Assessment Component 2 Practical and Collaborative Work

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					Stage 2 Nutrition

Assessment Exemplar
Assessment Component 2: Practical and Collaborative Work Practical Program

Topic 1: Laboratory Practical: Energy Value of Nuts This practical provides a concrete demonstration that food is rich in energy. It requires some practical skills (which are learned in formative work), working in groups, and the collection and collation of class data. A literature search is also needed so students’ data can be compared with published data. A data table and a graph are constructed, and patterns of results are interpreted. The practical report will require students to evaluate the work they have done and identify weaknesses and suggest improvements. Topic 2: Research-based Practical: Diet modification for a diet-related disorder Students are presented with a case study of a person who has a diet related disorder and their food consumption for one day. Using their current knowledge, students recommend appropriate changes to the diet, and then use published data (e.g. FoodWorks) to discuss how useful their recommendations actually are. Students work individually and will need to demonstrate skills in finding, organising and analysing data. The practical is carried out in class over several lessons. Topic 3: Design-type Practical: Modification of a muffin recipe Working individually students suggest ways of modifying a muffin recipe to improve the nutrition value whilst maintaining the taste quality. The design of the practical must include how to measure the taste characteristics of the muffins. There is an emphasis in this practical on design skills and demonstrating an understanding of the components of a valid experimental investigation. After the individual practical designs are assessed, students will work as a team using one of their designs. They will be required to prepare two batches of muffins, and then the class will form a panel to carry out a sensory evaluation of the muffins. Topic 4: Design-type Practical: Comparison of ‘Fast’ and ‘Home-cooked’ food Students investigate two aspects of a ‘Fast’ food of their choice – nutrient value and sensory characteristics. The practical incorporates the cooking of a ‘home-cooked’ version of the food, then designing and conducting sensory evaluations so that the ‘Fast’ food can be compared with the homecooked version. This practical will involve considerable collaboration, as well as opportunities for design and analysis.

A table that shows the allocation of marks for each of the criteria for judging performance in each of these four practicals is presented on the next page. It demonstrates that each of the criteria do not have to be assessed in every practical, and the marks allocated to each criterion are reasonably close to those suggested in the Learning Area Manual. This Form should accompany the student work submitted for moderation.

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Stage 2 Nutrition
MARKS ALLOCATION FOR ASSESSMENT COMPONENT 2: PRACTICAL AND COLLABORATIVE WORK
School ______________________________________________________________________________ Core Topic 1 2 Diet Modification to suit Lifestyle, and Health 3 Modification of muffin recipe. (Nutritional and sensory evaluation) 4 Fast and Slow Food, (Nutritional and sensory evaluation) Total

Students must be able to demonstrate:

The Energy Value of Nuts Nutrition

Suggested marks allocation

designing skills

20

12

32

35

practical skills

10

2

5

5

22

20

collaboration

5

5

8

18

20

analysis and evaluation

20

25

10

17

72

70

reporting

15

23

10

8

56

55

Total

50

50

50

50

200

200

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Stage 2 Nutrition
Assessment Component 2: Practical and Collaborative Work Core Topic 1: The Fundamentals of Human Nutrition Energy Value of Nuts Learning Outcomes: 1, 3, 5, and 6 Total marks 50

Introduction Energy is described as the ability to do work. Energy is neither created nor destroyed; rather it is transformed from one form to another. Energy from the sun is used to convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose. Thus light energy is transformed into chemical energy. All living organisms use this chemical energy to make the other molecules of which they are composed, and also maintain body temperature, reproduce, exercise etc. In order for animals to access this energy they must consume other animals and plants. Energy balance is determined by the input of energy in relation to the output of energy. If energy intake exceeds energy output there will be a net gain in body mass. If energy intake is equal to energy output body mass will remain constant. If energy intake is less than energy output there will be a net loss in body mass. The following information can be used to calculate the amount of energy in foods. Energy is measured in Joules or kilojoules. 1 kilojoule = 1000 Joules. 4.2 Joules is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of 1mL of water 10C. This practical has three parts: Part 1: Macronutrients in almonds Part 2: Energy content of almonds Part 3: Energy content of a variety of nuts (collect personal and class data). In this practical you will work in groups of three. The assessment will be based on the extent to which you demonstrate practical skills, collaboration, analysis and evaluation, and reporting.

Equipment White tile (welled) Iodine solution Uristix Brown paper Distilled water Whole almonds Crushed almonds Variety of whole nuts Pestle and mortar Glass stirring rod Retort stand Boss head and clamp Heatproof mat 250 mL beaker Electronic scales Thermometer Needle Rubber stopper with one hole (to hold needle) Goggles Protective clothing (apron or coat)

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Part 1: Test for Macronutrients in Almonds Aim To test almonds for the presence of starch, protein, glucose and lipid. Method 1. Wear appropriate safety equipment. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Collect equipment needed for practical. On a well tile, in four places, place a small quantity of crushed almond. To one portion add 4 drops of iodine solution. A blue colour indicates that starch is present. To another portion add 4 drops of distilled water, mix well and dip in an Uristix. Determine from the bottle label the presence of glucose and protein. Rub the last portion well into a small piece of brown paper. A greasy spot that is translucent (lets light through) indicates the presence of lipid. Draw up a table to record your results.

Results 1. Identify which macronutrients were present in almond samples. 2. Name other nutrients that you would expect to find in almonds.

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Part 2: How Much Energy is there in Almonds? Aim To measure the energy content of almonds. Method 1. Weigh an almond on the electronic balance to one decimal place. Record the measurement below. MASS OF ALMOND = ______________ g 2. Set up your apparatus as shown below. Thermometer

Beaker of water

Retort stand

Almond Needle

Rubber stopper Heatproof mat 3. 4. 5. Using a measuring cylinder put 100 mL of distilled water in the beaker. Take the temperature of the water. Record the measurement below. Initial temperature __________________________________ Using a match or the flame from a Bunsen burner, light the almond and immediately put it below the beaker of water. Adjust the height of the beaker so that the flame has good contact with the beaker. Stir the water gently. Allow the almond to burn until it goes out and only charcoal is left. Record the maximum temperature reached by the water. Maximum temperature: ______________________________ 8. 9. Repeat this experiment twice more. Calculate the amount of heat energy released by each almond using the given equation. Energy (Joules) = volume of water (mL) x 4.2 x temperature change (maximum-initial temperature) 10. Record your results in the table below.

6. 7.

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Table 1: How much energy is there in an almond? A
Trial number Mass of almond (g)

B
Initial temperature of water (0C)

C
Maximum temperature reached (0C)

D
Temperature change (C - B)

E
Energy/g of almond (Joules/g)

F
Energy/g of almond (kJ/g)

Average energy value of almond in (kJ/g)
(Trial 1 + 2 + 3 divided by 3)

1 2 3

Discussion Use the following questions to construct a discussion about this part of the practical. a) Explain why it is necessary to calculate the average amount of energy contained in one gram of almond. b) FoodWorks shows that the energy from 1 gram of raw almond is about 24.6 kJ. Compare this to your experimental result. Your experimental value for the energy in one gram of almond is likely to be quite different from 24.6 kJ. Describe the weaknesses in the procedure, which may account for this discrepancy. c) Describe and explain two or more improvements that you could make to this experiment to improve your results.

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Part 3: How much energy is there in other nuts? Aim To find out if it is likely that all nuts have the same energy value. Hypothesis All nuts have the same energy value per gram. Method 1. Choose a nut other than almond. 2. 3. Follow the procedure in Part 2 to calculate the energy content of that nut. Repeat for two other varieties of nuts. Record all results in the table below.

Results Table 2: How much energy is there in other nuts?

A
Type of nut being tested Trial Mass of nut (g)

B
Initial temperature of water (0C)

C

D

E

F
Actual energy value of nut (kJ/g)

G
Average energy value of nut (kJ/g)

Maximum Temperature Energy temperature change per gram of water (C – B) of nut (0C) (J/g)

1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3

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Part 4. Collate Class Results Present data collected from the whole class in the table below, and use this data to construct a graph. Table 3: The energy value of nuts Type of Nut Group A B C Average energy value of nut (kJ/g) almond peanut cashew

Graph

Discussion Relate results to the aims of Parts 3 and 4 of the practical. Explain why collating class results is a strength and how it may affect the validity of your conclusion.

Conclusion (One sentence)

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Stage 2 Nutrition
Assessment Component 2: Practical and Collaborative Work Core Topic 1: The Fundamentals of Human Nutrition Energy Value of Nuts Student ___________________________________________ Class __________________________

Criteria for Judging Performance practical skills  record data accurately  work safely  manage time and apparatus or equipment collaboration  communicate with others in group  assume responsibility reporting (formatting and recording data)  record measurements in tables accurately and clearly  record calculated values to appropriate number of significant figures  choose an appropriate style of graph  construct a graph with appropriate choice of axes, scales and units  accurately plot points  use correct terminology and language  present information logically analysis and evaluation (discussion)  analyse data and compare results  assess the strengths and weaknesses of the practical  discuss reliability of data  suggest improvements  draw logical conclusion Total

Teacher’s Comment

Mark

/10

/5

/15

/20

/50

Prepared by Anna Palombaro, Lenore Barritt and the Subject Advisory Committee Copyright SSABSA

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Stage 2 Nutrition
Assessment Component 2: Practical And Collaborative Work Core Topic 2: Diet, Lifestyle, And Health Diet Analysis for a Diet-Related Disorder

Learning Outcomes: 1, 3, 5, and 6

Total Marks: 50

Aim To assess the suitability of a short-term diet to meet the specific needs of a diet-related disorder. The Task You will be allocated a case study, profiling an individual’s health status and food consumption for one day. 1. Construct a table that clearly and concisely sets out the possible causes, common symptoms and health concerns for the dietary-related disorder mentioned in your case study (maximum 100 words – use dot points). You may use reference materials, which should be acknowledged in your reference list. 2. Construct three graphs to represent three aspects of the diet and include the relevant recommended daily intake (RDI) for each nutrient. Label each graph with an appropriate title. Graph 1: percentage of total daily intake that is carbohydrate, protein, total fat and alcohol; Graph 2: total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat consumption; Graph 3: calcium, iron, thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin intake. 3. Analyse the graphs and compare the results with the RDIs. Recommend foods that could address any discrepancies (maximum 300 words). 4. Type your recommended food choices into FoodWorks and print the Foods and Analysis tables. 5. Discuss your findings (maximum 400 words). Consider:  whether you improved the diet or not (comment on the original diet and your modified version);  whether you would make further recommendations to the daily intake or not;  the method of collecting data;  the validity of your conclusions based on the data given. 6. Conclude how easy or difficult it is to address this dietary disorder by modifying food intake. (Maximum 100 words). 7. Present a Reference list. 8. The marks’ sheet and the Food and Analysis tables you have printed must be attached to your report. Two examples of Case Studies that might be used are given below. The teacher provides each student with a case study profiling an individual’s health status and food consumption for one day, along with print outs of an analysis of that food (e.g. FoodWorks Personal Edition Analysis). The student uses this information to recommend changes to the diet. The modified diet is then analysed and evaluated.

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Case 1 Freda lives in a share house but does not like to cook there as the others leave the kitchen in a mess and there are always arguments about whose food it is. Freda doesn’t like to exercise (activity level – light) and doesn’t feel she needs to exercise, as she is the perfect weight. All her friends say they would like a figure like hers. In fact, she is considering modelling. Freda currently works in a supermarket. Freda is 22 years old, Body Mass Index 19, female, 55 kg, 172 cm. Health Status: Freda is often tired and frequently constipated. Foods Breakfast 1 serving McDonalds Bacon & Egg McMuffin 1 coffee cup (180 mL) coffee, white, with milk, cappuccino, regular Lunch 1 serve salad, Caesar, with dressing NFS 250 mL water in a beverage Dinner 1 burger McDonalds Big Mac 1 medium McDonalds French fries 1 can (375 mL) Mixed Drink, Pre-Mixed, canned, Vodka and orange 250 mL water in a beverage The teacher gives the FoodWorks analysis of this diet to the student. Case 2 Jack lives alone and does not like cooking but he will cook very simple foods. He does not like recipes and has no desire to learn from them. He likes his food to be quick and easy to prepare and does not eat a wide variety of food. His job is very physical and he also participates in individual exercise such as running, swimming and cycling. His activity level is described as heavy. Jack is 47 years old, Body Mass Index 23, male, 76 kg, 180 cm. Health Status: Has had three consecutive high blood pressure readings; doctor has mentioned the term hypertension. Foods Breakfast 4 regular toast slices. Buttercup toasty thick slices – fresh (Bread) 4 tbspn margarine spread, polyunsaturated 2 tspn vegemite (Yeast extract) 1 coffee cup coffee (180 mL) with milk, from instant, reg, NS strength 250 mL water in a beverage Morning Tea water in a beverage Lunch 2 individual meat pies, Pie meat, two crusts, individual size 1 large (>8 cm diameter) apple, red, raw, unpeeled 250 mL water in a beverage 1 carton Farmers union iced coffee (Milk (flavoured)) Afternoon Tea 1 cup coffee (180 mL), coffee with milk, from instant, reg, NS strength 10 biscuits Arnott’s Yo Yo (Biscuit)

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Dinner 1 large steak Beef, Steak, Rump, Fried, Fat trimmed 1 large (8 – 11 cm diameter) potato, boiled, without skin (peeled) NS added fat 1 medium (17 cm long) carrot, cooked, fat not added in cooking 1 unsp serve peas and corn, cooked, from frozen, fat not added in cooking 250 mL water in a beverage Supper 8 biscuits, chocolate-dipped, one side, commercial The teacher gives the FoodWorks analysis of this diet to the student.

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Stage 2 Nutrition
Assessment Component 2: Practical And Collaborative Work Core Topic 2: Diet, Lifestyle, And Health Diet Analysis for a Diet-Related Disorder

Student ____________________________________________ Class: _________________________ Criteria for Judging Performance practical skills  manage time and computer program to gain data reporting  appropriate choice of format for the presentation of data (3)  table with headings (6)  graphs with headings, uniform scale, labelled axes, accurate plots (3 x 3 = 9)  clear, logical, and sequential presentation using appropriate terminology and language (5) analysis and evaluation  analyse data from graphs and compare with RDIs (9)  justify recommendations to diet (4)  critical analysis of recommended diet (6)  assess the strengths and weaknesses of the data collection (4)  draw a relevant conclusion and comment on validity (2) Total Teacher’s Comment Mark /2

/23

/25

/50

Acknowledgement

Prepared by Karen Magee and the Subject Advisory Committee. Copyright SSABSA

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Stage 2 Nutrition
Assessment Component 2: Practical And Collaborative Work Core Topic 3: Diet Evaluation And Food Selection Muffin Recipe Modification Learning Outcomes: 1, 3, 5, and 6 Total Marks: 50

Aim: To modify a muffin recipe to improve its nutritional status whilst maintaining the taste quality. Basic Recipe Ingredients 2 cups SR flour 2/3 cup sugar (150g)

1 egg ½ to 2/3 cup full cream milk

1/3 cup vegetable oil spices (e.g. mixed spice, cinnamon) Method 1. preheat oven to 180o C 2. whisk egg and oil in bowl 3. add dry ingredients and mix (do not over mix) 4. add the milk as required to make a wet, but not sloppy mixture 5. distribute into compartments on a 12 muffin tray 6. cook for 15-20 minutes or until cooked
Information about the technique for making muffins can be found at http://www.joyofbaking.com/muffins/muffins.html

Task A. Working individually 1. Use the Australian Dietary Guidelines to modify the basic muffin recipe to improve its nutritional status whilst aiming to maintain taste quality. For example replace sugar with honey. (Note that your modified mixture should have the same consistency as the original –therefore it may be necessary to adjust the amount of liquid added.) 2. State the hypothesis you plan to test. The hypothesis will link the independent variable and the dependent variable. 3. Describe how you are going to:  modify the basic recipe;  collect data about the nutrition status and sensory values of the muffins produced from both recipes. 4. In your method identify: a) the independent variable; b) the dependent variable and how it is to be measured; c) four factors which will be kept constant. Also indicate; a) the quantities used; b) how you will prepare the muffins; c) exactly what you intend to measure, and how you intend to measure it (e.g. nutritional value using FoodWorks, texture, flavour and appeal); d) how you will set up your tasting panels and how you will collect and collate the data; e) the format of any tables and graphs you plan to use (with headings and units). 5. Submit the method you propose to use to your teacher for summative assessment.

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B. Working as a class 1. Discuss as a class the different designs, which have been approved. Form groups of 3 to 4 students. Each group selects one design that they agree to use while working together for Part C. C. Working in groups 1. Prepare two batches of muffins. One batch made using the standard recipe and the other using the modified recipe. 2. Conduct a sensory evaluation of the two batches of muffins. D. Working individually 1. Each student writes a report of the experiment (maximum 1000 words, excluding the Method and Materials). The report should have the following format: Hypothesis (actually tested) Introduction  name the ingredient you will be modifying.  explain your choice, and outline intended outcomes of the modification. Method and Materials  you may insert your design here if it was not changed by your teacher. If it was changed, write out the method and materials actually used. Results  present your results in labelled diagrams, photographs, tables and /or graphs as is appropriate. Discussion (maximum 200 words)  compare the two batches of muffins.  explain why it was necessary to prepare the original recipe.  explain why more than one muffin of each type is necessary.  describe strengths and weaknesses of the practical.  suggest improvements to the practical. Conclusion  explain whether your hypothesis is supported or refuted by your results.  be concise.

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Stage 2 Nutrition
Muffin Recipe Modification – Design-type Practical Student ________________________________________ Class ___________________________ Criteria for Judging Performance designing skills (Design)  formulate a testable hypothesis (2)  identify independent and dependent variables (4)  identify factors to be held constant (4)  design and describe procedures (10) practical skills  prepare food skilfully and safely (2)  record raw data accurately (2)  manage time and equipment (1) collaboration  communicates within group  responsible, reliable  shares ideas and skills  manages tasting panel well reporting (Results)  data presented correctly in diagrams and tables and graphs (6) - select appropriate format for the recording and presentation of data - construct tables and graphs with appropriate headings and units shown - present diagrams with appropriate labelling and headings  use appropriate terminology and language analysis and evaluation (Introduction, Discussion and Conclusion)  describe the pattern of results (3)  analyse data and use logical explanations (5)  assess strengths and weaknesses of the practical and thus reliability of data (3)  suggest improvements to the practical (2)  draw a concise conclusion (2) Total Teacher’s Comment Mark

/20

/5

/5

/10

/10

/50
Prepared by Elizabeth Arthur, Lenore Barritt and the Subject Advisory Committee

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Stage 2 Nutrition
Assessment Component 2: Practical And Collaborative Work Core Topic 4: Food, Nutrition and the Consumer Fast Food

Learning Outcomes: 1, 3, 5, and 6

Total Marks: 50

For the purposes of this practical Fast Food is defined as hot food that is prepared quickly and purchased from commercial food outlets. This practical involves assessing students’ designing skills. The weighting of the assessment of the criterion designing skills is small. Some teachers may prefer students to design in groups and assess collaboration skills. There are also the possibility students who are interested in the Fast Food versus the Slow Food debate could explore this theme further by conducting a survey to find out:  how often Fast Food is used;  why the Fast Food was used (e.g. taste, speed, playground available, organised birthday party, on route, light to carry (dry dinners), diet food (frozen ‘Lite’ meals). The results could be then be collated, average frequency of use (for one age range) calculated, and a graph prepared showing relative frequency of reasons for use. This survey could be assessed as part of Assessment Component 1: Course work. Introduction It is consistently reported in the media that Fast Foods are not healthy as they contain large proportions of fat and sugar, and very little of any other kind of nutrient. Nutritionists and those in the ‘Slow Food’ movement often claim that not only is Fast food inferior nutritionally, it is also inferior in its sensory characteristics such as taste. In this task each student chooses a Fast Food, finds a recipe for the home-cooked equivalent food and the designs an investigation to test both versions for:  nutritional content;  sensory characteristics.

Student Task A. Design of the investigation (work individually) 1. Choose one of the following Fast Foods to investigate. (The food must have a nutrient analysis available, e.g. McDonald’s Big Mac):  hamburger;  pasty;  chicken nuggets;  frozen main meal (e.g. Lamb Curry);  dried main meal (e.g. Chicken and Mushroom Pasta). 2. Design an investigation to compare the chosen Fast Food with a home cooked version of the same food. (For example, if you choose a Balfours’ pasty, you are to cook your own pasty and then compare it with the Balfours’ pasty.) The design of your investigation must:  include a recipe for the home cooked food;  describe how you will analyse the nutritional content of both;  contain the tables you are going to use to collect the data;  describe how you are going to organise a tasting panel;  contain the score cards to be used by the tasting panel;  describe how you are going to collate the data from the tasting panel.

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3. Submit the design of your investigation for summative assessment. B. Conduct the Investigation (work as a group) After the investigation designs have been assessed, students who chose one food type meet and discuss their ideas. They agree on one design that they all will carry out. (There may be a number of groups for one food type.) Each group then:  prepares the ‘home cooked’ version;  buys the Fast Food;  collects nutritional analysis data for home cooked and Fast Food;  organises and carries out the sensory evaluation of both foods;  discusses results. C. Report Writing (work individually) Use the following report format. Aim Introduction Materials / Ingredients Method a. Preparation of cooked food b. Source of nutritional information c. Procedure for sensory evaluation Results a. Comparison of nutrient values b. Sensory evaluation Discussion Conclusion

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Stage 2 Nutrition
Assessment Component 2: Practical And Collaborative Work Core Topic 4: Food, Nutrition and the Consumer Fast Food Student _________________________________________________ Class _______________________

Criteria for Judging Performance designing skills (Introduction and Method))  state aim clearly (2)  identify factors to be held constant (2)  design and describe procedures (8) practical skills  prepare food skilfully and safely (2)  record raw data accurately (2)  manage time and equipment (1) collaboration  communicate with others  assume responsibility  contribute to planning  discuss results and conclusions reporting (Results)  data presented correctly in diagrams and tables (6) - select appropriate format for the recording and presentation of data - construct tables with appropriate headings and units shown - present diagrams with appropriate labelling and headings  use appropriate terminology and language (2) analysis and evaluation (Discussion and Conclusion)  describe the pattern of results (3)  analyse data and use logical explanations (7)  assess strengths and weaknesses of the investigation and thus the reliability of data (3)  suggest improvements to the investigation (2)  draw a concise conclusion (2) Total
Prepared by Lenore Barritt and the Subject Advisory Committee

Teacher’s Comment

Mark

/12

/5

/8

/8

/17

/50

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