The Webibliography for Physics featuring Newton's Laws of Motion by umsymums37

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									    The Webibliography for Physics featuring:
            Everything in General

                Created and Reviewed by Jen Gasowski

Below is a list of websites focusing on Physics in general. These sites will give
parents and students an insight to what physics is and help tutor them in a way to
augment their classroom experience. For teachers of physics, sometimes it seems
that there are too many concepts to discover and a large part of the curriculum and
much time can be spent defining, solving, and applying them. I have included this
webibliography to give myself and others the resources that they will need to
integrate technology into the introduction, definition, mathematical solution, and
applications of the laws of physics as well as to provide a concise list of supplemental
websites for a physics classroom or to provide additional support for struggling
students.



                                 Physics



         http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics

This site has a wonderful overview of the basic concepts of physics, but focuses much of
the attention on core theories and research. The Wikipedia site does not offer a wide
array of formulas and concepts, but rather introduces topics in physics and the latest and
most up-and-coming research that is available. It is not a site to use when studying for a
formula test, but it is helpful to get a feel for physics before taking the class. The benefit
about this site first of all, is its format complete with a table of contents and links for
clarifying and additional information. I was especially pleased with the extensive list of
resources at the bottom of the page as well. It assisted my decision in claiming this
website to be both accurate and credible as a site geared towards a general overview of
physics.


                                                            http://www.physics.org/
Possibly not as                                          “in your face” accessible as the
Wikipedia site,                                          physics.org is much more interactive.
It has links and                                         browsers set up for almost any
physical inquiry.                                        They have a page set up that shows
and tells all of                                         the things that this site can do for its
viewers, such as                                         searching through over seven
thousand physics                                         websites, offering educational
physics games to                                         play, current events links along with
other news, plus                                         educational and career information
about what can be done in the field of physics. In addition, this site is a *.org site and
credible, plus it is affiliated with the Institute of Physics. The only downfall to this site is
that you have to register to gain full access to all of the amenities that it offers. Overall, I
believe this site to be educational, interactive, fun, and credible. A site like this will draw
in the attention of you and adults alike and teach them something before they cease their
surfing.




                                                        http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/
                                                        physics/

                                                      This site includes an excellent table
                                                      of contents navigator. This makes
                                                      for easy navigating and centers in on
                                                      organization from one concept to the
                                                      next. For each concept visited, there
                                                      is another table of contents further
specifying the concept and breaking it down into smaller and more useful bits of
information. This website is a great resource for struggling students and teachers that
need supplemental information. It includes that definitions of theory, the formulas, and
detailed references at the end of each section to reinforce the websites stature and
credibility. The site has been set up both text-based, and visually to stimulate both types
of learners. I would give this an “Educated, Animated, Actuated” rating.




http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/index.pl
One of the most intriguing sites can be found at the link above. This site is set up more
as an interactive laboratory than a lecture based, informational site. It is full of applets
and downloads, animations, and clips. I think it is fun, interactive and exciting. The site
even has downloads specifically for educators and an e-mail option for questions,
comments, or concerns. It doesn’t necessarily tutor the student in mathematics, but it will
augment their classroom experience with almost live demonstrations and activities. It
will definitely hold the attention of a student and teach them something along the way.
Plus, with it being a *.edu site, it is almost guaranteed to be educational. I would
recommend this site to all of the bored or frustrated students and teachers of physics for a
“Phun, phresh, look at physics!”




                                 http://physics.about.com/

This physics site has more links and information than any one person could ask for. It
addresses the topics, current events, theories, important people, careers, and even popular
physics myths using the click of a mouse on the navigator bar. The information is real
and true, the stories are fantastic and interesting, and there is so much in one centralized
location, that no one could get bored or find nothing that interests them. I think an entire
class period could be devoted to exploring this site and each of the students could find out
one new thing, get help with something they didn’t quite understand, or find one thing
that interests them and they will have gained a resource and a tool for the future. This
site is rated “E” for “Ever so Exploratory”.




http://www.physicscentral.com/

This site focuses on everyday physics, such as how a fluorescent bulb works. It contains
written pieces from scientists, and a lot of fun and interesting activities, news, and
projects. It is aimed toward teaching the world a little physics as opposed to fine-tuning
physics students’ conceptual knowledge. The experiments and explanations are factual
and understandable and easy to follow—it is an accurate, current, objective, and fun.
And the authority stands tall. This site was sponsored by the American Physics Society.
I rate it “World Educating Site—A +!”




http://www.dmoz.org/Science/Physics/
This website separates all of the concepts (or most of them) into alphabetical hyperlinks
to encyclopedia articles and further references. It gives definitions, resources for further
exploration, links to full text journal articles on a concept and so much more. This site is
an excellent addition to any research paper or starting point. Even though it is just an
engine to take you someplace else, its usefulness falls within its organization. You can
go anywhere or find just about anything related to physics just from this one website.
Parents can learn current events; while students research the theory of relativity and both
can be certain that their information will be accurate and up-to-date. It is rated “Research
Ready.”



                                                               PHYSICS

http://dir.yahoo.com/Science/physics/

								
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