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Dedication & Acknowledgments............................................................................4 Preface .................................................................................................................5 Introduction to Knife Collecting .............................................................................6 What Makes a Knife a Collector’s Item? ...............................................................13 The Knife Shield’s Mystical Relation to Value .......................................................23 Bone’s Use on Handles .......................................................................................25 Pocketknife Patterns............................................................................................29 A Common Sense System for “Total Appraisal” ...................................................48 Total Appraisal Using the RBR Scales...................................................................55 The Major Knife Companies ..............................................................................143 Custom-Made Knives and Makers.....................................................................326 Commercial Sheath and Hunting Knives ...........................................................349 Carving and Kitchen Cutlery Collectibles ............................................................351 Straight Razor Collecting ...................................................................................354 Care and Management of a Knife Collection ......................................................358 Knife Sharpening Know-How ............................................................................363 Cutlery Stores, Mail-Order Dealers, and Online Dealers .....................................368 Knife Books and Periodicals ..............................................................................372 Knife Clubs and Organizations ..........................................................................375 Bicentennials, Commemoratives, Reproductions, and Limited Editions .............380 Handle Materials ...............................................................................................481 Appendix 1: Buck Creek....................................................................................545 Appendix 2: Case Brand Knives ........................................................................570 Appendix 3: Cattaraugus Cutlery .......................................................................631 Appendix 4: Remington Arms Company ...........................................................661 Appendix 5: Robeson Knives ............................................................................699 Appendix 6: Taylor Cutlery ................................................................................716 Appendix 7: Winchester Arms Cutlery ...............................................................723 Glossary ...........................................................................................................746 A Note from the Authors ...................................................................................751

Introduction to Knife Collecting
A Southerner is rarely considered dressed unless he has a pocketknife in his pocket. The knife is considered a tool that is to be carried and used on a daily basis. In fact the challenge “Put it in your pocket and carry it a week, you will feel lost without it,” has converted many an unbeliever. It is a little hard to say when knife collecting really began. The argument could be made that it was the cave man who accumulated scrapers and flint knives and actually started collecting them. Others may point to the early Romans as the first pocketknife collectors, primarily because they seem to have been the first to develop folding knives. Others argue it was the French that started it, the Spanish might have a claim, and certainly the English can claim that they made significant contributions. However, knife collecting in the modern era can certainly be placed in the mid-southern United States. Kentucky and Tennessee have played significant roles. It was in the 1950s, following World War II and the Korean Conflict, that knives seemed to become serious items of accumulation. Of course there are those who The Russell Barlow will not agree. During this time people Ownership of this knife served as began paying attention to knife brands, the membership requirement of the patterns, and handles when considering “Barlow Bearcats” club. The club knives instead of just how well the knife encouraged in its members a pride in would hold an edge. and appreciation for fine old knives. In the early 50s, the Louisville-Courier Journal newspaper, by way of its folksy columnist Alan Trout, did much for promoting interest in knives. Trout collected a little of everything and he wrote about it all. His first love though seemed to be the Russell Barlow pocketknife, made by the John Russell Cutlery Company. He wrote stories about the knife and encouraged his readers to share their stories with him. As interest rose, he took things to another level. He set up a club for collectors of the old Russell Barlow. He called it “The Barlow Bearcats.” Membership required that you own a genuine Russell Barlow and send some proof that you were the proud owner. Letters came in by the bundle! Along with them were descriptions and stories. He printed the names of new members and sometimes their stories. The Courier Journal, which had (and still has) a national, as well as a Kentucky readership, carried the message that “pocketknives, especially the Russell Barlow, are collectible” nationwide. The old Russell Barlow became the knife to have in your collection. Later, another publication, The Blue Mill Blade, a tabloid issued by Roy Scott of Kingsport, Tennessee, picked up the ball and continued to promote knife collecting. The Blue Mill Blade encouraged collecting all kinds of knives and provided members with a way of sharing their interests. A recognized club or organization was needed. Readers, contributors, and fans of The Blue Mill Blade met and decided to start such an organization. The National Knife Collectors and Dealers Association was the result. The Association grew and

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Introduction to Knife Collecting
grew and grew. It soon became an international organization with literally thousands of members. Branch clubs were formed and members joined from almost every state. A knife museum was built in Chattanooga and knife collecting was promoted. Today, almost every self-respecting knife collector is a member of the National Knife Collectors Association. The museum has recently been relocated to a larger facility in the mezzanine of the newly expanded Smokey Mountain Knife Works facility in Sevierville, Tennessee. Although knife collecting as a serious hobby is considered to be still in its infancy, casual knife trading and collecting definitely are not new. Knives have been used as items of barter for centuries. Currently knife collecting is growing by leaps and bounds. There are tens of thousands New York Knife Co., ivory, office pen knife. of collectors in the United States and a growing number abroad. Knives have been carried around longer than money. It appears that the common ornery old pocketknife is man’s most useful and cherished tool. It is the only gadget a man will allow to stay in his pockets day after day. There are so many types and styles of knives available that one can always be found which is adaptable to personal or professional needs. A person can even choose a style which suits his fancy alone. It is doubtful that the popularity of the pocketknife will diminish with time or be replaced by another invention in the forseeable future. The knife’s ancestry dates from the early stone age when stone knives and hand axes gave the cave man an “edge” of superiority over the beasts of the jungle. Archaeologists are finding that as man progressed, he became very adept at improving the blade edge. In one European dig during the 1970s, a knife was found which had an edge “sharp enough to shave the hair off your arm.” Some surgeons use obsidian (volcanic glass) knives similar to those used by the Mayans of Central America and Mexico. According to Pacon Sheets, an anthropologist from the University of Colorado who has been studying the Mayan find, “The fractured glass edge (of the obsidian knives) is vastly sharper than anything commercially available with a honed edge.” Sheets also points out that the use of obsidian knives can be traced to 2000 B.C., making the knives approximately 4,000 years old. Currently, obsidian pocketknives are marketed by at least one U.S. company and several custom knifemakers. The ancient Romans are credited with making the ancestor of what is today known as the folding or pocketknife. Roman knives were made of bronze, and according to Plato, who was a Roman captive at one time, “they made the blade to fold back into the handle,” making it safer to carry in a pocket or pouch. Later in their reign, the Romans began using iron ore to make their blades and armor. Whether they discovered its use themselves or adapted it from the Hittites of Asia Minor is an open question.

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Total Appraisal Using the RBR Scales

Chart 1
POCKETKNIFE MANUFACTURERS’ MASTER LIST (Brand Code x Pattern x Handle Material x Condition = Collector Value) *Denotes example pattern Denotes illustration shown Value Range High Code 20 50 70 (55) (70) (125)

†

Brand Marks & Stampings (Dates) ACCO, Atlanta, GA (c. 1970 – ) USA *3", 2 bl., Pen pat., pl. hdl., $14.50 ACME (F. Westpfal c. 1884 – 1928) Ger. ACE CUTLERY CO. Fremont, OH (c. 1920 – 1930+) *3", 2 bl., pen, pearl hdl., $76

Low 10 8 15

Chart 1 Code Value 150
†

Adams Knife Co., boy’s knife, iron handle Chart 2 Chart 3 Chart 4 Pattern Value Handle Value Condition x .35 x .65 x .99 15 25 20 =

RBR Collector Value $33.78 95 100 95 (150) (125) (100)

ADAMS KNIFE CO. *21⁄4", jack boy’s knife, metal hdl., $33 ADAMS & SONS, Ivy (c. 1860 – 1890) *4", 2 bl., jack, wood hdl., $50 A’DINCER, Kaiserslautern, Ger. *31⁄2", 4 bl., pen, pearl hdl., $70

Chart 1 Code Value 300 x

Aerial Cut. Mfg. Co., large stockman Chart 2 Chart 3 Chart 4 Pattern Value Handle Value Condition .50 x 1.25 x .99 =

RBR Collector Value $185.63

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The Major Knife Companies
Aerial Cutlery Knives

No. D256. “Congress.” Hollow back knife, wonderfully made. One sheepfoot blade and one small spear. 37⁄8".

No. D149. “Corporal.” This knife has an excellent type of handle that insures a positive handhold. One bolster only. One large saber clip blade. No. D249. As above but has two bolsters as cut and one large sabre clip blade and one small spear. No. D249A. As cut, has one large sabre clip blade and one large corn or speying blade.

No. D222. “Jumbo.” An exceptionally heavy type of knife, short and compact. Has extra strong blades, very wide. Particularly suited for electricians, carpenters, woodsmen, etc. Large bolsters as cut. One large and small spear blade. 41⁄4".

No. D247. “The President.” One large spear and one small spear.

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The Major Knife Companies
Holley Knives

Small wharncliffe whittler, brass lined, 33⁄8" closed.

Excelsior whittler pen, brass lined, 31⁄4" closed.

Small congress. Brass lined, 27⁄8" closed.

Senator. Brass & German silver lined, 31⁄4" closed.

Combination knife and cigar cutter. German silver handle. 31⁄4" closed.

Pocket budder. Steel lining, 31⁄4" closed.

Jack. Steel lined, 33⁄8" closed.

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The Major Knife Companies

SMITH & WESSON ARMS COMPANY Springfield, Massachusetts, C. 1974 – Present
In 1974 Smith & Wesson Arms Company, one of our country’s great makers of side arms, produced a series of knives designed by the outstanding custom knifemaker Blackie Collins. These knives were 440 SS with Wessonwood handles, nickel silver bolsters, and guards. Only one of the series, the number 606 dropped point, was a folding hunter, and the other six were sheath knives. All are stamped with the famous Smith & Wesson logo and trademark and are fitting companions to the Smith & Wesson side arms. The knives in this series are already good collectors’ items, though rather expensive for a new collector. About 1980 a new series mostly consisting of lockback, folding hunter type knives was introduced at a more moderate price. The S&W trademark is currently being used on a line of knives produced and distributed by Taylor Cutlery of Kingsport, Tennessee. Collectible rating: High Stamping and logo: Smith & Wesson (logo in circle)

Bowie, Model 6010.

Outdoorsman, Model 6020.

Survival, Model 6030.

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Straight Razor Collecting

Barber shops as pictured above were commonplace well into the 1930s. The straight razor was a common tool of that trade. Straight razor collecting is very popular today.

Chart A: Companies & Base Values
Abercrombie & Fitch, NY Aerial, WI Boker, Henri & Co., Germany Brick, F., England Case Mfg. Co., Spring Valley, NY Chores, James Dahlgren, C.W., Sweden Diane, Japan Electric Co., NY ERN, Germany Faultless, Germany Fox Cutlery, Germany Golden Rule Cutlery, IL Griffon XX, Germany Heimerdinger Henckels, Germany $14.00 $21.00 $13.00 $11.00 $35.00 $10.00 $11.00 $10.00 $14.00 $11.00 $10.00 $10.00 $14.00 $11.00 $20.00 $15.00 Holley Mfg. Co., CT International Cutlery Co., NY/Germany I.X.L., England Jay, John, NY Ka-bar, Union Cut Co., NY Kanner, J., Germany Kern, R. & W., Canada/England LeCocltre, Jacque, Switzerland Levering Razor Co., NY/Germany McIntosh & Heather, OH Merit Import Co., Germany National Cut. Co., OH Oxford Razor Co., Germany Owl Brand, England Palmer Brothers, Savannah, GA $27.00 $9.00 $14.00 $12.50 $30.00 $9.00 $10.00 $12.00 $18.00 $14.00 $9.00 $14.00 $10.00 $11.00 $20.00

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Handle Materials

Top, Remington, scout pattern, Remington style jigged bone handle. Bottom, Remington, jack pattern, Remington style jigged bone handle.

New York Knife Co., Welden, congress pattern, jigged bone handles (NYK style). Mark Zalesky collection.

Case tested, congress pattern, Rodgers jigged bone handle. Private collection.

495

Handle Materials

Maher & Grosh, Toledo, Ohio, pen pattern #378, jigged bone handle (Maher & Grosh style jigging). Mark Zalesky collection.

Cattaraugus Cutlery, Yukon, folding hunter pattern, “King of the Woods,” worm groove bone handle. Mark Zalesky collection.

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