the ironing board, the lawn sprinkler, and many other useful things. 3. _____________________ This person was one of the first people killed in the cause of American independence. 4. _____________________ This civil rights advocate told her life story in the book A Colored Woman in a White World. 5. _____________________ This person -- the 15th of 17 children born of former slaves -- grew up to become a college president. 6. _____________________ This person, the child of ex-slaves, developed a hair product and died a millionaire. 7. _____________________ Many consider this fur and grain trader to be the founder of the city of Chicago. 8. _____________________ This former coal mine worker born to former slaves got a degree from Harvard University and started what is called today "Black History Month." 9. _____________________ Many consider this doctor to be the originator of the Blood Bank concept. 10. ____________________ This person, the child of a runaway slave, was a football AllAmerican and a well-known actor and singer. Crispus Attucks http://search.eb.com/Blackhistory/article-9011185 Mary McLeod Bethune http://www.stamponhistory.com/2003/09/06/0001 Charles Drew http://www.blackinventor.com/pages/charlesdrew.html Jean-Baptist-Point DuSable http://search.eb.com/Blackhistory/article-9031305 Elijah McCoy http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0775694.html Joseph Hayne Rainey http://search.eb.com/Blackhistory/article-9062498 Paul Robeson http://africawithin/bios/paul_robeson.htm Mary Eliza Church Terrell http://search.eb.com/Blackhistory/article-9002972 Madame C.J. Walker http://www.lkwdpl.org/wihohio/walk-mad.htm Carter G. Woodson http://www.chipublib.org/002branches/woodson/woodsonbib.html For use with /lesson052-4 © 2006 by Education World. Permission is granted to teachers to reproduce this skill page for classroom use.

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Standard 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
Strand A: Basic Computer Skills and Tool/Microsoft Word Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs) Types of Research Based Activities and Assessments that could illustrate Objectives Suggested Resources

How does Microsoft Word enable access to the most commonly used commands? How does Microsoft Word help us create professional looking documents? How does Microsoft Word assist us in organizing and managing information?

1. (CPI) Create a multi-page document with citations using word processing software in conjunction with other tools that demonstrates the ability to format, edit and print. 2. (CPI)8.1B1 Describe the potential and implications of contemporary and emerging computer applications for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs. 3. (CPI) Produce and edit page layouts in different formats using desktop publishing and graphics software. 4. (CPI) Create documents including a resume and a business letter using professional format. 5. (CPI) Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs and interpret the results.

Introduction to Microsoft Word

Refer to Recommended Textbook: Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson/Prentice Hall DDC

Using Microsoft Word Help.doc

Career Preparation Lesson Plan by Greg Farley For Cover Letter rubrics

Business Letter Activity.doc

A Day at the Museum.doc

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Standard 8.1 Computer and Information Literacy All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
Strand A:: Basic Computer Skills and Tool/Microsoft Word Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs) Types of Research Based Activities and Assessments that could illustrate Objectives Suggested Resources

How does Microsoft Word enable access to the most commonly used commands? How does Microsoft Word help us create professional looking documents? How does Microsoft Word assist us in organizing and managing information?

6.(CPI) Discuss and or demonstrate the capability of emerging technologies and software in the creation of documents or files. 7. (CPI) 8.1B1 Describe the potential and implications of contemporary and emerging computer applications for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs. 8.(CPI) 8.1B11 Identify new technologies and other organizational tools to use in personal, home, and/or work environments for information retrieval, entry, and presentation. 9. (CPI) 9.1 All students will develop career awareness and planning, employability skills, and foundational knowledge necessary for success in the workplace.

An Introduction to Desktop Publishing

APA and MLA formatting http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/reso urce/560/01/

Promotional Flyers
Lesson: An individual wants to select a career pathway

Seminar Memo

Classroom Activity by Lisa Tauscher: Internet Safety

Technology in Education

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Standard 8.2 Technology Literacy
All students will develop an understanding of the nature and impact of technology, engineering, technological design, and the designed world as they relate to the individual, society and the environment.
Strand A:. Nature and Impact of Technology Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs) Types of Research

Based Activities and Assessments that could
illustrate Objectives

Suggested Resources

How has technology change society over the past century? How do you think technology will change society over the next century? What are the advantages and disadvantages of advances in science and technology?

1. (CPI) Use appropriate data to discuss the full costs, benefits and trade offs, and risks related to the use of technologies. Pioneers in Technology 2. (CPI) Discuss various examples of how technological developments have shaped human history. 3. (CPI) 8.1B1 Describe the potential and implications of contemporary and emerging computer applications for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs. Technology in Education

Computerhistory.org http://www.ntuaft.com/njcccs/Webpa ge/contents/Workplace%20activities/ 6.93%206.96.pdf

People and Discoveries, a databank consisting of 120 entries about 20th century scientists and their stories.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Introduction to Word Based on Lesson 1, “Getting Started with Word 2007,” Learning Microsoft Office 2007 (Pearson Education, Inc.) Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

(CPI 8.1A9) Discuss and or demonstrate the capability of emerging technologies and software in the creation of documents or files. (CPI) 8.1A2 Create documents including a resume and a business letter using professional format.

Brief Description: In this lesson, students will become familiar with Microsoft Word basics. Students will focus on the Microsoft Word window, how to type in a document, correct errors, use undo, redo, and repeat, work with Show/Hide marks, correct spelling and grammar, and formatting text and paragraphs. Students will also learn how to use proofreading marks in editing a series of documents and set proofing options. How to Teach: 1. 2. 3. Teacher will review personal letters, business letters, memos, resumes. Students will become familiar with the parts and spacing of letters and memos. Refer to Exercise 5 and 6 of Learning Microsoft Office 2007 (Pearson Education, Inc.). Teacher will review basic proofreading marks (Refer to page 88 of text). Teacher will review the Microsoft Word window, typing in a document, correcting errors, undo/redo, the purpose of Show/Hide marks in editing, correcting spelling and grammar, and formatting text and paragraphs, and document properties. Teacher will review setting proofing options in Word. Students will recreate a series of business documents, including revisions detailed with proofreader marks. Sample business documents may include: business letter, business memo, resume, and a promotional flyer.

4.

Resources: Refer to Lesson 2 of Learning Microsoft Office 2007 (Pearson Education, Inc.) Microsoft Office Online http://office.microsoft.com

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Using Word Commands, Help, Shortcut Menus Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

(CPI 8.1A9) Discuss and or demonstrate the capability of emerging technologies and software in the creation of documents or files. (CPI) 8.1B11 Identify new technologies and other organizational tools to use in personal, home, and/or work environments for information retrieval, entry, and presentation.

Brief Description: Students will review options for issuing commands: dialog boxes, shortcut menus, and task panes. Students should locate specific commands to complete a sample task in Word. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. Sample Questions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. How do you change the margins of a page? How do you locate autocorrect feature? How do you locate the templates available in Microsoft Word? How do you change the font color to blue? How do you select the toolbars to display? How do you insert a table in Word? How do you insert a page break in your document? Teacher will review the commands and features available in Word, including the Microsoft Word Help feature. Teacher will explain how these tools increase productivity by enabling users to solve technical problems and increase proficiency with applications. Teacher will distribute questions and students will use the Microsoft Word Help feature find instructions on how to complete task

Notes to Teacher: This lesson presents an opportunity to collaborate with the English Department.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Business Letter Activity Applies to Standards: (CPI) 8.1A2 Create documents including a resume and a business letter using professional format.

Computer Applications

Brief Description: Students will be able to develop goals and articulate course expectations in a properly formatted business letter to instructor. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Resources: Business Letter Templates http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/653/02/ Business Letter Writing http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/653/01/ Teacher should display the proper business letter format and discuss the parts of a business letter and spacing. Teacher should discuss how to write an effective business letter. Students should write course expectations and goals for the academic year and draft an outline for their business letter. Students should write a letter to the teacher discussing course expectations and academic goals in a well-written, properly formatted business letter. Students should create a bulleted list of goals for the cycle and academic year. Students should use Spelling/Grammar Check and formatting commands in creating this document. Students should review goals/expectations mid-cycle and end of cycle. At the end of every cycle, teacher should assign activity.

Notes to Teacher:

This lesson presents an opportunity to collaborate with the English Department.

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A Day at the Museum Applies to Standards: (CPI) 8.1A2 Create documents including a resume and a business letter using professional format. (CPI) 8.1A3 Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs and interpret the results.

Brief Description: Students will create a memo detailing the itinerary of an upcoming trip to the museum. Students will summarize information in a Microsoft Word table. The teacher will provide links to local museums where students may gather information about departments and exhibits to schedule activities. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. Resources: www.newarkmuseum.org http://www.metmuseum.org/visit/general_information/ http://www.moma.org/visit_moma/ Students should provide the following information: Itinerary of day including museum exhibits. Cost of admission Opening and closing times. Location of museum Availability of parking and accommodations for meals Note to Teacher: This lesson presents an opportunity to collaborate with the English department. Teacher will review the use of the memo, the memo template and how to write concisely. Students will create a memo to the teacher detailing the planned activities for the museum visit. Students may select from the links provided to local museums. Students will research the departments and special exhibits at the museums and plan their trip. The student should also include information about admission costs and museum opening and closing times. Students will detail the visit‟s activities in a time frame of 9:00 am - 3:00 pm in a Microsoft Word table.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 An Introduction to Desktop Publishing in Word Adapted from Lesson 2 of Learning Microsoft Office 2007 (Pearson Education, Inc.) Applies to Standards: CPI 8.1A6 Produce and edit page layouts in different formats using desktop publishing and graphics software. Brief Description:

Computer Applications

Students will develop desktop publishing skills by formatting a sample one-page newsletter. Students will apply a multi-column format and include illustrations in the document. How to Teach: 1. Teacher will demonstrate how to apply a multi-column format, drop cap and insert illustrations into a Word document. Teacher will demonstrate the types of document views, page breaks, continuous breaks, and column breaks. Teacher will also demonstrate how to position objects on a page with text. Teacher will discuss the parts of a newsletter and the elements of an effective design (see Resources). Students will format a sample document by applying a multicolumn format to the document. Students will apply a drop cap to the beginning of each article position clip art on a page. Students will use the headers/footers view to include their name and page number.

2. 3. 4. 5. Resources:

Refer to Lesson 2 of Learning Microsoft Office 2007 (Pearson Education, Inc.) for additional activities and resources. About.com: http://desktoppub.about.com/od/newsletters/a/newsletter_part.htm About.com – Graphic Design Tutorials http://desktoppub.about.com/od/graphicdesign/Graphic_Design_Tutorials.htm

Notes to Teacher: This lesson presents an opportunity to work with Graphics Arts.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Promotional Flyers Applies to Standards: 8.1A6. Produce and edit page layouts in different formats using desktop publishing and graphics software.

Computer Applications

Brief Description: Students will prepare three promotional flyers for upcoming school or business events. Students will apply skills on formatting paragraphs and fonts, styles, inserting illustrations, and page set up. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. Discuss the importance of creating professional documents. Discuss the parts of a promotional flyer (headline, image, copy, call to action) Demonstrate the following skills: a. Applying different font colors, styles, effects b. Adjusting margins and page orientation c. Adjusting paragraph spacing. d. Inserting symbols, special characters, and illustrations. Evaluate sample flyers for accuracy and effective layout/design.

4.

Resources: Complete Lesson 19/ Exercise 19 page 130, Learning Microsoft Office 2007 (Pearson Education, Inc.)

Notes to Teacher:

Students may create flyers for actual school clubs/sports activities.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Templates and Tables

Computer Applications

Applies to Standards: (CPI) 8.1A2 Create documents including a resume and a business letter using professional format.

Brief Description: As a training manager, you are managing computer training at a regional business meeting. To confirm the details of the event, you will write a memo that includes the training schedule. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. Example: 1. 2. Students should draft a message to instructors to inform them of the course scheduling for the seminar scheduled on a specific date, time and location. Students should include the following information and apply borders and shading to enhance the table. Teacher should demonstrate the templates available in Microsoft Word. Teacher should discuss the use of letters and memos in business communication. Teacher should demonstrate how to include tables in Word documents. Teacher should demonstrate how to apply borders and shading.

Seminar Time 8:00 am – 9:30 am 9:45 am – 11:15m 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Seminar Course Word Excel PowerPoint

Instructor Jones Rivera Roberts

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Technology and Education Applies to Standards: (CPI 8.2 A3) Provide examples of how technological developments have shaped human history. (CPI 8.1 A2) Create documents including a resume and a business letter using professional forma

Computer Applications

(CPI) 8.1B1 Describe the potential and implications of contemporary and emerging computer applications for personal, social, lifelong learning, and workplace needs.

Brief Description: Teachers will lead a brainstorming session on how technology may change the way we learn in schools. Students will reflect on discussion by responding in five-paragraphs to the question, “Describe a typical school day for a high school student in 2107.” How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Resources: www.pbs.org www.phoenix.edu www.edweek.org (Digital Connections) www.encarta.msn.com Teacher should lead discussion how technology has shaped society and education in the 20th and 21st century. Discuss the pros and cons of technology and society. Discuss how technology has specifically shaped the way we learn. Discuss how technology will continue to change/improve the way we learn. Teacher should include time for students to discuss topics in small groups to share in class discussion.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Pioneers in Technology Applies to Standards: (CPI 8.2 A3) Provide examples of how technological developments have shaped human history.

Computer Applications

CPI 8.1A1 Create a multi-page document with citations using word processing software in conjunction with other tools that demonstrates the ability to format, edit, and print. Brief Description: Teachers will discussion on how technological innovations have shaped the way we live. Teacher will visit the Web resources to discuss pioneers in technology according to a historical timeline. Students will research technological developments and choose three inventions that have shaped society. Students will cite resources using the APA formatting. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. Teacher will discuss pioneers in technology and how their inventions and contributions have shaped society. Students will research two pioneers using Web resources. Students will create an outline in Word that includes biography and technological contributions. Students will create a two page summary with an image of the pioneers and cite resources using APA formatting.

How have their inventions or contributions shaped the way we live today?

Resources: www.computerhistory.org www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/databank APA/MLA http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

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Standard 8.1 All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
Strand A: - Basic Computers Skills and Tools / Microsoft Excel Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments
that could illustrate Objectives Using the Microsoft Excel Application Interface

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

Why is it important to use electronic workbooks to increase efficiency, productivity, and accuracy of data and work production? In what ways can the acquisition of technology skills effect potential employment endeavors?

1. Students will be able to recognize and navigate through various options associated with creating, modifying, and saving electronic workbooks and spreadsheets as well as become familiar with the user interface. 2. Students will be able to customize MS Excel toolbars and become familiar with Microsoft Excel Help utility 3. Student will be able to create, add text to, perform basic edits and save basic electronic workbooks 4. Students will be able to comprehend how MS Excel performs calculations (order of operations) by creating formulas using mathematical operators to calculate listed numerical values 5. Students will be able to create formulas using basic Excel programmed functions including sum, min, max and average to calculate listed numerical data.

Text Book: Learning Microsoft Office 2007 Pearson Prentice Hall DDC

Customizing Toolbars and Using Excel Help Options

Creating and Editing Basic Workbooks

Framework for Technological Literacy Classroom Activity by NJ Educator, Kristanne Coppola http://www.nj.gov/education/aps/cccs/te ch/frameworks/ms/checkbook.doc

Basic Formulas and the Order of Operations

Excel Basic Functions

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Standard 8.1 All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
Strand A: - Basic Computers Skills and Tools Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments
that could illustrate Objectives Editing and Proofing (Correcting) Workbooks)

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

What would be some possible effects on employees, expenses, and profit if inaccuracy occurs in data when managing businesses for the business overall.

6. Students will be able to modify existing spreadsheets by manipulating data, cells, columns, and rows as well as use the editing commands for performing data searches and spell checks. 7. Students will be able to enhance and modify worksheets creating a professional appearance using Excel formatting options including adding borders, shading, varying fonts, number formats, cell content position, and applying styles
8. Student will be able to use default and user

Workbook Formatting

Page Set Up and Printing

defined print options. As well they will analyze and modify large worksheet set up (header/footer) and page breaks to present professional and legible hard copy worksheets 9. Students will be able to create graphic representations of reported data using Excel basic charting options to create and modify charts

Spartacus Educationalhttp://www.spartacus.scho olnet.co.uk/USAES1920S.htm Excel Basic Charts

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Using The Microsoft Excel Application Interface Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Student will be instructed to open the Microsoft Excel application and perform hands on exploration of the application interface focused on the ribbon, toolbars, common program commands, scroll bars, and cell references How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. Example: Discuss the toolbars, toolbar buttons, cell coordinates (column and row headings), drop down menus, and standard buttons Resources: Text Book: Learning Microsoft Office 2007 Pearson Prentice Hall DDC Page 358-360 Have students open Microsoft Excel Discuss and explain the spreadsheet application Discuss the difference between the workbook and worksheets Model using a projected image navigating and exploring components of the user interface

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Customizing Toolbars and Using Excel Help Options Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Using the Microsoft Excel Interface students will use options and customize commands categories to modify existing toolbars by adding, deleting, and renaming command buttons. Students will identify how to trouble shoot simple Excel issues using the applications help options. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Example: Add multiple buttons to an existing tool bar such as the button for the command “Save As” Resource: Text Book: Learning Microsoft Office 2007 Pearson Prentice Hall DDC Page 358-360 Have students open Microsoft Excel Discuss the advantages of customizing Application toolbars so that they are unique to the user Model the specified commands using a projected image on a screen Model using Excel Help options Have students perform each modeled task. Check computers to assess students ability to perform task

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Creating and Editing Basic Workbooks

Computer Applications

Applies to Standards: 8.1Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Students will create a balance sheet detailing personal income and expenses associated with managing personal finance. The spreadsheet will include data that will be entered, edited and calculated using basic formulas. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Have students navigate to specified file Give and overview of the activity and instructions Demonstrate adding data to a cell based on the cell reference Demonstrate using the formula toolbar to view and edit the contents of a cell Allow students time on task Check student computers to assess their ability to perform tasks Assist students as needed

Example: Demonstrate adding text to cell location and editing text in the cell or the formula toolbar Resource: Text Book: Learning Microsoft Office 2007 Pearson Prentice Hall DDC Activity (S02MAAC) Page 365-367

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Basic Formulas and the Order of Operations

Computer Applications

Applies to Standards: 8.1Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of how Microsoft Excel calculates data based on the order of operations. As well they will create formulas to calculate data in columns and rows using mathematical operators to complete a checkbook. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Have students navigate to specified file Give and overview of the activity and instructions Discuss how Excel performs calculations using the order of operations Model creating formulas using basic functions such as sum, max, min, average Have students create formulas using functions Assist students as needed

Example: Click on a cell location that has the specified formula and explain how to set up a formula and how Excel will calculate the formula. Resource: Order of Operations Activity Checkbook Activity- http://www.nj.gov/education/aps/cccs/tech/frameworks/ms/checkbook.doc

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Excel Basic Functions

Computer Applications

Applies to Standards: 8.1Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Students will analyze a company‟s overall production by using Excel‟s basic functions including Sum, Average, Max and Min, to calculate listed data finding totals, averages, the largest number in a group of numbers and the smallest number in a group of numbers. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Have students navigate to specified file Give and overview of the activity and instructions Discuss how to create formulas based on cell reference locations instead of values in the cells Discuss Excel‟s basic functions and their proper syntax for performing workbook calculations Demonstrate creating each type of formula including: Sum, Average, Max and Min Have students create the formulas to complete a spreadsheet Assist students as needed

Example: Demonstrate adding text to cell location and editing text in the cell or the formula toolbar

Resource:

See Basic Function Activity worksheet below

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Editing and Proofing (Correcting) Workbooks

Computer Applications

Applies to Standards: 8.1Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Students will complete a critical thinking activity whereas they are managers of an athletic club and responsible for keeping client usage and billing records. They will create a worksheet that will track the necessary data for the accounting department. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Have students navigate to specified file Give and overview of the activity and instructions Discuss Excel‟s tools for editing and correcting spreadsheets spelling,, pagination, and page layout Discuss the purpose of and how to create page headers and footers Model performing specified tasks and using applicable commands. Have students perform tasks as teacher demonstrates Have students complete a corresponding activity on their own Assist students as needed

Example: Demonstrate adding text to cell location and editing text in the cell or the formula toolbar

Resource:

Text Book: Learning Microsoft Office 2007 Pearson Prentice Hall DDC Activity 1 (S06SpaServices), Activity 2 (S06InvoicesWS) Page 391-392

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Workbook Formatting

Applies to Standards: 8.1Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Students will take on the role of an inventory manager of a retail store with the responsibility of enhancing inventory documents so that they are indicative of a professional inventory reports How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Have students navigate to specified file Give and overview of the activity and instructions Discuss Excel‟s formatting tools for modifying workbooks to create a professional appearance Model performing specified tasks and using applicable commands. Allow students time on task Assist students as needed

Example: Demonstrate how to change font color and cell background color

Resource:

Text Book: Learning Microsoft Office 2007 Pearson Prentice Hall DDC Activity (S09Inventory) 400-405

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Printing and Page Set Up

Computer Applications

Applies to Standards: 8.1 Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Students will prepare a cost estimate report for an amusement adventure company trip and will be responsible for modifying print and page set up options to deliver an estimate report according to precise specification of the company‟s manager. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Have students navigate to specified file Give and overview of the activity and instructions Discuss Excel‟s user defined printing page set up options Review dialog box commands for setting printing and page set up options Model performing specified tasks and using applicable commands. Allow students time perform tasks Check student computers to assess their ability to perform tasks properly Assist students as needed

Example: Demonstrate how to set up a page so that there are visible grid lines

Resource:

Text Book: Learning Microsoft Office 2007 Pearson Prentice Hall DDC Activity A. (S23TripBudget.xlsx) Activity B. (S32ColExp.xlsx)

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Excel Basic Charts Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Construct a spreadsheet, enter data, use mathematical or logical functions to manipulate and process data, generate charts and graphs, and interpret the results. Brief Description: Using Microsoft Excel 2007, students will add data to a spreadsheet and then create and modify linked (3D pie) data charts Student will complete an immigration WebQuest to discover the amount of people from various locations that in migrated to the United States during the early 20 th century.

How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Have students navigate to specified file Give and overview of the activity and instructions Discuss Excel‟s default charts and the benefits of adding charts to data reports for analyzing numerical data. Model performing specified tasks and using applicable commands. Allow students time on task Assist students as needed Give students the link below to find immigration data for the spreadsheet

Example: Review various chart types

Resource:

Find Immigration Totals for spreadsheet and chart http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAES1920S.htm Immigration Chart Activity See Basic Chart Activity Below

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Excel Basic Functions

Computer Applications

Resourceful Reading Unlimited

Store 207-Newark Name Johnson Williams Evans Rogers Thomas Total Average High Low 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr Totals Average 110 175 140 750 200 210 240 575 300.9 180 395 1100 150 200.4 125 185 220 195 335 1025 High Low

Name Shehu Kirkland Stoffer Giles Dean Total Average High Low

Store 219-Jersey City 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr Totals Average 305.5 195 203 232 219 147 136.7 205 104 230 185 245.1 125.2 99.5 206 201 320 255 235 145

High Low

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The Newark Public Schools 2008

Computer Applications

Educational Internet Fun Quest
Immigration In Early 20th Century America
Every month the international research company that you work for gives a history challenge. The reward for the first person to produce a finished product with the correct answers is a $200.00 bonus and a write up that will include the persons research related work. This month the task is to investigate history related to immigration to the United States during the early 20 th Century. Follow the instructions below Immigration Totals for spreadsheet and chart http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAES1920S.htm

Spread Sheet Instructions: Using Microsoft Excel 2007, students will add related data to a spreadsheet and then create and modify linked (3D pie) data charts 1. Click on the link above to find immigration data for the spreadsheet 2. Click on this link(spreadsheet) to enter data into cells 3. Select specified data to create the linked chart 4. Go to Insert/ Pie/ 3D 5. Using the top task bar choose a chart layout 2 6. Right click on any part of the chart to modify colors and add pictures, or select a chart style from the top task bar

Immigration In Early 20
th

Century America

1820-1920

Country Total Immigrants

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The Newark Public Schools 2008

Computer Applications

Standard 8.1 Computer & Information Literacy All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
Strand A: Basic computer Skills and Tools/PowerPoint Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments
that could illustrate Objectives

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

What are the elements of preparing and delivering an effective Microsoft PowerPoint presentation? How can using Microsoft PowerPoint enhance presentations? How do organizations use Microsoft PowerPoint as a communication tool? In what ways can using Microsoft PowerPoint increase productivity in the workplace?

1. (CPI) Students will learn the importance of utilizing PowerPoint to deliver effective presentations. 2. (CPI) Students will be able to explore the PowerPoint user interface, use Microsoft help feature, use basic features in PowerPoint such as adding a new slide, enter and save a presentation. 3. (CPI) Students will be able to open an existing presentation, edit slide layout, and apply themes. 4. (CPI) Students will be able to create notes pages and handouts, use print preview and print presentation materials. 5. (CPI) Students will add graphic objects to a presentation using clip art. 6. (CPI) Students will be able to rearrange slides, copy, duplicate and delete slides.

Steps to Delivering Effective Presentations

Microsoft.com Presenting PowerPoint Do's & Don'ts The Key Steps to an Effective Presentation http://www.theeggman.com/writings/keystep1.html Business PresentationsAbout.com http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/ powerpointinbusiness/tp/bus_pres_ti ps.htm How Stuff Works http://communication.howstuffworks .com/effective-powerpointpresentations.htm 9 Presentation Tips for Students http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/ classrooms/tp/student_tips.htm

Navigating the PowerPoint Window

Adding, Editing and Enhancing a Presentation

Print Materials

Get the Picture

Rearrange Slides, Copy, Duplicate & Delete Slides

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The Newark Public Schools 2008

Computer Applications

Standard 8.1 Computer & Information Literacy All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
Strand A: Basic computer Skills and Tools/PowerPoint Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs)

Based Activities and Assessments that
could illustrate Objectives

Types of Research

Suggested Resources

What are the elements of preparing and delivering an effective Microsoft PowerPoint presentation? How can using Microsoft PowerPoint enhance presentations? How do organizations use Microsoft PowerPoint as a communication tool? In what ways can using Microsoft PowerPoint increase productivity in the workplace?

7. (CPI) Students will be able to apply a design template using the New Presentation dialog box. 8. (CPI) Students will be able to insert headers/footers, dates, and numbers to provide additional information to help identify and organize slides. 9. (CPI) Students will be able to hide background graphics created as part of a theme. 10. (CPI) Students will be able to enhance the appearance of text working with placeholders, formatting lists and line spacing. 11. (CPI) Students will be able to create and format a table on an existing slide or choose a slide layout with a content placeholder. 12. (CPI) Students will be able to create and edit a diagram using SmartArt. 13.

Design Templates

PowerPoint Resources and Tutorials http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/ powerpoint101/tp/080620your_first _powerpoint.htm

Background Information Microsoft.com Help for PowerPoint 2007 http://office.microsoft.com/enus/powerpoint/FX100648951033.as px

Formatting Placeholders

Formatting Lists & Line Spacing PowerPoint Resources for Teachers http://www.internet4classrooms.com /on-line_powerpoint.htm

Putting Everything on the Table

Using SmartArt to Create Diagrams

Create Your Family Tree Chart http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/ powerpoint2007/tp/family_tree_char t_templates.htm

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Standard 8.1 Computer & Information Literacy
All students will use computer applications to gather and organize information and to solve problems.
The Newark Public Schools 2008 Strand A: Basic computer Skills and Tools/PowerPoint Essential Questions Instructional Objectives / Skills and Benchmarks (CPIs) Types of Research Based Activities and Assessments that could illustrate Objectives Computer Applications

Suggested Resources

What are the elements of preparing and delivering an effective Microsoft PowerPoint presentation? How can using Microsoft PowerPoint enhance presentations? How do organizations use Microsoft PowerPoint as a communication tool? In what ways can using Microsoft PowerPoint increase productivity in the workplace?

13. (CPI) Students will be able to create and edit a chart using SmartArt. 14. (CPI) Students will be able to add animations text and slide transitions.

Making Everything Clear

Finishing the Job

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Steps to Delivering Effective Presentations Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: In this activity, students will learn the importance of good presentation skills. Students will learn to make their presentation focused on a particular type of audience, learn what information to include in the presentation, understand how to keep the audience interested, and learn how to deal with questions. Students will also learn the importance of slide layout. ( http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/powerpointinbusiness/tp/bus_pres_tips.htm)

Use this activity for reinforcing Internet Skills and in conjunction with Navigating the PowerPoint Window.
How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. Resources: Have students read article(s) on delivering effective presentations. Have students answer questions about delivering effective presentations using the attachments below. Discuss the article(s) key take away points as a class.

Effective Presentations

Worksheet

Business PresentationsAbout.com http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/powerpointinbusiness/tp/bus_pres_tips.htm The Key Steps to an Effective Presentation http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/keystep1.html How Stuff Works http://communication.howstuffworks.com/effective-powerpoint-presentations.htm Microsoft Do‟s and Don‟ts Presenting PowerPoint Do's & Don'ts

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Navigating the PowerPoint Window Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: You have been hired by Marketing Consulting, Inc. Your first assignment is to research the topic “How to Deliver an Effective Presentation”. You have been asked to use the information you gathered to create a PowerPoint presentation. With this exercise you will start a new presentation and explore basic features such as using placeholders, applying layouts, entering text and saving a presentation. How to Teach It: Teacher will discuss with students how to use presentation software like PowerPoint to create slides that contain text, pictures, and charts. Explain that PowerPoint provides a variety of presentation designs and layouts to arrange information attractively. 2. Teacher will discuss the importance of keeping the audiences attention and how utilizing PowerPoint helps to do so. 3. Teacher will show a PowerPoint presentation that includes a number of different layouts and objects such as sounds, clip art, or media clips. Point out that a PowerPoint presentation is composed of separate slides. 4. Teacher will discuss basic Microsoft PowerPoint terminology. 5. Teacher will demonstrate how to open, navigate and use basic features in PowerPoint. 6. Teacher will demonstrate how to use the Help feature in PowerPoint. 7. Teacher will explain that by default, the first slide of a new presentation uses the Title Slide Layout option. 8. Have students open the PowerPoint window and add a new slide, apply different layouts, work with placeholders, enter text (utilizing the information gathered from researching “How to Deliver Effective Presentations”). 9. Teacher will instruct students to save the file as Effective Presentations for later use. 10. Teacher will explain that the skills students learn in this exercise will be used in subsequent exercises; emphasize the importance of mastering each skill. Resources: The Key Steps to an Effective Presentation http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/keystep1.html Business PresentationsAbout.com http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/powerpointinbusiness/tp/bus_pres_tips.htm How Stuff Works http://communication.howstuffworks.com/effective-powerpoint-presentations.htm Microsoft Do‟s and Don‟ts Presenting PowerPoint Do's & Don'ts 1.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Adding, Editing and Enhancing a Presentation Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: Continue with the previous exercise “How to Deliver an Effective Presentation”. Your boss has asked you to do more research on limiting content in each slide. You will research and add this information to your presentation file Effective Presentations. In this exercise you will open an existing presentation, apply a theme for visual interest, change slide layout, work with the view panes, and spell check a presentation. How to Teach It: Teacher will discuss how themes can be used to enhance the appearance of a PowerPoint presentation. Teacher will discuss the Themes gallery that appears on the Design Tab and show students how to choose a theme or switch to a different theme. 3. Teacher will review using the spell checker; point out that this feature works much the same way in PowerPoint as in Word. 4. Teacher will demonstrate how to change slide layout options and PowerPoint‟s slide views using a sample presentation. 5. Have students apply a theme to the Effective Presentations file, run a spellcheck and save their work. 6. Have students save another copy of the file as Effective Presentations Practice File. Use this file for the next part of the activity. 7. Teacher will show students how to switch between the Slides pane and the Outline pane in Normal view. 8. Teacher will use a sample presentation to demonstrate to students how to move, copy, duplicate and delete slides. These operations can be done in the Slides pane in Normal View or in Slide Sorter View. 9. Teacher will explain to students that Slide Sorter View is the best tool for reorganizing a presentation because all slides display on the screen at the same time, making it easy to move them around. 10. Have students move, copy, duplicate and delete slides to practice working in Slide Sorter View. Save the file and exit. 1. 2.

Notes:

The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 2, Page 731, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own” on Page 732.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Print Materials Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound.

Brief Description: Your boss has asked you to add notes to a presentation that you have already prepared. In addition, your boss has requested that you print a copy with notes and print a handout copy with four (4) slides to a page. In this exercise, you will change page orientation, prepare notes pages and print materials. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Teacher will display a presentation in Notes Page view and explain the purpose of adding notes to a presentation. Have students open and add notes to previous activity Effective Presentations. Teacher will review the Page Setup dialog box in PowerPoint and explain how it differs from the same dialog box in other Office applications. Teacher will display a presentation in Print Preview and explain the options available on the Print Preview tab of the Ribbon. Have students use Print Preview to view the slides in the presentation. Have students select different options from the Print What drop-down list. Have students view other settings available from the Options button on the Print Preview tab and close Print Preview. Have students access the Page Setup dialog box by clicking the Page Setup button on the Design tab and make any desired changes to the presentation, such as page orientation. If you choose to review a hard copy of student work, have students print their presentation, otherwise, close the dialog box, save and exit PowerPoint.

Notes: The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 6, Page 755, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own” on Page 756.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Get the Picture Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: Continue with the previous exercise “How to Deliver an Effective Presentation”. Your boss has asked you to add Clip Art and WordArt to make the presentation more interesting. You have also been asked to explore how changing Theme elements might impact the presentation‟s appearance.

How to Teach It: 1. Teacher will discuss how Clip Art and WordArt can be used to enhance the appearance of a PowerPoint presentation. Emphasize that students should use Clip Art that relates to the presentation topic. 2. Teacher will demonstrate how to change the slide layout to a content layout that allows the user to insert clip art, a chart, a table, etc. Explain each of the six options that can be added to a content placeholder. 3. Teacher will demonstrate how to search for a specific clip art subject and then insert the picture on the slide (On and Offline). 4. Teacher will demonstrate how to select, insert, resize, and position clip art on a slide. 5. Have students insert Clip Art that relates to the presentation topic. 6. Teacher will review how Themes can be used to enhance the appearance of a PowerPoint presentation. 7. Teacher will demonstrate to students how to use the features on the Design Tab that enable them to change Theme colors, fonts, and background style of their presentation. 8. Have students apply different theme colors, fonts, and background styles to the Effective Presentations file. 9. Teacher will demonstrate how to insert and format WordArt. 10. Have students insert WordArt that matches the Theme previously chosen and save a new copy as Effective Presentations Revision 1. Notes: The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 3, Page 737, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own” on Page 739.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Rearrange Slides, Copy, Duplicate & Delete Slides Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: Your boss has reviewed your presentation and has asked you to work on the file adjusting content and order. In this exercise you will move, copy, duplicate, and delete slides using the Slides pane in Normal view or Slide Sorter view. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Resources: The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 4, Page 742, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own” on Page 745. Teacher will demonstrate how to move, copy, duplicate, and delete slides using the Slides pane in Normal view or Slide Sorter view. Teacher will review the View buttons available in the status bar. Explain to students that Slide Sorter view is the best tool for reorganizing a presentation. Have students open Effective Presentations. Have students insert and delete slides in a presentation, and make a duplicate copy of an existing slide. Have students exit the file without saving their changes.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Design Templates Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: Continue with the previous exercise “How to Deliver an Effective Presentation”. Your boss has decided that he/she is not happy with the Theme you have chosen to use for the presentation. He/She has decided that using a Template that relates to the presentation topic may improve the look of this presentation. In this exercise you will open an existing presentation and apply a Template for visual interest. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Notes: The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 4, Page 743, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own” on Page 745. Resources: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/default.aspx Teacher will discuss how design templates also enhance the appearance of slides. Teacher will define Templates and explore the design template options. Teacher will demonstrate how to choose a new design template using the New Presentation dialog box. Students can choose from templates already installed on their computer or Office Online. Have students open Effective Presentations Revision 1. Have students apply design templates to their presentation. Have students download a template from Office Online and practice switching between the different PowerPoint Views. Have students apply a design template that relates to the presentation topic and save a new copy as Effective Presentations Revision 2.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Background Information in PowerPoint Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: Your boss has reviewed your presentation and would like to see information displayed in the background of the presentation to help identify the slides. You have also been asked to delete background graphics created as part of a theme.

How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Teacher will discuss and demonstrate how inserting slide numbers, date and time, and footer text using the Header and Footer dialog box can help identify and organize slides in a presentation. Have students open the file Effective Presentations Revision 2 that was saved in the previous activity. Have students add insert slide numbers and the date in the footer of the presentation. Teacher will discuss and demonstrate why students might want to remove background graphics from some slides in a presentation. Emphasize that students should be careful when hiding background graphics. Sometimes text colors are chosen to contrast with the graphic background, and when it is removed, the text color blends into the background, which makes it seem to disappear. You may need to change text color to make it visible again. Have students hide the background graphics from a theme and save the presentation file as Effective Presentations Revision 3.

6. Notes:

The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 5, Page 750, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own” on Page 751.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Formatting Placeholders Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: Your boss wants you to make some changes to the appearance of your presentation Effective Presentation 3. In this exercise you will explore ways to improve the appearance of text in a presentation. How to Teach It: 1. Teacher will demonstrate how to select text in a placeholder and review formatting options for changing the appearance of text: changing the font, font size, font style, color, and case. Mention that students can use the Font group buttons on the Home tab, the Mini toolbar, or the Font dialog box to change text appearance. 2. Teacher will explain the AutoFit feature and cover the available AutoFit options. 3. Teacher will remind students to use the Format Painter to copy formats to one or more sections of text. 4. Teacher will explain that in addition to choosing PowerPoint themes, students can also use several different theme fonts and theme colors to customize a presentation. If they want to use a particular font on slides, they also have the option of creating new theme fonts. 5. Teacher will review the text formatting tools on the Home tab of the Ribbon. 6. Have students open the Effective Presentations 3 file. 7. Have students change font, font style, color, and size of text in their presentation. Remind them to use the Home tab for single changes and the Font dialog box to change several formats at once. 8. Have students use the Format Painter to copy formats from one text placeholder to another. 9. Have students change one or more fonts in their presentation using the Create New Theme Fonts dialog box. 10. Have students resize a text placeholder to make it smaller, so they can see how PowerPoint uses AutoFit to adjust the font size to fit the placeholder. 11. Have students save their changes and close the PowerPoint file for later use. Resources: The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 9, Page 764, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own” on Page 765.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Formatting Lists & Line Spacing Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: Your boss has asked you to make additional changes to your presentation In this exercise you will modify list items, text alignment, text, and the position and size of placeholders. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Resources: Teacher will discuss and demonstrate how to adjust bullet and number formats in their slides using the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Teacher will demonstrate how to increase and decrease the paragraph spacing using the Paragraph dialog box. Explain that paragraph spacing may be changed to fill up a placeholder or fit text into a placeholder. Have students open Effective Presentations 3. Have students add a slide and type several bulleted list entries. Have them adjust paragraph spacing between the bullets by selecting all bullet items and using the Paragraph dialog box. Have students adjust the line spacing within bullets by using the Line Spacing button in the Paragraph group. Have students save their changes and close the PowerPoint file.

The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 10, Page 770, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own” on Page 771.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Putting Everything on the Table Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: You are a receptionist for a recreation center. You have been asked to prepare a presentation that will include information for this summer‟s day camp schedule. In this exercise you will insert and format a table. How to Teach It: 7. 8. 9. Teacher will explain that tables can be used to organize text into rows and columns, making it easier for readers to read and understand. Teacher will reinforce that inserting a table is a skill students learned using Word and that it is similar in PowerPoint. Teacher will show students how to use the Insert table to create a table on an existing slide or choose a slide layout with a content placeholder if they want to add a new slide. 10. Have students create a table using a slide layout with a content placeholder for a table. Have students create activities and a schedule and enter this information into the table. Notes: This activity is based upon Exercise 12, Page 777, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. To reinforce this skill use the “On Your Own on Page 781.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Using SmartArt to Create Diagrams Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: You have been assigned the role of Teacher‟s Assistant (TA) in your Computer Applications class. Your teacher has asked you to help students understand the hierarchy of computer peripheral devices by using a diagram as a way for students to visually remember this information. In this exercise you will create and modify a diagram using Smart Art. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Teacher will discuss how adding a diagram to a slide illustrates the visual flow of or relationship of information. Teacher will discuss how an organization chart organizes people or items according to a hierarchy of levels. Teacher will demonstrate how to insert a diagram (organization chart) using SmartArt Graphics either by inserting a graphic into a content slide layout or adding it without a placeholder using the SmartArt button on the Insert tab. Teacher will demonstrate how to add shapes at various levels, apply a new layout and format the diagram. Have students start a new presentation and insert an organization chart using the SmartArt button on the Insert tab and enter the following information: 1) Peripheral Devices a) Input Devices i) Mouse ii) Keyboard iii) Scanner iv) Camera b) Output Devices i) Monitor ii) Printer iii) Speakers Notes: The skills in this activity are based on Exercise 13, Page 785, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC.

Resources:

The following activity can also be used to teach this lesson: Create Your Family Tree Chart http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/powerpoint2007/tp/family_tree_chart_templates.htm

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Making Everything Clear Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: You are a secretary in the guidance office of a high school. The Vice Principal of the school has asked for enrollment and graduation information for the past two years. You have been asked to create a chart that visually displays how many students represent each grade over the two year period in order to display graduation trends. In this exercise you will create a chart using SmartArt. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Teacher will discuss how adding a chart to a slide visually illustrates data and displays trends. Teacher will demonstrate how to insert a chart using SmartArt Graphics either by inserting a graphic into a content slide layout or adding it without a placeholder using the SmartArt button on the Insert tab. Teacher will display and review the main parts of chart: the data series, axes, plot area, chart area, legend, etc. Teacher will review the common types of charts and when each should be used. Teacher will demonstrate how to insert labels and values for a chart. Have students start a new presentation and view the slide layouts that include placeholders for charts. Have students insert a bar chart and enter the following data: Year 1 Ninth Grade Tenth Grade Eleventh Grade Twelfth Grade 8. 400 350 275 200 Year 2 450 375 300 175

Have students save this file as High School Graduates and exit PowerPoint.

Notes: The skills in this activity are based on Exercise 13, Page 785, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Finishing the Job Applies to Standards:

Computer Applications

8.1 Basic Computer Skills and Tools Strand A: Produce a multimedia project using text, graphics, moving images, and sound. Brief Description: You are preparing your presentation to present to an audience. You will need to apply transitions and animations and set-up how you want your presentation to run. In this exercise students will prepare to deliver a presentation, review the content, add transitions, apply animation effects and run a presentation in Slide Show View. How to Teach It: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Notes: The skills in this activity are based upon Exercise 20, Page 818, Learning Microsoft Office 2007, Pearson Prentice Hall DDC. Teacher will review how to run a presentation in Slide Show view. Teacher will introduce transitions and demonstrate how to select and apply a transition to one or more slides using the transition gallery on the Animations tab of the Ribbon. Teacher will discuss sounds and animations as a means of keeping audience attention. Teacher will emphasize that using too many sounds or animations during a presentation can distract the audience from focusing on the presentation topic. Teacher will demonstrate how to use the Animate drop-down list on the Animations tab and show students how to apply PowerPoint‟s preset animation schemes to slides. Teacher will explain the difference between manually advancing slides and setting timing to advance slides automatically. Have students switch to Slide sorter view and click the More button to display the transition gallery. Explore the transitions available in the transition gallery. Teacher will review the commands in the Transition to This Slide Group on the Animations tab. Point out the Transition sound effects that can be associated with the transition, the Transition Speed setting, and the Advance Slide options. Have students set a transition and note the immediate preview using the thumbnail. Note also the small star icon below the slide that indicates a transition has been set. Teacher will explain that a single transition can be applied to all slides, or different transitions may be used on different slides. Teacher will discuss slide advance methods. Show students how to specify automatic timing and have them add some timings to slides. Have students use the Rehearse timings button on the Slide Show tab to rehearse the show. Have students Preview the transitions and animations that have been applied to the presentation.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Computer Applications Making Effective Presentations The key to effective presentations lies in careful preparation. You need to know about your audience and their expectations; you need to identify your own objectives (do you intend to inform or persuade your audience?); you need to sequence your information in a logical way and you need to know the best ways to create and keep the audience's interest. You should also have your audio-visual aids ready and in the right sequence and should check that the equipment is in working order. Your audience Before you start to think about the content of your presentation, look at what you know about the audience. Ask yourself: _ why they are attending _ what they want to know _ how much information they have already _ what technical language they use or are familiar with. If you were presenting information about road safety, your approach to an audience of parents would be quite different from your approach to an audience of policemen. Parents would be concerned primarily with protecting their children. They would be looking for advice and information on safe practices. The police, on the other hand, would be far more interested in statistics, on looking for those responsible for road accidents, on the relationship between traffic regulations and safety. Presentations for information If you have information to give an audience, you must decide on the most logical sequence for the material. In your introduction you should state your name, your company or organization and your credentials and the purpose of your talk: Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. My name is Mary Green and I'm a consultant with the Insight Corporation. I have ten year's experience in the field of X and the purpose of my talk today is give you the results of our recent research into Y. It is important in the first stage of the presentation to give the audience some signposts and some approximate times. This is rather like having an agenda for a meeting; the audience knows what to expect and finds it easier to follow: My presentation today will take about fifteen minutes and falls into three stages. First I will remind you briefly of the background to the research. Next I will spend about eight minutes outlining the results and I will conclude by talking for two or three minutes about the implications of these findings. There will be another ten minutes available at the end of my talk for you to ask questions. As you reach the end of each stage of your presentation it is a good idea to signal this: That concludes the background information... and to briefly summarize the main points of that section, and, as you can see, there are two main points to bear in mind: the effects of early research on current practices and the gaps in our knowledge that were identified. You should then signal your move to the next stage: Now I want to turn to the results of our recent research. Presentations to Persuade As with information presentations, you should give a clear introduction to yourself and your topic. However, in addition to organizing your talk in a logical fashion, you need to build up a convincing argument. You should concentrate on: _ the benefits of your standpoint _ compare these with the disadvantages of other approaches _ lead up to the conclusion that what you offer is a better alternative. In my presentation today I am going to show you how our new product can save you between 15% and 20% of your annual energy costs... Until now, comparable products have required a high initial outlay. In contrast our prices are 30% lower than our competitors'... From what you have seen today, I am sure you will agree that what we offer not only allows the biggest per annum savings at a considerably lower price than comparable products, but that it also comes with a cast-iron warranty and an excellent after sales package. Capturing and keeping the audience's interest To capture your audience's interest, you need a lively introduction with a 'hook'; that is to say a way of making the audience want to know more. Some ways of doing this are: _ identify a problem you know they would like solved _ "trail" some new and interesting information that you are going to unveil _ ask rhetorical questions (questions to which you don't expect an answer: what exactly went wrong? where does that leave us? how can we interpret this?). Department of Teaching & Learning ©2008 80

The Newark Public Schools 2008 Computer Applications Once you have the audience's attention, you should ensure you keep it by: _ making clear, brief points _ using simple visual aids to highlight specific points (these should be vivid and with only minimal information) _ using humor if it is appropriate to your topic _ summarizing key points. Body Language Remember that a message is conveyed not only by words but also by facial expression, posture, gestures. People say that as much of 75 percent of a message is conveyed by body language. If you are nervous, you will betray this in your body language, perhaps by pacing or repeating some gesture like touching your ear or fingering your clothing. All this can be distracting for your audience, so you might need to practice in front of a mirror or a video camera. Aim for a clear, steady gaze and look at individuals in the audience from time to time. Don't pace or fidget or tap your toe. Try to match your facial expressions to the tone of your subject. If you find you are becoming nervous, pause for a second and take a sip of water to give you time to recover. Dealing with questions Questions at the end of the presentation are of four main kinds: _ questions you can answer on the spot _ questions that require further information you don't have with you _ questions you wish to avoid _ aggressive questions. The first kind is no problem and you will deal with them as efficiently as you can. For the second kind, you should acknowledge the question as useful/important/interesting and offer to send the information on, or provide another source of information, if the questioner gives you an address after the presentation. For questions you wish to avoid, you should find some formulae for politely declining to answer: _ that's really too complicated an issue to discuss right now _ that's beyond my brief for today _ I'm not really the best person to deal with that question. If someone in the audience is asking aggressive questions, then acknowledge their anger and politely decline to get involved: I can see you are upset/angry/disturbed by this, but this not the time to engage in an argument.

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The Newark Public Schools 2008 Effective Presentations Worksheet Making Effective Presentations Worksheet QUESTIONS

Computer Applications

Questions 1. What do you need to know about your audience? 2. Why is it important to provide some signposts and timings? 3. What is the function of “hooks”? 4. What techniques will help you keep an audience's attention? 5. Why do you need to control your body language? 6. What are the four types of questions you can be asked at the end of a presentation?

Making Effective Presentations Worksheet ANSWERS Answers: 1. Why they are there, what they want to know, what they already know and whether they understand the technical term associated with the topic. 2. So that it is easy for the audience to follow your argument. 3. Hooks are designed to capture attention. 4. a. Making clear, brief points b. using simple visual aids to highlight specific points (these should be vivid and with only minimal information) c. using humor if it is appropriate to your topic d. summarizing key points. 5. Because body language is as much a part of the message as words (in fact the greater part). 6. Questions at the end of the presentation are: _ questions you can answer on the spot _ questions that require further information you don't have with you _ questions you wish to avoid _ aggressive questions.

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