Specialisation Course on Child Protection, Monitoring and by olliegoblue32

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									    Specialisation Course on
    Child Protection, Monitoring
    and Rehabilitation
    COURSE CONCEPT




Developed through the
EC Project on Training for Civilian Aspects of Crisis Management
TablE Of CONTENTS



I    INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................... 4

II   OVERALL OBJECTIVES.. ......................................................................................... 4

III GENERAL BACKGROUND.. .................................................................................... 6

IV MODULES AND SUBJECT AREAS.. ......................................................................... 7
     1. Setting the Context – Basic Concepts . ................................................................ 7
        Subject.1:.Introduction.to.Approaches.of.International.Organisations..
          to.Child.Protection,.Monitoring.and.Rehabilitation.. ......................................... 7
        Subject.2:.Introduction.to.Basic.Concepts.of.Childhood....................................... 7
        Subject.3:.Introduction.to.Basic.Concepts.of.Crisis.Management........................ 8
     2. Impact of Armed Conflict on Children.. ............................................................... 8
        Subject.1:.Direct.Violence.against.Children.. ........................................................ 8
        Subject.2:.Structural.Violence.against.Children................................................... 8
        Subject.3:.Different.Impact.of.Armed.Conflict.on.Boys.and.Girls......................... 9
     3. Legal Framework and International Standards.. ................................................. 9
        Subject.1:.Introduction.to.International.Standards.on.Human.Rights..
          of.Children....................................................................................................... 9
        Subject.2:.Introduction.to.International.Humanitarian.and.Refugee..
          Law.Standards.. ............................................................................................... 10
     4. Monitoring......................................................................................................... 11
        Subject.1:.Child-focused.Situation.Analysis/Investigation.. ................................. 11
        Subject.2:.Child-focused.Monitoring.and.Reporting.. .......................................... 11
     5. Protection.......................................................................................................... 12
        Subject.1:.Strengthening.the.Justice.Structures.and.Mechanisms,..
          and.the.Juvenile.Justice.System.. ..................................................................... 12
        Subject.2:.Protection.from.Abuse.and.Exploitation............................................ 12
        Subject.3:.Protection.from.Separation,.Trafficking.and.Recruitment.................. 12
        Subject.4:.Facilitation.of.Humanitarian.Assistance.to.Children.......................... 13
     6. Rehabilitation.................................................................................................... 13
        Subject.1:.Psychological.and.Trauma.Healing.in.the.Context.of..
          Reconciliation.Efforts.in.Peace.Processes........................................................ 13
        Subject.2:.Reintegration.of.Child.Refugees/IDPs................................................ 14
                                                                 .
        Subject.3:.Rehabilitation.of.Child.Soldiers.. ........................................................ 14
        Subject.4:.Educational.and.Vocational.Training.. ................................................ 14
7. Field Work Techniques.. .................................................................................. 14
   Subject.1:.Communicating.with.Children.and.the.Child..
     Participatory.Approach.. .............................................................................. 14
   Subject.2:.An.Organisational.Culture.which.Values.Child.Protection.and.
     Expected.Behaviour.of.Personnel.with.Regard.to.Children..
     (Code.of.Conduct).. .......................................................................................15
8. Information and Cooperation .........................................................................15
   Subject.1:.Child.Rights.Advocacy.and.Public.Information.–.Awareness.Raising.. ..15
   Subject.2:.Understanding.and.Working.with.other.Child.Protection.Actors.. ..... 16
I    INTRODUCTION

An estimated 300 million children worldwide are subjected to violence, exploitation and
abuse in communities, schools and institutions during armed conflict. This includes
the worst forms of child labour, such as recruitment into armed forces, as well as harm-
ful practices such as female genital mutilation and child marriage. Millions more
remain without adequate protection and are forced into displacement or take refuge in
other countries.
   Protecting children from violence, exploitation and abuse, monitoring their situa-
tion and support their rehabilitation into society is an integral component of protect-
ing their rights to survival, growth and development. The commitment to protecting
children is underlined in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the
Millennium Declaration and numerous international human rights agreements.
   International organisations advocate and support the creation of a protective environ-
ment for children in partnership with governments, civil society, and national and
international partners, including the private sector. National child protection systems,
protective social practices and children’s own empowerment, coupled with good over-
sight and monitoring, are among the elements of a protective environment and enable
countries, communities and families to prevent and respond to violence, exploitation
and abuse.
   With strategies such as the EU guidelines on children and armed conflict (2003) or
Towards an EU strategy on the rights of the child (2006), the European Union (EU) seeks
to take a position on the issue of child protection, which is on the agenda of many
international organisations, with the United Nations (UN) at the forefront.
   With this specialisation course on child protection, monitoring and rehabilitation,
experts shall be acquainted with respective policies, legislation, methods and tools for
protection, monitoring and rehabilitation, possibilities for cooperation in the field,
lessons learned, etc. in order to prepare them for their engagement in this sensitive but
crucial field of activity.
    The course was designed in close cooperation with experts in this field from inter-
national governmental organisations (IGOs) and non-governmental organisations
(NGOs) (e.g. the United Nations [UN] Office of the Special Representative of the
Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict [OSRSG CAAC], UN Children’s
Fund [UNICEF], UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations [DPKO], Human
Security Network, etc), taking into consideration the pre-existing and ongoing activi-
ties and efforts in this area.




II   OVERall ObJECTIVES

The overall objective of this course is to prepare experts who would like to become
involved in monitoring, advisory and executive functions related to children in crisis
areas. It should not duplicate pre-existing and ongoing training efforts which main-
stream the topic, but rather train experts in related, specialised topics in child protec-


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tion, monitoring and rehabilitation, and to provide the EU with a pool of civilian
experts in this sensitive field. Furthermore, this course should also contribute to an
international discussion between experts in this field in order to benefit from an
exchange of ideas, experiences and lessons already learned, as well as to promote child
protection, monitoring and rehabilitation on an international level.
   Considering current initiatives for comprehensive monitoring of child rights viola-
tions, as well as the massive need for programmes supporting recovery, rehabilitation
and reintegration of children affected by armed conflict, the immediate goal of this
course is to cover the main aspects related to children in crisis areas (relevant primarily
for field preparation training).

Participants should gain an understanding of:
•	 The	situation	of	children	affected	by	armed	conflict;
•	 The	concepts	of	childhood	and	the	role	models	of	children	in	different	societies,	
   perceptions	of	children	individually	and	as	a	social	group;
•	 The	phenomenon	of	child	soldiers;
•	 International	child	rights	and	human	rights	law,	humanitarian	law	and	refugee	
   law	standards;
•	 Child	rights	assessment	and	monitoring;	
•	 Strategies	for	prevention	of	child	rights	violations	and	strategies	to	reduce	the	impact	
   of armed conflict on children (child recovery, rehabilitation and reintegration),
   emphasising the relevance of child rights-based and child-participatory
   approaches, as well as the direct involvement of children in rehabilitation and
   reconstruction	efforts;	and
•	 Methods,	instruments	and	actors	involved	in	the	implementation	of	strategies	for	
   child protection, monitoring and rehabilitation.

The course should aim at training candidates with already relevant professional back-
grounds in working with children, who want to become experts of child protection,
monitoring and rehabilitation in crisis areas (e.g. child protection officers). Participants
may as well come from diverse professional background but plan to intensively include
the children’s rights topic in future activities in their respective areas of competence.

The target group can also be identified according to different organisational backgrounds
and levels of knowledge:
•	 The	organisational background would include civil servants, NGO personnel and
   independent experts (from the academic and private sectors) who are willing to
   participate in field missions.
•	 In	terms	of	levels of knowledge, participants will have expertise in their respective
   areas of professional competence (such as human rights, rule of law, social work,
   humanitarian aid and development) which they would like to use for child protec-
   tion monitoring and rehabilitation. In addition, they might also already have
   acquired field experience.




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Basic knowledge on peace and conflict-related topics, organisational and management
skills, monitoring techniques, situation assessment and analytical skills, as well as
documentation, communication and networking skills, are a precondition for attend-
ing this course. Participants should also have a basic understanding of international
human rights and humanitarian law.




III     GENERal baCKGROUND

Concerns about children’s rights are rising world-wide. The CRC is almost universally
ratified, but by no means universally applied. Particularly in situations of armed con-
flict, children suffer disproportionately in a variety of ways and with long-lasting
effects. The impact of armed conflict on future generations may sow the seeds for con-
flicts to continue or re-emerge. The Optional Protocol to the CRC on the involvement
of children in armed conflict is aimed at countering this situation.1
    The EU Guidelines on Children and Armed Conflict2 were presented on special request of
the European Commission to the European Group on Training (EGT) meeting in
Brussels in September 2004. As highlighted within the EU guidelines, armed conflicts
are estimated to have claimed the lives of over two million children and physically
maimed six million more in the past decade. Conflict deprives children of parents,
care-givers, basic social services, healthcare and education. There are some twenty
million displaced and refugee children, while others are held hostage, abducted or
trafficked. Systems of birth registration and juvenile justice systems collapse. At any
given time, there are estimated to be at least 300,000 child soldiers participating in
conflicts. Children have special short- and long-term post-conflict needs, such as the
need for tracing of family members, redress and social reintegration, psycho-social
rehabilitation programmes, and participation in disarmament, demobilisation and
reintegration (DDR) programmes.
    In unison, the EGT recommended that the issue of children and armed conflict be
mainstreamed in the core courses, and the specialisation courses on human rights and
DDR. Additionally, the topic should also be sensitised in specialisation courses on rule
of law and civilian administration. Furthermore, it was pointed out that the topic is
also pertinent to civil protection and humanitarian assistance, but that these areas are
not covered by the activities of the European Community (EC) Project on Training
for Civilian Aspects of Crisis Management.
    However, the mainstreaming of child protection, monitoring and rehabilitation in

1. For example, see: Committee on the Rights of the Child (2005). Consideration of Reports Submit-
   ted by States Parties under Article 8 of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child
   on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflicts (Doc. CRC/C/OPAC/CO/2) (38th Session),
   ‘Concluding Observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child: Austria’. Geneva,
   Switzerland. This document gives detailed information on the implementation of the Optional
   Protocol.
2. Council of the European Union (2003). EU Guidelines on Children and Armed Conflict
   (Doc. 15634/03). Brussels, Belgium. Available at http://ue.eu.int/uedocs/cmsUpload/
   GuidelinesChildren.pdf.



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core and specialisation courses seems not to be sufficient for addressing this important
issue in EU crisis management activities. Well prepared experts focusing on child protec-
tion are needed in order to meet the basic needs of children in crisis areas. These experts
need intensive specialised training in child protection, monitoring and rehabilitation,
which can not be covered by the existing core and specialisation courses, which are
already very intensive.




IV       MODUlES aND SUbJECT aREaS

1. Setting the Context – basic Concepts

Subject 1: Introduction to Approaches of International Organisations to Child
Protection, Monitoring and Rehabilitation

Context
Child protection is high on the agenda of international organisations such as the EU
and UN. Whoever wants to engage in the protection of children affected by armed
conflict should be aware of the major approaches of the EU and UN to child protec-
tion, monitoring and rehabilitation.

Learning objectives
•	 Be	aware	of	the	international	approaches	to	child	protection,	monitoring	and	
   rehabilitation;
•	 Learn	about	topic-specific	EU	and	UN	documents;	and
•	 Understand	the	distinct	EU	and	UN	approaches	and	their	complementarities.	


Subject 2: Introdution to Basic Concepts of Childhood

Context
There are some basic concepts of childhood, and awareness of the status and needs of
children in different societies is crucial as a basis for any engagement in the field of
child protection, monitoring and rehabilitation.

Learning objectives
•	   Be	aware	of	the	role	of	the	family	and	the	community;
•	   Be	aware	of	the	gender	aspects;
•	   Understand	child	and	adolescent	development;	and
•	   Be	aware	of	the	different	needs	of	children	and	adolescents,	and	the	need	for	
     targeted intervention.




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Subject 3: Introdution to Basic Concepts of Crisis Management

Context
Whoever is working in conflict or post-conflict areas should be acquainted with basic
concepts of crisis management, crucial in order to “do no harm”.

Learning 0bjectives
•	   Understand	the	concept	of	crisis	prevention;
•	   Understand	the	concept	of	peacemaking;
•	   Understand	the	concept	of	peacekeeping;	and
•	   Understand	the	concept	of	post-conflict	rehabilitation.



2. Impact of armed Conflict on Children

Subject 1: Direct Violence against Children

Context
Direct violence refers to events that harm or kill individuals or groups, as contrasted
with structural violence, which is manifest in social inequalities. In conflict or post-
conflict areas children are often exposed to various forms of violence, direct violence
being one of them. The session aims to make participants familiar with direct violence
against children, such as sexual exploitation, trafficking, exposure to traumatic events
and the use of child soldiers.

Learning objectives
•	 Be	aware	of	physical	and	psychological	violence	against	children	(torture,	discipline/
   corporal	punishment,	etc);
•	 Be	aware	of	sexual	violence	(e.g.	rape,	sexual	abuse,	exploitation,	etc);
•	 Be	aware	of	child	trafficking;
•	 Be	aware	of	the	use	of	child	soldiers/child	combatants;
•	 Be	aware	of	the	abduction	of	children	(including	recruitment	practices);
•	 Be	aware	of	the	difficulties	related	to	small	arms	(trade,	availability	to	children)	
   and	land	mines;	and
•	 Be	aware	of	the	specific	gender	impact.


Subject 2: Structural Violence against Children

Context
Structural violence denotes a form of violence that corresponds with the systematic
ways in which a given social structure or social institution causes violence to people by
preventing them from meeting their basic needs.
   In conflict or post-conflict areas children are often exposed to various forms of
violence;	structural	violence	is	one	of	them.	The	session	aims	to	make	participants	
familiar with forms of structural violence against children, such as separation, loss of


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parents, displacement, or lack of food, clean water, shelter, clothing, healthcare and
education.

Learning objectives
•	 Be	aware	of	the	difficulties	of	children	being	separated	from	families;	
•	 Be	aware	of	the	situation	of	child-headed	households;
•	 Be	aware	of	the	impact	of	loss	of	family	members,	personal	relations,	social	contacts	
   to	peers,	destruction	of	homes,	every-day	routines,	etc.	on	children;
•	 Be	aware	of	the	problem	of	displaced	and	refugee	children;
•	 Be	aware	of	the	impact	of	destruction	of	child-relevant	infrastructure	(e.g.	schools,	
   healthcare,	etc);
•	 Be	aware	of	the	need	of	basic	social	services	for	children,	including	food,	water,	
   shelter,	psycho-social	assistance	and	education;
•	 Be	aware	of	the	need	for	information	on	and	prevention	of	HIV/AIDS;
•	 Be	aware	of	children	with	disabilities	and	their	specific	situation;	and
•	 Understand	the	specific	gender	aspects.


Subject 3: Different Impact of Armed Conflict on Boys and Girls

Context
Although boys and girls may be similarly affected by conflict, it may impact them in
different ways. Therefore, being aware of the different needs and dangers, and know-
ing how to apply gender in working with children affected by armed conflict, is crucial.

Learning objectives
•	 Be	acquainted	with	lessons	learned	and	best	practices	in	the	field	of	gender;
•	 Be	acquainted	with	the	different	needs	of	and	dangers	for	boys	and	girls;	and
•	 Understand	that	children	in	particular	are	affected	by	gender-based	violence	in	
   conflicts.



3. legal framework and International Standards

Subject 1: Introduction to International Standards on Human Rights of Children

Context
The basic standards, or human rights, set minimum entitlements and freedoms that
should be respected by governments and international organisations. They are founded
on respect for the dignity and worth of each individual, regardless of race, colour, gen-
der, language, religion, opinions, origins, wealth, birth status or ability, and therefore
apply to every human being everywhere. In the framework of the course it is impor-
tant to understand international standards on human rights of children, such as the
CRC, which is the first legally binding international instrument to incorporate the
full range of human rights (civil, cultural, economic, political and social).



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Learning objectives
•	 Learn	about	the	Convention	on	the	Rights	of	the	Child	and	its	Optional	Protocols;
•	 Learn	about	the	International	Labour	Organisation	(ILO)	Convention	No.	182 on
   child	labour;
•	 Learn	about	the	African	Charter	on	the	Rights	and	Welfare	of	the	Child;
•	 Learn	about	other	core	human	rights	conventions;
•	 Be	able	to	identify	which	treaties	apply	to	international	armed	conflicts,	and	which	
   ones	apply	to	non-international	armed	conflicts;	and
•	 Understand	the	relevance	of	UN	Security	Council	Resolutions	and	the	International	
   Criminal Court (ICC).


Subject 2: Introduction to International Humanitarian and Refugee Law Standards

Context
Armed conflicts have often been accompanied by large-scale movements of civilians,
both within the borders of a country and across international borders. International
humanitarian law expressly prohibits the forced displacement of civilians in both
international and non-international armed conflicts, and offers protection should dis-
placement occur. Thus, international humanitarian, refugee and human rights laws
are complementary bodies of law that share a common goal: the protection of the
lives, health and dignity of persons. They form a complex network of complementary
protections and it is essential to understand how they interact. It is also important to
understand that international humanitarian and refugee law provides standards
for the general protection of civilians in armed conflict situations, and afford special
protection for children, whether they are civilians or child soldiers.

Learning objectives
•	 Learn	about	the	Geneva	Conventions	and	Additional	Protocols;
•	 Learn	about	the	Rome	Statute	for	the	ICC;
•	 Learn	about	conventions	and	protocols	relating	to	the	status	of	refugees:	UN	
   High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) guidelines and Guiding Principles
   on	Internal	Displacement;
•	 Learn	about	the	UN	Security	Council	Resolutions	1261 (1999), 1314 (2000), 1379
   (2001) and 1460 (2003);
•	 Be	aware	of	the	concept	of	human	security;
•	 Be	aware	of	relevant	international	structures	and	mechanisms;	and
•	 Understand	the	role	of	non-state	actors.




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4. Monitoring

Subject 1: Child-focused Situation Analysis/Investigation

Context
Child-focused situation analysis means a systematic collection and evaluation of past
and present data. It is aimed at: (1) identification of internal and external forces that
may	have	influence;	and	(2) assessment of current and future strengths, weaknesses,
dangers, opportunities, etc. focusing especially on the situation of children. In order to
be able to conduct such analysis, it is important to learn about proactive and reactive
investigations.

Learning objectives
•	 Learn	about	tools	for	child-focused	analysis/investigation;
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	building	trust	and	confidence	with	information	
   sources;	
•	 Learn	about	interview	techniques,	including	child-sensitive	and	gender-sensitive	
   interviewing;	and
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	addressing	children	with	respect	(ethics).


Subject 2: Child-focused Monitoring and Reporting

Context
Monitoring generally means to be aware of the state of a system meaning, for example
observing a situation for any changes which may occur over time, using a monitor or
measuring device of some sort, or observing the behaviour or communications of
individuals or groups. In order to fulfil one’s duty without causing harm, it is crucial
to learn to apply a child rights-based approach to monitoring and reporting.

Learning objectives
•	 Learn	about	understanding	and	developing	of	indicators	for	monitoring	(which	
   violations,	how	they	are	perceived,	etc);
•	 Be	aware	of	child-participatory	monitoring;	
•	 Learn	about	data	collection	and	documentation;
•	 Be	aware	of	the	risks	of	using	misinformation	and	be	able	to	produce	a	check-list	
   of	steps	to	take	in	order	to	control	the	quality	of	information;
•	 Understand	the	principles	of	confidentiality	and	impartiality	(diagnostic	
   monitoring);
•	 Be	able	to	analyse	the	situation	concerning	witness	protection	and	how	to	
   implement	it	if	needed;
•	 Learn	about	reporting	techniques;
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	addressing	children	with	respect	(ethics);	and
•	 Respect	the	gender	aspect	in	all	activities.




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5. Protection

Context
Protecting	children	from	violence,	exploitation	and	abuse;	from	separation,	traffick-
ing	and	recruitment;	strengthening	justice	systems	and	mechanisms	to	secure	basic	
rights standards, etc. – all these are an integral component of protecting children’s
rights to survival, growth and development. The commitment to protecting children
is underlined in the CRC, Millennium Declaration and numerous international
human rights agreements as the basis for a response.


Subject 1: Strengthening the Justice Structures and Mechanisms,
and the Juvenile Justice System

Learning objectives
Learn	about	the	importance	of	strengthening	the	justice	structures	and	mechanisms,	
in particular the juvenile justice system:
•	 Learn	about	normative	pre-conditions	for	legal	protection;
•	 Learn	how	to	build	elements	to	secure	child	rights	basic	standards;	
•	 Be	aware	of	the	standards	on	juvenile	justice,	(e.g.	concepts	of	guilt	and	responsibility,	
   age	limits,	etc);
•	 Learn	about	culturally-sensitive	justice	and	truth-seeking	mechanisms;	and
•	 Learn	about	juvenile	correctional	administration	(e.g.	special	centres	for	minors,	
   dealing with issues like cohabitation of minors, adults in prisons, growing up in a
   prison, and international standards, etc).


Subject 2: Protection from Abuse and Exploitation

Learning objectives
Learn	about	possibilities	for	preventing	child	rights	violations	such	as	abuse	and	
exploitation:
•	 Learn	to	read	and	understand	the	“signs”;
•	 Understand	early	warning	mechanisms;	and
•	 Understand	the	gender	impact.


Subject 3: Protection from Separation, Trafficking and Recruitment

Learning objectives
Learn	about	mechanisms	for	preventing	child	rights	violations	such	as	separation,	
trafficking and recruitment:
•	 Learn	to	read	and	understand	the	“signs”;	
•	 Understand	early	warning	mechanisms;	and
•	 Understand	the	gender	impact.	




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Subject 4: Facilitation of Humanitarian Assistance to Children

Learning objectives
Learn	how	to	assist	in	the	delivery	of	humanitarian	assistance,	specifically	by	facilitat-
ing the logistics of the operation and providing security to the humanitarian relief
workers:
•	 Be	aware	of	how	to	obtain	information	on	the	needs/situation	of	the	children;	
•	 Know	how	to	relay	this	information	through	the	proper	channels	to	those	who	are	
   in	a	position	to	help	provide	humanitarian	assistance	to	children;	and
•	 Understand	the	gender	impact.	



6. Rehabilitation

Context
During and after violent conflict children are exposed to violence, destruction, trauma,
etc. Rehabilitation of both perpetrators and victims is a difficult process. Children
have often been brutalised and have carried out killings, or have been victims of violence
themselves. Child soldiers, for instance, have wielded life-and-death power over adults,
often in their local communities. The armies using them have fed, clothed and given
them shelter. There are various ways (methods, tools, lessons learned) of reintegration,
rehabilitation and reconciliation to study in this module.


Subject 1: Psychological and Trauma Healing in the Context of Reconciliation
Efforts in Peace Processes

Learning objectives
Understand the challenge, concepts and activities for psychological and trauma
healing in the context of reconciliation efforts in peace processes:
•	 Be	familiar	with	the	effects	of	trauma	–	post-traumatic	stress	disorder	(PTSD);
•	 Understand	strength	and	weaknesses	of	PTSD-assessment;
•	 Know	the	strategies	for	providing	psychosocial	assistance	(e.g.	trauma	therapy,	
   traditional healing rituals, counseling, activities for adolescents, parenting
   support,	etc);	
•	 Be	acquainted	with	trauma	interventions	and	trauma	healing:	assessment,	facili-
   tation of grief, counseling, expressive activities, psycho-educational workshops,
   community	sensitisation	on	mental	health,	etc;
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	the	time	factor	for	rehabilitation;
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	treating	children	with	respect;	and
•	 Understand	the	gender	impact.




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Subject 2: Reintegration of Child Refugees/IDPs

Learning objectives
Get familiar with the challenge of reintegration of child refugees/internally displaced
persons (IDPs):
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	family	reunification,	family	tracing,	repatriation,	etc;
•	 Be	familiar	with	rehabilitation	programmes	(identification	of	resources,	skills,	
   cooperation	and	networking,	etc);
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	treating	children	with	respect	and	listening	to	their	
   needs;	and
•	 Understand	the	gender	impact.


Subject 3: Rehabilitation of Child Soldiers

Learning objectives
Get familiar with the concepts, methods and mechanisms of DDR of child soldiers:
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	treating	children	with	respect	and	listening	to	their	
   needs;	and
•	 Understand	the	gender	impact.


Subject 4: Educational and Vocational Training

Learning objectives
•	 Understand	the	concepts	and	activities	of	peace	education,	tolerance/human	
   rights education for peaceful conflict resolution and the importance of vocational
   training for adolescents.



7. field Work Techniques

Subject 1: Communicating with Children and the Child Participatory Approach

Context
Working with children affected by armed conflict requires special skills and techniques,
as well as empathy and sensitivity. Therefore, it is crucial to get to know ways of building
confidence and trust with children in order to introduce a child-participatory approach.

Learning objectives
•	 Be	aware	of	the	context	in	which	children	are	communicating	(something	or	
   someone may be intimidating the child) and understand the importance of cre-
   ating	a	safe	environment	in	which	to	talk	to	the	child;	and
•	 Understand	the	basic	principles	of	communicating	with	children:	allow	children	
   time	–	be	patient;	do	not	demand	replies	if	the	child	does	not	want	to	respond;	
   pay	attention	to	verbal	and	non-verbal	communication;	learn	how	to	use	simple	
   language	and	questions;	and	respect	the	gender	impact.


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Subject 2: An Organisational Culture which Values Child Protection and Expected
Behaviour of Personnel with Regard to Children (Code of Conduct)

Context
Codes of conduct, also described as codes of ethics, are guidelines issued by an organ-
isation to its workers and management to help them conduct their actions in accord-
ance with organisation’s primary values and ethical standards. Thus it is of the upmost
importance that child protection issues are included in mission policies at all levels.

Learning objectives
•	 Understand	that	child	protection	values	are	important	to	the	organisation	and	
   are	not	done	just	for	good	image;
•	 Learn	that	management	and	reporting	structures	have	to	facilitate	open	and	
   honest discussion about child protection issues and guarantee quick responses and
   action in favour of children and against abusers, if suspicions of breaches or viola-
   tions	are	raised;
•	 Understand	that	the	management	culture	needs	to	demonstrate	awareness	of	
   issues	of	abuse	and	of	the	steps	that	can	be	taken	to	minimise	the	risks	of	abuse;
•	 Be	acquainted	with	behaviour	that	is	prohibited,	mission-specific	codes	of	
   conduct,	rules	and	regulations,	and	mission	mandates	with	regards	to	children;	
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	respecting	the	rights	of	children	at	all	times;	and
•	 Respect	the	gender	impact.



8. Information and Cooperation

Subject 1: Child Rights Advocacy and Public Information – Awareness Raising

Context
Awareness raising is an essential means of making a topic or issue known to people,
getting their attention and their support. This session is therefore focusing on a famil-
iarisation with concepts and means for raising awareness about child rights, and for
promoting child rights advocacy and public information.

Learning objectives
•	 Understand	the	importance	and	the	concept	of	child	rights	advocacy;
•	 Be	familiar	with	examples	of	public	information:	awareness-raising	campaigns;
•	 Know	how	to	strengthen	legal	awareness	and	a	rights-based	approach	to	the	situa-
   tion	of	children	affected	by	armed	conflict;	and
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	addressing	children’s	needs.




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Subject 2: Understanding and Working with other Child Protection Actors

Context
Many different actors are active in the field of child protection, monitoring and
rehabilitation. In order not to duplicate efforts and make the best use of the resources
available, it is key to understand the importance and possibilities of cooperation with
other child protection actors in the field, such as the EU, UN and NGOs.

Learning objectives
•	 Know	about	the	other	actors	in	the	field;
•	 Understand	the	importance	of	NGOs	and	their	impact;
•	 Understand	how	to	cooperate	with	other	organisations	in	order	to	ensure	that	
   activities	are	mutually	supportive	or	reinforcing;
•	 Be	able	to	reinforce	structures	and	policies	that	advocate	for	prevention	of	child	
   rights	abuses	(e.g.	by	expanding	the	network	of	child	protection	actors);	and
•	 Be	able	to	pass	on	learning	and	skills	needed	for	short-	and	longer-term	quality	
   child protection work.




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The.contents.of.the.EGT.website.and.all.documents.produced.by.the.EGT.are.the.sole.respon-
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To.learn.more,.visit.www.europeangroupontraining.eu.

								
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