Boudreaux Travels by methyae

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									Lesson Plan
Title: Boudreaux’s Time Travels Subject: Mathematics Grade Level: 9 - 11 Overview: Through the completion of “Boudreaux’s Time Travels,” students will explore various historical periods and areas of Louisiana. Throughout the journey of this webquest, srudents continue to advance in Bloom’s Taxonomy to reach higher order thinking skills at a gradual pace and relate math to the life around them. Activities include translating Cajun-French into English to determine information to be include in an excel spreadsheet. The information is further expanded through the creation of an equation that relates to a seen pattern. The students' travels finally land at the quadratic formula being applied to their groups originally created blueprint of a Louisiana historical home. Approximate Duration: 3-90 minute periods *can expand to 5 with emphasis Content Standards:
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Number and Number Relations In problem-solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the real number system and communicate the relationships within that system using a variety of techniques and tools. Algebra In problem-solving investigations students demonstrate an understanding of concepts and processes that allow them to analyze, represent, and describe relationships among variable quantities and to apply algebraic methods to real-world situations. Measurement In problem-solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of the concepts, processes, and real-life applications of measurement. Geometry In problem-solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of geometric concepts and applications involving one-, two-, and three-dimensional geometry, and justify their findings. Data analysis, Probability, and Discrete Math In problem-solving investigations, students discover trends,

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formulate conjectures regarding cause-and-effect relationships, and demonstrate critical thinking skills in order to make informed decisions. Patterns, Relations, and Functions In problem-solving investigations, students demonstrate an understanding of patterns, relations, and functions that represent and explain real-world situations.

Benchmarks:
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N-1-H demonstrating an understanding of the real number system; (1,2,4) N-3-H using number sense to estimate and determine if solutions are reasonable; (2,4) N-5-H selecting and using appropriate computational methods and tools for given situations (e.g., estimation, or exact computation using mental arithmetic, calculator, symbolic manipulator, or paper and pencil); (3) N-7-H justifying reasonableness of solutions and verifying results. (1,2,4) A-1-H demonstrating the ability to translate real-world situations (e.g., distance versus time relationships, population growth, growth functions for diseases, growth of minimum wage, auto insurance tables) into algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities and vice versa; (1,2,4) A-2-H recognizing the relationship between operations involving real numbers and operations involving algebraic expressions; (2,4) A-3-H using tables and graphs as tools to interpret algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities; (1,3) M-1-H selecting and using appropriate units, techniques, and tools to measure quantities in order to achieve specified degrees of precision, accuracy, and error (or tolerance) of measurements; (3) M-2-H demonstrating an intuitive sense of measurement (e.g., estimating and determining reasonableness of results as related to area, volume, mass, rate, and distance); (1,2,4) M-3-H

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estimating, computing, and applying physical measurement using suitable units (e.g., calculate perimeter and area of plane figures, surface area and volume of solids presented in real-world situations); (1,3,4) M-4-H demonstrating the concept of measurement as it applies to realworld experiences. (1,2,3,4,5) G-4-H using inductive reasoning to predict, discover, and apply geometric properties and relationships (e.g., patty paper constructions, sum of the angles in a polygon); (1,2,4) D-1-H designing and conducting statistical experiments that involve the collection, representation, and analysis of data in various forms (Analysis should reflect an understanding of factors such as: sampling, bias, accuracy, and reasonableness of data.); (1,2,3,4) D-2-H recognizing data that relate two variables as linear, exponential, or otherwise in nature (e.g., match a data set, linear or non-linear, to a graph and vice versa); (1,2,3,4)

Grade-Level Expectations (GLEs):
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Grade 9 Distinguish between an exact and an approximate answer, and recognize errors introduced by the use of approximate numbers with technology

(N-3-H) (N-4-H) (N-7-H) Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e.g., estimation, mental math, technology, paper/pencil) (N-5-H) Distinguish between precision and accuracy (M-1-H) Demonstrate and explain how the scale of a measuring instrument determines the precision of that instrument

(M-1-H) Determine appropriate units and scales to use when solving measurement problems (M-1-H) (M-3-H) (N-2-H) Identify trends in data and support conclusions by using distribution characteristics such as patterns, clusters, and outliers (D-1-H) (D-6-H) (D-7-H)
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Grade 11-12 Correlate/match data sets or graphs and their representations and classify them as exponential, logarithmic, or polynomial functions

(D-2-H)
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Grade 9 Use order of operations to simplify or rewrite variable expressions

(A-1-H) (A-2-H) Model real-life situations using linear expressions, equations, and inequalities (A-1-H) (D-2-H) (P-5-H) Use equivalent forms of equations and inequalities to solve real-life problems (A-1-H) Evaluate polynomial expressions for given values of the variable (A-2-H)

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Grade 11-12 Factor simple quadratic expressions including general trinomials, perfect squares, difference of two squares, and polynomials with common factors

(A-2-H) Interdisciplinary Connections:
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English/Language Arts : Standard 1 Students read, comprehend, and respond to a range of materials, using a variety of strategies for different purposes. English/Language Arts : Standard 4 Students demonstrate competence in speaking and listening as tools for learning and communicating. English/Language Arts : Standard 5 Students locate, select, and synthesize information from a variety of texts, media, references, and technological sources to acquire and communicate knowledge. English/Language Arts : Standard 7 Students apply reasoning and problem solving skills to reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. Arts : Historical and Cultural Perception Students develop historical perspective and cultural perception by recognizing and understanding that the arts throughout history are a record of human experience with a past, present, and future. Social Studies : History: Time, Continuity, and Change Students develop a sense of historical time and historical perspective as they study the history of their community, state, nation, and world. Science : Life Science The students will become aware of the characteristics and life cycles of organisms and understand their relationships to each other and to their environment. Science : Science and the Environment In learning environmental science, students will develop an appreciation of the natural environment, learn the importance of environmental quality, and acquire a sense of stewardship. As consumers and citizens, they will be able to recognize how our personal, professional, and political actions affect the natural world. Foreign Language : Communication: Interpretive Mode Students understand and interpret spoken and written communication in the target language on a variety of topics. Agriscience/Agribusiness : Environmental Management

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AgEd/FFA students will develop an understanding of the interrelationship between people, agriculture and the environment. Family and Consumer Sciences : Housing, Interiors, and Furnishings 2.1 Evaluate housing decisions in relation to available resources and options. Family and Consumer Sciences : Housing, Interiors, and Furnishings 2.2 Apply principles and elements of design to create environments that are aesthetic and functional. Family and Consumer Sciences : Housing, Interiors, and Furnishings 2.3 Demonstrate drafting, blueprint reading, and space planning skills using available technical resources. Family and Consumer Sciences : Housing, Interiors, and Furnishings 2.4 Analyze the influences on architectural and furniture design and development. Family and Consumer Sciences : Housing, Interiors, and Furnishings 2.5 Evaluate the use of housing and interior furnishings and products that relate to specific design needs. Family and Consumer Sciences : Housing, Interiors, and Furnishings 2.6 Evaluate client’s needs, goals, and resources to create a design plan. Family and Consumer Sciences : Housing, Interiors, and Furnishings 2.7 Demonstrate design ideas through visual presentation. Family and Consumer Sciences : Housing, Interiors, and Furnishings 2.8 Demonstrate effective communication skills. Family and Consumer Sciences : Management of Resources 4.17 Demonstrate effective communication skills.

Educational Technology Standards:
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Demonstrate knowledge and skills of Internet use and other resources consistent with acceptable use policies including the legal consequences of plagiarism and the need for authenticity in student work through an understanding of copyright issues. Refine knowledge and enhance skills in keyboarding, word processing, desktop publishing, spreadsheets, databases, multimedia, and telecommunications in preparing and presenting

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classroom projects. Collaborate (e.g., desktop conferencing, e-mail, on-line discussions) with peers, experts, and others to compile, synthesize, produce and disseminate information, models, and other creative works. Use appropriate technology to locate, retrieve, organize, analyze, evaluate, and communicate information for problem solving and decision making.

Objectives: 1. TLW translate Cajun-French into English. 2. TLW identify five different Louisiana time periods. 3. TLW use online sources and library resources to locate basic housing and land information about the time periods. 4. TLW assemble an Excel spreadsheet on listed information from each period. 5. TLW compare information between periods. 6. TLW create an equation to represent one fact they linked in the periods. 7. TLW construct a blueprint of a house in one of the periods with accurate measurement relations. 8. TLW determine how the quadratic formula could be used to solve a word problem about the house blueprint. Lesson Materials and Resources: 1. Louisiana State Map 2. Post-It Notes 3. Pens 4. French - English Dictionary 5. Blueprint Packet - Grid paper, ruler, pencil, compass. 6. "Power of Algebra - Factoring I" video* *If your school library doesn't have the "Power of Algebra - Factoring I" video, it is available on the unitedstreaming website(www.unitedstreaming.com). First, you will need to contact your technology coordinator for your schools access code in order to set-up your account. Technology Tools and Materials: Hardware: 1 computer per group Software: spreadsheet software such as Excel

Websites: •Boudreaux's Time Travels Webquest www.mindenhigh.com/teachers/ldick/tech/wqbtt/ •Unitedsteaming www.unitedstreaming.com Background Information: This lesson is not designed to be one of the first computer integrated activities for your class. I implemented this to an Algebra I class shortly before midterm. We have a computer activity for each chapter. Before working this webquest, students should: - be able to read at middle school reading level - know effective search techniques to locate information on the internet - have basic knowledge of the Microsoft program Excel. - grasp at least middle school geometry and algebra concepts - basic first half Algebra I concepts - creating a Word and Excel document - copy, paste, and save Lesson Procedures: Before class (set-up/check-out projector, go over webquest, check links, get materials together) Introduction - (Set-up the computer projector and have the webquest index page displayed on the board/screen.) Act out or role play the introduction to the Boudreaux Time Travel's Webquest. Explain to the students that over the next few days they will be working math through the webquest hands-on activities. (This is a great time to go over your rules for group assignments, organizations, etc.) Lesson 1. Go over the steps of the webquest with the students. 2. Break the students into groups and discuss roles. - Task Manager - Moderate team discussions, keep the group on task for the assignment, and ensure that everybody assumes their share of the work involved - Group Recorder - Distributes materials, receives/returns papers, prepares written information - Reporter - Orally summarizes the groups activity and conclusion also assists recorder with preparation of written information - Timekeeper - Keeps the group aware of the time, works with the task manager to help groups remain on task 3. Go over the activities for the webquest. - What's All the Excitement About? - Boudreaux Needs Your Help

- Where Will Your Beach House Be in 2015? - Gaston Builds a House - Homes Have Quadratics? (All activity information is found on the webquest.) 4. Students begin to work the first two activities. - Rotate around groups to answer questions and to keep students focused. Closure 1. At the end of the first day discuss information about the first two activities, questions, findings, etc. 2. Continue at your students pace. All activities should be completed within 3 - 5 days.

Assessment Procedures: Informal - Observation Formal - Rubric, work, quiz Accommodations/Modifications: Teachers of specific groups of students may wish to enhance the curriculum by including activities relating to their culture such as Native American, Mexican American, or French Acadians might enjoy issues relating to their cultural heritage. Do to some cooperative grouping activities, teachers will want to carefully pair students. Motivated students should be spread between groups. Students with limited technology and reading skills should be paired with stronger students in these areas. Any physical or behavior challenged student should also be carefully paired with a “helper”. Learning challenged students will also need to be paired with someone in their group to make sure they are on task and have someone readily available to answer questions. ----- written by Lisa Dick Reproducible Materials:
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Boudreaux Time Travels Quiz Boudreaux Rubric

Explorations and Extensions: To extend the quadratic lesson students can swap blueprints and create

quadratic formulas for eachother. Numerous geometry aspects could be applied to this lesson such as Pythagorean Theorem, surface area, volume, etc. Lesson Development Resources: Dunn, R. & Dunn, K. (1993). "Teaching secondary students through their individual learning styles: Practical approaches for grades 7-12." Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon. (2004). retrieved Nov 12, 2004, from Rubistar Web site: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php. Thomson, B. & Mascazine, J. Attending to learning styles in mathematics and science classrooms. ERIC Digest, Retrieved Feb 2, 2004, from http://www.ericdigests.org/2000-1/attending.html. Dodge, B. (1995). Webquests: a technique for internet-based learning.. retrieved May 5, 2004, from Webquest Portal Web site: http://webquest.org/. LaBruyere, Janet. "Louisiana INTECH 7 - 12." Louisiana Region VII Teaching Learning and Technology Center. Region VII Technology Center, Minden. 2 June 2003. * * APA does not include presentations as part of bibliographic references. This resource is written in MLA style. Reflections: The students did a great job on Boudreaux's Time Travels. I did find that some of the steps seemed more challenging to them than I thought. The class was over half freshman, and I believe that was the key challenge. The hardest thing was to get the students to take it one step at a time. They wanted to jump to another activity as soon as they had skimmed one. I stopped the students periodically to give them an idea of an approximate place they should be in the webquest. I also said "If you have finished the first activity, you have... completed to turn in." This seemed to help the most. Contact Information: Lisa Dick pencilbo@nls,k12,la,us High School


								
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